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History of the A. M. E. Zion Church in America.
Founded in 1796, In the City of New York:

Electronic Edition.

Moore, John Jamison, 1818-1893


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Source Description:
(title page) History of the A. M. E. Zion Church in America. Founded in 1796, In the City of New York.
John Jamison Moore, D. D.
392 p., ill.
York, Pa.
Teachers' Journal Office
1884
Call number BX8453 .A4 M6 (Holgate Library, Bennett College, Greensboro, North Carolina )


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HISTORY
OF THE
A. M. E. ZION CHURCH
IN AMERICA.

FOUNDED IN 1796, IN THE CITY OF NEW YORK.

COMPILED AND PUBLISHED BY

JOHN JAMISON MOORE, D. D.,
BISHOP OF A. M. E. Z. CHURCH.

YORK PA.:
TEACHERS' JOURNAL OFFICE,
1884.


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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1884, by
BISHOP JOHN JAMISON MOORE, D. D., In the office of the
Librarian of Congress, at Washington.

        

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CONTENTS.


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PREFACE.

        The Ministers and Laymen of our beloved Zion have anxiously waited for years for an extended history of our church--a work indispensable to a proper knowledge of our origin, the cause of our organizing as a distinct body of Methodists from the Methodist Episcopal Church, our established government, our progress, and our present standing. Not only is such a work desirable among our own ministry and laity, but there are tens of thousands that are friendly to our church, who desire to have our church history. There are none of our members, who properly reflect upon the subject, but feel that we cannot maintain our true ecclesiastical standing without a reliable history of our church. For the want of such a work we are frequently being misrepresented, in other church histories or religious encyclopedias, that get their account of our connection from unreliable sources. Therefore, has the author, at the instance of the Board of Bishops, undertaken the work of publishing such a history.

        There is no branch of common literature that men attach greater importance to than history, because it is the universal registry of all the known developments connected with the origin and progress of our planet. It furnishes each succeeding generation of men with all the doings of the past that have come under its observation, and that have been preserved in its archives; without it the past of the great cycles of time would be to us and all coming time, or generations, a blank. History is


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properly divided into two general classes--Sacred and Profane. Sacred History is divided into two branches, Biblical and Ecclesiastical. Biblical History furnishes us with all those events connected with the origin and progress of our world, necessary to be known by man, which could only be divinely given by inspired writers. Ecclesiastical History furnishes us with the origin and progress of the various religious organizations, or out-growths of Christianity, from its origin to the present. Ecclesiastical history is necessary to note and transmit the origin, doctrines, rules and regulations developed in all the religious organizations that have arisen in Christendom, that men might have a full knowledge of whatever in the establishment of sacred or divine things, would most redound to man's earthly and immortal well-being. That in the light of revealed truth, as furnished in the Scriptures, he might accept or reject religious tenets. Therefore is church history important and indispensable; it furnishes a perpetual record of the Christian Church, with all its varied developments and denominational distinctions. Church history does not only benefit the religious body whose internal record they are, but they secure popular judgment upon religious tenets, and give general scope to the investigation of religious truth, or error, as might be disseminated by religious bodies. In denominational branches of church history, it is not the province of the historian to indulge in criticisms or animadversions on the creed fundamentals of other religious sects. Under this conviction, in furnishing our church history, I shall aim simply to set forth facts connected with the incipient incentives to our establishing an independent religious body; with the attendant measures, movements,


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success, reverses, and our progressive developments for eighty-eight years.

        It is proper that the Christian world should have some knowledge of the principles that incited us to seek a separation from our white brethren, and to worship by ourselves. We were actuated by pure Christian principles; we were fully conscious of certain great truths that the Bible taught, upon which our course would be justified in the judgment of the Christian world.

        The first great religious truth that awoke our reflections, and incited us to action on the subject of our own separate organization was, that Christianity has provided a platform of brotherly love, sufficiently broad to admit all Christ's followers to a full religious fellowship and religious association; a platform so broad as to exclude the necessity of caste, or race proscriptions, to prevent their Christian association as a religious brotherhood, being a religious social detriment. Having settled upon this great truth, we felt no hesitancy in seeking to establish ourselves in an organization, with a religious platform, where no race proscriptions or frictions could restrict our religious privileges, enjoyments, and interrupt our brotherly associations as the followers of Christ.

        The second great truth taught by Christianity, another grand incentive to our determined purpose in establishing our separate organization was, that the gospel of Christ intended and provided that men converted to Christianity, and called into the work of the gospel ministry, that such men had a right to, and should engage in, the work of evangelizing mankind, irrespective of their race or caste. Fully conscious of this great truth, we felt it our privilege, and our


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duty, to put ourselves in a position to enjoy this Christian privilege.

        A third essential or important truth that prompted us in our conception and purpose of a separate and independent organization was, that the Christian Church was a religious compact, that could be organized in separate local societies, under such forms of local government as circumstances might dictate, and that each member of such local organization had an equal franchise in the formation of their ecclesiastical constitutions or local church governments. There was to us the conception, in the l ght of divine truth, that Christian men and women had a common and Christian right to take part in legislating for their own government. To secure the advantage of this principle, we were still further induced to form an independent and separate organization from the M. E. Church. To secure this great fundamental principle, an inherent right in man, either in secular or religious government, we have in our ecclesiastical economy secured to laymen a representation in our legislative department, as well as in the judicial. These are some of the radical considerations that led us to determine upon the establishment of a separate or independent religious organization from the mother church, the M. E. Church. In addition to what has been given on the cause or origin of this body, the following history furnishes information as to movements, measures, successes, reverses, and progressive developments during our eighty-eight years history.

JOHN J. MOORE.


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INTRODUCTION.

        In the course of human progress, and the current of events, human institutions are constantly undergoing superficial or radical changes arising from forces developed by new intellectual, moral and social conditions, which a progressive, enlightened civilization fixes upon men. Indeed, were it not for these changes, mankind would be hopelessly consigned to a state of moral, intellectual, religious and social imbecility and deficiency; they would be remedilessly so. Those eventful changes have been the constant safeguards of all the vital interests of human society, either secular or religious; they have disenthralled thought; they have unfettered religion; severed the chains of vassals; given prosperity to kingdoms; and exalted the most debased of mankind, socially and religiously. They have made potent, moral and intellectual forces that no antagonisms could withstand. Even religion, however immutable in its nature and its source, having to deal with the mutable creature man in the application of its systems of operation, has to depend upon organic or systematic changes.

        It has, under the most palpable Divine directions, made important institutional changes, as its epochs have been measured in the economy of God's Church. Revealed religion has not only in the course of its history been subject to institutional changes,


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but also in the expressed nature of its faith, the applition of its practical dogmas, in its degree of the toleration of conscience and expressed judgment, and the common history of its votaries. In the history of its organizations those changes have either been instituted by the majority or by the minority. In the history of all religious sects existing since the establishment of Christianity, among the many institutional changes that have affected more or less the destiny of human society, they have originated invariably in some one or more of five distinct principles as the cause. Such principles as the orthodoxy of doctrines; the right of religious conscience; the free exercise of human judgment; full religious liberty; or the proper form of ecclesiastical economy. All the schisms or secessions, superficial or radical, reforms or expulsions, that have marked the history of christian sects, have involved one or more of these principles as the cause. When heterodoxy, religious intolerance, ecclesiastical errors find support with the controlling element of a religious body, there are three sources to which the majority or minority can resort as the advocates of right principles: First, a persistent effort to effect a remedy; second, an expulsion of the heretics or refractory ones, by the faithful adherents to right; or third, by the withdrawal of true adherents to principles, from the main body. To the first of these three remedies for reform, the faithful advocates of truth frequently resort, but without avail. The second remedy has often been


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practical, where the main body was not corrupt. The third is the only practical means that a powerless minority can adopt to free themselves from participation in corrupt dogmas, and maintain right religious principles; this course has the written sanction of God. Rev. xviii. 4. Where God commands the true Christians to separate from the corrupt. This was the course pursued by the celebrated reformers: Luther of Germany, Knox of Scotland, and Wesley of England, in the 15th and 17th centuries; they left their mother churches to enjoy liberty of conscience and action, and the free advocacy of christian purity; and although excommunicated and anathematized by fulminating bulls, the former two, and the latter persecuted and stigmatized, yet, what untold blessings these three great religious beacons of reform have bequeathed to the Christian world, that has its millions yet to number and enjoy them. It was this same love of right and freedom of conscience and religious liberty that prompted our honored fathers, who laid the foundation of our connection, who withdrew from the mother church (white Methodist Episcopal Church) more than eighty-eight years ago. It is true, their's was not an effort or an attempt at reformation of corrupt fundamental Christianity, but it was to throw off undue religious restrictions, that Christianity did not sanction, in which the mother church had departed from the simple Christian rule, "Do unto others as you would they should do unto you," and to have no respect of person, and when


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she began to tolerate respect of persons, contrary to God's word. In the noble effort of our fathers to secure for themselves and their race religious privileges which they could not enjoy among their white Methodist brethren, in this noble attempt of our fathers at religious liberty they were not unlike christian reformers of early times; they invoked unkind, unjust, and decrying criticism; and that, even from their white Methodist brethren, but thank God, not to the defeat of their glorious cause. It is a pleasing fact to state that some twenty years after the establishment of our colored religious organization, in the best judgment of the mother church (white) in conference capacity assembled, she acknowledged the reasonableness of the course of our fathers in separating from the white Methodist church, and that they, (the M. E. C., the mother) were in a large degree responsible for our separate organization. We find upon historic records the following remarks, reported by a committee in the Philadelphia annual conference of the M. E. C. convened in June 1821. When a petition from Zion Church (colored) of New York city was under consideration, said they: "We have cause to charge ourselves with too little attention to the colored people's spiritual interest, and as though they were an inferior race or class of beings, they have been treated with unwarranted neglect. It is to be feared that their loss of confidence in us and the consequent measures which many of them have pursued may in a considerable degree be traced to our neglect


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as a cause." (For the above and other like remarks, see Bishop C. Rush's history of the rise and progress of the African M. E. Church, 62-67.) In writing the history of our connection, now known as the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America, we shall state the causes that led to the organization and establishment of our connection, the important developments connected with the beginning and progress of its establishment, and the continued progress of our church, with its numerous changes and interests, as developed during the eighty-eight years of its history.


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CHAPTER I.

THE FORMATION AND ESTABLISHMENT OF THE AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION CHURCH IN NEW YORK CITY.

        First:--THE CAUSES THAT LED TO ITS FORMATION AND ESTABLISHMENT.--

        When the first Methodist Episcopal Society was established in New York (whites), among whom were several colored persons, the two races found no difficulty in the reciprocity of religious fellowship, and the equal enjoyment of religious rights and privileges, but as the church grew popular and influential, the prejudice of caste began to engender negro proscription, and as the number of colored members increased, the race-friction and proscription increased, which finally overcame the tolerance of the colored members of the M. E. Society. Again the M. E. church in New York, licensed a number of colored men to preach, but prohibited them from preaching even to their own brethren, except occasionally, and never among the whites. The colored preachers, being thus deprived of the opportunity of improving their gifts and graces, as they then stood connected with the white M. E. Society, and prohibited from joining the annual M. E. conference, as itinerant preachers,


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with their white brethren. Thus restricted in their church relations, they were prompted to seek the privilege of holding meetings among themselves. We set forth these facts because we are frequently asked why we separated from the mother church, and why we don't now return to the mother church and let them take the supervision of us. We simply say in answer to the above query, we could not consistently return to the mother, while the radical causes exist that drove us out, which they know still exist;--race prejudice, and proscription. When we return we do not wish to be under their government, but an integral part of it.--Our brethren and fathers having concluded to seek a change in their religious situation, in 1796, a number of our most influential and intelligent colored members called a meeting at a member's house, which was well represented. At this meeting, a committee was appointed to wait on Bishop Francis Asbury, of the M. E. Church, to ask permission to hold meetings by themselves, which committee was composed of the following brethren, to wit: Francis Jacobs, William Brown, Peter Williams, Abraham Thompson and June Scott. Those brethren waited upon the bishop, who granted their request. The following brethren then went forward to seek a place of worship, namely: Francis Jacobs, William Brown, Peter Williams, Abraham Thompson, June Scott, Samuel Pointer, Thomas Miller, James Varick, and William Hamilton, with others who united with them. The brethren with


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much difficulty secured a house in Cross street, between Mulberry and Orange streets, which had formerly been an old stable, but at that time was occupied as a cabinet-maker's shop, by William Miller; which place was fitted up with seats, a pulpit and a gallery. In this place they held prayer meetings on Sunday afternoons, in the intervals of the divine service held by the white brethren, between the afternoon and evening service, and also preaching and exhorting meetings. Wednesday nights, the meetings were conducted by those of the colored brethren, that were licensed to exhort and to preach. At this time, there were in the city of New York, three licensed preachers, viz: Abraham Thompson, June Scott, Thomas Miller, and William Miller, an exhorter, who officiated as they had opportunity, and occasionally they were aided by colored preachers from Philadelphia and other places. In this way they continued until some time in 1799, still under the care of the M. E. Church, in the city of New York, when our brethren began to think about building a house of worship for themselves, and to form themselves into a corporate body separate from the white church, according to the privilege granted religious societies by the law of the State of New York. For this purpose they called a meeting of some of the most respectable and intelligent religious colored men of New York City, to consult upon the best method to proceed in this great undertaking on behalf of the colored people's religious privileges in New York


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City. Their meeting was held in the meeting house on Cross street. The following are the names of those present, whose names have been preserved, viz: George E. Moore, Thomas Sipkins, David Bias, George White, Thomas Cook, John Teesman, and George Collins. After they had duly considered the object of the meeting, they concluded that the church should be under the Methodist government and should be named the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. (In reference to which see Bishop Rush's work: "Rise and Progress of our Connection.")

        Second:--THE ESTABLISHMENT OF ZION CHURCH AS A BODY CORPORATE.

        The society procured a corporate charter from the State of N. Y., which was enacted and read as follows: "In pursuance of an act entitled an act to enable all the religious denominations in this state to appoint trustees, who shall be a body corporate for the purpose of taking care of the temporalities of their respective congregations and for other purposes therein mentioned, passed the 6th day of April, 1784." Public notice having been given in the African Methodist Episcopal Church (known as Zion Church), of the city of New York, as required by the law, we the subscribers, being nominated, agreeably to the afore said ACT, inspectors of an election, held in our place of meeting, the eighth day of September, A. D. 1800, do report and declare the following persons duly elected by a plurality of votes to


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serve as trustees for the said church, viz: Francis Jacobs, George Collins, Thomas Sipkins, George E. Moore, George White, David Bias, Peter Williams, Thomas Cook, and William Brown; which said persons, so elected, and their successors in office, shall forever be styled and denominated the trustees of the corporation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in the city of New York, given under our hands and seals this the fifth day of February, one thousand eight hundred and one.

X    PETER WILLIAMS, his mark.
FRANCIS JACOBS.

        ATTESTED, STATE OF NEW YORK, S. S.:

        On the sixteenth day of February, 1801, before me personally came Peter Williams and Francis Jacobs, to me known to be the persons within described, and who executed the within conveyance, who duly acknowledged the same and there being no material erasures or interlineations therein, I do allow it to be recorded.

(Signed) JAMES H. HUGHES.
Master in Chancery,


Recorded in the office of the Clerk of the city and county of New York, in Lib. No. 1 of Record Incorporations of Religious Denominations, page 28, this the ninth day of March, 1801.

(Signed) ROBERT BENSON,
Clerk.



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        Articles of agreement with the mother church (white Methodist Episcopal Church) by which the Zion church was supplied with a minister from the Methodist Episcopal Church.--This article of agreement made this sixth day of April, 1801, between the Rev. John McClaskey in behalf of the Methodist Episcopal Church of United States of America of one part, and the trustees of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in the City of New York of the other part, showeth for themselves and their successors in office.

ARTICLE I.

        It is provided and declared that the style and title of this corporation shall be the African Methodist Episcopal Church of New York City, in the state of New York, and shall consist of Francis Jacobs, George Collins, Thomas Sipkins, George E. Moore, George White, David Bias, Peter Williams, Thomas Cook, and William Brown, trustees and members of the Zion Church, and their successors, duly qualified, elected and appointed according to law (for the purposes and with the powers and privileges hereinafter granted and specified) of the church called Zion Church, and of all and every such other church or churches, as do now, or hereafter shall become the property of the corporation.

ARTICLE II.

        The corporation aforesaid and their successors forever do and shall have and shall hold the said


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building called the Zion Church, and all other churches which are now, or shall become, the property of the corporation in trust for the religious use of the ministers and preachers of the Methodist Episcopal Church who are in connection with the general conference of the said church, and likewise for our African brethren, and the descendents of the African race, as hereafter specified, and also for ministers and teachers of the African brethren duly licensed, or ordained according to the form of discipline.

ARTICLE III.

        It is provided and declared that the rents, issues, profits, and interests of real and personal estate, if any, belonging to the said church and trustees, and their successors, shall from time to time be applied and laid out for repairing their said Zion Church, and all or any other place or places of public worshp, lot, or lots, of ground, burial grounds, or buildings, which now do, or at any time hereafter may or shall belong to the said church or trustees, for the time being; and if the funds and revenues be sufficient, the trustees, may and shall be permitted in their own discretion to allow a reasonable and proportionable part for the support of the ministers.

ARTICLE IV.

        It is provided and declared that the said trustees and their successors shall not, by deed or otherwise, grant, lien, convey, or otherwise dispose of any part or parcel of the estate, real or personal, in the said


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corporation vested, or to be vested, or in any way to mortgage or pledge the said real estate for the payment of any debts by them contracted to any person or persons whatsoever, unless such grant, alienation and conveyance be made by and with the consent of two thirds of the regular male members of said church, of at least twenty-one years of age, and one year's standing.

ARTICLE V.

        It is provided and declared that none but Africans or their descendents shall be chosen trustees of the said African Episcopal Zion Church, and such other church or churches, as may or shall hereafter become the property of this corporation, and none shall be eligible to the office of a trustee, but such as are received and acknowledged to be members of said church in the city of New York, who shall be appointed by the conference of said church to the charge of the Methodist society in the said city.

ARTICLE VI.

        All elections of trustees for the aforesaid Zion church shall be by ballot of the male members, in close communion with them, or as many of them as attend, after being duly warned thereto; and no one shall have the right to vote for trustees, until he has been a member, standing in full connection one year at least; and no person will be chosen a trustee of this coporation, until the said person shall have been a member in full connection, and standing at least


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two years. And no person shall be admitted into close connection with their classes, or be enrolled on their books, but Africans and their descendants.

ARTICLE VII.

        It is provided and declared, that the trustees aforesaid, and their successors forever, are and shall be empowered to have, and shall have, the entire direction and disposal of the temporal revenues of the aforesaid African Zion Church, and after paying the ground rent of the said church, are to apply the remainder for the benefit of said church, as a majority of the aforesaid trustees and their successors shall from time to time direct, and the aforesaid trustees and their successors, forever shall have the disposal and management of the temporal concerns of the aforesaid African Methodist Episcopal Church, subject nevertheless, to the provisions, and under the regulations, made and provided in the fourth article of this instrument.

ARTICLE VIII.

        It is declared, that the trustees and members of the African Methodist Episcopal Church do acquiesce and accord with the rules of the Methodist Episcopal Church for their church government and discipline, and with their creed and articles of faith, and that they and their successors will continue forever in union with the M. E. Church in the city of New York, subject to the government of the present bishops and their successors, in all their ecclesiastical affairs


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and transactions, except in the temporal right and property of the aforesaid Zion Church, which is to be governed as herein directed, as long as the said articles and creed of said church remain unchanged.

ARTICLE IX.

        It is declared, that the elder of the Methodist Episcopal Church, for the time being, in the city of New York, appointed as aforesaid, shall have the direction and management of the spiritual concerns of said Zion Church, or any other church or churches. which may or shall be built hereafter by said corporation or by any other means becoming their property agreeably to the form of the discipline of the said Methodist Episcopal Church, provided always that the said elder receive no one into the African Methodist Episcopal Church, or society, but such as are properly recommended by the trustees or trustee, of the said African Zion Church. And upon complaint being made to the said African Zion Church, or to the elders, of any of its members having walked disorderly, they shall be dealt with according to the form of discipline, provided, always, that their triers be members of their own church, and that the members, if condemned in the first trial, have an appeal to the trustees, local, preachers, exhorters and class leaders of the aforesaid Zion Church. And it is further declared that no person who may come recommended to the elder from other societies as a member of the African church, if he refuses to have his name


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registered in the books of the said Zion Church after notice having been given him.

ARTICLE X.

        It is agreed and declared that the elders of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the city of New York appointed as aforesaid shall, from time to time, for ever hereafter nominate the preacher who shall officiate in said African Methodist Episcopal Church, and any and all church or churches which shall hereafter become the property of the corporation, and shall attend to the said church or churches himself, to administer the ordinances of Baptism and the Lord's Supper, as often as he, the said elder, can make it convenient. And the said elder for the time being shall license to exhort and to preach any one or more of the brethren who are, or shall be, members of the said church, and shall appear to the satisfaction of the said elder to be adequate to the task, and to have grace and gifts proper to appear in public; provided, always, that such persons are previously recommended to him by a majority of the trustees, local preachers, exhorters, and class leaders of the aforesaid church. And if either of the aforesaid African brethren shall graduate into holy orders, it shall be done in such manner and way as the General Conference has directed. And it is provided and agreed that the said elder may claim for himself and his white brethren, and shall have and possess a right to preach once every Sunday and once every week in


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the course of the week, (and no more when there is a sufficient number of African preachers) in any or all the houses set apart and built, or to be built and set apart, by the aforesaid trustees or their successors, of the said African Zion Church in this city and suburbs of New York.

ARTICLE XI.

        It is provided and declared that no powers and authorities hereby given to the aforesaid trustees shall be understood, taken, or construed, in anywise to prohibit or prevent the elder for the time being, duly authorized and appointed as aforesaid, the religious use, benefit and enjoyment of the church known as the Zion Church, or any other church or churches, which at any time hereafter may be purchased or built by the said corporation, or in any other way become their property, in the city of New York or the suburbs thereof, but that the same shall be, and forever hereafter continue to be had, used, and enjoyed by the said elder for the time being as heretofore, and by no other person whatsoever of another denomination, unless by particular license and consent of the elder for the time being, with the concurrence of two-thirds of the trustees for the time being, any thing to the contrary in these articles notwithstanding.

Signed
X     FRANCIS JACOBS, his mark,
GEO. E. MOORE,
GEORGE WHITE,
GEORGE COLLINS,
THOMAS SIPKINS,
X     PETER WILLIAMS, his mark,
THOMAS COOK,
X     WILLIAM BROWN, his mark,
DAVID BIAS.


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CHAPTER II.

LEASING AND PURCHASING GROUND ON WHICH TO ERECT A PLACE OF WORSHIP.

        They then appointed nine trustees to attend to the business of the church, and to the getting up of the house of worship. Among the said appointed trustees were Francis Jacobs, William Brown, Thomas Miller, and George Collins; the names of the others have not been preserved. Francis Jacobs was appointed chairman of the Board of Trustees, Thomas Miller, treasurer, and George Collins, secretary. The trustees then issued subscriptions, and solicited the citzens of New York for aid to build the contemplated house of worship, and having collected eighty dollars and deposited it in the hands of Thomas Miller, treasurer, and being anxious to commence the operation of building they immediately appointed him to go forward and purchase a lot of ground upon which to erect a church. According to appointment, the said Treasurer, Thomas Miller, purchased a lot of ground twenty five feet front and one hundred feet deep, on Orange street, for which he paid the eighty dollars on account and obtained a deed for the same, in his own name. But upon examination it was found to be an unsuitable place upon which to erect a church,


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and especially when they found he would not consent to have the deed altered, which caused much dissatisfaction in the minds of the trustees. Being thus disappointed, (though not discouraged) Francis Jacobs, chairman of the trustee board, a very intelligent man, and of good report, undertook the purchase of a suitable place for a church, and in connection with William Brown they succeeded in securing two lots of ground each twenty-five feet front and seventy-five feet deep, on the corner of Church and Leonard streets. This success gave the trustees new courage and they accepted the said lots of ground and resolved to erect a church thereupon, the lots of ground being now purchased, and the erection of a church thereupon determined. The trustees then renewed their efforts to collect funds and for that purpose went forth with their subscription books, and appealed to the public for help, in the great and laudable work which was intended to benefit the colored people of New York generally. In the month of September, in the year 1800, they completed the erection of a place of worship on the said lots of ground 35×45 feet. Thus established under the supervision of the Methdist Episcopal Church as a colored incorporated society they remained so until 1820. During this period the lease of the two lots on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, on which they had erected their frame building, expired, and an adjoining lot 25×100 feet was offered for sale, which the trustees bought with the two leased lots, by the advice of their elder


Page 29

in charge, Rev. John Wilson, the appointee from the M. E. Conference over them. The trustees of the A. M. E. Zion Society having purchased the said two lots by taxing the members and issuing a subscription among the colored population and by great effort, the necessary amount to pay for the lots was raised, it being the first time the colored citizens were asked for aid to secure a place of worship. They had now a frontage of 75 feet by 75 depth; with this flattering prospect, and with the arrangement for the management of their religious services with their white elder of the M. E. Church being satisfactory, which was as follows:--The white elder was to preach in the Zion Church on Sunday afternoons and on Wednesday nights during the week, except on Sacrament Sunday, the second Sunday in every month; that Sunday his appointment was in the morning. Our colored preacher was to preach on Sunday mornings on all other Sundays, and at night all Sundays, and on Friday nights. Thus was the spiritual work arranged, and now the work went on prosperously, the members and congregation increasing rapidly. But the enemy of souls became angry with our success and prosperity, and sought opportunity to hinder our work through two of our oldest preachers, Abraham Thompson and June Scott, who from selfish motives sought to create a schism in the church, by establishing another society. They were prompted in this by one John Edwards, who had been expelled from the Friends' Society. He owned a lot


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on Green street, and having a desire to preach, he built a house upon it, as a place of worship with a parsonage for any preacher that might connect with his society. Abraham Thompson and June Scott being made acquainted with his movement, united with him and formed a society, which they called the Union Society.

        At this time our colored brethren were not allowed any compensation for preaching to their brethren, as the white elders in charge of the church from time to time required whatever the trustees could pay them for salary. In view of this disparity in remunerating the services of white and colored laborers in the vineyard of the Lord, no doubt, Thompson and Scott were actuated in their attempt to organize another society. This movement on the part of those brethren caused a division in the minds of a number of the members of the Zion Church, and some of them seemed inclined to follow those two brethren; but this stratagem of the enemy soon failed. When the official members of the Zion Church found out this intrigue of the enemy, and were about to expel those members that had aided in the formation of the Union Society, Abraham Thompson recanted and left June Scott, pleading ignorance in what he had done, and thus saved his membership in Zion Church, as did also the others that had taken part in this movement, except June Scott, who continued in the Union Society until it went down. Then he connected with another church; thus the


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attempt was a complete failure. The next attempt of the enemy to impede the progress of Zion Church occurred in 1813, which was also instigated by selfish motives. Thomas Sipkins, who had been a member of Zion Church and a trustee, but had been expelled for insubordination, determined to get up a society under his own supervision. Finding a small church on Elizabeth street, between Walker and Hester streets, he resolved upon securing it, that he might organize a society separate from Zion Church. He consulted with William Miller, who was then a deacon in Zion Church, who approved of his movement and joined him, and the two went forward and secured the place of worship, and organized a society, which they titled the Asbury Church. This stratagem of the enemy to Zion's success proved more effectual than the former, relative to forming a society. Brother William Miller, was a deacon ordained in the M. E. Church. He was very active, and exerted his influence to entice as many as he could to join them from Zion, but it did not effect any essential injury to her, notwithstanding. It was thought by the observers of this movement that the Asburians did not intend to be under the government of the whites, as the Zioners; but being disappointed in their expectations, they found it necessary to make application to Rev. Phineas Cook, the elder in charge of Zion Church at that time, requesting of him a consideration of their case relative to the spiritual concerns of their church. Brother


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Cook then sought an interview with the trustees of Zion Church on the subject; he and Rev. Thomas Ware, an elder in the white M. E. Church, held an interview with some of the trustees of the Zion Church, and those two elders having obtained the consent of the trustees, received the Asburians into the M. E. Church. Notwithstanding those impediments thrown in the way of Zion Church's progress, the work of the Lord continued to prosper in her, and membership and congregation continued rapidly to increase, so much so, that the trustees were necessitated to undertake the erection of a more commodious and substantial church on the site of the old one, and on the 25th day of November 1818, a committee was appointed to obtain estimates from master builders for the erection of a suitable church for the society. On the 13th of July, 1819, they contracted with Messrs. James Dubois & Thompson Price to build a house fifty-five feet by seventy-five, to be of stone, for the sum of eleven thousand five hundred dollars. On the 16th of July, 1819, the trustees agreed to commence building the foundation around the old frame house, which was done, and the building carried up nearly to the water table, except the front; but in consequence of the want of money, they were obliged to stop the work, and have the builders cover up the walls, hoping to be able by the following spring to proceed. The trustees petitioned the Legislature of the state for aid toward the school-room that


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they had connected with the structure, hoping to obtain from them at least a small portion of the amount allowed by law for school purposes, but they were unsuccessful. The next spring in the month of May, 1820, the old house was taken down, by the agreement of the trustees, and being unable to procure a suitable place to accommodate the congregation, they were necessitated to hire the use of a riding circus, in Broadway, between Hester (afterward called Howard) and Grand streets; in this they held meetings Sunday mornings, afternoons, and evenings; week nights they held their meetings in a house on Rose street, called the Rose Street Academy, between Pearl and Duane streets. The old church being pulled down, and wanting means to proceed with the new edifice, the trustees were necessitated to borrow three thousand dollars in order to proceed with the work, which they obtained on bond and mortgage from Mr. James Bogert. The Mastery of Chancery granting the trustees permission to negotiate the said loan; and on the fifth day of June they recommenced the building. Following these impediments difficulties arose from an unexpected quarter.


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CHAPTER III.

THE ALLENITES ENTER NEW YORK.

        Soon after recommencing the building opposition arose to Zion through the instigation of a man named William Lambert who had left Zion Church and connected with Asbury Church, and who, though not qualified, had a conceited desire to preach, having been recommended by William Miller, of Asbury Church, to Rev. Richard Allen of Philadelphia, as he wished to get rid of him. This man (Lambert) went on to Philadelphia, and attached himself to Bethel Church in Philadelphia, and Rev. Richard Allen made him a kind of missionary. He then returned to New York, and being denied the pulpit in Asbury Church on his return from Philadelphia, he determined to raise a church or congregation for Rev. Richard Allen (who was styled a bishop), and to accomplish his purpose, he obtained a school-house on Mott street, and with the assistance of George White, a member and ordained deacon in Zion Church, they had the school-house fitted up for a church, or place of worship. At this time there was considerable private communication between some of the officials of Zion Church and Rev. Richard Allen of Philadelphia, while the Zion Church edifice


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in New York was under erection; which private correspondence was unknown to the general body of Zion Church members and officials, and while Zion Church members were scattered, for the want of a suitable place of worship and their church was under erection, and as some of them were much opposed to worshipping in the circus, their minds were unsettled. At this time, Richard Allen sent an elder named Henry Harden to New York, who, when he arrived in this city, assisted by the aforesaid Wm. Lambert and George White, organized a Bethel Society. The preachers of Zion Church, considered that Allen had acted very unkindly toward Zion Church, by sending an elder into the city of New York, with an intention of establishing a third African Methodist Society, to the detriment of the Zion Church, and the religious interests of the colored people of New York generally. They, therefore, resolved not to preach for the Alenites, nor tender them our pulpits; in this resolution the Asbury Church acquiesced. The church (Bethel) was dedicated on Sunday, the 23d day of July, 1820, shortly after which Rev. Richard Allen himself, arrived in New York, and sanctioned all that had been done by those men acting under his supervision. Thus he laid the foundation of a connectional strife that has been perpetuated against Zion Connection by the Bethel Church to this day. Had Bishop Allen and his followers pursued a different course at this time, as the leader of his body, there is no doubt but Zion and Bethel Connections


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would have been one body to-day. (For an account of these facts, see Bishop C. Rush's work on the Rise and Progress of the African M. E. Zion Church in America, page 32.)


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CHAPTER IV.

THE WITHDRAWAL OF THE ZION CHURCH FROM THE WHITE M. E. CHURCH; CAUSES AND PROGRESS OF THE MOVEMENT, AND ITS CONSUMMATION.

        On Sunday evening, July 16, 1820, Elder William M. Stillwell, who was the employed pastor of the Zion Church, and Asbury Church, visited the divine service in the Zion Church on Rose street, and at the close of the service informed the official brethren of the Zion Church that he and several hundred of the other white brethren had withdrawn from the White Methodist Episcopal Church on account of some resolutions the preachers had passed in the General Conference, which they considered improper measures for ministers of the Gospel to resort to, and which would be injurious to the temporal concerns of the church. Among the objectionable resolutions was one petitioning the Legislature of the State of New York, for a special act of incorporation that would give the preachers more power over the temporalities of the churches under their government in the State of New York. This information alarmed the trustees, and the other official members of our church, whose official rights had been threatened


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several times by elders who served those churches who frequently treated them unkindly; which conduct, of said elders, had already caused considerable dissatisfaction in the minds of the official brethren. And now, learning of the attempt on the part of the preachers to secure this special act of incorporation, they were aroused to a consideration of what they should do for the best interests of our Zion Church. They had already imbibed the opinion that the time had come when they should dissever the Zion Church from under the government of white bishops and preachers of the M. E. Church. On the following Tuesday, the 18th day of July, the trustees were notified to meet the presiding elder at the residence of Peter Williams, on Liberty street. They went, accordingly, and Abraham Thompson, the oldest preacher, and a deacon in our church, accompanied them to the place appointed, where they found the Presiding Elder, Peter P. Sanford, Aaron Hunt, Joshua Souls and Thomas Mason, of the M. E. Church. After several questions and answers had been interchanged by the parties, the Presiding Elder informed the trustees of Zion Church that, as William M. Stilwell had withdrawn from the M. E. Church, he had no further charge of our church, and that he wished to know what our church intended to do. The trustees told him they would consult on the subject, and give him an answer as soon as possible. The preachers of Zion Church were unpleasantly exercised in mind about a resolution of the white


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Methodist preachers, in one of their conferences relative to a Local Preachers' Conference. They had previously appointed a meeting, and had requested our trustees to meet and consult each party in regard to what they had heard. The appointed time happened to be on the night of the same day that the trustees met the aforesaid preachers at Peter Williams' house, on Liberty street. They accordingly met at the residence of James Varick, and after consultation, John Dungy, George Collins and Abraham Thompson were appointed to call on Doctor Phoebus, an old elder of the Methodist Episcopal Church, (who was said to be neutral in the case of the division and William M. Stilwell.) To gain some further information on the subject, and to obtain from Rev. Stilwell a copy of the resolution of the late General Conference of the M. E. Church, which had caused the schism in the White M. E. Church; they also agreed to request a meeting of all the official members of the Zion Church at the Rose Street Academy the following Friday night, at which time they hoped to come to a final decision among the official brethren. On Friday night, July 21, 1820, the official members met in the Rose Street Academy, according to request, and after due deliberation, they agreed upon the following:--

        Whereas--A very grievous schism has taken place in the White M. E. Church, in this city, in consequence of a resolution passed in the last General Conference and that the resolution acted upon by


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the Annual Conference of the New York District, the substance of which is (as we are informed) that a memorial shall be drawn up, signers obtained by the preachers, and the same to be presented to the Legislature of the State of New York, at their next session, praying for a special act of incorporation, to suit the peculiarities of the Methodist discipline, so that the preachers may have more authority to exercise their functions in the church than they now have; and Whereas, it is reported that, should the Legislature deem it expedient to grant the request of the Memorialists, and enact the said special act of incorporation, it will very materially change the present manner of conducting the temporal concerns of the said church; as the trustees or stewards who are to be appointed, according to the contemplated mode, will hold the property of the society in trust for the preachers in conference instead of for the society; and Whereas, in consequence of the aforementioned schism, a very different explanation is given, relative to the contents of said Memorial, and fearing that the said report is true, and that our church property will be involved in the same difficulties, should the act of incorporation be obtained, and having no desire to transfer our church property to the Methodist preachers in conferences, we have

        Resolved--I. That, as we cannot fully understand the intention of the said preachers in praying the Legislature for a special act of incorporation, and having some reason to fear that the abovementioned report is correct, we are much dissatisfied and highly


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disapprove of the said memorial, praying for a special act of incorporation, to suit the peculiarities of the Methodist discipline.

        2. That in consequence of the dissatisfaction and doubts existing in our mind, relative to the intended special act of incorporation, and to the conduct of the preachers in conference requiring such an act, we decline receiving any further services from them.

        3. That George Collins, Tobias Hawkins and William Brown, be a committee appointed to inform the Presiding Elder of the district, or the Ruling Elder in the city of New York, of the above resolutions.

        4. That we request William M. Stillwell to continue his services with us the remainder of the year.

        5. That we recommend the above to the members of our Society.

        They also agreed to call a meeting of the whole society, male and female, which they did on the next Wednesday evening, the 26 of July; whereupon a large number of the members crowded the Rose street Academy, and unanimously sanctioned the foregoing resolutions. The trustees being informed that they could not hold meetings any longer in the circus, were now obliged to turn their attention toward their new edifice under erection, on the corner of Church and Leonard streets; which building was a little more than half up. A portion of it they


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fitted up temporarily with seats, so as to accommodate several hundred persons; and on Sunday morning, July 30, 1820, Rev. William L. Stillwell preached for the first time in our new Church. Though rain commenced to fall shortly after he took his text, which continued during divine service, yet few left the meeting, though the building was not yet under roof. In the afternoon, the weather having cleared up, they held services in the building again. Abraham Thompson and James Varick, (Preachers), conducted the services, and in the evening they held the third service. Thus the trustees endeavored to accommodate the society, and others attending divine service; and on week nights they held meetings in the Rose street Academy. While the trustees were thus struggling under three difficulties, (which were; I: the refusal to receive further service from the ministers of the white church, 2: the effort of Bishop Allen to take advantage of their necessities, 3: the unsettled minds of many of the members of the church). Besides these they learned that some of the Zion preachers were inclined to join Richard Allen's Connection and had called a meeting to consult about it. This so early apparent change in the minds of the preachers, together with a notice they received from Rev. Enoch George, Bishop of the White Methodist Episcopal Church, on the subject of our refusal to receive further service from the whites, sickened the hearts of the trustees; but trusting the great Head of the church for aid, they took courage and


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went forward. The preachers accordingly held their meeting at the residence of Rev. William Miller, in Mulberry street, and after some consultation, they requested a meeting of all the official members of our church. The official members therefore met together in the Rose street Academy, on Friday night, August 11, 1820, and the preachers informed them, (the official members), that they had held a meeting for the purpose of considering the present state of our church, and that there were two grand questions put and answered at the meeting; viz: 1: Shall we join Bishop Allen? Answer, No; 2: Shall we return to the white people? Answer, No; and that they therefore determined to consult with the rest of their official brethren upon the subject of completing the establishment of a form of church government of our own. After several of the brethren had given their opinions, it being late, the meeting was adjourned to the following Tuesday night.

        On Saturday morning, the 12 of August, 1820, Tobias Hawkins, William Brown and Thomas Jenkins, trustees, called upon Bishop George, at the residence of Mr. Morris Carter, in Church street, pursuant to a notice, and were in conversation about two hours with the Bishop, and several elders of the white M. E. Church; after which they parted in apparent friendship, with the Bishop's request that the trustees of Zion's Church would grant Rev. Joshua Souls the privilege of explaining to the society the true nature of the business, in regard to


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the schism which had taken place in the white Church, in order to clear the preachers of some censure attached to them; which request the trustees told him, (the Bishop), they would mention to the rest of the brethren, as they, being only three in number present, were too small a number to decide upon the Bishop's request.

        On Tuesday night, August 15, the official members of Zion Church met, according to adjournment of the meeting at William Brown's in Leonard street; Abraham Thompson was appointed chairman and Charles Anderson secretary. At this meeting Rev. William Miller was present as a representative of the Asbury Church, and acknowledged his willingness to acquiesce with what ever was determined upon, by the official members of the Zion Church, in relation to their spiritual government. The church, after considerable talk, resolved that William Miller, Thomas Jenkins and Lowther Bruce, be appointed a committee to inquire of Bishop Hobart, of the Protestant Church (in the city of New York), whether he would assist to ordain one of our Deacons to the order of Elder: some of the ministers of Zion Church took exceptions to requesting aid from a white Bishop, instead of applying to Bishop Allen, who was then in the city. But on account of Rev. Allen's acting unfriendly toward Zion Church, and he, having establisded a separate colored Methodist Society in New York city, the majority of them were in favor of soliciting a white Bishop.


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        At that time, the official brethren learned that Bishop Allen was disposed to be friendly with Zion Church, and wished to have an interview with some of the trustees and preachers: whereupon, the official members of the Church resolved to appoint a committee of five trustees, and four preachers, to meet with him, whom he met. The following were the trustees and preachers composing the committee: Tobias Hawkins, William Brown, Thomas Jenkins, George Collins and Charles Tredwell, (trustees), Abraham Thompson, William Miller and Christopher Rush, (preachers). On Thursday night, August 17, 1820, the committee met Bishop Allen at William Brown's in Leonard street. After some conversation between the parties, it was owned that the interview only served to let them know that he, Allen, was not a child, that he knew his business, (as he said), and that he had no intention to assist in ordination, unless we put ourselves under his charge. Thus we discovered to what extent he was friendly disposed toward Zion Church, and the object of his interview with us. His conduct toward us in this interview, revealed to us a selfish and ungenerous motive on his part, and a seeming design to take advantage of the unsettled state of Zion's Church affairs at this critical moment of our early struggles.

        During this time the preachers who were attached to his connection in New York city were going on to make proselytes of all they could, to his church, from Zion Church, both of individuals and of


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churches. With the influence of the afore-named George White, and bad management, the Allenites obtained the consent of the African Zion Church at Brooklyn, to unite with them, and thus they proceeded in making all the proselytes they could, in opposition to Zion Connection. On Sunday, Aug. 20, 1820, the sacrament of the Lord's supper was administered for the first time, within the walls of the new church, by Rev. William M. Stillwell. On Friday night, September 1, 1820, the official members met in the Rose street Academy, for the purpose of receiving the reports of those committees which were appointed to make inquiry relative to ordination; and to have an interview with Bishop Allen. Abraham Thompson, the chairman, Charles Anderson, secretary. The chairman being called upon to report the result of their interview with Bishop Allen, stated that Bishop Allen refused to assist in ordaining elders for our church, that he could not do anything for us in that respect unless we put ourselves under his government. This ended all interview with Allen; and greatly to the disappointment of Father Thompson, who had been all the while a great Allen advocate. At this same meeting, Rev. William Miller, chairman of the committee sent to Bishop Hobart, was called on to report. He stated that he called on Rev. Thomas Lyell, a presbyter of Christ's Church, on Ann street, known afterwards as North street. Rev. Lyell informed brother Miller that Bishop Hobart was out of the city; but when the


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Bishop returned he would speak to him upon the subject. Rev. Lyell thought there would be no difficulty in obtaining ordination. Rev. Lyell also stated to brother William Miller, that Rev. William M. Stillwell would be a very suitable person for us to apply to for ordination, he being a presbyter of the Methodist Church, newly formed, which he thought would be a much easier way to obtain the desired end. During the interval of our meeting, several of the official brethren having had an interview with Rev. Stillwell, to gain information in regard to church government, had their minds fully satisfied that ordination could be easily obtained from that source. They made known the information they had obtained, which afforded much comfort and satisfaction to the brethren. As matters now began to wear an aspect of regularity, uniformity, and reconciliation, George Collins, a leading official member, and anxious to see Zion fully established under her own government, suggested to the official brethren the utility of preparing for the completion of the establishment of a permanent organization, under our own ecclesiastical government. At a meeting of the official members convened to consider this subject, a committee of the following named brethren were appointed, namely: James Varick, George Collins, Charles Anderson, Christopher Rush and William Miller. They were to form a discipline for our church by making suitable selections from the discipline of the White Methodist Episcopal Church to secure us our needed church


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government as a self governing Colored Methodist organization.

        The preachers now unanimously agreed to exert themselves in giving such necessary assistance to our African brethren, elsewhere, as they might require. After discussing the case of the Brooklyn church, the meeting adjourned. The church building on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, now progressed rapidly, being favored with fair weather, and on Monday, September 4th, 1820, the builders commenced shingling the roof. On Monday evening, September 4th, 1820, the committee appointed to form a discipline met at William Miller's in Mulberry street, but they did not accomplish much, except to determine on the title, including the established doctrines of Methodism, for the Discipline of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in America. They also resolved to call to their assistance John Dungy and Abraham Thompson, and to meet the following Wednesday night, at the same place; requesting George Collins in the meantime to draw up a preamble for the said discipline.

        At a regular monthly meeting of the trustees held at William Browns, there appeared to be some dissention among the trustees. Some of them manifesting an inclination to go under Allen; others favoring the maintaining of our own church government. At this meeting a letter was read addressed to them by Bishop Allen, directed to William Brown, advising them to agree to join his connection, but


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there was but little attention paid to it. The discipline committee persued their work. The preamble was prepared by brother Collins, as requested by the committee, which they examined and adopted. They then proceeded to complete the form of discipline they were to prepare and, on Tuesday night, September 26, 1820, they completed and adopted it, and authorized George Collins to prepare the manuscript for printing. Our church at this time, was in a very precarious situation, particularly from the want of elders of our own church, and it became necessary that something be done immediately to relieve her from that religious embarrassment. Whereupon a meeting of all the official members of the church was convened in the Rose street Academy, on Wednesday night, September 13, at which time the elder William M. Stillwell informed the brethren that his purpose in calling them together was to consult upon the propriety and necessity of electing an elder, and read to them several extracts from books written by Methodist preachers to prove the validity of such a course in case of necessity. He also advised them to adopt the same plan, as it would be a case of real necessity with them, being an African Methodist Church without elders, and as he had not sufficient numbers of elders connected with him at present to perform ordination. A vote was then taken in order to ascertain whether the official brethren approved of the measure, and if they were


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ready to act upon it. The vote was carried in favor of the measure, and immediate action. They then proceeded to nominate Abraham Thompson and James Varick, to be reccommended to the society as persons to be elected to the office of elders in the church. Bishop William McKendree, having arrived in the city, expressed a desire to see some of the official members of the church, and nine of them accordingly waited on him; comprising the following brethren: Abraham Thompson, Leven Smith, John Dungy, Christopher Rush, Timothy Eato, Samuel Bird, Tobias Hawkins, William Brown and George Collins. They called on him on Sunday, September 24, 1820, immediately after divine service, in the afternoon, at his lodging, (he being indisposed), at the residence of Joshua Souls. Here they had a mutual conversation on the subject of our refusing the further service of the white brethren. The Bishop said he desired to see them, to know what they wanted him to do forthem. They told him what they wanted, what theyhad done, and how far they were willing to go in order to be in union with, or under the care of the white Bishops and Conference, and asked him whether he could ordain elders for them. He said that he was limited in his office and could not at present: But he advised them to wait until the sitting of the ensuing Annual Conference, and have the case brought regularly before that body, so that if they should agree on the subject, our preachers might be ordained by


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him. Our brethren then informed him that such was the state of their spiritual affairs, that they could not wait until that time, but would be obliged to proceed and elect elders as was contemplated by them, and gave him to understand that probably they would wait the result of the said Conference relative to ordination. Sunday afternoon, October 1, 1820, being the time appointed to elect the two brethren who were nominated on the 13th of September for that purpose, at the close of the divine service the members, male and female, were requested to remain after the congregation was dismissed for special business. After the elder, William M. Stillwell, had given satisfactory explanation of the purpose for which the members of the society were detained, Abraham Thompson was offered for election, and he was most solemnly elected by a large majority (if not by the whole body). Then James Varick was offered and was also solemnly elected an elder. These two brethren being thus elected, were considered as having full power to exercise the peculiar functions of elders in the church with us, or any other society of colored people in connection with us, until an opportunity offered to ordain them by the imposition of the hands of proper authority. The whole procedure was conducted with general satisfaction. On the evening of the 3d of October, the trustees held a very harmonious meeting in which it was stated that the church building was progressing rapidly, the floor being laid and ready for seating,


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all of which gave the official brethren renewed encouragement, and the members generally. Thus another important chapter of our progress was completed.


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CHAPTER V.

HOW ZION CHURCH IN NEW YORK CITY BECAME THE MOTHER CHURCH OF THE AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION CONNECTION OR CHURCH IN AMERICA--THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THEIR CHURCH POLITY --THE COMPLETION OF THE FORMATION OF OUR CONNECTION AS AN ECCLESIASTICAL BODY.

I The adoption of a Discipline for our Government.

        On Wednesday evening, October 25, 1820, there was a meeting held by the official members of the church to decide upon the adoption of the form of Discipline that the committee had prepared for our Government, (which George Collins had arranged and prepared for the printer, and which had been submitted at another meeting of the official members), which being read and carefully examined, was adopted and it was decided that it should be printed. The following brethren were selected as a committee to have it published; namely, George Collins and


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Christopher Rush. On the first of November following, the manuscript was put into the hands of John C. Totten, printer, who was ordered to print 1,200 copies. Our Discipline embraced in full the Faith, Religious Practice and Modified Ritual of the (Mother, the White Methodist Episcopal Church), with such modifications of other departments of it as were necessary to our church as a distinct body. Having secured our form of church government, the official members of the church being now fully determined upon gathering into the connection such churches of their colored brethren as were willing to unite with them in the formation of a uniform system of church government, they held a meeting on the subject. It was known at this time that there were several places open where our preachers might have formed societies or taken charge of those already formed under the White Methodist Episcopal Church, but being inexperienced, they did not succeed very rapidly in organizing societies. This, and the want of means, hindered them considerably in their work of extending Zion's borders. Sometimes, the Allenites did not hesitate to represent themselves to be the same as the Zion preachers, when they found it necessary to make a point. Generally our colored brethren, having formed societies, sent for Zion preachers. In this same year, 1820, a society in New Haven, Connecticut, sent for a preacher to visit them from our body, and for our church disciplines to which


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application we responded by sending deacon Leven Smith. In this same year, Abraham Thompson received a letter from Philadelphia, from the president of a committee of twelve persons, who superintended the erection of a church they were building in that city; which was separate from Richard Allen's connection. The letter contained a request from that committee, asking for one or two of our preachers, to be sent on to Philadelphia in five weeks from that date, by which time the building would be completed and ready for consecration; that they might mutually consult about the Zion connection.

        The Zion church edifice in New York on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, still progressed in its erection and on the 2d of November they began to put the seats up. At this date information was received by some of the officiary, that there was an African Methodist society at Flushing that wished to connect with us, but before we could send a preacher, George White, one of Bishop Allen's preachers, visited the society, and although we sent two preachers, Mr. Miller and George Collins, with whose visit the society seemed pleased, yet through the influence of White, one of Allen's preachers, they were induced to join Allen's connection.

        November the 2d, 1820, being the first Tuesday of the month, the leaders meeting and Quarterly Conference of the Zion Church convened together by the advice of the elder in charge, at the residence


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of William Brown, on Leonard street. A large number of the official brethren were present. The secretary, George Collins of the leaders meeting, made a financial report at this meeting of the monies received and disbursed during the three years last past, which was as follows:

        Money received during three years ending October 1820, $4,654.62½, church borrowed $3,000, making $7,654.62½, disbursed in the same time, $7,238.78, leaving a balance in hand of $415.91½, which was ordered to be paid over to the builders. He also reported the amount paid in cash to the builders, viz: $5,542.78, in addition to which the old house was sold to the carpenters and stone sold to the mason, together with some money which the builders had collected for the church all which amounted, (with the cash paid) to about $5,842.78, all of which gave general satisfaction.

        After which the leaders' business meeting closed. At this meeting, held on the 2d of November, the business of the Quarterly Conference was taken up. During this meeting, the elder handed over to the trustees $10.37½ which was all he had received for his salary from Zion Church that year. This amount he gave to the church as his subscription for the new church, also informing the brethren that the money collected in the future for him in the Zion Church should be given to the preachers to assist them to travel. This was pleasing news, for the brethren did not know how they should raise money to assist our


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preachers to travel, when visiting places, to organize societies. At this meeting, the subject of drafting articles of agreement between the Zion and Asbury Churches was considered and decided upon; George Collins was appointed to draw up the proposed articles and present them to the official members of Zion Church for their ratification, then to the officials of the Asbury Church for their concurrence.

        The following were the articles of agreement, to wit:

        Whereas, the official members of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and of the Asbury Church are desirous of becoming more united in their spiritual government and privileges, the two churches being separate incorporations, and their temporal concerns being managed by two separate Boards of Trustees, it is deemed necessary to have a definite arrangement or understanding set forth in Articles of Agreement between the two Churches, as set forth in the following:

        First, It is provided and agreed between the two parties, that the two Boards of Trustees shall not interfere with each other in the temporal management of the affairs of their respective churches.

        Secondly, It is provided and agreed, that in every case when persons apply for admission into either of said churches, by letter or on probation from other circuits or stations, the elder having charge of said Asbury or Zion Church shall inquire of said applicants which church register he or she wishes to be


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placed upon, and shall enroll the applicants according to their desire.

        Thirdly, It is provided and declared that no person shall at any time receive applicants into either of the said churches, on probation or otherwise, except the elder in charge of said churches, or a deacon, or a preacher whom he may authorize or request so to do.

        Fourthly, It is provided and declared, that the sick and the poor members of the churches respectively, shall have no claim upon the poor funds of the other; that each church shall give relief to their own sick and poor members.

        Fifthly, It is provided and declared, that there shall be but one Quarterly Conference to transact the spiritual business of the two churches, according to the Discipline of the Church. The official members of both churches shall have equal voices and privileges in the said Quarterly Conference. Each church shall have separate leaders' meetings and Trustee meetings.

        Sixthly, It is provided and declared, that in all cases when houses are to be built, hired, or enjoyed gratis, for the purpose of divine worship, and wherein collections of money are to be made in any place under the jurisdiction of the incorporation of either Church, a fair representation of the same shall be made at the Quarterly Conference from time to time, by the party intending to build, hire, or enjoy any place gratis; thus securing a clear understanding between


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the two Boards of Trustees, relative to the revenue arising from such establishments.

        Seventhly, It is further provided and declared between the said churches, that in all cases of differences between the two bodies, which cannot be settled at the Quarterly Conference where it was first considered, the Elder in charge shall call an extra Quarterly Conference, where the case shall be finally settled.

        Eighthly, It is further provided and declared, that these Articles shall not be so construed as to affect any former agreement made by the Asbury Church and its stated minister.

        The foregoing articles were agreed to by the officiary of each church and signed by the elder, Wm. M. Stilwell, for both parties, with Abraham Marks Secretary for Asbury Church, and George Collins Secretary for the Zion Church.

        On November 12th, 1820, the second Sunday in the month being communion Sunday, James Varick and Abraham Thompson, the two elders elected, administered for the first time the communion, being assisted by Leven Smith, a deacon. At that time the official brethren of a society under the Methodist Episcopal Church in New Haven, Connecticut, desiring to connect with our body, sent an exhorter to New York, to be licensed by our church; and also the society made application to join our connection; the applicant for preacher's license was Jeremiah Jacobs. On the 15th of November, he had determined


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to embark on a vessel for Port-Au-Prince, as a missionary; having received his license, he set out on his journey. At that time an application to connect with our body was made by a religious society established in Philadelphia, separate from the Allenites. The application from the New Haven Society having been responded to by sending Christopher Rush, a preacher, to visit them, and arrange with them to unite with us, a union was agreeably effected.

        On the first of December, Abraham Thompson and William Miller were sent from New York City to visit the society in Philadelphia that had applied for union with the Zion body in New York City; their mission resulted in the consummation of the union of the Philadelphia society with the Zion body of New York.

        Abraham Thompson while in Philadelphia on the above named mission, had an interview with Ezekiel Cooper, Esq., an old and prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, (our mother church,) who advised him to have an address prepared in reference to ordination, and sent by our body to the Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church the following spring, which was to convene in Philadelphia; and thence to the New York Annual Conference, also of the M. E. Church, for their consideration. The advice of Brother Cooper was accepted, and, accordingly, at an official meeting of members of the Zion and Asbury Churches, John Dungy, James Varick, Charles Anderson, and William Miller


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were appointed a committee to draft an address for that purpose. On the 22nd of February, 1820, they engaged in drafting the address, which was as follows:

        "To the bishops and preachers of the Philadelphia and New York Annual Conferences of the Methodist Episcopal Church, assembled:

        "Respected Brethren:--We the official members of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and Asbury Church of New York, of the Wesley Church of Philadelphia, of Zion Church of New Haven, Conn. and Zion Church of Long Island, in consolidation, forming a Methodist body, beg leave to present to your Honorable body an address on a subject, to us of great importance, and we trust not a matter of indifference to you. In the first place, permit us to humbly and sincerely tender our thanks for what you have done for us, in the kind service you have rendered us when in our infant state. We trust the Great Head of the Church in His goodness may continue to reward you for your labors among us; you, who have been the instruments in bringing us from darkness to light, from the power of sin and Satan to God. Permit us further to say, that when the Methodist Society in America was small, the Africans enjoyed comfortable privileges among their white brethren, but as the white element increased, the Africans were pressed back; therefore, it was thought necessary for them to have separate places of worship, giving the Africans a better opportunity of full religious enjoyment and privileges. It is well known


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that our number has greatly increased within the last few years. Many are still coming into the fold of Christ. Among us preachers have been raised up, whose labors God has blessed; but hitherto they have been too limited in their ministerial privileges; they have not had the opportunity of travelling, as we think God designs they should have, at least to reach our own race in the evangelical work of the Christian Church. There is no provision in the mother church, the Methodist Episcopal Church, for us in the itinerant work, that colored preachers might go forth and dispense the Word of life among our own race. And now it seems the time has come that something should be done for the improvement of the colored brethren in the ministry. But how shall this be accomplished? We have not the least expectation that the African preachers will be admitted to a seat and vote with their white brethren in ecclesiastical assemblages. (This is not what they ought to have expected among christian brethren, who could not fail to understand the divine lesson on it being a sin to have respect of persons, and if simply on account of clothing, much more a sin on account of race or color. James ii. 9, 10.)

        "We do not desire to unite with the R. Allen party, being dissatisfied with their general manner of procedure. The brethren in the city of New York, after due consideration, have concluded to form an itinerant plan, and establish an Annual Conference for the African Methodist Episcopal Zion preachers,


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under the patronage of the white bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church. We believe that such an arrangement effected, would tend greatly to promote the spiritual interest of our people generally our preachers would receive new encouragement in their ministerial labors. If we should commence this important work of forming the said itinerant plan and establishing an African annual conference, under the supervision of the bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, the two societies, the Zion and Asbury Churches in New York City with the Philadelphia society, with their connectional title, shall be the AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION CHURCH IN AMERICA. We have also selected a portion of the Discipline of the mother church (the M. E. Church), for our government, with the necessary modifications to meet the circumstances of our organization; to this we beg leave to refer you for perusal. After you have considered our case, should our proceedings meet your approval and should you decide to comply with our wishes, we will stand ready to receive such advice or instructions as you may think proper to give us through our Rev. Father in the Lord, Bishop McKendree, or any other whom the conference may see fit to select. On the subject of ordination to eldership, of which our preachers have all been deprived, we might have obtained it from other sources, but we preferred to follow the advice of Bishop McKendree, given to us in New York, to wait until the meeting of your annual conference in this and the New York


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District; then we could fully understand what the mother church could do for us in the matter. In consequence of some uneasiness in the minds of some of our brethren or members in New York, occasioned by Richard Allen determining to establish a society of his connection in New York City, we have been under the necessity of electing three of our deacons to the office of elders and some of the preachers to the office of deacons; we thereby show our people that their preachers can be properly authorized to administer the ordinances of God's Church. We believe it has had the desired effect of settling the minds of our brethren and advancing the work of the Lord. We expect our first yearly conference to be held in the city of New York, on the 24th day of June next, at which time we hope to have the happiness of hearing that our Rev. Father, Bishop William McKendree presided and took jurisdiction of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Conference formed under the patronage of the Methodist Episcopal Church. With this hope we rest, awaiting your answer; meanwhile praying that the great Shepherd and Bishop of souls may guide you in your deliberations, in ours, and in all other cases; that your conclusions may be pleasing in his sight and tend to advance the kingdom of Christ among the African Race.

        "N. B.--Should the above address be sanctioned by your Honorable body, and should you be pleased to act upon it immediately, you will forward it on to the New York Annual Conference for their consideration


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and action. Should the time appointed by us for the sitting of the African Conference be inconvenient to the person who might be appointed to organize the same, we are willing to change the time a few days sooner or later, provided you will be pleased to give us timely notice for such change. But should you see fit not to favor the address in any respect, you will have the goodness to return it to the bearer.

        "Signed in behalf of the official members of both societies, at a special meeting called for that purpose, March 23rd, 1821, in the city of New York:

George Collins, Sec. James Varick, Chairman."


        The address being prepared, Rev. Abraham Thompson and Leven Smith were appointnd a committee to present it to the official brethren of the society at Philadelphia (the Wesley). They presented the same, and it was approved by them. Brothers Thompson and Smith then conveyed it to the Annual Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, convened at Milford, Delaware. The conference received it and acted upon it with the following result:

        "We, your committee, to whom was referred the memorial presented by the delegation from the African Methodist Episcopal Zion and Asbury Churches in the city of New York, and Wesley Church in Philadelphia, on behalf of themselves and others of their colored brethren, proposing and requesting the establishing of an African Methodist Episcopal Zion Conference for the African Methodist


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preachers, under the Bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church, having had the matter under consideration in all its bearings and relations, beg leave to report the following: First, we view it as a subject of great importance to the colored people, demanding from us our friendly patronage and pastoral attention, so far as circumstances will admit. We have always acted on the principle toward the colored people of doing them all the good that was in our power. We have aimed at the promotion of their moral and religious condition, protecting and defending them in all their just rights and privileges; and more particularly, as instruments under God, we have labored among them for the conversion of their souls. They know, and it is generally known and acknowledged, that our labors of love and good will toward them for many years past have been crowned with much good effect and gracious success, greatly improving their social condition and circumstances in life.

        "Secondly, There are at this time various societies and congregations of colored people in different parts, who have been collected and raised under our ministerial labors, who have erected for themselves houses of worship, in which they worship separately from the white people. There are among them a number of pious colored men who, we have reason to believe, are qualified to preach the word of life and salvation, and to be useful among their own race; but on our present plan, their privileges as ministers are very much circumscribed, and their opportunities


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for improvement and usefulness very limited. There exists no expectation or prospect of the colored preachers being admitted to a seat or vote in our white conferences, or a participation in other privileges among us white preachers in our labors or pastoral care of churches; neither is it understood that they so desire. Their request is, that we establish them in a conference by themselves, in unity and friendship with us, and under the patronage of our bishops and conference, having our bishops to preside over their conferences, and superintend, counsel, direct and protect their itinerant regulations. It appears that they could obtain the ordination of their preachers from other sources and become independent of our bishops and conferences, but they prefer and desire our patronage and a certain degree of union with us. They have refused to unite with Richard Allen, being dissatisfied with his general manner of proceedings.

        "Thirdly, From every view we have been able to take of the subject, we are of the opinion that the time has come when something must be done, more than has been, for our colored people, especially such as are situated as our memorialists, in order that their sphere of labor and usefulness, privileges and opportunities to operate among themselves may be extended under our protection and direction. Otherwise we shall lose their confidence and our influence over them. They will become separate from and independent of us, and thereby our usefulness among


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them will in a great measure be lost. It appears in the present case under consideration that they have determined and arranged to have a conference of their preachers established, whether patronized by us or not; and they have appointed the time and place for holding it. Therefore, your committee proposes the following resolutions to the conference for adoption, viz: I. RESOLVED, that the Philadelphia Conference do advise and recommend, that one of our bishops do attend and preside in the African Conference appointed to sit in New York, and that he superintend their organization, as an African Methodist Conference under the supervision of our bishops and conferences, agreeably to the proposed plan, if the New York Conference concur with us in the following arrangement, viz: First, that one of our bishops is always to preside in the said conference; or, in case no bishop be present, then such white elder as the bishop shall appoint, shall preside. Secondly, our bishops to ordain all deacons and elders, such as shall be selected by their own conference and approved of by the bishop, as being qualified for the office. Thirdly, the bishop, or elder appointed by him to preside in the conference, with an advisory committee chosen by the conference, shall make out the appointments of the preachers. Fourthly, all other proceedings of the conference to be as conformable to the rules and regulations generally followed in our conferences as circumstances will admit. Fifthly, their discipline, doctrines, government, and rules of order in all things


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to be as conformable to ours as possible, so as to procure to themselves their own peculiar rights and privileges. Sixthly, the bishop, or such elder as shall be appointed by him, with his proper instructions, together with the said African Conference, to agree upon the several points, terms, and considerations of unity and amity, mutually to exist as reciprocal duties and obligations between them and us. This agreement to take place and be entered into at the time of organization of the said conference.

        "II. Resolved, that a copy of this report be forwarded with the African Memorial to the New York Annual Conference, and that their concurrence with this report be requested in the proposed plan of the organization of an African conference under our patronage, with any additions or alterations that may appear to them best."

Committee
EZEKIEL COOPER,
THOMAS WERE,
ALWAR WHITE.


        The above report was adopted by the Philadelphia conference, and the secretary was instructed to forward a copy of the same to the New York Conference of M. E. C.

Samuel Cox, Secretary.

Milford, April 19th, 1821.

        The foregoing report was highly approved by the official brethren of the Zion, Asbury, and Philadelphia Churches, giving them great encouragement, hoping their desires would be realized; but they found


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their hopes to be of short duration. The New York Conference in their action refused to concur with the Philadelphia Conference. They decided that they could do nothing for them, except they renounced the form of discipline they had selected, and adopted and were willing to be governed by the Methodist Discipline of the mother church (whites). The following is a copy of the report uf the committee of the New York Conference:

        "We, your committee on the African Memorial, as acted and decided upon in the Philadelphia Annual Conference, convened at Milford, Delaware, beg leave to report the following:

        "First, The committe conceive that humanity and religion combine to influence us to do all we can for the instruction and salvation of the colored people, to have the pure Word of God preached among them, and the discipline and ordinances of the Gospel faithfully administered, as indispensably necessary to their happiness and prosperity. It is believed that in these respects we have cause to charge ourselves with too little attention to their spiritual interests, and as though they were an inferior class of beings; they have too often been treated with unwarranted neglect. It is to be feared that their loss of confidence in us and the consequent measures which many of them pursued, may in a considerable degree be traced to our neglect as a cause. But painful as this consideration is, we cannot approve of the course our colored brethren have taken, in separating themselves


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from us, and forming themselves under a distinct and independent body. This course places them in a position that the constitution of our church cannot cover. Your committee conceives that the primary object contemplated in the memorial and accompanying document lies beyond the limits of the constitutional power of an Annual Conference. It is a matter that can only be reached through the General Conference. An Annual Conference, or Conferences, connot organize such a conference, much less, one acting under a distinct discipline and an independent authority. With this view of the subject, your committee are of the opinion that the African Conference specified in the memorial cannot be constitutionally organized or adopted; that it would not be advisable for our bishops, or any one appointed by them, officially to preside at said conference, or to ordain a deacon or elder for said African Conference. But, although we deem it inexpedient to prostrate the constitution and government of our church to accommodate any case whatever, we firmly believe the evil would overbalance the good that we might hope to effect. We consider the condition of the Africans such as demands every prudent exertion in our power to recover them from their wandering, and preserve them in the confidence and communion of our church. Your committee therefore recommend the adoption of the following resolutions:

        "First, RESOLVED, that if the African brethren who have addressed the memorial to the conference


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will agree to be subject to the government of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in common with their white brethren, in such cases under existing circumstances as it is expedient and advisable that such colored preachers as are regularly constituted be appointed to labor among them, and take the pastoral charge of them until the next General Conference.

        "Secondly, RESOLVED, that the colored brethren submitting themselves to the order and discipline of our church are entitled to the same rights and privileges as their white brethren, in regard to the ordination of local deacons and elders, the same form of our order of discipline applying to both.

        "Thirdly, RESOLVED, that the organization of the African Annual Conference, on the same principles and subject to the same order and government as other conferences, may be affected by General Conference.

        "Fourthly, RESOLVED, that it is advisable that a member, or members, be appointed by the bishop to present the above resolutions to the African brethren in New York, together with any explanation and instruction that may be thought proper, and receive their answer."

        Joshua Soule was appointed to present the foregoing report to the Zion and Asbury Churches of New York, Mr Thomas Mason accompanying him. On the 12th of June, 1821, our official brethren met for the purpose of considering the action of the New York Annual Conference, which had failed to concur


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with the Philadelphia Conference. The action of the New York Conference was received with great disfavor by the official brethren of the New York and Philadelphia Churches. After deliberating upon the subject, they resolved upon proceeding according to the plan proposed by the Philadelphia Conference of the Methodist Church, viz: "That one of the white bishops be selected and solicited to preside at all our conferences, ordain all our ministers, and appoint them to their charges; and that we agree to come on terms of unity and amity to that effect, if the next General Conference will receive us under their patronage."

        George Collins and Charles Anderson were appointed a committee to inform Joshua Soule of the above decision of our brethren. The committee had an interview with Joshua Soule; they also had an interview with Bishop Enoch George on the subject. He informed them that the other two bishops were sick, and that it was out of his power to attend the African Conference by reason of his pressing engagements. He advised them to do the best they could in holding the aforesaid conference or meeting. For the above, see Christopher Rush's Rise and Progress of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America.


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OUR CHURCH POLITY.

        The object of a system of Church Government, is to formulate a system of ecclesiastical rules by which the votaries of a religious sect may most effectually disseminate and practically apply the religious principles they have espoused; which system of rules is generally shaped in accordance with the force of circumstances, as are all systems established and regulated by human judgment. It has been fully established, and generally admitted by the ablest writers on Church Government, that the New Testament Scriptures do not contain any formulated system of rules as a model of Church Polity, or ecclesiastical economy, the integrity of which was to be perpetuated throughout the church's history, coming down from the apostles to us. Therefore true Church Government has, and must mostly depend upon enlightened, human judgment. This position is fully sustained by such able writers on Church Government as Stillingfleet, Arch-bishop Cranmer, Archbishop Whitgift, Dr. Low and Abel Steven, of the M. E. Church, and a host of others.

        Therefore, each Christian denomination has been led to adopt such religious polity, or form of Church Government, as they under the force of circumstances deemed the most suitable for the propagation and the practical application of the principles of religion they


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had espoused. The form of Church Government depends primarily on the idea men entertain of the Constitution of the Church, or what constitutes the Church of Christ.

        The Congregationalists place the Church Government in the hands of the members of the congregation, and the office bearers whom they have elected, without any distinction between the congregation and the church proper, consisting of the regenerated.

        The Baptists distinguish between the church proper and the congregation; and hence they lodge the Church Government in the church, as the primary body.

        The Episcopalians, Presbyterians and various Methodist branches agree that many congregations may be united under a common government. This common government, with the Presbyterians, is carried on properly by members of the church, and elders. These congregations united under a common government, may meet for the purpose of acting in legislative, judicial and executive capacity constituting a Church Government. The government of the Episcopalians is more absolutely in the hands of the bishops. The government of the Methodist Episcopal Church is chiefly in the hands of three distinct branches of their ecclesiastical or conventional economy, as a Quarterly Conference, an Annual Conference and a General Conference: the Laity having but a small share in the government. The African Methodist Episcopal (or Bethel) Church, is under the


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same form of government as that of the M. E. Church. In our own body, (the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church), the government is lodged in the hands of the ministers and laymen, as set forth in our church polity, a synopsis of which we give in the following system. Our Church Polity, or form of government, originally embraced and does now embrace all the doctrines of religious faith and Christian practice contained in the government of the mother Church, (white M. E. Church), which see in full, in the present form of Discipline.

        First. In the following we give an epitome of our articles of religious Faith, fundamentally:

  • 1 Faith in the Holy Trinity.
  • 2 Of the Word or Son of God, who was made man.
  • 3 Faith in the Resurrection of Christ.
  • 4 In the Holy Ghost.
  • 5 In the sufficiency of the Holy Scriptures for salvation.
  • 6 Faith in the following named Canonical Books of the Old and new Testaments, as follows: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, The First Book of Samuel, Second Book of Samuel, The First Book of Kings, Second Book of Kings, First Book of Chronicles, Second Book of Chronicles, The Book of Ezra, The Book of Nehemiah, The Book of Esther, The Book of Job, The Psalms, The Ecclesiastes, The Song of Solomon, The Four Prophets the great, The Twelve Prophets
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    the less, all the Books of the New Testament, as they are received and as we account them as canonical.

  • 7 That the Old and New Testament are in harmony with each other; that in both everlasting life is offered to mankind by Christ, who is the only mediator between God and man.
  • 8 OF ORIGINAL SIN. We believe that original sin, standeth not in the following of Adam (as the Pelagians vainly say), but in the corruption of the nature of every man, that is naturally of the offspring of Adam.
  • 9 OF FREE WILL. The condition of man after the fall of Adam is such, that he cannot turn and prepare himself by his own natural strength and work to faith, and calling on God. Wherefore we have no power to do good works, pleasing and acceptable to God, without the grace of God by Christ assisting us that we may have a good will, and working with us, when we have that good will.
  • 10 OF JUSTIFICATION. We are accounted righteous before God only for the merits of Jesus Christ, by faith and not for our own works or deserving; wherefore that we are justified by faith only, which is a most wholesome doctrine and full of comfort.
  • 11 OF GOOD WORKS. Although good works, which are the fruits of saving faith, and follow justification, they cannot put away our sins and endure the severity of God's judgments, yet they are pleasing and acceptable to God in Christ and spring out of a
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    true lively faith, insomuch that by them a lively faith may be as evidently seen as a tree is known by its fruits.

  • 12 OF WORK OF SUPEREROGATION. Voluntary works, besides, over and above God's commandments, which are called works of Supererogation, cannot be taught without arrogance and impiety, for by them men do declare, that they do not only render unto God as they are bound to do, but that they do more for his sake than of bounden duty is required, whereas Christ saith, when ye have done all that ye can, as command you, ye are unprofitable servants.
  • 13 OF SIN AFTER JUSTIFICATION. Not every sin willingly committed after justification is a sin against the Holy Ghost. For other fundamental Methodist doctrine of faith entertained by us see our Book of Discipline.

        Secondly. OUR GENERAL RULES OR FORM OF GODLINESS:

        This section of our Ecclesiastical Economy embraces the general rules or form of Godliness by which all persons connecting with our church give:

  • 1 The most solemn attestations of their religious sincerity, and desire of salvation;
  • 2 It is intended to interpose all possible restraints upon carnal indulgences that tend to stifle the spirit of religious aspiration and Christian devotion, and alienate the heart from God, and that would chill the spiritual affections;
  • 3 The said form of Godliness is intended to
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    secure a distinction between the religious confessor of our church and the ungodly; it draws a line of social discrimination between the world and the church.

  • 4 It is to aid the professor of religion in the devotion of his soul, body and spirit to the service of God.
  • 5 In this form of Godliness are ritual injunctions laid, that promote religious devotional duties of the confessor in the church, that tend to perpetuate in him a constant desire for Spiritual Communion with God, and which cherish in him a perpetual religious zest. For a full and detailed account of our Form of Godliness, see our Discipline.

        Thirdly. THE TEMPORAL ECONOMY OF OUR CHURCH.

  • 1 The conveyance of property. In our original temporal economy, our church property was deeded to the Trustees, held in trust for the members of each local society. The trustees themselves being members of the church or society. Our present form of conveyance deeds our church property to trustees held in trust, for the ministers in conference, and members of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America, giving the ministers in conference an equal claim with the local members, to the church property of the connection.
  • 2 The second feature of our temporal economy is our official provisions. The first grade of officers is STEWARDS. They are constituted by the Quarterly conference, holding office for one year. They
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    fill the functions of incorporated trustees, where our societies or churches are not incorporated by law. They take charge of the temporalities of the society.

  • 3 TRUSTEES ARE THE SECOND GRADE OF OFFICIALS. Trustees are elected by the members of the society; they are to serve according to the statute of the particular state as provided for incorporating religious society. They are amenable to state law and also to the Quarterly Conference, a local court of the church or society for their official and moral conduct. They take full control of the temporal interests and church property of the church society they serve. They are elected annually. Their line of duty is laid down in our Book of Discipline.

        OUR ECCLESIASTICAL ECONOMY. The Hierarchical arrangements, clerical and common licentiates are as follows:

  • 1 Exhorters. They are religious public Speakers, licensed, by the Quarterly Conference, a local court of the society. For particulars on their appointment, see our Book of Discipline.
  • 2 Local Preachers. A higher order of Licentiates, they are licensed by the same local court of the society, to preach as local clergymen.
  • 3 Itinerant Preachers. Are those sent out by an Annual Conference, appointed by a bishop to their field of labor, to collect and organize societies, and to serve those already organized as pastors. In relation to them see our Book of Discipline.
  • 4 Ordained Ministers. Consisting of two
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    orders, as Deacons and Elders, sacredly set apart by the church, and elected by the Annual Conference, and ordained by Elders and a Bishop, by the imposition of hands.

  • 5 Our Bishops. A third modern Episcopal order in the Christian church. They are elected by the General Conference, consecrated and installed into that office, and appointed to their diocese by that body. The Bishop remains in office during good standing and efficiency for duty. Until 1880 he was quadrennially elected, but at that time the quadrennial election was abolished. The title of our Episcopal officers was changed in the General Conference of 1868, from Superintendent to Bishop, in the modern sense, as used by Episcopal Methodists.

        Although bigots have questioned the Christian authenticity or validity of our Bishopric, the ablest writers on primitive Church Government sustain the ground upon which we base our Episcopal economy; writers whom we have already mentioned in this work.

        That elders can ordain elders, legitimately, or can constitute or set apart a modern Bishop, no one can successfully controvert. That elders and presbyters were the only two sacred orders in the primative Christian Church, is a settled point with the best Biblical expositors. That elders and presbyters were in the primative church also styled Bishops, and exercised similar functions to those of a Methodist Bishop, as far as was necessary in that period of the church, is


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also fully established by scripture. Elders, or presbyters, regulated in the primitive Christian Church or churches their ecclesiastical interests, as do the executives that we now set apart and entitle Bishops, who are our general overseers. Let us examine the word Bishop, derived from the Saxon word Biscop. The Saxon word is a corruption of the latinized Greek word, Episcopus. Its analogy to the second and third sylables of the latter is obvious. Then the English word Bishop is derived from the Saxon word Biscop, which is from the latin word Episcopus, which is from the Greek word Episkopos, which Greek word signifies an Overseer or Superintendent. Thus the word from which we get our English word Bishop, was used by the Apostle to express or represent the office or function of an elder in the church of God, and of no higher office. The word Bishop, is used five times in the New Testament, and in each case, it is evidently synonymous with Presbyter or Elder (Acts xx. 17-28). Take heed to yourselves and to all the flock over which the Holy Ghost hath made you Bishops in our English text: in the Greek text Episkopos: which means overseers or superintendents. In the seventeenth verse the Apostle sent for the Elders or ordained Ministers and in the twenty-eighth verse he reminds them of their high relation to the church as ordained ministers, they were overseers or superintendents or Bishops, all being synonymous terms. Again Phil. i. 1. Here he addresses the church at Philippi.


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  • 1 The members, whom he calls saints.
  • 2 Then the Bishops and Deacons. Surely if the Bishops had been a separate and distinct order of the ministry of the church from elders or presbyters he would not have passed them in his address and descended to the Deacons, the order below elders in the church. See A. Steven's (of M. E. C.) work. In Titus i. 7, it is said, "For a Bishop must be blameless as the steward of God," The Apostle had left Titus in Crete to organize the Christian converts into churches, and ordain Pastors among them. He describes the qualifications of these Pastors. What were those Pastors? were they Elders? He tells us in the fifth verse, "For this cause left I thee in Crete that thou shouldest set in order the things that are wanting, and ordain elders in every city." After describing the necessary qualifications of these elders, he assigns the reasons thata Bishop or Episkopos or an overseer, must be blameless. That a Bishop and an elder were indentical, what could be more evident. The word occurs again (1 Tim. iii. 2). "A Bishop must be blameless, the husband of one wife."

        "The Apostle in this chapter, instructs Timothy respecting the qualifications of a Bishop and then immediately describes those of a Deacon without a single reference to presbyters though these were an unquestionable order of pastors in the Ancient Church and though he was expressly directing Timothy in the appointment of its necessary officers. This fact in connection with the passages already examined


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renders it evident, that he called presbyters Bishops; and that he did not neglect them by oversight." (See Coleman on Primitive Church, also Rev. Abel Stevens of the M. E. Church, and also Dr. Campbell, the able writer on Philosophy of Rhetoric).

        Now, if it be admitted, which it must be, that the elders were the highest order of pastors and Gospel ministers in the Christian church, then it must be admitted that there is no higher ordaining power than they are in the church since the Apostles' time, and that they were an ordaining power in the time of the Apostles, then elders have the power to ordain elders and to appoint them as local Bishops, which elders or presbyters, were in the primitive church, and with the consent of the churches they had power to appoint an elder or presbyter or Bishop (which were synonymous terms in the scripture), over several local churches, and the elder so appointed would be a Bishop in a general sense and in accordance with our more modern Episcopacy.

        The source of ordination in the Zion's Connection. The African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America, obtained its ordination from the M. E. Church, (the Mother Church); our first ordination of elders was by elders, ordained in the M. E. C. who were in good standing, and those elders, ordained in our church by them, established our Episcopacy; establishing it upon the same principles our Mother Church (the M. E. Church) established her Episcopacy.


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We have the great satisfaction and pleasure, to know that one of he most eminent Bishops of the M. E. Church, Bisthop Scott, in a letter to Bishop S. T. Jones, of the A. M. E. Zion Church, acknowledges our Episcopacy as being as valid as theirs. Hence, let the mouths of all Zion's gain-sayers on her Episcopacy be stopped, if it is possible for bigotry and ignorance to stop.

Of our several Instituted Conferences.

  • 1 Our Quarterly Conferences. This is an established branch of our ecclesiastical system a local court, that has been commensurate with the existence of our church as a colored organization. It is composed of all the local preachers, exhorters, travelling preachers on trial, local deacons, Elders, class leaders, Trustees, Stewards and Superintendents of the Sabbath school; and the Pastor of a church, or local society, or several societies of a circuit or station, is the president.
  • 2 Our Annual Conferences. These are Annual Conventions over which a bishop presides, and are composed of all the traveling preachers of an Annual District which embraces a number of local churches that the ministers and laymen represent in the said Annual Conference. The functions of these Annual Conferences, are to examine the moral standing of ministers, and their work during the year, and receive men into the itineracy, ordain Deacons and Elders, receive new societies, receive general statistics from the preachers, set off Annual Districts and
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    appoint the pastors to the churches, etc., in relation to which, See our Book of Discipline.

  • 3 District Conferences or Conventions. These are composed of ministers embraced in a local district, over which a presiding elder has jurisdiction. Of its functions See our Discipline.
  • 4 Our General Conference. This body is composed of Ministerial and lay delegates from the different Annual Conference Districts, one Ministerial delegate to every seven members of an Annual Conference, selected by the members of the Annual Conference; also there are allowed two lay delegates from each Annual Conference, the said delegates are chosen by an Electoral Conference, of the lay delegates at an Annual Conference, such delegates to the General Conference have all the rights and privileges in said Conference with those of the Ministerial delegates. The business of said General Conference is to enact laws for the government of the connection; elect and consecrate Bishops, arrange, Episcopal Districts; fix the salary of the Bishops per annum; fix the amounts for the ministers' annual allowance for salary and set off new Annual Conferences, also to legislate and to take the supervision of all our Connectional Institutions (to legislate for their best management), of our book concern, our Connectional Journal, our missionary work, our Institutions of learning, to regulate our Episcopal work and see to the conduct of our Episcopal Functionaries, fix the time of its sitting etc. It is an appellate
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    court and also has original jurisdiction over its own members. (For further details relative to the functions of this body see the book of discipline of our Church).

        For full details, on our Religious Faith, and Practice, and Ecclesiastical Economy. See our Book of Discipline.

        The Establishment of the First Yearly Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America. On the 21st day of June, 1821, being the time fixed by the preachers for holding the first African Methodist Episcopal Zion Conference, the preachers of Zion and Asbury Churches met together in Zion Church in New York at 2-30 P. M. Rev. Joshua Soule and Dr. William Phoebus were present, being invited previously to attend the meeting. The brethren proceeded to elect one of the Methodist Episcopal Bishops as their superintendent. There being no bishop present, they chose Dr. Phoebus for the president of the conference, pro ex viso. Joshua Soule was chosen secretary. The convention then adjourned to 3 o'clock the following day, June 22d. The preachers met persuant to adjournment; Dr. Phoebus presided, Rev. Joshua Soule acted as secretary. The conference proceeded to prepare rules for its government; a committee was appointed for that purpose, composed of Abraham Thomas, Christopher Rush, and Charles Anderson. A roll of members


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was then prepared, announcing the following preachers present: Abraham Thompson, Leven Smith, Christopher Rush, John Dungy, Charles Anderson, James Smith, Timothy Eato, Samuel Bird, Peter Vanhass, James Varick, from Asbury Church; William Miller, Abraham Mark, Christopher Anderson, John Palmer, from New Haven; James Anderson, from Long Island; William Carman and Elijah Jackson, from Philadelphia; Simon Murry and Edward Johnson, Wesley Church; present as visitors, Durham Stevens, Daniel Purnell, Arthur Langford; total, 22.

        On the fifth day of the session, Rev. Freeborn Garretson visited the conference. (He was the first presiding elder in the New York Conference District of the M. E. Church.) He advised the brethren to go forward and do the best they could until the next General Conference of the M. E. C. Then he thought an African Conference would be established by that body, to be governed by the same rules as the whites. The conference then proceeded to frame a form of church polity or ecclesiastical system. In the provision of this they established a DISTRICT CHAIRMAN, who took the supervision of all the preachers of the Annual District, which embraced New York, Long Island and New Haven; the said DISTRICT CHAIRMAN to preside at all the Quarterly Conferences and oversee the district. This was an office of temporary provision to meet our incipient necessities. At this conference James Varick was


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elected DISTRICT CHAIRMAN. At that annual meeting Simon Murry was elected deacon, and then elected an elder. At this conference the following statistical report was made, to wit: Number of members reported as follows: Zion Church, New York, 763; Asbury Church, New York, 150; Long Island Church, 155; Wesley Church, Philadelphia, 330; East Penn'a., 18; New Haven, 24; total, 1426. Money collected for conference: Zion Church, $27. 30; Asbury Church, $7.78; total amount, $35.08. Following this statistical report, the appointment of the preachers was made out by a committee of the conference, as follows:

        Abraham Thompson, to Zion Church in New York City; William Miller, to Asbury Church, in New York; Simon Murry, to Wesley Church, Philadelphia; Wm. Carman, Long Island; James Anderson, New Haven; JAMES VARICK, DISTRICT CHAIRMAN, acting also as presiding elder over the entire Annual District.

        After five days of agreeable and harmonious session, the conference adjourned, to meet on the 16th day of May, 1822, in the city of Philadelphia, in the Wesley Church, on Lumbard Street. During the interval of this Annual Conference, great anxiety existed in the minds of the official brethren relative to ordination and their permanent establishment as an independent connection. As we were still looking for assistance from the Methodist Episcopal Church in effecting our permanent establishment, while resting


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upon this uncertainty, the members of our churches were quite unsettled, and matters began to be much out of order. On the 27th of September, 1821, there was a meeting called on the subject of ordination, and there were three different opinions entertained by our people on that subject: one portion of the members were in favor of returning under the government of the M. E. Church; another portion, for getting ordination from Rev. Wm. M. Stilwell and his associates who had withdrawn from the Methodist Episcopal Church; the third class were for remaining as we were already established, an independent body, and to be contented with election ordination until we could get ordination by imposition of hands.

        Thus divided, they were unable to reach a decision for some time. Numerous letters were exchanged between the party during the year. During this year, John Dungy, one of our preachers, went from New York to New Haven, and applied to the M. E. Church for license to preach, and endeavored to get the society there under us to put themselves under the white Methodists' government. This caused some uneasiness in the society, as the question of ordination was not settled in our connection. Among the other perplexities and dissatisfactions was the conduct of the Asbury Church in New York. The trustees of that church, contrary to the expectation of the official members of Zion Church in N. Y., granted the Allenites the use of their church to


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hold their conference, which was to convene the following June. On the 15th of May, 1822, Abraham Thompson, Christopher Rush, Leven Smith, William Carman, Timothy Eato, and Samuel Bird embarked for the second Annual Conference to convene at Philadelphia. On their arrival there, they had some difficulty in deciding who should preside over the conference. On applying to the bishops of the Methodist Episcopal Church that were in Philadelphia at that time, they informed our brethren that they could not attend the meeting officially. Ezekiel Cooper, who was also in the city, from engagements could not even be present with our brethren. On the 16th of May, 1822, the Second Annual Conference of the African M. E. Zion Church opened their session by appointing Rev. Abraham Thompson president of the conference. On proceeding to business, they found the officiary of the Wesley Church divided on the subject of our church government; on which we had some difficulty in getting them reconciled and united. Rt. Rev. Bishop Roberts and Rt. Rev. Bishop George called on them during the conference session, and advised them to await the meeting of the General Conference of the M. E. Church and see what they would do for us in reference to organizing an African conference, according to the views of the New York Annual Conference contained in their action on our memorial, asking them to organize us an African Annual Conference; they also stated that the door of the Methodist Episcopal Church would be closed against


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the Allenites, and so would it be closed against our people if we concluded to get our ordination from that source. During the session of this conference, the official members of the Wesley Church in Philadelphia came to a resolution declaring that, if the government established under the discipline we had selected was maintained, they would continue in union with us; but, if the Zion Church returned under the government of the white M. E. Church, they would not go; they would leave our connection. At this time, the dissatisfaction, which had taken place on account of the proceedings of the trustees of Asbury Church in New York, was rife; the members were convened to consult about it, and about joining the Allenites. An official letter was sent by them to the Philadelphia Zion Conference, informing them that they had concluded to act in an independent way, and should allow whom they saw proper to preach for them. However, James Varick was appointed to take charge of Asbury, provided they would receive him. On the arrival of the brethren in New York from Philadelphia, a meeting of the official members of the connection was called for the 30th of May, 1822, to consult what was best to be done to establish the connection permanently, with full power to ordain our preachers as deacons and elders.

        At this meeting an official letter from the Wesley Church of Philadelphia was read, expressing their desire for the immediate establishment of ordination


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in our connection. They suggested that our deacons ordain an elder, or that we call to our assistance an elder from some other church, who with two of our deacons might ordain an elder; thus at once establishing our ecclesiastical government under our own Discipline. In their letter they expressed their positive objections to making any further applications to the white Methodist Conference for ordination of our preachers. They objected to having Rev. Wm. M Stilwell assist us in ordination, as it might injure them in Philadelphia. Brother Leven Smith at this meeting stated that he had learned that Rev. Bishop McKendree had spoken favorably of our movement; and a committee of five was appointed to call on him: James Varick, Leven Smith, Abraham Thompson, Christopher Rush and James Smith. The Bishop being in the city at that time, they called upon him and had an interview with him. He informed them in the interview that he could not do any thing for them in their present attitude; it would be contrary to the wishes of his brethren. He desired that a written document be furnished him, stating the desires of the African society. To meet the views of the Bishop, the committee that waited upon him were authorized by the brethren to draw up an instrument of writing, stating positively and pointedly the immediate desires of the brethren. The instrument was drawn up as follows:

        "We, the subscribers, composing a committee appointed by the official members of the African


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Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, in the City of New York, beg leave to present the following on the subject of ordaining our preachers, as instructed by our church:

        "First, That the said church in New York, several societies on Long Island, a society in New Jersey, one in New Haven, Conn., the Wesley Church in Philadelphia, and several societies in the state of Pennsylvania have resolved to be established in a connection according to the rules and regulations of the Discipline selected and printed in New York for the African Methodist Episcopal Connection.

        "Secondly, That the aforesaid societies or connection wishes to be in perfect union with the mother church, as respects brotherly and friendly affection, so that we may not be in opposition to each other in the course of our operations in our great religious work.

        "Thirdly, We think the foregoing desire can be accomplished if one of the bishops of the mother church could be allowed to preside at the yearly African Methodist Conference from time to time; and in case of his absence the superintendent contemplated by the aforesaid Discipline of the African M. E. Conference shall have full power to preside and perform the duties of a bishop, so far as it shall become essentially necessary for the prosperity of the aforesaid connection, and without any opposition to the interests of the mother church.

        "Fourthly, That in order to accomplish the object


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of the third item, reciprocal regulations can be adopted, to secure the bishops of the mother church the prerogative of superintending at the African Conference from time to time; also, to secure to him compensation for his extra service and expense; also, that the said African Conferences be so convened as to suit the convenience of the bishops, and not too laborious or expensive for the African preachers to attend.

        Fifthly, That the members, particularly of the Zion Church, regret exceedingly to see this necessary division among Methodists, especially subdivisions among their African brethren. We believe this unhappy division will continue to exist, unless a permanent African Connection is formed, to meet the wants of the colored people in the land.

        "Sixthly, If the foregoing items are thought to be impracticable by the bishops and conference of the Methodist Church, we shall be under the necessity of procuring ordination otherwise, but without the least intention of opposition to the interests of our white brethren. As the unity of our societies depends upon our obtaining ordination for our preachers, we must this summer secure this provision and become established under the Discipline we have selected and which these societies have approved."

        The foregoing document was approved by the official members of the Zion Church in New York, and presented to Rev. Bishop McKendree, according to his request.


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        On the 6th of June, 1822, Abraham Thompson, Christopher Rush, and James Smith, an appointed committee, called on Bishop George and Bishop Roberts, Bishop McKendree being out of the city. The committee received the following answer to the communication they had presented to Bishop McKendree, to wit: That they could not do any thing for us, if it were to save their lives and ours, unless we united to their government as heretofore. They informed the committee, also, that William Miller and some more of the officers of the Asbury Church had given the charge of said church unto them as heretofore, and had agreed to give one hundred dollars a year toward the support of a white elder.

        On the evening of the same day, the 6th of June, the official members held a meeting to hear the result of the interview of the committee with the bishops of the mother church. Hearing the result as previously set forth, the same meeting authorized the same committee to seek for information as to the best manner of obtaining ordination elsewhere. The committee went forward and succeeded in securing the aid of three elders in the Methodist Church in good standing, who agreed to assist in ordaining our preachers, and thereby establishing ordination in our connection. The Revs. Dr. James Covel, Sylvester Hutchinson, and Wm. M. Stilwell were the three elders that assisted us in securing ordination in our church. Monday evening, June 17th, 1822, they attended an appointed meeting in the Zion Church, and


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after an appropriate and solemn sermon, delivered by Dr. J. Covel, those three elders ordained Abraham Thompson, James Varick and Leven Smith elders in the church of God for our beloved Zion, in the presence of a large audience. Thus the brethren succeeded in securing ordination and establishing permanently our ecclesiastical economy. At this time Asbury Church had returned to the old connection, and during the yearly conference of the Allenites, William Miller had allowed their preachers to preach in his church, and being separated from us, was deprived of ordination.

        The brethren being unable to complete the business of the Second Yearly Conference that met in Philadelphia, on account of the question of Ordination not being then settled, they convened an extra session of the Yearly Conference at New York July 18th, 1822. At this extra session, on Sunday morning, Christopher Rush, James Smith, James Anderson, William Carman, Edward Johnson and Tilman Cornish were ordained deacons; and in the afternoon the same brethren were ordained elders. This was a necessity, there being a great demand for ordained ministers in our societies.

        There were twelve preachers at this extra session of the Second Yearly Conference. At this meeting, James Varick was appointed superintendent of the connection, according to the provision of the Discipline. Abraham Thompson was appointed to Zion Church, New York; Christopher Rush, to the charge of Newark


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and Jersey Society; Leven Smith was appointed a missionary, to go to Boston, Mass.; James Smith and William Carman, Long Island; Edward Johnson, Wesley Church at Philadelphia; James Anderson, New Haven.

        During this year, through Christopher Rush's energetic efforts, a fine church was built at Newark. On Wednesday, May 21st, 1823, the Third Yearly Conference met in the city of New York. The preachers in attendance were James Varick, Superintendent, Abraham Thompson, Christopher Rush, James Smith, Samuel Bird, Timothy Eato, Peter Van Hass, William Carman, George Treadwell and James Anderson. The Philadelphia preachers did not attend this Annual Session or Yearly Conference, on account of some little dissatisfaction existing from the meeting of the extra session. At this session, four deacons were ordained. The preachers received their appointments, no statistics being presented to the conference. During this session the conference learned that William Miller of the Asbury Church in New York had connected with the Allenites in Philadelphia, and was ordained an elder by them, and was appointed to the charge of a society of Allenites in Washington, D. C. And, shortly after this, Asbury Church in New York put themselves under the government of Allen, thus changing their government twice in one year. In consequence of some dissatisfaction existing among some of the official members, and of their having sent an address to the white General


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Conference, our Yearly Conference was changed from the 20th of May to the 15th of July, in order to see what the Methodist Episcopal General Conference would determine upon for the benefit of their colored brethren. When our brethren found they had done nothing for their advantage, they held their Fourth Yearly Conference, as appointed for July 15th, 1824. This year there arose some difficulty with the New Haven Church; on account of the expulsion of a lay member, the society became insubordinate; the conference took jurisdiction of the case and by stringent steps brought them into subjection to our Discipline, and continuance in our connection.

        May 19th, 1825, the Fifth Yearly Conference convened in the city of New York in Zion Church. There were no preachers in attendance at this annual meeting but those that belonged to New York City, and the session was short and of but little interest. Little more was done at this session but to examine the standing of the preachers and appoint them to their charges. Christopher Rush was appointed to Zion Church in New York; Peter VanHass, to Harlem; Abraham Thompson to Newark and Elizabeth town. No other appointments were made from this conference. The conference adjourned to meet in the city of New York May 18th, 1826.

        The Sixth Yearly Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church met in the Zion Church in the city of New York, May 18th, 1826, being attended by the following preachers: James


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Varick, General Superintendent, Leven Smith, Peter Van Hass, Timothy Eato, Abraham Thompson, Charles Anderson, William Carman and George Treadwell. The two last named were ordained deacons, and Timothy Eato was ordained an elder. This session was a very agreeable one. The preachers were assigned their several charges, and the conference adjourned to meet May 17th, 1827.

        May 17th, 1827, the Seventh Yearly Conference met, according to appointment, in Zion Church in New York City; Superintendent James Varick presided. The conference was opened with the usual preliminaries, and the following members were present: Revs. James Varick, Timothy Eato, Christopher Rush, Abraham Thompson, Leven Smith, Charles Anderson, Peter Van Hass, Wm. Carman, George Treadwell and Joseph P. Hopkins. This year Jacob Matthew joined the conference. After several days agreeable sessions, the appointments were made and the conference adjourned to meet on the 15th of may, 1828, in the city of New York.

        May 15th, 1828, the Eighth Yearly Conference met in the city of New York in the Zion Church, Rev. James Varick, General Superintendent, presiding. The usual preliminaries being performed, twelve preachers reported themselves. This being our Fourth Year or General Conference, which convened first in session, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush was elected Superintendent or Bishop for the first time, James Varick's term having ended. At this session, through a letter


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from the official members of the Wesley Church in Philadelphia, application was made to join our connection; they also sent a delegate to meet our yearly session, if the union was consummated. After six days session, including the General Yearly Conference, the appointments being made, the conference adjourned to meet on the 21st of May, 1829, in the city of New York.

        May 21st, 1829, the Ninth Yearly Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church met in New York City at 10 o'clock, A. M. Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, Superintendent, presiding. The opening ceremonies having been performed, the following were the preachers present:

        Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, Elders Leven Smith, Peter Van Hass, Timothy Eato, William Carman, George Treadwell, Charles Anderson, of New York; Elders Edward Johnson, Richard Philips, David Stevens, David Crosby, Phila. delegates; Elder David Smith of Fredericksburg; Elder Jacob Richardson of Harrisburg, Pa.

        At this conference they set off the Philadelphia Annual or Yearly Conference, to be organized the 14th of the following June in the city of Philadelphia. Delegates were appointed from the New York Conference to attend it. The Philadelphia Conference being set off, and the appointments for the New York Conference being made, the conference adjourned.

        June 13th, 1829, the First Philadelphia Yearly Conference met in Philadelphia in the Wesley Church


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on Lombard street. The following preachers were present: Rev. Christopher Rush, Gen. Supt., Jacob Matthews, Timothy Eato, from New York Conference; Edward Johnson, Durham Stevens, David Stevens, George Stevenson, David Crosby, Jonathan Gibbs, Arthur Langford, Tower Hill, John Marshal, Richard Philips, David Smith, Jacob Richardson, Samuel Johnson, Abraham Green; total, 17. After a pleasant session of several days, the conference completed its business and adjourned. At this time the white ministers of our mother church manifested a friendly disposition toward our connection, and occasionally filled the pulpit of the Zion Church in New York.

        May 17th, 1830, the Tenth New York Annual Conference met in the City of New York, in the Zion Church. The conference was opened by the usual religious services of reading a scripture lesson, singing and prayer. The roll was called, with the following preachers present: Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, Superintendent, presiding; Elders Leven Smith, Peter Van Hass, Timothy Eato, J. C. Beaman, David Smith, Delegates from Philadelphia; Elders Edward Johnson and David Stevens. During this session Elder William Miller made application to join us again, having left the Allenites. He had charge of the Asbury Church in New York City, then connected with the Allenites. He with the society was received by the conference. This year Timothy Eato was appointed to the Zion and Asbury Churches of New


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York; Leven Smith, to Harlem; J. C. Beaman and G. Treadwell, to L. Island. The conference having completed its session, adjourned to meet May 21st, 1831.

        June 12th, 1830, the Second Philadelphia Annual Conference met in Philadelphia in Wesley Church, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, Superintendent, presiding. The usual preliminaries being performed, the conference entered upon its regular business routine, and after several days pleasant session, it closed its business.

        May 21st, 1831, the Eleventh N. Y. Annual Conference met in the city of New York, Rt. Rev. C. Rush presiding. There were twelve preachers present, and twenty-five reported as connected with the conference, with one thousand and sixteen members. The session closed with the completion of the usual conference business.

        June 11th, 1831, the Third Philadelphia Annual Conference met in the Wesley Church, Philadelphia, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding. At this conference there were fourteen preachers in attendance; they reported six hundred and seventy three members connected with the conference.

        May 19th, 1832, the Twelfth N. Y. Annual Conference met in the city of New York, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding. The following preachers were present: William Miller, Jacob Matthews, Charles Anderson, Leven Smith, Timothy Eato, Charles A. Boyd, Henry Johnson, William H. Bishop, Jehiel C. Beaman, Hosea Eston, James Simmons,


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Peter Van Hass, Henry Draton, David Blake, Adam Ford, Daniel Vandevier, Francis P. Graham, John Lewis, George Garnett. The conference closed after several days session, to meet on the 18th of May, 1833.

        May 18th, 1833, the Thirteenth New York Annual Conference met in New York City, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding. The following ministers were present: Elders Jacob Matthews, William Miller, Peter Van Hass, Leven Smith, Henry Draton, Timothy Eato, Henry Johnson, George Treadwell, Jehiel C. Beaman, William Carman; Deacons James Simmons, William H. Bishop, John W. Lewis, Hosea Eston, George Garnett, John W. Robinson, George Matthews; Adam Ford, David Blake, Daniel Vandevier, William Fuller, John Williams; total, 23.

THE HISTORY OF THE NEW YORK ANNUAL CONFERENCES
SEPARATELY GIVEN FROM 1834.

        The Fourteenth New York Annual Conference met, May 18th, 1834, in New York City, in the church on the corner of Leonard and Church streets, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding; associated by Wm. Miller, Sr. Elder; William Serington was appointed Secretary, John A. King, Ass. Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance:

        Wm. H. Serington, J. A. King, Dempsey Kenedy, Henry Johnson, James Simmons, John Tappan, John Dungy, Jacob D. Richardson, Jacob Matthews,


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William H. Bishop, Jehiel C. Beaman, David Blake Richard Noyee, Peter Ross, John Lyle, John P Thompson, Leven Smith, Peter Van Hass, Timothy Eato, James Smith, Daniel Vandevier, John Chester Nathan Blunt, John A. Williams, John L. Mars George Garnett, J. B. Johnson, Thomas James, Edward Bishop, Thomas Jackson, delegates from Philadelphia; Edward Johnson, Solomon T. Scott, George Stevenson. Number of members reported this year, 2,356. William Tilman, Edward Bishop, Thomas Jackson, John Lyle, and Jacob B. Johnson joined the conference this year. There were no expulsions, withdrawals, suspensions, or deaths of ministers of the conference during the year.

        The fifteenth New York Annual Session met May 10th, 1835, in Zion Church, on the corner of Leonard and Church streets, in the city of New York. Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presided, with Rev. Wm. Miller, Sr. Elder, as associate. Wm. B. Serington was elected Secretary, D. Vandevier, Assistant Secretary. There were in attendance thirty two preachers and three delegates; number of members, 2,203. There were no expulsions, withdrawals, suspensions, or deaths this year among the ministers of the conference. Financial report, $260.00, Bishop's money.

        The Sixteenth N. Y. Annual Session convened May 14th, 1836, in Zion Church, in the city of New York. Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presided, with Rev. Wm. Miller, Sr. Elder, as his associate; Rev. J. A. King, Secretary, D. Vandevier, Assistant Secretary.


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There were 35 preachers in attendance, including three ministerial delegates from the Philadelphia Conference. The number of members reported, 2,425; Bishops' money, $75.00, conference money, $117.00. The condition of the district was considered quite prosperous: no death, expulsion, nor suspension of ministers this conference year.

        The Seventeenth Session of the N. Y. Annual Conference convened May 12th, 1837, in the city of New York, in the Zion Church, on the corner of Leonard and Church streets, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, with Wm. Miller, Sr. Elder, as associate. There were 29 preachers in attendance; two delegates from Philadelphia African Conference. There were 2,500 members reported this year; no expulsions, deaths or suspensions.

        The eighteenth N. Y. Annual Session of the A. M. E. Zion Church convened on the 11th of May, 1838, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, Rev. Wm. Miller, Sr. Elder, acting as associate; J. P. Thompson was appointed Secretary, J. Lyle, Assistant Secretary. Thirty two preachers responded to the roll-call; 2,540 members reported. No death, expnlsion, suspension or withdrawal. Financial statistics mislaid.

        The Nineteenth Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in the City of New York, in Zion Church on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, May 18, 1839, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, Rev. Wm. Miller associated; Rev. Wm.


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Serington was appointed Secretary, Rev John A King, Assistant Secretary. The following minister were in attendance:

        Jacob D. Richardson, Henry Johnson, Jacob Mat thews, James Simmons, Wm. H. Bishop, John Tap pan, Jehiel C. Beaman, Timothy Eato, Leven Smith John P. Thompson, Peter Van Hass, Dempsey Kenedy, James Smith, John Dungy, Daniel Vandevier John Chester, Jacob B. Johnson, Nathaniel Blunt Richard Noyee, John A. Williams, Peter Ross, John N. Mars, Thomas James, George Garnett, Edward Bishop, David Blake, John Lyle, Thomas Jackson. There were 2608 members reported this year. Wm. Tilman, Edward Bishop, Thomas Jackson, John Lyle, and Jacob B. Johnson joined at this session. None withdrew, died, were expelled or suspended. Money collected by the preachers, $186.94.

        This year the following Annual Conference Fund was established in the New York Annual Conference:

        "Whereas, on account of the people's delinquency in many of our stations and circuits, our preachers fail to get means to support their families and are compelled to neglect their duties as ministers, or suffer. We have therefore agreed in our associated capacity as ministers, to establish a fund to be used in relief of our brother ministers connected with this conference, when they are in want of relief or help. We therefore adopt the following constitution:

        "In consequence of the delinquency of the people in many of our stations and circuits, the preachers


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have not received a sufficiency to support themselves and families; they have heretofore been compelled to neglect their duties as ministers, or suffer; we have agreed, therefore, in our associated capacity, for the purpose of raising a fund to be appropriated to our members, to adopt the following:

CONSTITUTION.

ARTICLE I.

        Section I.--The fund shall be known by the name of the New York Annual Conference Fund.

        Sec. 2.--The members of this fund shall consist of all the preachers belonging to the conference, who shall pay in to the treasury one dollar annually, or such sum as the conference may determine.

ARTICLE II.

        Sec. I.--The officers of this fund shall consist of nine persons, who shall be members of this conference, to be elected annually, (President and Vice-president excepted); the Superintendent shall be President, and Senior Elder, Vice-president; a Secretary, Treasurer, and a Board of Managers consisting of three elders and two deacons or preachers.

        Sec. 2.--The duty of the officers shall be as follows: The President shall preside at all meetings of business, the Vice-president shall preside in his absence; the Secretary shall keep the books and hold


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correspondence as directed by the Board; the Treasurer shall hold the funds, under sufficient bonds, and report the same annually to the conference; he shall keep an account of all the funds received and expended in behalf of the conference, and submit the same to the Secretary.

        Sec. 3.--It shall be the duty of the Board of Managers to transact all business during the recess of the conference not otherwise provided for; it shall also be their duty to use their best endeavors for the advancement of the fund, by forming auxiliaries whenever it is in their power, and in conjunction with other officers of the Board, determine who are suitable applicants for aid.

ARTICLE III.

        Sec. 1.--The official Board of this fund shall meet monthly, or as often as the President may deem it necessary, at which meeting the funds shall be examined.

        Sec. 2.--An audited report of all the proceedings of the Board, in the recess of the conference, shall be made to the conference annually.

        Sec. 3.--The constitution may be altered or amended by a vote of two-thirds of its members.


        The Twentieth Session of the A. M. E. Z. Conference convened in the Asbury Church in the city of New York on the fourth Saturday in May, 1840; Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presided, associated by Rt. Rev. William Miller; Rev. John P. Thompson


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was appointed Secretary, Rev. John A. King, Assistant Secretary. Twenty-eight preachers were in attendance; number of members reported, 2,680. Geo. Washington, Benjamin Sims, Wm. L. Brown, John Wells and Samuel Serington joined the conference this year. None of the preachers were expelled, suspended, withdrew or died during the conference year.

        The Twenty-first New York Annual Conference met in Zion Church on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, in the city of New York, May 22, 1841; Rt Rev. Christopher Rush presided, associated by Rt. Rev. William Miller; Rev. John P. Thompson was appointed Secretary, Rev. Wm. H. Bishop, Assistant Secretary. The following ministers were in attendance:

        John P. Thompson, Dempsey Kenedy, Wm. H. Bishop, Leven Smith, Jacob D. Richardson, George Garnett, Timothy Eato, John Tappan, Henry Johnson, John Dungy, Daniel Vandevier, John N. Mars, John A. King, Nathan Blunt, Jacob Matthews, Jehiel C. Beaman, Wm. Serington, John Wells, John A. Williams, Edward H. Bishop, James Simmons, John Lisle, Peter Van Hass, George H. Washington, Samuel Serington, Jacob P. Johnson, Benjamin H. Sims, Wm. L. Brown, George E. Spywood, Peter Ross, Richard Noyee, Thomas James.

        None were expelled this year, none withdrew; one was suspended until conference, and one died: Jesse Kimble. Number of members in society, 3,213

        The Twenty-second New York Annual Conference


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convened in the Asbury Church on Elizabeth street in New York, May 28, 1842, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Rt. Rev. Wm Miller. Rev. J. A. King was appointed Secretary Rev. Peter Ross, Assistant Secretary. There were thirty-two preachers in attendance. Joseph Hicks Noah Brook, Samson Tolbot and Jerman W. Louen joined the conference this year. Three members of the conference were expelled, and one suspended until the ensuing conference; none withdrew, none died. Number of members in society, 3,653. Money collected for the support of confereoce, $157.93.

        The Twenty-third New York Annual Conference convened in Zion Church on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, in the city of New York May 20th, 1843, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, Rt. Rev. William Miller associating him. Rev. Samson Tolbot was appointed Secretary, Rev. Peter Ross, Assistant Secretary. There were forty preachers in attendance at this conference, and two ministerial delegates from the Philadelphia Conference. There were two expulsions this year, no withdrawals, no suspensions, and no deaths of the preachers of the conference. Thomas Henson, John Tuthill, and James S. Hall joined the conference this session. Number of members reported, 3,931. Money paid into conference, $156.73.

        The Twenty-fourth New York Annual Conference convened in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, May 22, 1844, Rt. Rev. Christopher


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Rush presiding, associated by Rt. Rev. Wm. Miller; Rev. Samson Talbot was made Secretary, Rev. J. A. King, Assistant Secretary. There were forty-three preachers in attendance. Joseph P. Thompson, James Scott and James Myers joined conference this year. There were 3,370 members reported at this conference session. There were no expulsions, no suspensions, no withdrawals, but one death: Rev. Jacob D. Richardson. Money paid over by the preachers, $87.04.

        May 17th, 1845, the Twenth-fifth New York Annual Conference met in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. John P. Thompson was appointed Secretsry, Rev. J. A. King, Assistant Secreretary. There were thirty-three preachers in attendance at this session. Bryant Hamilton, Cyrus Booha, Francis Thompson and William Goodman joined conference this session. There were 2,721 members reported this year. J. N. Mars withdrew, and one was expelled, none deceased. Money paid over by preachers, $129.55.

        The Twenty-sixth New York Annual Conference convened in the Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, city of New York, May 16th, 1846, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. S. Talbot was elected Secretary, Rev. Wm. H. Bishop, Assistant Secretary. There were twenty-nine preachers in attendance, three ministerial delegates from the Philadelphia Conference, and three delegates from


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the New England Conference. Richard Estep and Wm. H. Decker joined the conference this year. Number of members reported, 2,275. No one was expelled, none suspended, no one withdrew, one deceased: Rt. Rev. William Miller. Money received for conference, $143.70. It is proper here to state that the cause of the decrease of the ministers and members of this conference is owing to the fact that the New England Conference organized in 1845 was composed mostly of the New York Annual Conference, they having been transferred to the New England Conference.

        The Twenty-seventh New York Annual Conference convened in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, in New York, May 1st, 1847, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Rt. Rev. G. Galbreath; Rev. S. Talbot was appointed Secretary, Rev. D. Vandevier, Assistant Secretary. Thirty preachers were in attendance; 2,350 members were reported. Money from the ministers reported, $138.65.

        The Twenty-eighth New York Annual Conference met in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, in the city of New York, May 29th, 1848, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. Samson Talbot was appointed Secretary, Wm. H. Bishop, Assistant. There were twenty-seven ministers present this year. 2,506 members were reported. Conference money, $152.06..

        The Twenty-ninth Session of the New York


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Annual Conference met in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, New York City, May 15th, 1849, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. Wm. H. Bishop was elected Secretary, D. Vandevier, Assistant Secretary. Thirty-one preachers were in attendance; 2,630 members reported at this session.

        The Thirtieth Session of the New York Annual Conference met in the Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, May 18th, 1850, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding; thirty-two preachers in attendance; 1,720 members reported at this session: conference money paid in, $165.25.

        The Thirty-first New York Annual Conference met in New York May, 17th, 1851, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, Rt. Rev. George Galbreath, associate; Rev. S. M. Giles was appointed Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 35; number of members returned, 1818. Sunday-schools, 9; Scholars, 470. The conference was in session eleven days.

        The Thirty-second Session of the New York Conference convened in New York May 21st, 1853, Rev. John C. Spence presiding; Rev. James R. Livingston, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 33; the number of members returned, 1,247; Schools, 4; Scholars, 369; Teachers, 31. The conference was in session eleven days.

        The Thirty-third Session of the New York Conference met in Newburgh, May 20th, 1854, Rt. Rev.


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George A. Spywood presiding, Rt. Rev. John Tappan, associate, and Rev. Peter Ross, Secretary. The number of ministers present, 21; ministerial delegation, 1; number of members returned, 1156; Sunday Schools, 5; scholars, 210; teachers and officers, 32.

        The Thirty-fourth Session of the New York Conference convened in New York City, May 19th 1855, Rt. Rev. George A. Spywood presiding, Rev. John Tappan, associate; the number of ministers represented, 24; ministers from other conferences, 2; the number of members returned, 1083; Sunday-schools, 6; scholars, 294; teachers and officers, 51.

        The Thirty-fifth Session of the New York Conference convened in Newburgh, May 17th, 1856, Rt. Rev. George A. Spywood presiding, Rev. Cyrus Booha Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 26; the number of members returned, 1203; Sunday-schools, 11; scholars, 450; teachers, 60. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Thirty-sixth Session of the New York Conference of the A. M. E. Z. Church assembled in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, New York City, May 16th, 1857, Rt. Rev. James Simmons presiding, Rt. Rev. S. T. Scott, associate; and Rev. Robert R. Morris, secretary, with George E. Spywood assisting. Number of ministers in attendance, 30; number of members reported, 1507; Sunday-schools, 7; scholars, 323; teachers, 46. This conference was in session twelve days.

        The Thirty-seventh Session of the New York


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Conference convened in New York, May 15th, 1858, Rt. Rev. James Simmons presiding, Rt. Rev. Solomon T. Scott, associate, and Rev. Jos. P. Thompson, secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 28; the number of members returned, 1477; Sunday-schools, 7; scholars, 323; teachers, 36. The conference was in session thirteen days.

        The Thirty-eighth Session of the New York Conference convened May 19th, 1859, in the Zion Church, on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, in New York City, Rt. Rev. James Simmons presiding; Rev. Joseph P. Thompson was appointed secretary, Rev. G. E. Spywood, assistant secretary. The ministers in attendance numbered 30; lay delegates, 8; members reported, 1,500; Sunday-schools, 8; teachers, 40; scholars, 450.

        The Thirty-ninth Session of the New York Conference met in Zion Church, New York City, May 22d, 1860, Rt. Rev. G. A. Spywood presiding, Rev. J. P. Thompson appointed secretary, and Rev. T. A. Davis, assistant. Ministers in attendance, 38; members reported, 1,750; Sunday-schools, 10; teachers, 45; scholars, 600; books in libraries, 900 volumes.

        The Fortieth New York Annual Conference of the African M. E. Zion Church in America convened in Zion Church, on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, in the city of New York, May 18th, 1861, Rt. Rev. Joseph J. Clinton presiding, W. F. Butler, Secretary, Henry A. Thompson, Assistant Secretary. The following ministers were in attendance:


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        Ex-Supt. Christopher Rush, Elders David Stevens, Joseph P. Thompson, John Wells, Wesley C. Marshall, Cyrus Bohea, Silas Mitchell, James Myers, Wm. F. Butler, Jacob Thomas, Edward H. Matthews, James S. Wilson, James Simmons, Wm. Pitts, Joseph J. Long, J. Barcroft, Wm. McFarland, John P. Thompson, Jacob E. Trusty, James Howell, Otho J. Scott, Thomas A. Davis, Alexander Posey, Henry Johnson, George Treadwell, John Tappan, Wm. H. Decker; James A. Jones, Isaac Coleman, Samuel T. Gray, Clinton Leonard, Moses Manning, Henry, A. Thompson, Edward H. Bishop, Peter Coster, James Davis; Deacons Daniel Watts, William Brooks; Peter Hockin, John Washington, Jacob Jordon, Wilbur G. Strong; lay delegates, James Leaman, Abram Bolin, H. Seymore, C. C. Van Hosen, E. Tracy, George Caos, W. G. Strong.

        There were 1,743 members reported, 16 Sunday Schools, 96 teachers, 515 scholars, and 840 books in libraries. The session was held from the 18th to the 30th of May, twelve days. At this period of the New York Conference history, what at present composes most of the New Jersey Annual Conference District, was embraced in the New York Conference, which has since been taken from it.

        The Forty-first New York Annual Conference of A. M. E. Z. Church met on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, New York, May 17th, 1862, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rt. Rev. Peter Ross, Associate, Henry A. Thompson, Secretary, T. A.


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Davis, Assistant Secretary. Ministers in attendance 47; lay delegates, 5; members reported, 1920; Sunday-schools, 17; teachers, 4; scholars, 800; books in libraries, 517. The conference was in session twelve days.

        The Forty-second New York Annual Conference of the A. M. E. Z. Church convened on the third Saturday in May, 1863, in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, New York, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop presiding. Number of ministers in attendance, 48; lay delegates, 6; number of members reported, 2,000; Sunday-schools, 19; teachers, 74; scholars, 920; volumes in libraries, 528.

        The Forty-third Session of the New York Conference convened in the Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, in New York, on the 15th of May, 1864, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding. The number of ministers in attendance, 37; lay delegates, 5; ministerial delegates, 3; members returned, 1 230 Sunday-schools, 21; scholars, 1,000; teachers, 40; volumes in libraries, 890. Ministers in good standing, the connection progressing rapidly.

        The Forty-fourth Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in New York May 20th 1865, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. S. T. Jones, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 38; ministerial delegation from Philadelphia Conference, 7; number of members reported, 1,340; Sunday-schools, 19; scholars, 906; officers and teachers, 134; volumes tn libraries, 900.


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        The Forty-fifth Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, May 12th, 1866, Rt. Rev. Samson D. Talbot presiding, Rev. Wm. F. Butler, Secretary. Ministers in attendance, 42; members reported, 1,930; Sunday-schools, 22; scholars, 975; teachers, 142; volumes in libraries, 975.

        The Forty-sixth Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in the Zion Church in the city of Troy, May 18th, 1867, Bishop Samson Talbot presiding, associated by Bishop Wm. H. Bishop. Ex-Bishop Christopher Rush also being present, Rev. J. P. Thompson was appointed Secretary, John Taylor, Assistant Secretary. 30 ministers were present, 10 lay delegates, 5 ministerial delegates; 1,795 members reported, 25 Sunday-schools, 1,455 scholars, 178 teachers; books in libraries, 2,721; general tax, $164.26.

        The Forty-seventh Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in Hudson City, N. Y., on the third Saturday in April, 1868, Bishop. Samson Talbot, presiding, Rev. J. Thomas, Secretary, Rev. C. Leonard, Assistant Secretary. 32 ministers in attendance, 10 lay delegates, 2,860 members reported, 25 Sunday-schools, 180 teachers, 1,490 scholars; $170.00, general tax.

        The Forty-eighth Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in the city of Poughkeepsie, N. Y., Bishop J. J. Clinton, D. D., presiding. There were thirty two preachers present, and 6 lay


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delegates; number of members reported in the Annual District, 2,240; Sabbath schools, 31; scholars, 1,499; teachers, 153; value of church property, $186,900.

        The Forty-ninth Session of the New York Annual Conference convened at Troy, N. Y., Rt. Rev. Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. Number of preachers present, 51; lay delegates, 28; number of members reported in the district, 1841; Sunday-schools, 36; scholars, 1,343; teachers, 214; books in libraries, 7,093; value of church property, $364,600; money for support of missions, $256.22.

        The Fiftieth Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in the city of New York, corner W. Tenth and Bleeker streets, May 27th, 1877, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton, D. D., presiding. The number of preachers in attendance, members proper of the conference, 31, and 2 ministerial delegates, representing the New Jersey and New England Conferences; lay delegates, 12; number of members reported, 1,215; Sunday-schools, 30; scholars, 1,013; books in libraries, 4,808; mission money, $53.88; value of church property, $209.700.

        The showing of this conference year's statistics indicates a general decrease in the Annual District, but that is owing to the taking off of a portion of the New York Annual District and connecting it with the Jersey Conference.

        The Fifty-first New York Annual Conference convened in the city of Poughkeepsie, May 16th, Rt.


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Rev. J. J. Moore, D. D., presiding Bishop. The number of preachers in attendance, 35; lay delegates, 11; number of members returned, 1,330; Sunday-schools, 36; scholars, 1,078; books in libraries, 5,164; mission money, $51.97; value of church property, $197,400.

        The Fifty-second Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in Newburg, May 15th, Rt. Rev. J. J. Moore presiding. The number of preachers in attendance, 35; lay delegatss, 13; number of members returned, 1,064; Sunday-schools, 38; scholars, 958; books in libraries, 3,998; mission money, $63.32; value of church property, $211,800.

        The Fifty-third Session of the New York Annual Conference convened in New York City, May 18th, 1881, Rt. Rev. J. J. Moore presiding Bishop. The number of preachers in attendance, 34; lay delegates, 16; number of members returned, 1,071; Sunday-schools, 40; scholars, 915; books in libraries, 5,150; mission money, $77.85; value of church property, $257,200.

ESTABLISHMENT OF THE PHILADELPHIA ANNUAL CONFERENCE.

        The first Philadelphia Annual Conference convened May 25th, 1829, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, and J. D. Richardson appointed Secretary. The following preachers were present:

        Jacob D. Richardson, James Matthews, Timothy


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Eato, from New York Conference; Edward Johnson, Durham Stevens, David Stevens, George Stevenson, David Crosby, Jonathan Gibbs, Arthur Langford, Tower Hill, John Marshall, Richard Philips, and David Smith, of Philadelphia; Jacob D. Richardson, Samuel Johnson, Abraham Green, from Western district of Pennsylvania.

        After six days session, the conference adjourned. No statistics were given, this being the first session of the Philadelphia Annual Conference. The conference adjourned to meet in Philadelphia June 12th, 1830.

        The Second Philadelphia Annual Conference of the African M. E. Z. Church convened in the colored Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. David Stevens was appointed Secretary. After five days session, the preachers being all in good standing, they received their appointments, and the conference adjourned.

        The Third Philadelphia Annual Conference met June 11th, 1831, in Philadelphia in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, Jonathan Gibbs, Secretary. There were 14 preachers present at this conference, and 673 members returned. The ministers were all in good standing and received their respective appointments, after which the conference adjourned.

        The Fourth Philadelphia Annual Conference met June 12th, 1832, in Philadelphia, in Wesley


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Church on Lombard street, Bishop Christopher Rush, S. Johnson appointed Secretary. There were 20 preachers present and 800 members reported. After disposing of the usual business, and appointments of preachers being made, the conference adjourned.

        June 10th, 1833, the Fifth Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in Philadelphia in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding; D. Stevens was appointed Secretary. At this conference, 17 ministers were present and 975 members reported. The conference, after six days session, completed its business and adjourned.

        The Sixth Philadelphia Annual Conference convened June 15th, 1834, in Philadelphia, in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding and L. Gross appointed Secretary. There were 11 preachers present and 900 members reported. The conference adjourned after seven days session.

        The Seventh Philadelphia Annual Conference convened on the 13th of June, 1835, in the city of Philadelphia, in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. George Galbreath was appointed Secretary. The ministers present numbered 13, and 980 members were reported. After six days session the conference closed with the appointments of the preachers to their charges.

        The Eighth Philadelphia Annual Conference


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met in June, 1836, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. George Galbreath was appointed Secretary of the conference. This year there were only 14 preachers present and 1,000 members returned. This year there were 13 churches reported in this conference: Philadelphia, 2; Harrisburg, 1: York, 1; Carlisle, 1; Shippensburg, 1; Gettysburg, 1; Chambersburg, 1; Lewistown, 1; Bellefonte, 1; Williamsport, 1; Johnstown, 1; Pittsburg, 2.

        The Ninth Philadelphia Annual Conference met on the 3d of June, 1837, in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. George Galbreath was appointed Secretary. The number of preachers present, 15; number of members reported, 1100. This year a Zion Wesley Society was organized in Washington City, D. C., by Rev. George Galbreath, the church known as the Wesley Zion Church, on D street, the first Zion Church established in Washington City.

        The Eleventh Philadelphia Annual Conference convened June 8th, 1839, in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, Rev. George Galbreath, Secretary. The following preachers were represented:

        William Miller, George Galbreath, Edward Johnson, Solomon T. Scott, Leonard Collins, David Stevens, Bazell Mackall, Arthur Langford, George Stevenson, Wm. McFarlan, John Jackson, Abraham Cole, Samuel T. Gray, William Jones; delegates from New


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York, J. D. Richardson, James Simons, Jno. A. Williams.

        The number of members reported at this conference was 1,264. There were no deaths, withdrawals, or expulsions of ministers during this conference year. Samuel Gray and Abraham Cole joined the conference at this session. Finances paid into conference by ministers, $68.29. The conference closed after a session of ten days.

        The Twelfth Philadelphia Annual Conference met June 20th, 1840, in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop William Miller; Rev. G. Galbreath, Secretary, Rev. John P. Thompson, Assistant Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance.

        George Galbreath, John P. Thompson, Edward Johnson, Solomon T. Scott, David Stevens, Leonard Collins, Arthur Langford, Bazell Mackall, William Jones, John Jackson, Abraham Cole, Samuel Gray, Wm. McFarlan, Grorge Stevenson; delegates from New York: Revs. J. D. Richardson, T. Eato, J. Simmons.

        The number of members reported this year, 1,499. Philip Lum, Abram Miller and Shedrick Golden joined the conference this year. There were no expulsions, withdrawals or deaths this year. Financial receipts from ministers, $86.77½.

        At this Annual Conference, Rev. J. D. Richard, who was then the General Book Agent and kept the


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Book Concern at No. 82, Sullivan street, New York, made an earnest appeal to the conference to use their influence in support of the Book Concern and sell our books. At this conference, a resolution was passed, requiring our preachers in charge to recommend our members to pay ten cents a year to make up the allowance for the Superintendent's or Bishop's annual salary. The conference closed after eight days session.

        The Thirteenth Philadelphia Annual Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church met June, 1841, in Wesley Church in Philadelphia; Bishop Christopher Rush presided, associated by Bishop Wm. Miller, with Rev. G. Galbreath as Secretary and Rev. Leonard Collins, Assistant Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance:

        G. Galbreath, Leonard Collins, Edward Johnson, S. T. Scott, David Stevens, Abraham Cole, B. Mackall, S. Gray, Jr., Arthur Langford, Wm. Jones, Wm. McFarlan, Philip Lum, Shadrick Golden, G. Stevenson, John J. Moore, John Jackson.

        There were reported this year 1,667 members in the conference district. John J. Moore joined the conference this year. There were among the ministers no expulsions, suspensions, withdrawals or deaths this year. Of the ten cents Bishop's money there was paid in by the preachers $55.20; donated for the support of conference, $164.72. After ten days session conference adjourned.

        The Fourteenth Philadelphia Annual Conference


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convened on the second Saturday in June, 1842, in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop William Miller; Rev. G. Galbreath was appointed Secretary, Rev. Leonard Collins, Assistant Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance:

        G. Galbreath, Leonard Collins, David Stevens, S. T. Scott, Edward Johnson, Abraham S. Cole, Bazell Mackall, Samuel Gray, Jr., Wm. Jones, Shadrick Golden, Arthur Langford, George Stevenson, John J. Moore, Philip Lum, Moses Gales, Samuel Gray, Sr., Garrett Wilson, John Jackson; delegates from New York: Revs. Jacob Matthews, John P. Thompson, Wm. H. Bishop, James Simmons.

        The number of members reported this year was 2,184. Moses Gales, and Garrett Wilson joined conference this year. No expulsions, withdrawals, suspensions, or deaths of ministers this year. In this conference a Century Fund was established, and ministers were required to preach a sermon annually on the subject and take a collection for the Fund. The amount collected of the ten cents Bishop's money was $44.16; for support of conference, $167.96. After a session of eleven days the conference adjourned.

        The Fifteenth Philadelphia Annual Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Connection convened June 10th, 1843, in Philadelphia on Lombard Street, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop


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William Miller; Rev. G. Galbreath was appointed Secretary, John J. Moore, Assistant Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance:

        G. Galbreath, John J. Moore, David Stevens, S. T. Scott, Edward Johnson, Bazell Mackall, S. T. Gray, William Jones, Samuel Gray, Sr., Moses Gales, John D. Brooks, Philip Lum, J. M. Moore, Leonard Collins, A. Cole, Arthur Langford, G. Stevenson, Shadrick Golden, John D. Jackson, Joseph J. Clinton, Nelson H. Turpin, Samuel Curtis; New York Delegates: William H. Bishop, James Simmons, Henry Johnson.

        The number of members reported, 3,236. This year Nelson H. Turpin and Joseph C. Sinclair were admitted into the conference. None of the preachers expelled, suspended, withdrew or died. Bishop's money collected by the preachers, $52.54. Donated and collected for support of conference, $134.75. The conference, having completed its work, adjourned.

        The Sixteenth Philadelphia Annual Conference met the second Saturday in June, 1844, in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop William Miller; Rev. John J. More was appointed Secretary, Rev. George Galbreath, Recording Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance:

        John J. Moore, G. Galbreath, Edward Johnson, David Stevens, S. T. Scott, Abraham Cole, Bazell


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Mackall, Samuel T. Gray, Wm. Jones, Philip Lum, Shadrick Golden, Leonard Collins, Moses Gales, Wm. McFarland, Arthur Langford, Samuel Gray, Sr., Joseph C. Sinclair, Joseph J. Clinton, N. H. Turpin, James Rees, R. C. Hunt, Peter Fulman.

        At this Annual Conference, an independent Methodist Society at Baltimore made application to join with our connnction, through a delegation from that society consisting of the following persons: Revs. Jacob M. Moore and William Johnson, and Mr. Severn Johnson, a layman. This independent Methodist Society was a secession from the colored element of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the city of Baltimore, which was organized under the Rev. Jacob M. Moore, a local preacher in the M. E. Church, when he seceded and organized the said independent body. Some two years after they were established and J. M. Moore had secured elder's orders and had got several local preachers added to his society, they desired to join our connection, and accordingly made application at this Session of the Philadelphia Conference to join us; which was effected under the following stipulations and conference action, in accordance with their proposed condition and agreement entered into by the delegates.

        "Resolved, that we do agree to annex ourselves on the following condition: That you will grant us an annual conference or separate district, enjoying all the rights and privileges of other conferences and districts of the connection, we being subject to the


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Superintendency, arising from the General Conference of said Zion connection and Discipline of the same; being subject to the Book of Discipline so long as it does not interfere with the temporalities of the Church."

        A committee was appointed by the conference to consider and report upon their proposed condition of annexation; the following composed the committee: Leonard Collins, Henry Johnson, George Galbreath, David Stevens, S. T. Scott. These reported the following preamble and resolution, to wit:

        "WHEREAS, the church in the city of Baltimore, state of Maryland, is so situated by the act of incorporation that it is not possible for them to give their spiritual and temporal interests entirely to the supervision of our connection, but they are willing that their spiritual interests should be entirely put under our supervison so far as it does not interfere with their temporal affairs. If this can be constitutionally effected, Resolved, that we, your committee, recommend a concurrence with their proposed condition of annexation and their article of annexation, and submit the same for your action. Signed by the

Committee
DAVID STEVENS, Chairman,
LEONARD COLLINS,
GEORGE GALBREATH,
HENRY JOHNSON,
SOLOMON T. SCOTT.


        The conference in its action adopted the report of the committee, annexing the Baltimore Church to


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our body in June, 1844. The number of members reported at this conference was 3,234. No ministers died, withdrew, were expelled or suspended. No Bishop's money reported. Donated for the support of conference, $57.89.

THE ARTICLE OF AGREEMENT ON THE PART OF THE BALTIMORE SOCIETY.

Philadelphia, May 14th, 1844.

        We, the delegates and representatives of the First Colored Wesley Methodist Independent Society of Baltimore, do this day in the name of the Sovereignty of the Church and according to incorporation, that two thirds of the male members over the age of twenty-one years, being authorized by the same to form an annexation to the Philadelphia Annual Conference of the African Wesley Zion Methodist Episcopal Church, acknowledge this to be our act and deed.

Delegation
JACOB M. MOORE,
WILLIAM JOHNSON,
SEVERN JOHNSON.


        The conference after a lengthy session of eleven days adjourned sine die.

        The Seventeenth Philadelphia Annual Conference convened May 3d, 1845, in Wesley Church on Lombard Street, Philadelphia, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop William Miller; Rev. John J. Moore appointed Secretary, Rev. Joseph


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J. Clinton, Assistant Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance:

        J. J. Moore, J. J. Clinton, Edward Johnson, Bazell Mackall, S. T. Scott, Leonard Collins, Philip Lum, Moses Gales, D. Stevens, Abraham Cole, Samuel Gray, Wm. Jones, Shadrick Golden, George Galbreath.

        Number of members reported, 2,719. No preachers expelled, suspended, withdrawn, or dead this year. Bishop's money reported by preachers, $45.60. Jacob Trusty and Manuel Croper joined this conference. The conference after ten days session adjourned sine die.

        The Eighteenth Philadelphia Annual Conference convened June 27th, 1846, in the First Colored Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, at 4 o'clock, P. M. Bishop Christopher Rush presided, associated by Bishop Wm. Miller; Rev. J. J. Moore was appointed Secretary, Rev. J. J. Clinton, Assistant Secretary. The following preachers were in attendance:

        J. J. Moore, George Galbreath, J. J. Clinton, B. Mackall, D. Stevens, S. T. Gray, Philip Lum, S. T. Scott, Arthur Langford, J. B. Cox, Abraham Cole, L. Collins, Wm. Jones, S. Golden, Moses Gales, N. H. Turpin, Peter Fulman, Ralph C. Hight, J. H. Brown, G. Stevenson; Baltimore delegation: Rev. Joseph Sinclair, T. Hill; New York delegation: W. H. Bishop, Henry Johnson, John A. King, John P. Thompson. The number of members reported this year; 2,205. No preachers expelled, suspended,


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withdrew or died this year. John B. Cox and James H. Brown joined conference at this session. Abraham Cole was appointed to the Harrisburg church J. J. Moore was stationed at the Philadelphia church Pittsburg station, George Galbreath; Harrisburg circuit, D. Stevens; Washington, D. C., station Wesley Zion, Samuel T. Gray; Trenton station, J J. Clinton; Leonard Collins left in reserve for Baltimore; Chambersburg circuit, Bazell Mackall. This year the Rt. Rev. William Miller deceased. A resolution was passed in this conference that John J. Moore be authorized to prepare a biographical sketch of the late deceased Bishop Wm. Miller, and an encomium on his death and on the death of Rev. John Jackson, who died this conference year also. For said sketch see biography of Bishops in another part of this work; for the encomium on the death of Rev. J. Jackson, see list of deceased ministers at the end of this work. There were no ministers expelled this year, none withdrew, one suspended, two deceased. The conference after a lengthy session adjourned sine die.

        The Nineteenth Philadelphia Annual Conference convened May 4th, 1847, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. J. J. Moore was appointed Secretary, Rev. J. J. Clinton, Assistsnt Secretary. Number of preachers in attendance, 29. Number of members reported, 2,760. This conference after a session of ordinary interest adjourned.

        The Twentieth Session of the Philadelphia Annual


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Conference convened May 6th, 1848, in Philadelphia in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding; J. J. Moore was appointed Secretary, Joseph J. Clinton, Assistant Secretary. At this conference, Rev. Christopher Rush was associated by the Rt. Rev. George Galbreath, who had this year, at the General Conference held at New York, been elected Superintendent or Bishop. Number of preachers in attendance, 28. Number of members, 2,840. Conference adjourned sine die.

        The Twenty-first Session of the Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, May 5th, 1849, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, Rt. Rev. George Galbreath associating him; Rev. John J. Moore was appointed Secretary, Rev. J. J. Clinton, Assistant Secretary. 28 ministers were present, 2,020 members reported. The Allegheny Conference having been organized this year reduced the number of Philadelphia Conference ministers and members, they in part composing that new conference.

        The Twenty-second Session of the Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, May 4th, 1850, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, associated by the Rt. Rev. George Galbreath; Rev. J. J. Moore was appointed Secretary, Rev. J. J. Clinton, Assistant Secretary. There were 26 preachers in attendance. 2,100 members reported. The ministers reported


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a prosperous year.

        The Twenty-third Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, May 3d, 1851, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop George Galbreath; Rev. J. J. Moore was appointed Secretary, J. J. Clinton, Assistant Secretary. There were 29 preachers in attendance; 2,305 members reported.

        The Twenty-fourth Session of the Philadelphia Annual Conference met in Wesley Church, Philadelphia, 1852, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by the Rt. Rev. George Galbreath; Rev. J. J. Clinton was appointed Secretary, Rev. J. P. Hamer, Assistant Secretary. 25 preachers in attendance; 2,464 members reported. At this conference the Rt. Rev. George Galbreath presented his excellent essay on episcopacy, which has been lost.

        The Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in the Wesley Union Church, Harrisburg, Pa., April 26, 1856, Superintendent Wm. H. Bishop presiding. Conference was opened in the usual form, after which Elder James A. Jones was appointed Secretary, Shadrick Golden, Assistant Secretary. Ministers represented, 27; number of members returned, 1,750; Sunday-schools, 8; pupils, 526; teachers, 76; books, 442. The conference continued in session eight days.

        The Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in Philadelphia May 7th, 1857, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. J. J. Clinton, associate, Rev.


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J. P. Hamer, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 23; the number of members returned, 722; Sunday-schools, 6; teachers, 51; scholars, 277; in libraries, 300 volumes.

        The Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Superintendent John D. Brooks presiding. The session was opened in accordance to usage by religious ceremonies. Elder Wm. T. Biddle was appointed Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 25; the number of members returned, 2,802; Sunday-schools, 10; scholars, 478; teachers, 66; in libraries, 320 volumes. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Baltimore Annual Conference convened in Baltimore April 9th, 1868, Rt. Rev. W. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. J. P. Hamer, Secretary. The number of ministers represented, 21; ministerial delegation, 1; the number of members reported, 1,306.

        The Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in Philadelphia, May 15th, 1872, Rt. Rev. J. W. Logwen presiding Bishop. The number of preachers in attendance, 21; number of members returned, 1,151; lay delegates, 5; Sunday-schools, 14; scholars, 866; in libraries, 2,090 volumes; mission money, $50.00; value of church property, $83,650.

        The Philadelphia Annual Conference convened in Philadelphia, May 28th, 1873, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding. The number of preachers in attendance, 29; lay delegates, 5; number of members returned,


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2,276; Sunday-schools, 18; scholars, 861; in libraries, 3,038 volumes. Mission money, $65.00; value of church property, $92,460.

        The Philadelphia and Baltimore Annual Conference convened in the Wesley Union Church, South street, Harrisburg, Pa., May 19th, 1875, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, associated by Bishop J. W. Hood. The conference was opened with the usual ceremonies, after which Revs. J. P. Hamer and M. M. Bell were elected secretaries of the conference. There were 35 ministers present and 8 lay delegates; 2,753 members reported, 32 Sunday-schools, 167 Sunday-school teachers and officers, 1,899 pupils, 5,428 volumes in libraries; value of church property, $178,322. The session lasted ten days.

        The Forty-eighth Philadelphia and Baltimore Annual Conference convened in Philadelphia May 10th, 1876, Rt. Rev. J. J. Moore presiding. The number of preachers in attendance, 33; lay delegates, 10; number of members returned, 2,288; Sunday-schools, 30; scholars, 1,905; in libraries, 4,933 volumes; value of church property, $189,700.

        The Forty-ninth Session of the Philadelphia and Baltimore Annual Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church convened in Washington, D. C., May 16th, 1877, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Elder J. P. Hamer appointed Secretary, Elder A. Day, Assistant Secretary. Number of ministers present, 30; ministerial delegates from other conferences, 3; lay delegates, 7; number of members returned, 2,308;


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number of Sunday-schools, 32; number of pupils, 2,065; teachers and officers, 34; volumes in libraries, 5,603; churches, 24; value of church property, $180,565.

        The Fiftieth Philadelphia and Baltimore Annual Conference convened in Harrisburg, May 15th, 1878, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Alfred Day, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 28; lay delegates, 7; number of members returned, 2,004; Sunday-schools, 26; scholars, 809; volumes in libraries, 3,092; mission money, $68.11; value of church property, $231,400.

        The Fifty-first Philadelphia and Baltimore Annual Conference convened in Philadelphia May 21st, 1879, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton presiding, J. W. Hood, associate; Rev. Alfred Day was appointed Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 31; lay delegates, 9; number of members returned, 2,307; Sunday-schools, 26; scholars, 876; volumes in libraries, 4,168; mission money, $48.87; value of church property, $125,850.

        The Fifty-third Philadelphia and Baltimore Annual Conference convened in Chambersburg May 18th, 1881, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Hilliary presiding, Rev. J. P. Hamer, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 31; lay delegates, 13; number of members returned, 2,331; Sunday-Schools, 36; scholars, 1,053; in library, 4,890; mission money, $71.50; value of church property, $229,890.

        The Fifty-fourth Philadelphia and Baltimore


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Annual Conference convened in York May 1882, Bishop Wm. H. Hilliary presiding, Bishop J. J. Moore, associate, and Rev. J. S. Cowles, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 30; lay delegates, 14; number of members returned, 2, Sunday-schools, 32; scholars, 1,742; volumes in libraries, 4,976; mission money, $69.90; value of church property, $229,800.


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CHAPTER VI.

A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE ORGANIZATION AND CONSECUTIVE SESSIONS OF THE SEVERAL ANNUAL CONFERENCES, 1845 UP TO 1883, BEGINNING WITH THE NEW ENGLAND CONFERENCES.

        The First New England Annual Conference of the A. M. E. Z. Church of America convened in the colored Methodist Church in the city of Hartford, Conn., June 21st, 1845, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding. Rev. Thomas Henson was appointed Secretary, Rev. Daniel Vandevier, Assistant Secretary. The session was opened by reading Scripture, singing and prayer; after which Bishop Rush very impressively addressed the conference. The roll being then called, the following ministers responded:

        Thomas Henson, Daniel Vandevier, Leven Smith, James Simmons, George A. Spywood, Thomas James, John P. Thompson, Dempsey Kenedy; New York delegation: Wm. H. Bishop, John A. King, Peter Ross, Henry Johnson, J. W. Loguen.

        The conference embraced the following societies


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with the number of members: Nantucket, Mass., 30; Middletown, Conn., 50; Providence, R. I., 125; New Haven, Conn., 69; Stonington, 23; Bridgeport, Conn., 73; Hartford, Conn., 100. Money brought in, $76.37.

        The Second N. E. Annual Conference of the A. M. E. Z. Church convened in the colored M. E. Z. Church in the city of Hartford, Conn., June 13th, 1846, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding; Rev. Thomas Henson was appointed Secretary, Rev. Daniel Vandevier, Assistant Secretary. There were 15 preachers in attendance; number of members reported, 487. Gayloyd Peterson, James M. Ross and Alexander Posey joined the conference this year. No deaths, no suspensions, one expulsion. Money brought in by preachers, $46.62. After a session of eight days the conference adjourned to meet in Boston, June 12th, 1847.

        The Third N. E. Annual Conference convened in Boston June 12th, 1847, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush presiding, Rev. V. Hanson, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 15; number of members returned, 464. The conference was in session six days, and adjourned sine die.

        The Fourth N. E. Annual Conference convened in the city of Boston, Mass., June 24th, 1848, Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush in the chair. Rev. D. Vanier was appointed Secretary, and T. Hanson, Assistant Secretary. There were 12 preachers present and 2 ministerial delegates from New York Conference;


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number of members reported, 477; reported from the following places: Norwalk, Conn., 5; Bridgeport, Conn., 65; Hartford, Conn., 84; New Haven, Conn., 80; Middletown, Conn., 28; Springfield, Mass., 32; Boston, 73; Worcester, 9; Nantucket, 31; Providence, R. I., 70. No Sunday-school report; no deaths, expulsions or suspensions this year.

        The Sixth New England Annual Conference convened in Providence June 8th, 1850, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, Rev. D. Vandevier, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 16; number of members returned, 479; Sunday-schools, 4; scholars, 331; The conference was in session eleven days.

        The Seventh New England Annual Conference convened in New Haven June 14th, 1851, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, Rt. Rev. George Galbreath, Associate, Rev. L. Collins, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17; number of members returned, 694; Sunday-schools, 12; scholars, 367; teachers, 8. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Ninth New England Annual Conference convened in Bridgeport June 16th, 1853, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. L. Collins, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 19; number of members returned, 864. At this conference was reported the death of Rt. Rev. George Galbreath. The business being completed conference adjourned, after a six days session.


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        The Tenth New England Annual Conference convened in Providence, June 17th, 1854, Rt. Rev. G. A. Spywood presiding, Rt. Rev. J. Tappan, Associate, Rev. R. R. Morris, Secretary. Number of ministers in attendance, 21; ministerial delegation, 1; members returned, 480; Sunday-schools, 5; scholars, 210; teachers and officers, 30. At this conference Wm. Pitts and Robert R. Morris became members. None died, none were expelled or suspended. The conference adjourned after a session of eight days.

        The eleventh New England Annual Conference convened in Hartford, June 9th, 1855, Bishop G. A. Spywood presiding, Bishop J. Tappan, Associate, Rev. Daniel Vandevier, Secretary. Number of ministers, 17; ministerial delegates from New York Conference, 3; number of members returned, 504; Sunday-schools, 6; scholars, 285; volumes in libraries, 209; teachers and officers, 20. At this conference Joseph G. Smith joined. None died, none were expelled or suspended.

        The Twefth New England Annual Conference convened in Newark June 16th, 1856, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. Alexander Posey, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 11. The conference closed after eight days session.

        The Thirteenth New England Annual Conference convened in Halifax September 12th, 1857, Rt. Rev. James Simmons presiding, Rev. R. R. Morris, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance,


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11; the number of members returned, 502; Sunday-schools, 4; Scholars, 113. After ten days session the conference closed sine die. None died, none were expelled or suspended this year.

        The Fourteenth N. E. Annual Conference convened in Providence, June 12th, 1858, Bishop James Simmons presiding, Rev. R. R. Morris, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 18; the number of members returned, 456; Sunday-schools, 6; scholars, 393; mission money, $18.25. The conference closed after ten days session.

        The Fifteenth N. E. Annual Conference convened in Hartford, June 11th, 1859, Bishop James Simmons presiding, Rev. R. R. Morris, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 23; The number of members returned, 442; Sunday-schools, 8; scholars, 352. Conference closed after a nine days sesion.

        The Seventeenth N. E. Annual Conference convened in Providence, June 8th, 1861, Bishop Joseph J. Clinton presiding, associated by Bishop Peter Ross, with Rev. James A. Jones as Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 21; the number of members returned, 550; Sunday-schools, 6; scholars, 336; volumes in libraries, 734; mission money, $36.94; valve of church property, $19,000. The conference was in session nine days.

        The Eighteenth N. E. Annual Conference convened in Hartford, Conn., on Wednesday morning, June 11th, 1862, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop


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presiding, associated by Bishop Peter Ross and Bishop Christopher Rush; Rev. Joseph G. Smith, Secretary, Rev. J. W. Hood, Assistant Secretary. Number of ministers in attendance, 21; lay delegates, 3; members reported, 563; Sunday-schools, 9; scholars, 480; number of books in libraries, 1,423; teachers, 20; value of church property, $17,900.

        The Twenty-first N. E. Annual Conference convened in Providence, June 10th, 1865, Bishop Wm. II. Bishop presiding associated by Bishop J. D. Brooks, with Rev. Thomas Davis as Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 20; lay delegates, 4; number of members returned, 657; Sunday-schools, 10; teachers, 14; scholars, 629; volumes in libraries, 2,617; mission money, $46.62. The conference was in session 12 days.

        The Twenty-second N. E. Annual Conference convened in Hartford, June 9th, 1866, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Bishop J. D. Brooks, Associate, Rev. T. A. Davis, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 20; lay delegates, 5; the number of members returned, 757; Sunday-schools, 12; scholars, 715; teachers, 16; books in libraries, 2,759; value of church property, $40,900. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Twenty-third N. E. Annual Conference convened in New Bedford, June 8th, Bishop Sampson Talbot presiding, Rev. T. A. Davis, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 18; lay delegates, 7; Sunday-schools, 14; scholars, 820;


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teachers, 18; there were 2,860 volumes in the libraries. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Twenty-fourth New England Annual Conference convened in Boston June 20th, 1868, Bishop Sampson Talbot presiding, Bishop J. J. Clinton associating, J. D. Brooks and S. T. Jones, visiting Bishops. Rev. T. A. Davis was appointed Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 21; there were 7 lay delegates, 787 members returned, 10 Sunday-schools, 556 scholars, 17 teachers, 1,772 volumes in the libraries. The mission money this year amounted to $20.18. The value of church property was estimated at $72,900. The conference continued in session eleven days.

        The Twenty-fifth New England Annual Conference convened in Bridgeport June 9th, 1869, Bishop Sampson Talbot presiding, Bishop S. T. Jones, Associate, Rev. T. A. Davis, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 22; lay delegates, 2; the number of members returned, 745. There were 9 Sunday-schools reported, 584 scholars, 15 teachers, 2,187 volumes in the libraries. The mission money this year came to $47.00. Value of church property, $93,000.

        The Twenty-sixth New England Annual Conference convened in Gasbee street, Providence, June 8th, 1870, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Jenkins Williams, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 16; the number of members returned, 866; 11 Sunday-schools, 458 scholars, 2,877 volumes


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in libraries. Mission money, $24.00. Value of church property, $78,000.

        The Twenty-seventh New England Annual Conference convened in Hartford, June 14th, 1871, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Jenkins Williams, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 18; The number of members returned, 890; Sunday-schools, 11; scholars, 509; teachers, 19; value of church property, $68,500. None died, none were expelled or suspended.

        The Twenty-eighth New England Annual Conference convened in Cranston, May th, 1872, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. S. C. Birchmore, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 21; the number of members returned, 869; there were reported 13 Sunday-schools, 516 scholars, 35 teachers, 2,275 books in libraries. Value of church property, $93,000. None died, none were expelled or suspended.

        The Twenty-ninth New England Annual Conference convened in Worcester May 31st, 73, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. J. B. Small Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 18.

        The Thirtieth New England Annual Conference convened in New Haven, May 6th, 74, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. J. B. Small, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 22; number of members returned, 885; 14 Sunday-schools reported, 560 scholars, 3,026 volumes in libraries. Mission money, $376.50.


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        The Thirty-first N. E. Annual Conference convened in New Bedford, May 5th, 1875, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. J. B. Small, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 19. The number of members returned, 872. Sunday-schools, 15; scholars, 746, teachers, 10, volumes in libraries, 3,293. mission money, $118.69. Value of church property, $126,500.

        The Thirty-second N. E. Annual Conference convened in Boston, May 3d, 1876, Bishop J. J. Clinton, D. D., presiding, Rev. J. B. Small, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 18, lay delegates, 6, number of members returned, 949, Sunday-schools, 15, scholars, 645, books in libraries, 3,045, value of church property, $111,700.

        June 13th, 1877, the Thirty-third N. E. Annual Conference convened in Hartford, Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., presiding, Rev. J. B. Small, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 18, lay delegates, 4, number of members returned, 863, Sunday-schools, 12, scholars, 790, teachers, 50, volumes in libraries, 3,184, mission money, $288.12, value of church property, $128,000.

        June 12th, 1878, the Thirty-fourth N. E. Annual Conference convened in Providence, Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., presiding, Rev. J. B. Small, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 21, lay delegates, 7, number of members returned, 897, Sunday-schools, 12, scholars, 809, teachers, 53,


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volumes in libraries, 2,742, mission money, $160.21, value of church property, $138,500.

        June 11th, 1879, the Thirty-fifth N. E. Annual Conference convened in Bridgeport, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. R. R. Morris appointed Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 20, lay delegates, 7, number of members returned, 926, Sunday-schools, 10, scholars, 722, teachers, 58, volumes in libraries, 1,517, mission money, $168.33, value of church property, $130,000.

        The Thirty-sixth N. E. Annual Conference convened in New Haven, April 7th, 1880, Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., presiding, Rev. R. R. Morris, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 19, lay delegates, 6, number of members returned, 925, Sunday-schools, 12, scholars, 1,083, teachers, 62, volumes in libraries, 2,698, mission money, $79.68.

        The Thirty-seventh N. E. Annual Conference convened in Worcester, June 1st, 1881, Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., presiding, Rev. R. R. Morris, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 18, lay delegates, 7, number of members returned, 933, Sunday-schools, 11, scholars, 1,137, teachers, 60, books in libraries, 2,932, mission money, $37.62, value of church property, $139,350.

        The Thirty-eighth N. E. Annual Conference convened in New Bedford, June 7th, 1882, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., associating, Rev. R. R. Morris, Sec. The number of


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preachers in attendance, 26, number of members returned, 944, Sunday-schools, 19, scholars, 1,012, books in libraries, 10,967, value of church property, $213,350.

ALLEGHENY CONFERENCE.

        This conference was organized in 1849. The minutes of preceding sessions we have not been able to procure in time for insertion in this part of the work, but may be found in the appendix, if procured in time for this work, with the minutes of other sessions that may be wanting.

        The Sixth Alegheny Conference convened in Allegheny City, July 8th, 1854, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop pesiding, Rev. J. D. Brooks, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 12, number of members returned, 407. There were no expulsions or deaths during this year. The conference was in session six days.

        The Twelfth Alegheny Conference convened in Pittsburg, July 28, 60, Bishop Peter Ross presiding, Rev. B. D. Matthews, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17, lay delegates, 4, number of members returned, 565, Sunday-schools, 6, scholars, 25. Joseph Armstrong joined the conference this year. There were no deaths or withdraw ls, but three expulsions. After the appointments conference closed.


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        The Sixteenth Alegheny Conference convened in Allegheny City, July 30, 64, Bishop S. Talbot presiding, Rev. D. B. Matthews, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 13, number of members returned, 906, Sunday-schools, 11, teachers, 39, scholars, 254, volumes in libraries, 7 7. No expulsions, deaths or withdrawals. Conference was in session ten days.

        The Seventeenth Alegheny Confere ce convened in Allegheny City, August 5th, 65, Bishop S. Talbot presiding. The number of preachers in attendance, 11, number of members returned, 601, Sunday-schools, 14, teachers, 63, scholars, 536, volumes in libraries, 1,913. There were no expulsions, deaths or withdrawals. Conference was in session nine days.

        The Nineteetnh Alegheny Conference convened in Washington, August 7th, 67, Rt. Rev. W. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. D. B. Matthews, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 16, lay delegates, 4, number of members returned, 00, Sunday-schools, 10, teachers, 73, scholars, 600, volumes in libraries, 1,354. The conference was in session five days.

        The Twentieth Alegheny Conference convened in the city of Pittsburg in the John Wesley Church, July 18th, 1868, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding. The house was called to order and the conference organized. Bishop J. D. Brooks being present associated Bishop Loguen. Elder D. B. Matthews was


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appointed Secretary, and Elder Wm. Johnson his assistant. The number of ministers present, 16, lay delegates, 12, number of members returned, 792, Sunday-schools, 12, teachers, 29, books in libraries, 960, scholars, 318. The session lasted ten days.

        The Twenty-first Allegheny Conference convened in the Avery Mission Church in Allegheny City, July 24th, 1869, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding, associated by Bishop J. D. Brooks. The session was opened by reading a portion of scripture, singing and prayer, after which Elder D. B. Matthews was appointed Secretary, and Elder Wm. T. Biddle, Assistant Secretary. The number of preachers present was 14, number of lay delegates, 9, number of members returned, 914, Sunday-schools, 10, scholars, 498, teachers, 61, volumes in libraries, 1,982. The session lasted ten days.

        The Twenty-third Allegheny Conference convened in Washington, Pa., August 14th, 1873, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding. The number of ministers in attendance, 11, lay delegates, 7, number of members returned, 861, Sunday-schools, 11, scholars, 406, volumes in libraries, 612, value of church property, $25,600.

        The Twenty-fourth Allegheny Conference convened in Akron, July 16, 1873, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Dr. D. B. Matthews appointed Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 18, number of lay delegates, 4, number of members returned, 923, Sunday-schools, 17, scholars, 693, books in libraries,


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2,484; mission money, $11.17; value of church property, $65,400.

        The Twenty-fifth Allegheny Conference convened in Uniontown, August 5th, 1874, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Dr. D. B. Matthew, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 17, lay delegates, 6, number of members returned, 1,128, Sunday-schools, 21, scholars, 958, in libraries, 2,754 volumes, mission money, $25.25, value of church property, $49,600. The conference was in session eight days.

        The Twenty-sixth Allegheny Conference convened at Mt. Pleasant, Pa., August 9th, 1875, in the Zion Church, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. The session being opened with the usual ceremonies, Rev. D. B. Matthews was appointed Secretary, Elder J. E. Price, Assistant Secretary. The number of preachers present, 25, lay delegates, 7, number of members returned, 905, Sunday-schools, 19, scholars, 604, teachers, 84, volumes in libraries, 2,200. The session lasted six days.

        The Twenty-seventh Allegheny Conference convened in the mission church, Allegheny City, Pa., September 19th, 1876, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. Conference opened with the usual ceremonies, after which Rev. J. H. Bronson was appointed Secretary, Rev. J. S. Cowles, Assistant Secretary. Preachers present, 28, lay delegates, 8, number of members returned, 821, Sunday-schools, 19, teachers, 91, scholars, 677, books in libraries, 2,162, value of church


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property, $29,900. The session continued nine days.

        The Twenty-eighth Allegheny Conference convened in the Franklin, Pa., Zion Church, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. The conference opened with the usual religious ceremonies, and, the roll being called, Revs. J. H. Bronson and J. S. Cowles were appointed Secretaries. The number of preachers present, 18, lay delegates, 5, number of members returned, 956, Sunday-schools, 29, pupils, 906, teachers, 94, volumes in libraries, 3,555, value of church property, $89,000. The session continued ten days.

        The Twenty-ninth Allegheny Conference of the African M. E. Z. Church convened in Mansfield, Pa., August 22d, 1878, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. Conference organized with the usual ceremonies. Revs. J. H. Bronson and J. S. Cowles were appointed Secretaries. Preachers in attendence, 21, lay delegates, 6, number of members, 803, Sunday-schools, 27, teachers and officers, 167, scholars, 871, volumes in libraries, 4,385, value of church property, $97,800. The session closed after eight days deliberations.

        The Thirtieth Allegheny Conference convened in Pittsburg, August 11th, 1879, Bishop Wm. H. Hilliary presiding, Rev. J. S. Cowles, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 22, lay delegates, 8, number of members returned, 634, Sunday-schools, 24, scholars, 760, volumes in libraries, 3,674, mission money, $9.00, value of church property, $40,825.

        The Thirty-first Allegheny Conference convened


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in the Avery Mission A. M. E. Z. Church, July 13th, 1880. The conference organized in the usual manner. Bishop Wm. H. Hilliary presided, Revs. J. S. Cowles and S. T. Whiten acting Secretaries. The number of preachers in attendance, 27, lay delegates, 7, number of members reported, 471, Sunday-schools, 21, officers and teachers, 121, scholars, 938, volumes in libraries, 3,285, value of church property, $229,000. The session lasted nine days.

        The following are the members composing the thirty-third session of the Allegheny Conference convened in Uniontown, Pa., 1883, Rt. Rev. J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. Alfred Day, Secretary; Elders, James Henry, M. W. L. Knox, J. H. Trimble, C. H. Dockeet, J. W. Ticry, Alfred Day, W. A. McClure, Jenkins Williams, S. H. Lacy, John Thomas, J. H. Baptist, John Holliday, P. R. Anderson, S. F. Whiten, C. H. Rodgers, Wm. Fleming, Dr. N. H. Williams, T. J. Manson, A. Workman, Isaiah Pendleton; Deacons, Charles Roles, Nathaniel Maddin, G. W. Lewis, T. H. Datcher, Edward Little, T. B. Bymim; Preachers, Samuel Davis, Aaron Gaiter, Strother Brooks, D. G. Moore; Lay delegates, J. P. Young, Isham Smith, Edward Scheckles, Jane Duke, Hezekiah Scott, G. W. Washington, George Perkins, B. F. Gross, Sister Rollins, Charles Toliver, Wm. Ford.

        The following are the members composing the Sixth Allegheny Conference, convened in Mission Church, Allegheny City, 1854, Rt. Rev. Wm. H.


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Bishop presiding, Rev. J. D. Brooks, Secretary; Samuel Clingman, Grafton H. Graham, J. P. Hamer, Wesley C. Marshall, Isaac Coleman, Samuel Williams, David Crabb, J. W. Jones, Amos Hammond, Charles Wright.

THE GENESEE CONFERENCE.

        The First Genesee Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church convened in Ithaca, September 13th, 1851, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, Rev. Thompson, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 12, lay delegates, 2, the number of members returned, 135, Sunday-schools, 3, scholars, 95. The conference was in session nine days.

        The Second Genesee Conference convened in Ithaca, September 11th, 1852, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. J. Anderson, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 12, lay delegate, 1, number of members returned, 312, Sunday-schools, 5, scholars, 130. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Third Genesee Conference convened in Elmira, September 10th, 1853, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. John Williams, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 15, lay delegates, 7, number of members reported, 183, Sunday-schools, 2, scholars, 85. The conference was in session nine days.


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        The Fourth Genesee Conference convened in Elmira, September 2d, 1854, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop presiding. The number of preachers in attendance, 10, number of members returned, 217, Sunday-schools, 3, scholars, 78. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Fifth Genesee Conference convened in Ithaca, September 1st, 1855, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop presiding. The number of members returned, 249, Sunday-schools, 5, scholars, 145. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Sixth Genesee Conference convened in Binghamton, September 6th, 1856, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. F. Goodman, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance was 14, number of members returned, 273, Sunday-schools, 4, scholars, 128. The conference was in session seven days.

        The Seventh Genesee Conference convened in Elmira, September 9th, 1857, Bishop W. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 15, number of members returned, 238. The conference was in session five days.

        The eighth Genesee Conference convened in Montrose, September 1st, 1858, Bishop W. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 14, number of members returned, 32. The conference was in session eight days.

        The Ninth Genesee Conference convened in


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Binghamton, September 3d, 1859, Bishop Wm. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17, number of members returned, 368. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Tenth Genesee Conference convened in Elmira, September 1st, 1860, Bishop Peter Ross presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17, number of members returned, 407. The conference was in session eleven days.

        The Eleventh Genesee Conference convened in Ithaca, September 7th, 1861, Bishop peter Ross presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 15, lay delegates, 2, number of members returned, 449. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Twelfth Genesee Conference convened in Montrose, September 6th, 1862, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 10, number of members returned, 476. The conference was in session ten days.

        The Thirteenth Genesee Conference convened in Binghamton, September, 5th, 1863, Rt. Rev. W. H. Bishop presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 13, lay delegates, 5, number of members returned, 329. The conference was in session nine days.

        The Fourteenth Genesee Conference convened


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in Rochester, September 3d, 1864, Bishop J. D. Brooks presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 10, number of members returned, 452, Sunday-schools, 9, scholars, 388. The conference was in session nine days.

        The Fifteenth Genesee Conference convened in Elmira, September 2d, 1865, Bishop J. D. Brooks presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 19, lay delegates, 2, number of members returned, 498, Sunday-schools, 16, scholars, 414. The conference was in session nine days.

        The Sixteenth Genesee Conference convened in Montrose, September 1st, 1866, Bishop J. D. Brooks presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 16, lay delegates, 2, number of members returned, 500, Sunday-schools' 10, scholars, 420. The conference was in session eleven days.

        The Seventeenth Genesee Conference convened in Syracuse, September 7th, 1867, Bishop J. D. Brooks presiding, Rev. J. A. Jones, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 13, number of members returned, 490, Sunday-schools, 10, scholars, 384, books in libraries, 506.

        The Eighteenth Genesee Conference convened in Ithaca, September 5th, 1868, Bishop S. T. Jones presiding, Rev. M. H. Ross, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 15, number of members


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returned, 495, Sunday-schools, 9, scholars, 395. The conference was in session seven days.

        The Nineteenth Genesee Conference convened in Wilkesbarre, September 4th, 1869, Bishop S. F. Jones presiding, Rev. W. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17, number of members returned, 538, Sunday-schools, 11, scholars, 430, books in libraries, 991, value of church property, $31,000. The conference was in session nine days.

        The Twentieth Genesee Conference convened in Binghamton, September 3d, 1870, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding, Rev. M. H. Ross, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 15, number of members returned, 489, Sunday-schools, 11, scholars, 577, books in libraries, 1,000, mission money, $3.00, value of church property, $36,500. Conference was in session nine days.

        The Twenty-first Genesee Conference convened in Elmira, September 2d, 1871, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 24, lay delegates, 7, number of members returned, 486, Sunday-schools, 12, scholars, 528, books in libraries, 1,158, mission money, $6.00, value of church property, $51,500.

        The Twenty-second Genesee Conference convened in Syracuse, September 7th, 1872, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 20, number of members returned, 541, Sunday-schools, 14, scholars,


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578, books in libraries, 1,678, value of church property, $36,600.

        The Twenty-fourth Genesee Conference convened at Saratoga Springs, September 5th, 1874, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 20, lay delegates, 2, number of members returned, 620, Sunday-schools, 16, scholars, 721, books in libraries, 3,540, mission money, $36.25, value of church property, $83,000.

        The Twenty-fifth Genesee Conference convened in Montrose, September 7th, 1875, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 20, lay delegates, 5, number of members returned, 610, Sunday-schools, 14, scholars, 775, books in libraries, 2,170, value of church property, $69,208. The conference was in session eight days.

        The Twenty-seventh Genesee Conference convened in Binghamton, September 4th, 1877, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 20, lay delegates, 3, number of members returned, 541, Sunday-schools, 15, scholars, 688, value of church property, $67,000.

        The Twenty-eighth Genesee Conference convened in Wilkesbarre, September 9th, 1878, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 18, lay delegates,


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4, number of members returned, 485, Sunday-schools, 17, scholars, 713, books in libraries, 1,567, mission money, $11.37, value of church property, 65,000.

        The Thirtieth Genesee Conference convened in Syracuse, September, 14, 1880, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 19, lay delegates, 9, number of members returned, 430, Sunday-schools, 11, scholars, 476, books in libraries, 930, value of church property, $61,000.

        The Thirty-first Genesee Conference convened in Rochester, September 6th, 1881, Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17, lay delegates, 6, number of members returned, 469, Sunday-schools, 15, scholars, 770, books in libraries, 1,892, value of church property, $90,000.

        The Thirty-second Genesee Conference convened in Elmira, September 5th, 1882, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. Wm. Sanford, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 18, lay delegates, 7.

NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE.

Establishment of Zion Connection in North Carolina.

        In December, 1863, Rev. James W. Hood, of the New England Conference of the African Methodist


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Episcopal Zion Church in America, was appointed by Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton as a missionary to North Carolina. On the 20th of January, 1864, Rev. Hood arrived at New Berne, and was received by the official board of the Andrew's Chapel then connected with the S. M. E. Church. The church by a unanimous vote agreed to unite with the Zion connection and to be governed by its discipline. Shortly after the Purvice Chapel in Beaufort was received into Zion Connection.

        In March, 1864, Rev. John Williams, also of the New England Conference, followed Bro. Hood, went to Washington and Roanoke Island, and received the churches at these points.

        In May, 1864, Bishop Clinton visited the mission and set apart William Ryle at New Berne, and Enoch Wallace at Beaufort, to the office of Deacon.

        In July, 1864, David Hill was sent from the New England Conference, and appointed pastor of the church at Beaufort. Thus by the first of August 1864, we had five preachers. But before the autumn leaves had ceased to fall, three of these preachers namely, Hill, Wallace and Ryle, had fallen victims to the yellow fever, and the other two were at the point of death, but finally recovered. Ryle and Wallace were aged men, but Hill was in the bloom of youth and was a most promising young man.

        ESTABLISHMENT OF NORTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE

        The First Session of the North Carolina Conference of the A. M. E. Z. Church met December


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17th, 1864, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. The roll was as follows:

        Bishop J. J. Clinton, Revs. J. W. Hood, John Williams, Ellis Lavender, E. H. Hill; Deacons, David Cray, Sampson Copper, Joseph Green, H. W. Jones, W. J. Moore, A. M. Ferribee; Preacher Amos York.

        Six of these brethren were ordained to the office of Deacon on the morning of the 25th of December. Bros. Hill and Lavender were ordained to the office of Elder the afternoon of the same day. The statistics were as follows: Members, 1,832; Sunday-schools, 5; scholars, 1,215; local preachers, 10; probationers, 293; conference collection, $135.57. Appointments were as follows:

        Andrew Chapel, New Berne, J. W. Hood; Clinton Chapel, New Berne, H. W. Jones; Red Hill Circuit, David Cray; Howard Camp, Roanoke Island and Plymouth, John Williams; Elder Joseph Green, W. J. Moore and A. M. Ferribee in his charge; Hull Swamp Circuit, E. H. Hill; Kimble Hill Circuit, Sampson Copper; Purvice Chapel, Beaufort, Ellis Lavender; Missionary, Amos York.

        After the Federal forces occupied Wilmington in March, 1865, Bro. Hood went there and effected an organization, and licensed several preachers, who went forth organizing churches in that part of the state. Elder Williams, arriving a week or so later, took charge of the work, and Elder Hood returned to New Berne to look after his charge there. He


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soon after went to Kinston and effected an organization, and sent Laudon Johnson, a local preacher, to Goldsboro, who organized at that point and extended the work down through Green County. Bro. Hood went next to Edenton and Elizabeth City, and received the churches at those points, licensed preachers and put them in charge. During this trip, from exposure he took the yellow jaunders and bilious fever, which culminated in typhoid fever, which prostrated him from July to October.

        The Second N. C. Conference met in Beaufort, N. C., 1865, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Amos York appointed Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 33; number of members reported, 6,488; Sunday-schools, 19; scholars, 2,834; mission money, $169.00. After a pleasant session conference closed.

        The Third N. C. Conference convened in New Berne, December 17th, 1866, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Amos York, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 62; lay delegates, 6; number of members returned, 9,268; Sunday-schools, 30; scholars, 2,152.

        The Fourth N. C. Conference convened in Fayetteville, November 21st, 1867, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. J. W. Hood, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 112; number of members returned, 5,320; Sunday-schools, 70; scholars, 4,730. The conference was in session eight days.

        The Fifth N. C. Conference convened in Wellington,


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November 25th, 1868, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. Amos York, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 147; number of members reported, 17,632; Sunday-schools, 33; scholars, 6,800; books in libraries, 2,622. The conference was in session eight days.

        The Sixth N. C. Conference convened in Salisbury, November 14th, 1869, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. T. H. Lomax, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 111; lay delegates, 10; number of members returned, 4,936; Sunday-schools, 63; scholars, 1,525.

        The Eighth N. C. Conference convened in Lincolnton, November 22d, 1871, Elder Hood presiding on account of the illness of Bishop J. D. Brooks, the presiding Bishop; Rev. W. J. Moore was appointed Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 105; number of members returned, 19,086; Sunday-schools, 33; scholars, 8,026.

        The Ninth N. C. Conference convened in Fayetteville, November 27th, '72, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. A. M. Barrett, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 108; lay delegates, 20; members, 18,000; Sunday-schools, 69; pupils, 9,000.

        The Tenth N. C. Conference convened in Wilmington, November 26th, '73, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. A. Tyler, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 176; number of members reported, 17,887; Sunday-schools, 186; scholars,


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9,057; volumes in libraries, 3,318; mission money, $7.25; value of church property, $71,252.

        The Twelfth N. C. Conference convened in concord, November 24th, '75, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. A. Tyler, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 181; number of members returned, 21,841; Sunday-schools, 267; scholars, 9,796; volumes in libraries, 4,952; mission money, $25.50; value of church property, $74,561.

        The Thirteenth N. C. Conference convened in Washington, N. C., November 22d, '76, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. A. Tyler, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 122; number of members returned, 21,978; Sunday-schools, 284; scholars, 1,027; volumes in libraries, 5,204; mission money, $30.00; value of church property, $78,954.

        The Fourteenth N. C. Conference convened in Salisbury, November 28th, '77, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Bishop T. H. Lomax, Associate, Rev. A. B. Smyser, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 202; lay delegates, 16; number of members returned, 22,622; Sunday-schools, 264; scholars, 9,195; volumes in libraries, 7,315; value of church property, $38,891; mission money, $21.31.

        The Fifteenth N. C. Conference convened in Goldsboro, November 27th, '71, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Bishop T. H. Lomax, Associate, Rev. C. R. Harris, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 203, lay delegates, 16; number of members


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returned, 22,076; Sunday-schools, 264; scholars, 10,899; volumes in libraries, 2,776; mission money, $16.60; value of church property, $79,460.

        The Second Central N. C. Conference convened in Charlotte, November 26th, '81, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Bishop T. H. Lomax, Associate, Rev. J. W. Smith, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 110; lay delegates, 5; number of members returned, 14,123; Sunday-schools, 162; scholars, 7,636; volumes in libraries, 6,213; mission money, $11.61; value of church property, $4,956,338.

        The Third Central N. C. Conference convened in Statesville, November 22, '82, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Bishop T. H. Lomax, Associate, Rev. T. T. B. Reed, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 101; lay delegates, 10; number of members returned, 13,728; Sunday-schools, 187; scholars, 8,389; teachers, 932; books in libraries, 6,202; value of church property, $85,015. The conference was in session five days.

LOUISIANA CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the Louisiana Conference convened in New Orleans, May 13th, 1865, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong appointed Secretary. The number of ministers represented was 15; lay delegation, 1; the number of members reported, 2,736; Sunday-schools, 7; scholars, 142; officers and teachers, 21.


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        The Second Session of the Louisiana Conference convened in Mobile, May 2d, 1866, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 66; lay delegates, 2; number of members reported, 9,122; Sunday-schools, 8; scholars, 1,467; officers and teachers, 90.

        The Sixth Session of the Louisiana Conference convened in New Orleans, May 4th, 1870, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. P. M. Gertoux, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 54; lay delegates, 8; the number of members reported, 9,566; Sunday-schools, 95; scholars, 1,342; officers and teachers, 105.

        The Seventh Session of the Louisiana Conference convened in New Orleans, May 3d, 1871, Bishop Sampson D. Talbot presiding, Rev. C. Ligel, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 49; ministerial delegation, 3; lay delegation, 11; the number of members reported, 10,124; Sunday-schools, 90; scholars, 1,374; officers and teachers, 105.

        The Fifteenth Session of the Louisiana Conference convened in New Orleans, January 22d, 1879, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. M. Greggs, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 46; ministerial delegation, 3; lay delegates, 20; the number of members returned, 1,680; Sunday-schools, 18; scholars, 699; volumes in libraries, 283; officers and teachers, 46; probable value of church property, $20,000.


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        The Sixteenth Session of the Louisiana Conference convened in Amite City, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. F. P. Loney, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 46; the number of members returned, 2,854; Sunday-schools, 27; scholars, 954; volumes in libraries, 538; officers and teachers, 50; probable value of church property, $20,000. Conference adjourned after six days session.

SOUTH CAROLINA CONFERENCE.

        The Fourth Session of the South Carolina Conference convened in Yorkville, December 16th, 1869, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. I. C. Clinton, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 68; the number of members returned, 2,000; Sunday-schools, 18; scholars, 700.

        The Sixth Session of the S. C. Conference convened in Lancaster, December 7th, 1871, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding, Rev. W. J. Moore, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 44; the number of members returned, 2,290; Sunday-schools, 20; scholars, 880.

        The Seventh Session of the S. C. Conference convened in Unionville, December 18th, 1872, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. I. C. Clinton, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 69; the number of members returned, 4,694; Sunday-school scholars, 974; value of church property, $8,575.


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        The Eighth Session of the S. C. Conference convened in Yorkville, October 29th, 1873, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. I. C. Clinton, Secretary. The number of members returned, 4,441; Sunday-school scholars, 1,620; volumes in the libraries, 301; mission money, $7.25; value of church property, $16,725.

        The Ninth Session of the S. C. Conference convened in Chester, November 2d, '74, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. I. C. Clinton, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 75; number of members returned, 5,918; Sunday-schools, 36; scholars, 1,569; volumes in libraries, 291; mission money, $18.50; value of church property, $25,439.

        The Tenth Session of the S. C. Conference convened in Lancaster, October 27th, '75, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. I. C. Clinton, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 84; the number of members returned, 4,746; Sunday-schools, 50; scholars, 1,992; volumes in libraries, 1,196; value of church property, $26,997.

        The Eleventh Session of the S. C. Conference convened in Unionville, October 25th, '76, Bishop J. W. Hood Presiding, Rev. I. C. Clinton, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 84; number of members returned, 5,040; Sunday-school scholars, 2,020; volumes in libraries, 1,196; value of church property, $27,000.

        The Thirteenth Session of the S. C. Conference convened in Chesterville, November 6th, '78, Bishop


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J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. G. W. Clinton, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 73; Sunday-schools, 54; scholars, 6,000; volumes in libraries, 2,000; value of church property, $27,000.

ORGANIZATION OF THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the Kentucky Annual Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church was organized by Bishop Sampson Talbot on Wednesday, June 6th, 1866, at 4 o'clock, P. M., in Center Street Church, Louisville, Ky. The religious exercises were conducted by Bishop Talbot, who read the 12th chapter of Paul's Epistle to the Romans, followed by singing and prayer. Bishop Talbot then delivered a very touching address, alluding to the providence of God in permitting the conference again to assemble. After touching upon the great change in the state during the past few years, he expressed a desire that peace and prosperity might attend their efforts. The names of the members are as follows:

        Bishop S. Talbot, Bishop J. J. Clinton, Revs. W. F. Butler, Samuel Elliott, Leroy Brannon, R. Bridwell, Anthony Bunch, R. Marshall, W. H. Miles, Dr. Wm. Koger; Deacons E. H. Curry, Peter Mc Comrick, Henderson First, Henry Huges, David Cole; Preachers Henry Brown, Douglas Coward, Thomas Henry, Cicero Hazlewood, Samuel Sherman, Wilson Carneal, Lewis Arnal, Charles Rodman.


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Total of elders, deacons and preachers present, 21. Delegates present: Philadelphia Conference, J. A. Jones and S. T. Jones; Genesee Conference, J. W. Loguen (now Bishop), and J. J. Whiten Allegheny Conference, J. Armstrong, and J. Bowman

        All the above named ministers were present and participated in the business of the conference. To say the least, it was indeed a most eventful scene for the new-born citizens of old Kentucky. A scene coupled together with a privilege which their souls had long desired and for which millions of faces of their ancestors had been bathed in tears, mingled with their prayers. They had ascended the hill of God and now their children enjoyed the fruit of their ancestors' prayers.

        The membership reported was 1,841. The ministers of this conference went forth but poorly prepared for the weighty responsibility resting upon them, but few of them men of scholastic attainments, and surrounded with many embarrassments. Yet God crowned their labors with great success. They being men of sound judgment, great moral worth, and unflinching energy and enterprise, God condescended to open the way for their continual success.

        The Second Session of the Ky. Conference convened in Louisville, Ky., in Center Street Church, June 12th, '67, Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop presiding. The Bishop opened conference by reading the 11th Psalm, followed by singing and prayer. The Bishop then delivered a short address on the mercy of God


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in permitting the conference to assemble again. Then the business of the conference was entered upon. The brethren reported a membership of 3,253. Our Sunday-school scholars now numbered 1,647, with 50 teachers. The conference after passing through the summary of its business, the Bishop assigned the ministers to their several charges. The conference then adjourned sine die.

        The Third Session of the Ky. Conference convened in Louisville City, June 24th, '68, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding. The Bishop opened the session by reading a Scripture lesson, followed by singing and prayer. The Bishop then proceeded to address the conference, after which the business of the conference was entered upon, in the course of which the ministers reported the condition of their respective work, which was very encouraging. There were 30 ministers enrolled at this session, and 3,401 members reported, 1,001 Sunday-school scholars and about 45 teachers. The conference having completed its work, except making the appointments, the conference then completed its work in making out the appointments, which gave general satisfaction except the appointment of W. H. Miles, who was assigned a mission field. He refused to fill his appointment, and tendered his resignation to Bishop Loguen, which was accepted. Rev. Miles then bade Zion adieu, and went out and set up for himself and established an independent church, now known as the C. M. Church. In this movement he was joined


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by Rev. W. P. Churchill, Doctor Wm. Koger, Revs. Richard Marshall, Lewis Peter, and others who left Zion, and who went with him and took members and churches wherever they could be induced to follow him. But God being for Zion was more than those against her, and she withstood the schism and strode gloriously on.

        The Fourth Session of the Ky. Conference convened in Louisville, Ky., June 12th, 1869, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding. The Bishop opened the conference with singing and prayer. After the usual preliminaries, business was entered upon. The following were the members present:

        Elders R. Bridwell, J. B. Stansbury, J. B. Cox, J. B. Johnson, A. Bunch, S. Sherman, E. H. Curry, P. McComrick, Peter Hall, L. Brannon, S. Elliott, B. B. Rochester, Y. Carr, C. Rodman, H. First, Wilson Carneal, Joseph Irvin, James Irvin, Duncan Hines, Thomas Manson, and Nelson Shawler. Total number of ministers, 21; number of members, 3,490; Sabbath-school scholars, 567; teachers, 40.

        The Fifth Session of the Ky. Conference convened in New Albany, Ind., May 25th, '70, Bishop J. W. Loguen presiding. He read the 62d chapter of Isaiah, which was followed by singing and prayer, after which the usual opening business was entered upon. The number of ministers present, 26; number of members reported, 2,527; pupils in Sabbath-schools, 676; teachers, 45.

        The Sixth Session of the Ky. Conference convened


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at Russellville, Ky., February 28th, '71, Rt. Rev. S. T. Jones presiding, who opened the session by reading the 60th chapter of Isaiah, followed by singing and prayer. E. H. Curry was appointed Secretary. The roll being called, the conference proceeded in its usual course of business. There were 28 preachers in attendance. There were 2,660 members, and 800 Sabbath-school scholars reported.

        The Thirteenth Session of the Ky. Conference convened in Indianapolis, September 4th, 1878, Bishop S. T. Jones presiding, Rev. Samuel Sherman, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 43; lay delegates, 13; number of members returned, 3,103; Sunday-schools, 10; scholars, 2,213; volumes in libraries, 3,084; value of church property, $62,975.

VIRGINIA CONFERENCE.

        The Third Session of the Virginia Annual conference convened in Elizabeth City, October 14th, 1868, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. J. P. Evans, Secretary. The number of ministers present, 38; lay delegates, 6; number of members returned, 1,601; Sunday-schools, 13; scholars, 1,684; volumes in libraries, 1,560.

        The Fourth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Edenton, October 21st, '69, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. J. V. Givens, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 25; number of


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members returned, 3,126; Sunday- chools, 39; scholars, 2,287; volumes in libraries, 669; mission money, $17.65.

        The Sixth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Hertford, October 16th, '71, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. V. Givens, Secretary. The number of preachers present, 30; number of members reported, 4,234; Sunday-schools, 43; scholars, 2,472; volumes in libraries, 879.

        The Seventh Session of the Va. Conference convened in Hertford, December 16th, '72, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. V. Givens, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 36; number of members reported, 3,701; Sunday-schools, 40; scholars, 1,785; teachers, 135. Conference was in session six days.

        The Eighth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Edentown, November 12th, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. McH. Farley, Secretary. Preachers in attendance, 34; members reported, 5,200; Sunday-schools, 59; scholars, 2,645; value of church property, $30,000.

        The Ninth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Petersburg, November 11th, '74, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. McH. Farley, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 32 number of members reported, 4,620; Sunday-schools, 55; scholars, 2,514; volumes in libraries, 1,536; value of church property, $38,697; mission money, $23.90.

        The Tenth Session of the Va. Conference convened


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in Elizabeth City, November 17th, '75, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. McH. Farley, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 39; number of members returned, 5,545; Sunday-schools, 66; scholars, 3,003; volumes in libraries, 2,224; mission money, $0.70; value of church property, $33,128.

        The Thirteenth ession Sof the Va. Conference convened in Franklin, November 14th, '78, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding, Rev. J. McH. Farley, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 42; lay delegates 15; number of members returned, 5,757; Sunday-schools, 62; scholars, 3,123; volumes in libraries, 2,065; mission money, $13.69; value of church property, $33,574.

        The Fourteenth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Petersburg, November 19th, 1879, Rt. Rev. J. W. Hood presiding, bishops present, J. J. Clinton and T. H. Lomax, Rev. J. McH. Farley, Secretary. The number of ministers present, 43; lay delegates, 16, number of members returned, 6,357; Sunday-schools, 62; scholars, 3,277; volumes in libraries, 1,944; mission money, $10.22; value of church property, $48,837.55.

        The Fifteenth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Hertford, November 23d, '80, Bishop W. H. Hilliary presiding, Rev. J. McH. Farley, Secretary. The number of preachers present, 42; lay delegates, 22; number of members returned, 5,299, Sunday-schools, 61, scholars, 3,300, volumes in libraries,


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2,976, mission money, $97.43, value of church property, $102,848.

        The Sixteenth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Elizabeth City, November 16th, '81, Bishop W. H. Hilliary presiding, Rev. J. P. Hamer, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 50, lay delegates, 24, number of members returned, 5,624, Sunday-schools, 61, scholars, 2,400, volumes in libraries, 2,978.

        The Seventeenth Session of the Va. Conference convened in Edenton, November 15th, '82, Bishop J. J. Clinton, D. D., presiding, Rev. J. P. Hamer, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 36, lay delegates, 23, number of members returned, 6,164, Sunday-school scholars, 2,039, volumes in libraries, 2,330, mission money, $95.63, value of church property, $511,340.

ALABAMA CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the Alabama Conference convened in Mobile, April 3d, 1867, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of ministers in attendance, 66; lay delegates, 7; ministerial delegation, 4; number of members returned, 6,698; Sunday-schools, 14; scholars, 2,254; officers and teachers, 24.

        The Second Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Montgomery in 1868, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. Number


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of ministers in attendance, 75, lay delegates, 9; members reported, 7,320; Sunday-schools, 15; scholars, 2,540; officers and teachers, 28.

        The Third Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Montgomery in 1869, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. Number of preachers in attendance, 84, number of members reported, 8,240; Sunday-schools, 20; scholars, 2,820; officers and teachers, 34.

        The Fourth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Selma, April 6th, 1870, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Solomon Derry, Secretary. The number of ministers present, 137; ministerial delegation from other conferences, 3; number of members reported, 13,752; Sunday-schools, 52; scholars, 4,364.

        The Fifth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Selma in April of 1871, Bishop Sampson D. Talbot presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of ministers present, 145; ministerial delegation, 2; lay delegation, 7; number of members reported, 14,000; Sunday-schools, 65; scholars, 5,476.

        The Sixth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Mobile, April 3d, 1872, Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong Secretary. The number of preachers present, 146; ministerial delegation, 2; lay delegates, 9; number of members reported, 14,337; Sunday-schools, 70; scholars, 5,576; officers, 45.

        The Seventh Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Tuscaloosa, April 2d, 1873, Bishop S.


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D. Talbot presiding, Rev. A. C. Fisher, Secretary Number of preachers present, 143; ministerial delegation from other conferences, 2; lay delegation, 16 number of members returned, 15,000; Sunday-schools, 78; scholars, 6, 543.

        The Eighth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Greenville, April 1st, 1874, Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary The number of preachers present, 160; ministerial delegates from other conferences, 4; lay delegation, 14; number of members returned, 15,987; Sunday-schools, 83; scholars, 6,597.

        The Ninth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Montgomery, December 13th, 1875, Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. Number of preachers in attendance, 198; ministerial delegation to General Conference, 20; lay delegation, 2; number of members reported, 18,140; Sunday-schools, 87; scholars, 6,649; officers and teachers, 500.

        The Tenth Session of the Ala. Conferenc convened in Talladega, December 13th, 1876, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. Number of ministers in attendance, 204; ministerial delegation, 1; lay delegation, 2; number of members reported, 19,275; Sunday-schools, 90; scholars, 6,657; officers and teachers, 474.

        The Eleventh Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Mobile, December 12th, 1877, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary.


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Number of preachers in attendance, 226; clerical delegation, 2; number of members reported, 18,090; Sunday-schools, 78; scholars, 6,016; volumes in libraries, 259; value of church property, $61,801.

        The Twelfth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Selma, December 11th, 1878, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. Number of preachers in attendance, 242; ministerial delegation from other conferences, 6; number of members reported, 22,462; Sunday-schools, 92; scholars, 7,285; officers and teachers, 487; volumes in libraries, 819; mission money, $86.92; value of church property, $77,185.00.

        The Thirteenth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Mobile, December 10th, 1879, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 244; clerical delegation, 2; lay delegation, 2; number of members reported, 29,982; Sunday-schools, 40; scholars, 10,057; volumes in libraries, 1,483; value of church property, $61,878.10.

        The Fourteenth Session of the Ala. Conference convened in Montgomery, November 24th, 1880, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 138; ministerial delegation, 2; lay delegation, 16; number of members reported, 30,129; Sunday-schools, 20; scholars, 8,122; officers and teachers, 405. The Alabama Conference was divided into East and West this year.


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EAST ALABAMA CONFERENCE.

        The Second Session of the East Ala. Conference convened in Greenville, November 23, 1881, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. Joseph Gomez, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 153; ministerial delegation, 3; lay delegation, 19; members reported, 11,103; Sunday-schools, 20; scholars, 4,419; volumes in libraries, 1,881; officers and teachers, 740; value of church property, $34,600.

        The Third Session of the East Ala. Conference convened in Montgomery, November 22d, 1882, Rt. Rev. J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. Joseph Gomez, Secretary. There were 164 preachers in attendance, 3 ministrrial delegates, 12,340 members reported, 4,559 Sunday-school scholars, 209 officers and teachers, 1,316, $26,344 the probable value of church property.

WEST ALABAMA CONFERENCE.

        The Second Session of the West Alabama Conference convened in Tuscaloosa, December 14th, '81, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. There were 114 preachers in attendance, 9 lay delegates, 4,689 members reported, 86 Sunday-schools, 3,141 scholars, 743 books in libraries; mission money, $3.42; value of church property, $17,889.


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        The Third Session of the West Ala. Conference convened in Mobile, December, 13th, '82, Bishop T. H. Lomax presiding, Rev. C. C. Petly, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 98; ministerial delegation, 4; lay delegation 13; number of members reported, 17,144; Sunday-schools, 94; scholars, 5,214; teachers and officers, 1,250; volumes in libraries, 743; value of church property, $50,350.

CALIFORNIA CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the California Conference convened in San Francisco, Wednesday, January 10th, 1868, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, who opened the session by reading the 52d chapter of Isaiah, and the selection of the 960th hymn of Methodist Selections; singing was followed by prayer offered by the Rev. Adam B. Smith. The Bishop then delivered an impressive address, upon God's gracious providence in bringing him safely to the Pacific coast. The members, many of them, rose and responded to him congratulatory. The members stood enrolled as follows:

        Elders John J. Moore, Adam Smith; Preachers Joshua B. Handy, Wm. B. Smith, James B. Wilkinson, James Lodge, A. T. Rogers, R. T. Houston, R Bradford; Lay delegates, Henry M. Collins, Wm. Brooks, Thomas Gaines.


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        At the close of the speaking, Rev. J. J. Moore was appointed Secretary of the conference, and Edward Hall and T. E. Gaines, Assistant Secretaries. The several committees were then appointed. On Devotion, J. J. Moore, A. B. Smith; on Finances, J. J. Moore, A. T. Rogers, J. B. Handy; on Districts and Missions, J. B. Handy, A. B. Smith, J. Lodge; on Rules, A. B. Smith, R. T. Houston, J. J. Moore; on State of the Country, H. M. Collins, Wm. B. Smith, T. Rogers, E. Hall; on Sabbath Schools, A. B. Smith, Wm. Brooks, J. Lodge; on Temperance, Wm. B. Smith, R. Bradford.

        Rules were next adopted for the government of the conference. They then proceeded to the examination of the moral standing of the members; this being completed, the Discipline Questions were then taken up and disposed of in order. The conference met daily in two sessions for six days, disposing of important business consisting of the disposition of committees, reports, the discussion of matters of local and general connectional interests, and the adoption of important resolutions on vital subjects, and the statistical reports, as set forth in the summary of the following matter.

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES.

        The Committee on Education reported as follows:

        WHEREAS, millions of our race have inherited, as the intellectual legacy of slavery, the accumulated ignorance of two and a half centuries, which now is


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made by the enemies of our race a pretext against our claims to equality before the law, and is eagerly seized upon by the conservative spirit of the country against our just claims to a common manhood.

        Therefore,

        Resolved, that we consider it among the first duties of our ministers to labor to diffuse education among our people as much as possible in the sphere of their calling.

        Resolved, that each minister be required to use his influence and efforts to secure the establishment of public schools for colored children in districts, towns and cities where there are not any or proper provisions for our children's schooling.

        Resolved, that our ministers holding charges be required to lecture to their people twice a year and urge them to use their utmost efforts to have their children educated, showing them the importance of education; and, that ministers, wherever practicable, shall urge upon school directors, where necessary, our claims for appropriations for our children's education.

Respectfully submitted,

J. J. MOORE,
E. HALL,
J. M. WILKINSON.


        The Committee on Temperance submitted the following:

        WHEREAS, we believe that the use of intoxicating liquors is the basis of most of the crime committed,


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and as Christian ministers we should discourage its use in every possible way. Therefore,

        Resolved, that we recommend all the pastors of churches to urge upon their members temperance in all things, and that each minister shall lecture on the subject of temperance, and form temperance societies wherever he can.

Respectfully submitted,
W. B. SMITH,
B. BRADFORD,
R. T. HOUSTON.


        The Committee on the State of the Country submitted the following:

        WHEREAS, under the promptings of an evinced fealty to the American Republic only characteristic of the colored American citizens, who at the first call of the nation, when the republic was trembling on desolation's brink and her existence hung in the balance of war, without reserve threw themselves by the tens of thousands on the nation's alter to arrest her destruction, which we prevented; as her own lips testify through her loyal press; and

        WHEREAS, the American people have been admonished by the stern events developed in the late history of the country, under the special directions of Almighty God, to concede to all her citizens a common justice irrespective of race or color. Therefore,

        Resolved, that it is the sense of this body that common justice and Christianity make it the plain duty of all Christian bodies to ask at the hands of


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this Christian nation that it concede to us, its legitimate citizens, equality before the law. We ask it not only in the name of common justice and Christianity, but also in the voice of the blood of the martyred thousands of our race. We ask it for the future safety of the republic and for enlightened propress.

        Resolved, that if the nation found it necessary to appeal to religion by fasting and prayer to escape the rebel sword, religion should prompt her spiritual guides to vindicate political justice for those whom they called to help to save the nation in the hour of her greatest peril, those who helped to arrest the hand of the destroying angel of rebellion.

        Resolved, that we predicate the hope of the success of our cause in God, and that we recommend to the members of our church everywhere to set apart monthly a day of fasting and prayer to Almighty God that he will vindicate our cause by his over-ruling providence in the affairs of the nation, that justice and judgment may triumph. All of which we respectfully submit.

J. J. Moore,
H. M. Collins,
Wm. B. Smith,
Edward Hall,
A. T. Rogers.


        Following these and other reports of committees was the statistical report, as follows:

        The number of members reported; In Zion


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Church, Stockton street, San Francisco, 118; in San Jose, 33; in Zion Church, Napa, 30; in Watsonville, 2. Sabbath School statistics: Zion Church, San Francisco, Superintendent, 1; teachers, 7; pupils, 87; volumes in library, 200. San Jose Church, superintendent, 1; teachers, 4; pupils, 24; volumes in library, 20. Napa Zion Church, superintendent, 1; teachers, 5; pupils, 30; volumes in library, 50.

        The Second Session of the Cal. Annual Conference convened in the Zion Church on Stockton street, San Francisco, Cal., November 10th, 1869, Rev. W. H. Hilliary, presiding elder of the conference district, in the chair. The session was opened by the usual religious ceremonies of reading the Scriptures, singing and prayer, after which the chairman, Rev. Hilliary, rose and read a letter from Rt. Rev. John D. Brooks of the California Conference District, expressing his deep regret that his feeble health would not allow him to be present to hold the conference; and therefore he had authorized Elder Wm. H. Hilliary to hold it and to act as president of the conference. The chairman, Elder Hilliary, then rose and addressed the meeting in an appropriate manner, subsequent to which Edward Hall was appointed Secretary of the conference, Thomas E. Gaines and J. F. Anderson, Assistant Secretaries. The roll being called showed the following members present:

        Elders, Wm. H. Hilliary Joshua B. Handy, Adam B. Smith, James M. Wilkinson; Preachers, Wm. Stevens, John F. Anderson, Edward Hall,


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Albert Elliot, Rebecca Bradford; Lay delegates, Henry M. Collins, Thomas E. Gaines.

        Following the calling of the roll the chairman appointed the necessary committees for the session. During a session of twelve days several important measures were passed and important resolutions adopted. The following were some of the resolutions passed during the sessions. (The 17th, 18, 19th and 22d were convened at San Jose, Cal.)

        Resolved, that we will ever pray the great Head of the Church to so rule in the affairs of the nation, whether by preaching or by the sword, that every man shall be acknowledged a man, and be placed upon perfect equality in all the privileges of a loyal citizenship.

        Resolved, that we, as ministers of the Gospel, shall never cease to lift our voices in defense of our oppressed people from the pulpit and the stump.

        Resolved, that we, as American citizens, will never rest contented until we are clothed with all the rights and privileges of loyal citizens of this republic.

J. M. Wilkinson,
J. B. Handy.


        Resolved, that it is the duty of every minister to take a general interest in the Sabbath-school under his charge, and to organize schools where there are none.

        Resolved, that the parents of children, especially-those connected with our societies, shall be urged to


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send their children to the Sabbath-school of our church.

        Resolved, that a quarterly concert be held in all of our schools, which shall consist of the reading of Scripture, singing, recitations and addresses.

        Resolved, that the third Wednesday evening of every third month be set apart for the concert, and that collections shall be lifted to assist the Sabbath School Library.

        Edw. Hall,
Thomas E. Gaines,
J. F. Anderson.


        The Finance Committee reported as follows:

        Missionary son and daughters of Clinton, $55.00; Public collections, $59.85; San Jose supper, $25.00; Bishop's money, Napa City, $10.00; Bishop's money, San Jose, $4.50; Total, $154.35.

        To disbursements as follows: Printing minutes, $47.00; Traveling expenses of ministers, $74.00; Compiling minutes, etc., $17.50; President of conference, $14.85; Total, $153.35.

        Number of members reported, 186; number of Sabbath-schools, 5; scholars, 147; volumes in libraries, 640; value of church property, $75,700.

        The Ninth Session of the Cal. Annual Conference convened in San Francisco, Cal., in Zion Church on Stockton street, March 21st, 1877, Bishop Wm. H. Hilliary presiding, who opened the session by reading a lesson from the 55th chapter of Isaiah, followed by singing and prayer. Subsequent to this


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the conference roll was called, consisting of the following members:

        Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Hilliary, Rev. J. F. Anderson, Secretary, Rev. Jenkins Williams, Assistant Secretary, Revs. J. B. Handy, A. C. Fisher, A. B. Smith, James M. Wilkinson; Lay delegates, Samuel E. Freeman, Wm. A. Mitchell, M. L. Davis, James Hargrove.

        After the appointment of the Secretaries, the Bishop arose and delivered his address, which was very interesting; it set forth the number of members in the Zion body, 225; itinerent preachers, 2,263; Sunday-school scholars and teachers, 49,700; all headed by seven episcopal officers or bishops. After the delivery of the address, conference tendered the Bishop a vote of thanks.

        The Tenth Session of the Cal. Annual Conference convened in San Francisco, March 21st, 1878, Bishop W. H. Hilliary presiding, Rev. J. F. Anderson Secretary. The number of ministers present, 10; lay delegates, 3; ministerial visitors, 3; number of members reported, 112; Sunday-schools, 4; scholars, 86; volumes in libraries, 680; officers and teachers, 14; value of church property, $46,000. The several committees were appointed, after which the Discipline Questions were entered upon. In the disposition of the third Discipline Question, Revs. J. B. Handy, A. C. Fisher and Jenkins Williams were admitted into full connection with the California Conference. The committee on statistics reported to


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the conference as follows: Number of members In San Francisco, 40; in San Jose, 27; in Portland Oregon, 16; in Napa, 17; Total, 100. Number of teachers, pupils and books in libraries of Sunday-schools: In San Francisco, teachers, 3; pupils, 24; volumes in library, 150; In San Jose, teachers, 4; pupils, 26; in library, 200 volumes; In Portland, Oregon, teachers, 4; pupils, 12; books in library, 150; in Napa City, teachers, 3; pupils, 24; in library, 189.

FLORIDA CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the Florida Annual Conference convened in Pensacola, April 22d, 1869, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Edward Johnson appointed Secretary. The number of preachers present, 13; ministerial delegates from other conferences, 2; lay delegates, 4; number of members reported, 348; Sunday-schools, 5; Scholars, 167; teachers and officers, 23.

        The Second Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, April 21st, 1870, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Solomon Derry, Secretary. The number of preachers present, 12; lay delegates, 5; numbers reported, 370; Sunday-schools, 7; scholars, 243. The conference closed after a six days session.


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        The Third Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, March 8th, 1871, Bishop Sampson D. Talbot presiding, Rev. A. C. Fisher, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 10; ministerial delegation from other conferences, 4; number of members reported, 445; Sunday-schools, 5; scholars, 250; officers and teachers, 14.

        The Fourth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Milton, Fla., Wednesday, March 6th, 1872, Bishop Sampson D. Talbot presiding, Rev. A. C. Fisher, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 13; number of members reported, 534; Sunday-schools, 5; scholars, 195; officers and teachers, 27.

        The Fifth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, March 4th, 1873; Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding, Rev. A. C. Fisher, Secretary. Bishop Talbot spoke of the growth of the various conferences; also spoke of the death of Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, the second bishop and one of the founders of the connection; he had departed this life since the last meeting of conference. Bishop Talbot in his address dwelt for some time also on the death of the lamented Bishop Loguen. The number of preachers in attendance, 14; number of members reported, 465; Sunday-schools, 6; scholars, 179; teachers and officers, 16; mission money, $268.35; value of church property, $11,754.00.

        The Sixth Session of the Florida Conference


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convened in Milton, March 3d, 1874, Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding, Rev. W. C. Vesta, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 16; ministerial delegation, 3; number of members reported, 575; Sunday-schools, 8; scholars, 235; officrs and teachers, 20.

        The Seventh Session of the Florida Conference convened in Key West, February 16th, 1875, Bishop Sampson D. Talbot presiding, Rev. Robert N. Andrews, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 31; lay delegates, 3; number of members reported, 978; Sunday-schools, 6; scholars, 287; volumes in libraries, 203; teachers and officers, 24.

        The Eighth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, February 21st, 1878, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 30; lay delegates, 5; ministerial delegation, 4; number of members reported, 1,006; Sunday-schools, 14; scholars, 702; officers and teachers, 55; volumes in libraries, 759; value of church property, $17,850.

        The Ninth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, February 13th, 1879, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 35; ministerial delegation, 11; lay delegation, 5; number of members reported, 1,128; Sunday-schools, 15; scholars, 834; volumes in libraries, 525; teachers and officers, 63; value of church property, $19,075.


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        The Tenth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, February 12th, 1878, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 40; ministerial delegation, 2; lay delegation, 4; number of members reported, 1,174; Sunday-schools, 18; scholars, 979; volumes in libraries, 518; mission money, $23.80; value of church property, $15,060.

        The Eleventh Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, February 11th, 1879, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 33; ministerial delegation, 3; lay delegates, 7; number of members reported, 1,179; Sunday-schools, 15; scholars, 834; volumes in libraries, 679; teachers and officers, 65; value of church property, $19,075.

        The Twelfth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Milton, February 9th, 1880, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 37; ministerial delegation, 2; lay delegation, 9; number of members reported, 1,054; Sunday-schools, 17; scholars, 904; volumes in libraries, 874; teachers and officers, 72; value of church property, $17,947.

        The Thirteenth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Jacksonville, February 8th, 1881, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. C. Vesta, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 38; number of members reported, 1,411; Sunday-schools, 17; scholars, 1,269; books in libraries, 802.


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        The Fourteenth Session of the Florida Conference convened in Pensacola, February 14th, 1882, Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., presiding, Rev. W. C. Vesta, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 28; ministerial delegation, 2; lay delegates, 11; number of members reported, 1,037; Sunday-school scholars, 895; officers and teachers, 96, mission money, $31.00, value of church property, $68,150.

BAHAMA ISLAND CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the Bahama Island Annual Conference convened in Nassau, December 26th, 1877, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 14; ministerial delegation, 4; lay delegation, 2; number of members reported, 190; Sunday-schools, 4; scholars, 129; volumes in libraries, 78; officers and teachers, 17.

        The Second Session of the B. I. Conference convened at Nassau, N. P., January 4th, 1878, Bishop J. P. Thompson, presiding, Rev. W. G. Strong appointed Secretary, Rev. Robert N. Andrews, Assistant Secretary. The following were the preachers in attendance:

        Elders, Joseph Sexton, James Harris, D. L. C. Carr; Deacons, David Thomas, John A. Bain, D. W. Martindell, R. N. Andrews; Ministerial delegation


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from Alabama, W. G. Strong, John A. Mulligan; Lay delegate, Tobias Steel.

        Committee of ladies that made provision for the support of the conference:

        Hester Tarrington, Mary McQueen, Jestina Musgrove, Dorotha Foulks, Maria Jordan, Sister Malcolm, Emma Curry, Jane Roker, Margaret Davis, Ida Brown, Sarah Deane, Jessie Rogers, Eliza Dorset, Jane Simlet, Mary Ann Andrews, Margretta Andrews, Sarah Robinson, Sarah Young.

        The number of members represented at this conference was 206; sunday-schools, 4; scholars, 129; teachers, 17; books in libraries, 78; value of church property, $3,200; mission money, $27.75. After five days interesting session, the conference adjourned, sine die, to meet at the Bishop's call at N. N. P. Nassau, Bahama Islands.

NEW JERSEY CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the New Jersey Annual Conference convened at Redbank, N. J., July 2d, 1874, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton, D. D., presiding bishop of the First Episcopal District, Rev. J. A. Right, Secretary. Number of preachers in attendance, 19; ministerial delegation, 2; members, 544; churches, 16; Sunday-schools, 8; scholars, 427; teachers, 47; books in libraries, 1,690.

        The Second Session of the N. J. Conference convened at Redbank, June 9th, 1875, Bishop J. J.


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Clinton presiding, Rev. James A. Wright, Secretary. Preachers in attendance, 15; number of members reported, 509 Sunday-schools, 14; scholars, 611; books in libraries, 4,312; value of church property, $95,470.

        The Fifth Session of the N. J. Conference convened in trenton, April 18th, 1878, Bishop J.J. Moore presiding, Bishop J.J. Clinton, Associate, Rev. John H. White, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 20; lay delegates, 9; number of members returned, 668; Sunday-schools, 27; scholars, 786; books in libraries, 3,317; mission money, $29.75; value of church property, $59,300.

        The Sixth Session of the N. J. Conference convened in Camden, April 16th, 1879, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. D. D. Brown, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 19; lay delegates, 9; number of members reported, 683; Sunday-schools, 19; scholars, 673; books in libraries, 3,076, mission money, $15.70; value of church property, $61,000.

        The Seventh Session of the N. J. Conference convened in Burlington, April 21st, 1880, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. J. H. White, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17; lay delegates, 8, number of members reported, 583; Sunday-schools, 15; scholars, 919; volumes in libraries, 2,087; mission money, $23.65; value of church property, $53,500.

        The Eighth Session of the N. J. Conference convened in Redbank, April 9th, 1881, Bishop J. J.


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moore presiding, Rev. J. G. Palmer, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 17, lay delegates, 11, number of members reported, 529, Sunday-schools, 18, scholars, 994, books in libraries, 2,572: mission money, $8.15, value of church property, $48,450.

        The Ninth Session of the N. J. Conference convened in Camden, April 19th, 1882, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. J. C. Palmer, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 19, lay delegates, 7, number of members reported, 636, Sunday-schools, 16; scholars, 674, books in libraries, 2,944, mission money, $8.00, value of church property, $58,500.

CANADA AND MICHIGAN CONFERENCE.

        The Third Session of the Canada and Michigan Annual Conference convened in Detroit, September 11th, 1879, Bishop T. H. Lomax presiding, Rev. J. R. Alexander, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 32; ministerial delegation, 2; number of members reported, 499; Sunday-schools, 5; scholars, 39; officers and teachers, 12; volumes in libraries, 87; value of church property, $13,900.

        The Sixth Session of the C. and M. Conference convened at Pontiac, Michigan, October 19th, 1882, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. William Chandler, appointed Secretary, J. Cornelius, Assistant Secretary. The session was opened by reading the 61st chapter


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of Isaiah, which was followed by singing and prayer. The roll was then called, and the following preachers answered to their names:

        Elders, David Butler, J. R. Alexander, R. M. Johnson, G. W. Gorden, J. C. Smith, T. T. Brown, G. W. Solomon, A. Wilson, J. Green, A. Lewis, S. Stevens, Wm. B. Campbell, H. M. Cephas; Deacons, T. J. C. Green, C. Mortimore, J. M. Jones, A. King, W. R. Robinson, D. P. Sisco, C. Smith, J. Cornelius, J. Wilmore; Preachers, Wm. Lyons, J. Conoway, Wm. E. Chandler, Amy Guy, William Ellis.

        The number of 346 members was reported, 10 Sunday-schools, 29 teachers, 204 pupils, 297 books in libraries. Value of church property, $10,750. Amount of funds reported collected of general tax and special collections, $126.00. After five days session the conference adjourned, to meet at New Canaan, Ontario, the second Wednesday in September, 1883.

GEORGIA CONFERENCE.

        The First Session of the Georgia Annual Conference convened and organized on Saturday, June 15th, 1867, at Trinity Church, Augusta, Georgia, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. Wilbur G. Strong, Secretary. Conference was opened with the usual religious exercises. The following ministers were present:

        Edward west, Robert Brown, Simeon Beal, Jeremiah


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Hayes, Edward Jones, Bustee Gould, Wm. Laws, John Roberts, Gaberiel Camchall, Silas Garry, Ezekiel Pioncer, Robert Kent, King Jones, John Salisbury, F. Smith, H. Mobly, Reuben Smith, R. Whitehead, Adam Palmer, Daniel Wesley, Cambridge Smith, John Jefferson, Joseph Smith, Tobias Hopkins, Tobias Williams, Edward Lacey, Buck Waine, Preston Hesbie, Robert Brown, Washington Harris, Morgan Brownfill, Frank Williams, Willam Williams, Jerry Wilson, Elisha Webb.

        The number of 3,472 members was reported, 5 Sabbath schools, 465 scholars. The conference adjourned after a session of five days. Before the second conference convened, Rev. Dr. West recanted and went back to the M. E. Church, carrying back 1,160 members.

        The Second Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Augusta, March 27th, 1868, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding, Rev. A. Anderson, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 43; number of members reported, 2,032; Sabbath-schools, 6; scholars, 682. The conference was in session five days.

        The third Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Augusta, March 17th, 1869, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. Peter Drayton, Secretary. The number of preachers in attendance, 33; number of members reported, 2,648; Sabbath-schools, 3; scholars, 340. The conference was in session five days.

        The Fourth Session of the Ga. Conference convened


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in Augusta, Ga., January 6th, 1870, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, Rev. J. H. McFarley, Secretary. There were 35 preachers in attendance, 2,984 members reported, 4 Sunday-schools, 475 scholars; $69.50, finances. The conference was in session six days.

        The Seventh Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Augusta, January 11th, 1873, Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding, Rev. P. Drayton, Secretary. There were 40 preachers in attendance, 3,020 members reported, 8 Sunday-schools, 632 scholars. The conference was in session five days.

        The Eighth Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Augusta, February 11th, 1874, Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding, Rev. B. Snowden was appointed Secretary. There were 45 preachers in attendance, 3,049 members reported, 9 Sunday-schools, 740 scholars. The conference was in session five days.

        The Ninth Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Monroe, December 1st, 1875, Bishop S. D. Talbot presiding. There were 48 preachers in attendance, 3,110 members reported, 11 Sunday-schools, 794 scholars. The conference was in session six days.

        The Tenth Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Augusta, December 6th, 1876, Bishop J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. Peter Drayton, Secretary. There were 48 preachers in attendance, 5,117 members reported, 14 Sunday-schools, 974 scholars. Money collected, $58.20. The conference was in session five days.


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The Eleventh Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Columbus, Ga., December 28th, 1877, Rt. Rev. J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. H. J. Thomas, Secretary. There were 48 preachers in attendance, 4,297 members reported, 15 Sunday-schools, 1,040 scholars, 20 volumes; money collected, $65.35. The conference was in session six days.

        The Twelfth Session of the Ga. Conference convened in Stone Mountain, November 27th, 1878, Rt. Rev. J. P. Thompson presiding, Rev. E. W. Gibson, Secretary. There were 44 preachers in attendance, 4,317 members reported, 17 Sunday-schools, 1,104 scholars. Conference was in session six days.

RECORDS OF ANNUAL CONFERENCES WANTING.

        We have not been able to secure the records of either the Arkansas, East Tennessee, West Tennessee, or Mississippi Conferences. If we can possibly secure them in time they will be noticed in the appendix with other conferences whose records we hope to get in time to notice. We have been able to give a brief account of seventeen annual conferences in the foregoing record.


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CHAPTER VII.

A SEPARATE ACCOUNT OF THE GENERAL CONFERENCES, GIVEN CONSECUTIVELY FROM 1840 UP TO THIS DATE, BEGINNING WITH THE FIFTH GENERAL CONFERENCE OF THE CONNECTION IN 1840.

        The Fifth General Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America met according to appointment in the Asbury Church on Elizabeth street.

        FIRST DAY SESSION. The session was opened by singing and prayer, followed by appropriate remarks from Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush. He alluded to the expiration of his term of office; his address was followed by remarks from a number of the members of the conference in reference to the close of his term of office. Subsequent to this the following resolution was passed:

        Resolved, that the Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush preside until a further stage of business. The roll of members being made out, the following reported themselves in answer to the call of their names:

        Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, Rev. John P. Thompson, Secretary, Rev. John A. King, Assistant Secretary, Revs. Timothy Eato, Jacob D. Richardson,


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Jacob Matthews, Peter Van Hass, Wm. H. Bishop, John Tappan, Dempsey Kenedy, John A. Williams, John Chester, George Garnett, Peter Ross, Jesse Kimble, Thomas James, Edward H. Bishop, John Liles; Delegates from the Philadelphia Annual Conference: Revs. Edward Johnson, Solomon T. Scott, G. Stevenson, George Galbreath, David Stevens, Leonard Collins, Bazil Mackall, Samuel Gray, Wm. Jones.

        The roll being called, the conference proceeded to appoint a committee on nomination of candidates for the episcopal office. On motion a committee of five was appointed, the members of which were instructed to report on the following Monday. Conference then adjourned by singing and benediction.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Monday morning, May 25th, 1840, conference convened at ten o'clock, Rt. Rev. Rush presiding. The session was opened by reading a portion of Scripture, singing and prayer. The committee on nomination of candidates for Superintendents reported. Their report was received and adopted, and the committee discharged. It was then by motion resolved that the conference go into an election of Bishops. There being three judges of the election appointed, the conference proceeded with the election. The successful candidate was Christopher Rush, who was declared duly elected to the office of Superintendent for the term of four years. It was then by motion resolved that the conference elect another Bishop. A committee


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of seven was appointed to make a nomination of candidates; Wm. Miller and Edward Johnson were nominated by these, and an election was held which resulted in twenty-five votes being cast for Wm. Miller, and eight votes for Edward Johnson; where-upon William Miller was declared elected Bishop. The conference then appointed a committee on the revision of the Discipline, which committee consisted of the following five brethren: Jehiel C. Beman, Leven Smith, Jacob Matthews, David Stevens, Solomon T. Scott. The conference then adjourned until Tuesday morning.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. Tuesday morning, May 26th, at 10 o'clock, the conference convened, Bishop Rush presiding, associated by Bishop Miller; it opened with the usual ceremonies; roll called, rules read, minutes of the previous session disposed of, the committee on the condition of the church reported a favorable condition of the same in general; embracing the two annual districts of Philadelphia and New York Conterences, an encouraging increase of preachers and laymen. The committee on revision of the Discipline then reported; their report was received, discussed and adopted. After a few valedictory remarks, the conference adjourned, to meet in Zion Church in New York the third Monday in June, 1844. Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, Senior Superintendent, Rt. Rev. William Miller, Junior Superintendent, John P. Thompson, Secretary, John A. King, Assistant Secretary.


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        The Sixth General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church convened in New York City, in Zion Church on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, May 18th, 1844, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop Wm. Miller; Rev. Sampson Talbot Secretary, Rev. John A. King, Assistant Secretary. The roll of members stood as follows:

        Wm. H. Bishop, James Simons, Timothy Eato, Henry Johnson, Peter Ross, George Garnett, Thomas James, John Lile, Noah Brooks, Sampson Talbot, Samuel Serrington, Dempsey Kenedy, Daniel Vandevier, David Blake, George Treadwell, John A. King, John Wells, John Tappan, Joseph Hicks, George A. Spywood, John A. Williams, Jehiel C. Beman, Richard Noyes, Benjamin Sims, Thomas Henson, John N. Mars, John P. Thompson, John Dungy, Peter Van Hass, Leven Smith, John C. Spence, Joseph P. Thompson, James Scott, James Myers; Pennsylvania delegation: David Stevens, Solomon T. Scott, Leonard Collins, Samuel T. Gray, Phillip P. Lum, Wm. Jones, Moses Gales, J. J. Clinton, J. J. Moore, Bazel Mackall, Wm. McFarland, George Stevenson, Abraham Cole, Edward Johnson, George Galbreath; Baltimore delegation: Jacob M. Moore, James Johnson, J. T. Butler, J. H. Jones.

        FIRST DAY SESSION. Conference was opened with the usual ceremonies and an appropriate address from Bishop Rush, with happy responses. The first important business of the session was the re-election of the Superintendents or Bishops. After some preliminaries


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for the episcopal election, the conference adjourned to meet Tuesday morning, the 21st.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Tuesday morning, May 21st, the conference convened, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding, associated by Bishop Wm. Miller. After the usual opening service, the conference proceeded to the election of the episcopal officers, which resulted in the election of Bishop Rush to the episcopal office. After the disposal of some ordinary business, the conference adjourned, to meet Wednesday morning, May 22d.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. Conference convened Wednesday morning, the 22d, Bishop Christopher Rush presiding. The General Book Steward made his report touching the condition of the Book Concern, after which arose the subject of electing another episcopal officer. The necessary preliminaries being arranged, the election of the second episcopal officer was proceeded with, which resulted in the election of Rev. Wm. Miller to the episcopal office for four years. The conference after six days session completed its work, and adjourned to meet May 29th, 1848, in the city of New York.

        The Seventh Session of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church convened according to appointment in the Zion Church, on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, in the city of New York, May 29th, 1848.

        FIRST DAY SESSION. The session was opened by Bishop Christopher Rush reading a portion of


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Scripture, followed by singing and prayer. The Bishop then addressed the conference in an approp iate and touching manner on the general interests of the connection; he also referred to the expiration of his term of office. It was then by motion resolved that Rev. John Dungy act as president pro tem. Rev. J. J. Moore was appointed Secretary pro tem. The names of the members of the conference were then called, being 46 in number. A committee of seven was appointed to nominate candidates for the episcopal office, which committee consisted of the following elders: S. T. Scott, S. T. Gray, Peter Ross, J. J. Moore, Edward Johnson, Wm. H. Bishop and J. J. Clinton. The conference then adjourned.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. May 30th, 1848, the conference convened according to adjournment, Rev. J. Dungy presiding. Conference was opened with the usual exercises; roll was called, previous minutes read and approved. The committee on nomination for Bishops then reported the candidates for Bishops, to wit: Christopher Rush, James Simmons, George Galbreath, and John P. Thompson. The report was received and adopted, and the committee discharged. On motion, Elder Wm. H. Bishop, George A. Spywood and Edward Johnson were appointed judges for the election of bishops. The conference then proceeded to elect the first Bishop, which resulted in the election of Rev. C. Rush. Conference then proceeded to elect the second Bishop, which resulted in favor of Rev.


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George Galbreath. The Bishops elect were conducted to their seats by three of the oldest elders in conference. They were then heartily congratulated by the members of conference. A very impressive address was then delivered by each of the Bishops elect on the confidence imposed on them, as indicated by the suffrage of their brethren, and alluded to the responsibility of their office, and assured them that there should be no lack of effort on their part to advance the interests entrusted to them as episcopal officers of the church, and asking their invocation of God's assistance in their work. The conference then proceeded to appoint a committee on the revision of Discipline and on the Rush Academy. At this General Conference, Bishop Galbreath was elected President of the Rush Academy. The general statistical report at this General Conference was very gratifying. It was at this conference that the Allegheny Annual Conference was set off, which held its first session on the third Saturday in August, 1849, which convened in the church on Second street, Allegheny City. This General Conference in its statistics reported from the four Annual Conference Districts, New York, Philadelphia, New England and Baltimore, 4 established Annual Conferences, 90 itinerent preachers, 6,352 members, and 2 bishops.

        The conference after several days of pleasant sessions adjourned, to meet in Wesley Church, on Lombard Street, Philadelphia, June 26th, 1852.

        Rev. Christopher Rush, Bishop, Rev. George


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Galbreath, Associate Bishop, Rev. J.J. Moore, Secretary, Rev. J.J. Clinton, Assistant Secretary.

        The Eighth Session of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church.--As the proceedings of this General Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America were never published, the following extract is copied from the original manuscript and can only be given with a few explanatory notes, published for the satisfaction of those who feel interested in our general affairs. It is to be regretted that we have not the last day's proceedings of the session. The following is a synopsis of this General Conference:

        FIRST DAY SESSION. The conference convened according to appointment in the Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, at 2 o'clock, P. M., June 26th, 1852, Bishop Christopher Rush in the chair, associated by Rt. Rev. George Galbreath. The session was opened in the usual manner; Rev. J. D. Brooks was chosen Secretary. After a few preliminary remarks from the presiding officer, the conference adjourned by singing and benediction.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Rev. Daniel Vandere was appointed the Recording Secretary, and Rev. Jesse Bolden, Assistant Secretary. Bishops Rush and Galbreath then vacated their chairs, and the conference resolved itself into a committee of the whole. Rev. D. Kenedy was called to the chair, associated by Rev. S. T. Gray.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. Rev. D. Kenedy presiding,


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the following committee was appointed to nominate candidates for the Superintendency. The following were the committee: Jacob Trusty, Simpson Talbot, Jos. Hicks, John Anderson, S. T. Jones, and John N. Mars. The committee withdrew, and business was suspended up to the hour of adjournment.

        FOURTH DAY SESSION. Rev. D. Kenedy presiding; the committee returning, reported as follows: Rev. Christopher Rush and Rev. George Galbreath for re-election to the episcopal office. After the usual preliminaries preparatory to election, the candidates were balloted for, which resulted in favor of Rev. George Galbreath, who was declared the elected Bishop, and was afterward conducted to the chair.

        FIFTH DAY SESSION. Rev. George Galbreath presiding. The committee withdrew to nominate candidates for the episcopal office; on returning, they reported Rev. James Simmons and Rev. Wm. H. Bishop; Rev. Simmons declined the nomination. The committee withdrew again, and after a short absence returned, reporting Rev. Solomon T. Scott and Rev. Wm. H. Bishop. These were balloted for, the result being in favor of Wm. H. Bishop, who was declared elected, and afterward conducted to the chair.

        SIXTH DAY SESSION. Rev. Galbreath presiding. A long discussion arose for a whole forenoon. Subsequently the whole proceedings of the preceding


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sessions respecting the Bishopric were declared illegal and contrary to the constitution. The discussion lasted until the close of the eighth day's session. At this session, so much of the resolution passed on Monday as referred to conference going into a committee of the whole was received, which was the cause of the Bishops leaving the chair.

        NINTH DAY SESSION. Bishop C. Rush presiding, a re-election was held for General Superintendent. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop and Rev. George Galbreath were balloted for; Rev. Wm. H. Bishop was elected, and was conducted to the chair, and received by Bishop C. Rush, who addressed him in some appropriate remarks, and resigned his seat. The committee then withdrew and renominated candidates for assistant superintendent, and on returning, reported Revs. George G lbreath and S. T. Scott, and on being balloted for, the result was in favor of Rev. George Galbreath, who was conducted to the chair and made appropriate remarks, stating at the same time that "he was placed in an envious position, and declined serving in the capacity he had in the previous term; but if a platform was made to suit the wants of the people, he would serve." Whereupon, the following resolution prevailed: Resolved, that we suspend the rule of General Superintendency for the time being. (See Journal, pp. 160, 163). This action was considered and maintained by a minority as a violation of the Discipline,


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and that therefore the whole course was illegal throwing the responsibility upon Superintendent W H. Bishop, for putting the resolution amidst remonstrances.

        TENTH DAY SESSION. In its action a resolution prevailed, that the Discipline be so altered that there be no General Superintendent, but that the Superintendents be equal in their respective conferences or dioceses.

        TWENTIETH DAY SESSION. The committee on the revision of the Discipline reported it so revised as to provide for the election of three Superintendents with equal prerogatives; and Rev. G. A. Spywood was elected the third episcopal officer; all of which action was considered by a large minority unconstitutional, and which for a short period resulted in a connectional breach; but through the wisdom of the leading ministers and Divine assistance, the breach was soon healed. For further information on the proceedings of this conference, vide General Conference Journal.

        The three Bishops thus elected were assigned the following districts: Wm. H. Bishop, the New York District, embracing the New York and Genesee Conferences and Canada West; George Galbreath, the Southern District, embracing the Philadelphia, Allegheny and Baltimore Conferences; G. A. Spywood, the Eastern District, embracing the New England, Nova Scotia, and British Guiana Conferences.


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        The Ninth Session of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church assembled according to appointment at the Zion Church on the corner of Church and Leonard streets, New York, on Thursday, at 2 o'clock, P. M., June 26th, 1856, Bishop G. A. Spywood presiding, associated by Bishop John Tappan, Rev. Samuel M. Giles chosen Secretary, Revs. Daniel Vandevier and J. W. Loguen chosen Assistant Secretaries. The conference having been opened by proper religious ceremonies, the roll of members was called with the following responses:

        Bishop G. A. Spywood, Bishop John Tappan, Bishop C. Rush, Rev. Samuel M. Giles, Secretary, Revs. D. Vandevier and J. W. Loguen, Assistant Secretaries; Wm. H. Decker, John C. Spence, Jas. Davis, Leven Smith, Noah Brooks, Peter Ross, Cyrus Booha, Joseph P. Thompson, George Garnett, of the New York Conference; Revs. George A. Spywood, Jos. Hicks, Samuel T. Gray, G. H. Washington, John F. Lloyd, John N. Mars, John A. Williams, Henry Barrian, of the New England Annual Conference, West Indies by proxy.

        There not being a quorum for business, the conference adjourned until Monday the 30th.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Monday, June 30th, at 10 o'clock, A. M., conference convened, Bishop Spywood presiding,; the house being organized, Bishop Spywood addressed the conference upon the important object for which they had assembled, alluding also to the difficulties of the last four years, referring


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to the connectional breach that had taken place in 1852, and urged the members of the conference to study the best interests of the connection and our people. After a brief interchange of sentiment, Rev. Christopher Rush introduced to the conference Rev. J. F. Wright of the Methodist Episcopal Church of Ohio, agent for the Ohio African University, and Rev. Dr. C. Adamson, an agent for an other institution. They were cordially received and a time set for hearing their cases; subsequently, a resolution prevailed for appointing a committee to nominate candidates for the Bishopric; this committee was appointed and consisted of the following members: Revs. Jos. P. Thompson, John Nilbars, Jos. Hicks, Wm. H. Decker, James Davis; these retired, and in proper time returned, and reported the candidates for election; their report being received, the following candidates were offered and balloted for for Bishops: Revs. G. A. Spywood and James Simmons for general, and Revs. John Tappan and S. T. Scott for associate Bishop. The election resulted in favor of Rev. James Simmons and S. T. Scott, respectively. These officers elect were conducted to their seats and each addressed the conference appropriately.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. Conference convened Tuesday, July 1st, 1856, Bishop James Simmons in the chair, associated by Bishop S. T. Scott. The conference being organized, the Revs. Wright and Adamson were granted a hearing in the interest of 18


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the institutions for which they were agents; these having addressed the conference at some length, their cases were referred to the committee on education, who reported as follows:

        We, your committee, do recommend to this General Conference the following subjects for consideration: 1. The institution called the Ohio African University, represented by Rev. J. F. Wright, is worthy of our attention. 2. That this conference appoint a committee of three to visit the agent of the institution and inquire on what terms a right may be secured. 3. That the conference inquire into the state of the funds of the Rush Academy. 4. Also, to require Rev. Rush to give this conference perfect understanding of the deed of the institution.

        The report was received and adopted.

        The next important subject brought before the General Conference was the Anti-slavery Question, which was considered and acted upon under the following preamble and resolutions, offered by Rev. J. N. Mars, to wit:

        WHEREAS, the whole nation is now agitated upon the great sin of American slavery, which is regarded as the sum of all villainies, it is time for every honest hearted man to define his position before the world either for or against this great moral evil. Upon this subject no neutral ground can be taken, for Christ says, "He that is not for me is against me." Therefore, the minister who evades or does not come


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on the side of liberty and the Gospel is not on the side of God. Therefore,

        Resolved, that it is the duty of the members of this General Conference to take a Gospel stand against the sin of slavery, as against all other sins, in teaching, preaching, praying and voting; and to let the world know that so long as this sin remains, and we live, we will, through God's help, be found on the side of the slaves, whether they be white or black; and, that our motto is and ever shall be, "Liberty and Freedom forever."

        WHEREAS, justice and truth is our motto, it is due then to every one who labors with us, and with pure motives for the advancement of the Redeemer's kingdom. We are taught in the Scriptures that it is our duty to do justly and render to every one his due; then we should remember with due regard the Revs. G. A. Spywood and John Tappan, who have labored hard for the good of the connection, amid the series of difficulties that have occurred the last three years; they were firm in their minds and true to their trust. During this long interval they have suffered much, with respect to both pecuniary embarrassments and strong opposition. There have been expressions made to other brethren who labored for the benefit and good of the connection; it is considered essential, also, that some expression should go forth from this conference to these brethren, as a tribute of the respect and regard we have for them.


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        Resolved, that we are under great obligation to Revs. Geo. A. Spywood and John Tappan for their indefatigable labors and faithful service rendered the last three years, as the executive officers of the connection, amid so many trying circumstance, that they are worthy of our highest esteem and regard, for we believe they did their best for the good of the connection.

        Resolved, that we tender to them a hearty vote of thanks for their ardent labors in the connection during their administration. We shall ever pray for their prosperity, that the blessing of God be upon them and that they be rewarded by a higher hand.

        Subsequently, Rev. Leonard Collins, of the Philadelphia Conference, appeared before this assembly and imparted the intelligence that the faction which had been severed for some time desired a reconciliation and a reunion, and wished to know upon what terms the conference would be willing to come for reconciliation; that it was the voice of the people, and that a large representation from the different districts had come for that purpose. He was instructed to bring their desire in writing, as the connection could not act on the subject otherwise (see Journal, p. 109.) Subsequent to this, the subject of the Ohio African University was taken up and action on the subject resulted in the following resolution:

        Resolved, that we, the General Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church, concur in the establishment of this university and will


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lend our influence and aid to promote its prosperity. (See Journal, pp. 131,132.)

        The next business of importance brought before the conference was the Rush Academy; for which, officers were elected of the following persons: For President, Rev. S. T. Scott; for Vice-Presidents, Revs. Joseph P. Thompson and George A. Spywood; Treasurer, Christopher Rush. On motion, a Board of Trustees was elected, to hold the property of the institution in trust for the African Methodist Episcopal General Conference. A committee was then appointed to investigate the affairs of the institution. It was resolved that the said Board of Trustees have a representation in the next General Conference of 1857. The conference then by resolution set off an Annual Conference in the province of Nova Scotia, to be held on the second Saturday of September, 1857, at 4 o'clock, P. M., in the Zion Church at Halifax, N. S. The Demerara Mission was then called up and after several letters from the mission were read, in which Rev. R. C. Henderson informed the conference that he could not be present, his term having expired he was not re-elected Superintendent of the mission. (See Journal, pp. 109, 135, 137, 138.) Thus after a session of fifteen days the conference closed sine die.

        The Tenth Session of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America convened according to appointment on Wednesday, May 30th,


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1860, in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Pa..

        FIRST DAY SESSION. The conference was organized with reading a portion of the 75th Psalm by Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop, singing, and prayer by Rev. Superintendent J. J. Clinton. Subsequently, Rev. Wm. F. Buttler was elected Secretary. After this the following roll of members was announced:

        New York Delegation, ministerial: Rt. Rev. Christopher Rush, Leven Smith, John P. Thompson, John Tappan, Joseph P. Thompson, Wesley C. Marshall, Wm. H. Decker, John Wells, Cyrus Booha, Jacob Trusty, Allen Posey, J. W. Loguen, George Treadwell, Edward H. Bishop, Henry A. Thompson, Wm. H. Moore, Isaac Coleman, Jacob Thomas, Wm. McFarland, James Howell, Jeptha Barcroft, Wm. H. Pitts, Thomas Davis, Josiah J. Long, James Myers, Samuel T. Gray, Moses Manning, Otho J. Scott, Alfred Lawrence, James Davis, Peter Coster, John G. Urling, Samuel J. Wilson; Rush Academy Committee: Samuel M. Giles, Jos. P. Thompson, John P. Thompson, Alex. Posey, General Conference Fund Agent, J. B. Trusty, Rush Academy Agent, Wm. H. Bishop, Treasurer of General Conference Fund; Officers of Sabbath School Union: John P. Thompson, President, S. T. Jones, Charles Carter, Isaac J. Whiting, Wm. Sanford, S. M. Giles, Richard Tompkins, Vice-Presidents; James A. Jones, Secretary, Wm. F. Butler, Cor. Secretary, Alex. Posey, Treasurer; Officers of the Literary


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Society: Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton, President, Rt. Rev. Peter Ross and Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop, Vice-Presidents, Wm. F. Butler and R. R. Morris, Secretaries, James A. Jones, Cor. Secretary, Joseph P. Thompson, Treasurer; Committee on Revision: S. T. Jones, Richard Tompkins, Jno. Thomas, John P. Thompson, David Stevens, Wm. H. Decker, Charles J. Carter, John D. Brooks; Board of Home and Foreign Missions: George A. Spywood, President, Samuel M. Giles, Secretary, John F. Lloyd, Cor. Secretary, Clinton Leonard, Treasurer, R. R. Morris, G. H. Washington and Jos. G. Smith, Committee, Edward Matthew; Lay delegation: Wilbur G. Strong, Plato Gale, Josiah Bidwell, Isaac Deyo, Peter Hackins; Phila. ministerial delegation: John D. Brooks, S. T. Jones, John A. William, H. H. Blackstone, John Anderson, Wm. Young, Abner Bishop, James A. Jones, George Johnson, John J. Moore, Thomas A. Castor; Lay delegation: David Johnson, John E. Price; Southern ministerial delegation: J. P. Hamer, S. G. Golden, Abraham Cole, Robert Squirrel; Lay delegation: J. H. Butler, Richard Tompkins; Allegheny ministerial delegation: Prince G. Laws, Charles Wright, Peter B. Fulman, W. N. Williams, Isaac Whiting, Wm. Johnson, Amos Hammond, D. B. Matthew, Thomas James, David Stevens; New England ministerial delegation: Sampson Talbot, George A. Spywood, Peter Ross, Joseph Hicks, John William, George H. Washington, John F. Lloyd, Clinton Leonard, Jos.


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G. Smith, Gabriel Rice, R. C. Henderson; Genesee ministerial delegation: Basil Mackall, R. T. Eastep, John Thomas, George Bowsley, Wm. A. Cromwell, Christopher Renjah, James H. Smith, James J. Scott; Canada ministerial delegation: Joseph Sinclair, Charles J. Carter, R. Johnson, John B. Cox, W. H. Crawford.

        The roll being completed, Rev. Superintendent Wm. H. Bishop rose and addressed the conference, referring to God's gracious providence that had brought them together, after which a brief interchange of sentiment took place between the members. The several committees being appointed, as on credentials, devotion, finances, et cetera, (see list of committees in appendix), Rev. S. Talbot read a memorial eminating from a convention held at Newburg, May 30th, 1860, composed of New York Annual Conference of the two separate bodies of the connection, caused by the connectional breach, which memorial contained propositions for reunion. After the document was read, notice was given that it would be brought up at the opening of the next session. The conference according to adjournment, convened Thursday, May 31st, 1860.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Being organized in due form, the Superintendents presiding alternately, the first business was the consideration of the memorial on reunion. The document being read, after some congratulatory remarks from Bishop Pain, of the Bethel Church, on the prospect of a reunion, he being


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a visitor to the conference, a motion prevailed that the representatives of the convention be received in the conference as honorary members, after which a motion was made that the memorial on reunion be received and adopted by sections, which motion caused a tedious discussion, which extended beyond the present sitting.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. Friday morning, June 1st, 1860, conference convened according to adjournment. Being organized as usual, the question of reunion was resumed and finally adopted as a whole, which was a matter of great rejoicing. Rev. S. T. Gray having arrived from New York during the discussion of the question of reunion, and being introduced to the conference, presented his credentials as a representative of Zion Church, New York, with a letter from that church informing the conference that they could have the church to hold the General Conference in on the 6th of June, 1860. Following this the conference adjourned un il Saturday, June 2d, '60.

        FOURTH DAY SFSSION. Conference convened according to adjournment, being organized, proceeding with its ordinary business, adjourning and meeting each succeeding day up to the 5th of June, 1860; at the close of the session of that day, when the hour of adjournment arrived, on motion the conference adjourned to meet at New York, Wednesday, June 6th, 1860.

        SEVENTH DAY SESSION. The General Conference of the entire connection of the African Methodist


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Episcopal Zion Church assembled according to arrangement in Zion Church, corner of Church and Leonard streets, New York, at 4 P. M., to consummate the union of the two bodies which for some misunderstanding had been separated, Rt. Revs. Bishop and Clinton presiding. But the organization was delayed in consequence of the absence of Bishop Simmons and Bishop Scott; Rev. Rush entered half an hour after the time appointed and announced that Rev. Simmons had been taken ill suddenly and was therefore unable to attend, but he could not account for the absence of Rev. Scott. A suggestion was offered that the vacancy be supplied pro tem., but was over-ruled as not being necessary. After a brief interchange of sentiment on the subject, a motion prevailed that we proceed to organize the General Conference. The conference was then organized by Rt. Rev. Bishop, who read a portion of Scripture, followed by singing, and prayer offered by Bishop Clinton. Rt. Rev. Bishop then addressed the brethren with a few pathetic remarks respecting the object for which we had assembled, the interest we should manifest, and the prospects many realized from the consummation of this union. He expressed his desire that we might be cemented together in that bond of affection that may never be severed. Rev. Tappan made an inquiry respecting the conference whether we were to proceed to business independent of any other conference or not. A misunderstanding being apparent, the delegates of the convention


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requested the privilege to withdraw to take the matter into consideration, as they were the proper ones to decide that question. The house acceded to the proposal and the delegates withdrew. After half an hour's absence the delegates returned and upon motion reported as follows:

        Resolved, that the General Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Connection commence this day, 6th of June, 1860, under the Discipline of 1851.

        This not being satisfactory, Rev. Gray proposed on motion that the convention make a full report, which, preceeding the resolution previously given, was read as follows:

THE BASIS.

        SECTION 1. That all matters pertaining to the former difficulties be laid aside forever.

        SEC. 2. That these parties agree to use both books of Discipline until the sitting of the General Conference of 1860, and at the assembling of the General Conference to proceed to organize upon the Discipline suitable to the wants of the people or connection.

        SEC. 3. That this connection recommend the General Conference under Rt. Rev. W. H. Bishop, which is to meet in Philadelphia an May 30th, 1860, that they adjourn to meet in New York at Zion Church, on the 6th day of June, 1860, where the union will be consummated.--And be it further


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resolved that we recommend the election of the Bishop and the revision of the Discipline until the union is effected. Resolved that this convention recommend the New England Conference under the Rt. Rev. James Simmons, which is to meet on the 2d day of June, 1860, to adjourn to meet again to complete the unfinished business of the conference, after the General Conference or the reunion is consummated.

        SEC. 4. Resolved, that we cordially invite the two superintending Bishops with their assistants to meet the adjourned General Conference which re-assembles in New York the 6th of June, at 4 o'clock, P.M., to assist in consummating the union.

        SEC. 5. Resolved, that nothing in the foregoing basis be so construed as to interfere with the privilege of any of the members of the General Conference.

        SEC. 6. Resolved, that, as a convention, we stand united on the foregoing basis.


        After reading the report, it was on motion received and adopted; this created a great sensation; the delegates arose and embraced each other, which was followed by the entire conference, amid singing and great ecstacy and shaking of hanks, lasting ten minutes Quiet being restored, the following Secretaries were appointed: Wm. F. Butler, Samuel M. Giles, R. R. Morris, Wm. Sanford, W. G. Strong. Conference adjourned until Thursday, June 7th, 1860, after which the necessary committees were appointed.


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        The conference proceeded in the usual routine of business of ordinary interest up to the eleventh day of its session, June 11th, 1860, when it went into an election of Bishops. A committee on nomination, which had been appointed at the previous session, announced that they were ready to report, and on motion their report was heard; not being satisfactory, it was referred back to them. Subsequently, the committee reported on nomination, and being divided, they presented majority and minority reports. The majority report was read, presenting as candidate for the Bishopric Peter Ross, Wm. H. Bishop, Samuel M. Giles, Joseph J. Clinton; the minority report presented as nominees Jno. D. Brooks, Peter Ross, S. M. Giles, S. T. Jones. After a spirited discussion the majority report was adopted, and J. A. Williams, J. D. Brooks and C. J. Carter were chosen as judges of the election. Conference then adjourned until the following day.

        TWELFTH DAY SESSION. Tuesday, June 12th, 1860, conference convened and opened according to form; the election was proceeded with and resulted in favor of Revs. Peter Ross and Jos. J. Clinton as Bishops for the ensuing four years. The next important business of the conference was the arrangement of the episcopal districts; for this a committee on districts was appointed. It was in this conference on motion decided that the words General Superintendent and Assistant, as prefixed to the word Superintendent, be stricken out; which motion


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was made by the Rev. R. T. Gray. The committee on episcopal districts reported, arranging the episcopal districts as follows:

        FIRST, Western District, including Allegheny, Genesee and Canada Annual Conferences.

        SECOND District, including the Southern and Philadelphia Annual Conferences.

        THIRD, Northeastern District, including New York and New England Annual Conferences.

        The report was received and adopted, which made the election of another Bishop necessary. The conference chose the candidates: Revs. Wm. H. Bishop and John D. Brooks. The judges resumed their seats, and the balloting resulted in the election of Rev. Wm. H. Bishop. The conference continued the work of revising the Discipline and other matters of contingent nature until Friday, June 15th, 1860, when the committee on districting the Bishops reported as follows:

        FIRST YEAR.--FIRST District, J. J. Clinton; SECOND District, Wm. H. Bishop; THIRD District, Peter Ross.

        SECOND YEAR.--FIRST District, Wm. H. Bishop; SECOND District, Peter Ross; THIRD District, J. J. Clinton.

        THIRD YEAR.--FIRST District, Peter Ross; SECOND Distric , J. J. Clinton; THIRD District, Wm. H. Bishop.

        FOURTH YEAR.--FIRST District, J. J. Clinton;


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SECOND District, Wm. H. Bishop; THIRD District, Peter Ross.

        The above report was received and adopted, after which the conference adjourned until Tuesday the 18th of June, 1860, when it convened and closed sine die.

        The Eleventh Se sion of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church convened Wednesday, May 25th, 1864, in Wesley Church on Lombard street, Philadelphia, Pa., Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop in the chair.

        FIRST DAY SESSION. Conference was organized by reading the 54th and 122d Psalms, followed by singing the hymn, "All praise to our redeeming Lord, who joins us by his grace," and prayer by Rev. John H. Williams. The presiding Bishop addressed the conference, alluding to the providence of God in permitting us to assemble for deliberation upon matters touching the welfare of the Church and the duty obligatory upon its members; in concluding he expressed a desire that prosperity might attend our efforts. Rev. Wm. F. Butler was appointed Secretary of the General Conference. Rt. Rev. W. H. Bishop, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton.

        New York Conference: Revs. Christopher Rush, Joseph P. Thompson, John Tappan, Wesley C. Marshall, Wm. H. Decker, John Wells, W. H. Pitts, D. Kenedy, M. Manning, Josiah Long, C. Leonard, J. Myers, George Treadwell, Edward H. Bishop, Isaac Coleman, Jacob Thomas, Wm. Mc Farland,


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Jeptha Bancroft, James Simmons, Peter Costar, Gabriel Rice, John G. Urling; Noble Johns, Jacob Jordans, Wm. Brooks.

        New England Conference: Revs. G. A. Spywood, George H. Washington, Joseph G. Smith, Wm. F. Butler, Peter Ross, John Lloyd, James W. Hood, Samuel Giles, Nathaniel Stubbs, John Williams, Silas A. Mitchell, Thomas A. Davis, Henry Dumpson.

        Philadelphia Conference: Revs. Jacob B. Trusty, S. T. Scott, H. H. Blackstone, George Johnson, John W. Green, Jacob Anderson, Thomas Harris, Sampson Talbot, William Young, J. J. Moore, C. J. Carter, David Stevens.

        Allegheny Conference: Revs. Robert A. Gibson, Robert Squirrel, Isaac Gaseway, W. Nelson Williams, Abraham Cole, Jeremiah Bowman, Joseph Hicks, Prince G. Laws, Isaac J. Whiting, Wm. H. Johnson, D. B. Matthews, Joseph Armstrong, John B. Cox, Wm. Hamilton, John Holliday, James A. Jones.

        Genesee Conference: Henry Johnson, Hezekiah Butler, Henry Davis, Thomas James, William Sanford, George Bosley, Richard T. Eastep, Basil McKoll, John Thomas, Wm. Cromwell, Jeremiah Loguen, James Smith, Shadrach Golden, Wm. Brooks.

        Southern Conference: Revs. R. H. G. Dyson, J. A. Williams, Wm. T. Biddle, J. P. Hamer, J. D. Brooks.


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        Lay delegation: Philip Buchanan, Philadelphia; William Wilson, Washington; George Brooks, Washington; Edward Hill, New Berne; Plato Gale, Oyster Bay; James T. Butler, Baltimore; John J. Smith, Boston; Mr. Pulpress, Allegheny.

        The following were the committees appointed:

        On Devotion: J. B. Trusty, S. T. Scott; on Finance: J. B. Trusty, Jos. G. Smith, Robert Dyson; Lay delegations: R. H. Dyson, J. W. Green, Gabriel Rice; Business: Geo. A. Spywood, John A. Williams, J. W. Loguen, Gabriel Rice; Slavery: J. W. Loguen, J. W. Hood, J. P. Hamer; Missions: S. T. Jones, S. Talbot, C. J. Carter; Boundries: J. D. Brooks, H. Johnson, J. A. Jones, S. M. Giles, J. B. Trusty; Sabbath Schools: Wm. Sanford, G. H. Washington, J. Anderson; Temperance: J. C. Carter, N. H. Williams, J. Hicks; Education: Wm. F. Butler, S. T. Jones, J. D. Brooks; Discipline Revision: S. M. Giles, S. T. Jones, J. D. Brooks, John Thomas, C. J. Carter, Sampson Talbot; Book Concern: S. Talbot, J. W. Loguen, R. A. Gibson; State of the Country: S. T. Jones, S. Talbot, J. W. Loguen, Wm. F. Butler, J. A. Jones; Rush Academy: Jos. P. Thompson, S. M. Giles, S. Talbot; on Union: S. T. Jones, S. Talbot, J. D. Brooks, J. W. Loguen, G. H. Washington, Prince G. Laws, Isaac Coleman, J. P. Hamer; Points of Law: J. D. Brooks, S. T. Jones, S. Talbot, James A. Jones, S. M. Giles; on Reserves: J. W. Hood, S. M. Giles, W. F. Butler; on Rules, W. F. Butler, Dempsey Kenedy, S. T.


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Jones, Sampson Talbot, James A. Jones, S. M. Giles; on Salary: W. F. Butler, S. T. Jones, Wm. Wilson; on Districts: J. B. Trusty, G. H. Washington, D. Kenedy, S. T. Jones, John Thomas, Peter Ross, C. J. Carter, R. A. Gibson, J. A. Williams; Reporter: J. D. Brooks.

UNION OF A. M. E. CHURCH AND A. M. E. Z. CHURCH.

        It being deemed expedient that the proceedings of the General Conference should be published in the public journals, it was thereupon on motion resolved that the proceedings of the General Conference be published in the Philadelphia Press, the Inquirer, the Christian Recorder, and Anglo-African.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Conference convened and was opened in the usual manner. The first business brought up was the report of the committee on union of the two bodies: the A. M. E. Z. Church and the A. M. E. Church. Report was as follows:

        At a meeting of a joint committee consisting of nine members with the bench of Bishops from the A. M. E. General Conference and nine members with the bench of Bishops or Superintendents from the A. M. E. Zion General Conference.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. Conference met according to appointment in Bethel Church, Sixth street, Philadelphia, Friday evening, May 27th, 1864. The meeting was organized by Bishop Clinton with singing and prayer; Bishop J. D. Brooks was called to the chair; Revs. J. M. Brown and J. P. Hamer were


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chosen Secretaries. After deliberation it was decided that this should be a formal meeting. The object of the meeting was stated, whereupon the proceedings of the committee who originated the matter in the A. M. E. General Conference were read, but the resolutions in those proceedings not being sufficiently full, they were laid upon the table, and the matter referred to the following committee: Revs. Birch, S. T. Jones, J. H. Williams, J. W. Loguen, S. M. Giles; these persons were instructed to draw up resolutions expressing the sentiments of the joint committee on the subject. The committee withdrew, and after an absence of half an hour returned and reported as follows:

REPORT OF SUB-COMMITTEE.

        WHEREAS, the committee of the A. M. E. Zion and the A. M. E. General Conferences met in joint committee, and having interchanged sentiments on the great question of union between the bodies represented by them; therefore,

        Resolved, that it is the opinion of this meeting that the great question of consolidation may be safely committed to a convention to consummate a union upon a basis which will be satisfactory to all concerned.

        Resolved, that it is the sense of this joint committee that such a convention be held in the city of Philadelphia, commencing on the second Tuesday in June, 1864, in Wesley Church on Lombard Street,


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at 10 o'clock, A. M., and that twenty-five delegates from each connection shall compose said convention; and the result of said convention shall be submitted to the Annual Conferences of both Churches, and if agreed to by a majority of each, shall be final; all of which is respectfully submitted.


        Rev. J. W. Hood offered the following preamble and resolution:

        WHEREAS, It is indispensably necessary that the minds of the people of both organizations be prepared for the important event contemplated; therefore,

        Resolved, that a committee of three be appointed to issue an address to the churches through the columns of the Christian Recorder and the Anglo-African, setting forth clearly the object for which the convention is called.

        The above resolution having prevailed, the following committee was appointed, viz: J. W. Hood, S. T. Jones, E. Weaver. The privilege of appointing delegates for the convention, after being briefly discussed, was finally by motion referred to the General Conference to elect them. The meeting then adjourned.

        J. D. Brooks, Chairman, J. P. Hamer, Secretary; S. T. Jones, J. W. Loguen, P. G. Laws, Sampson Talbot, G. H. Washington, J. Coleman, J. W. Hood, J. D. Brooks, J. P. Hamer; Reserves, S. M. Giles, W. F. Butler, J. Williams.

        After brief and spirited deliberation, the report was received and adopted. The following were appointed


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delegates to meet the aforesaid convention:

        New York Conference: Revs. Wm. H. Pitts, Jeptha Bancroft, Isaac Coleman, Jacob Thomas.

        Philadelphia Conference: Revs. Sampson Talbot, S. T. Jones, Charles Carter, J. B. Trusty.

        New England Conference: Revs. S. M. Giles, G. H. Washington, W. F. Butler, J. W. Hood.

        Southern Conference: Revs. J. D. Brooks, J. P. Hamer, R. H. Dyson, J. A. Williams.

        Allegheny Conference: Revs. A. Cole, James A. Jones, J. B. Cox.

        Genesee Conference: Revs. J. W. Loguen, William Sanford, J. H. Smith.

        Reserves: J. P. Thompson, N. Y. C., Jacob Anderson, Phila. C., G. E. Spywood, N. E. C., R. A. Gibson, South. C., P. G. Laws, Allegheny C., John Thomas, Gen. C.

        The next business before the conference was a resolution for the establishment of an agricultural organization by Rev. G. A. Spywood. Referred to the committee on State of the Country. The Bishops were requested to address the conference in reply to Rev. Ross; in compliance therewith the Rt. Rev. Bishop addressed the conference, saying that there was the best of feelings between him and his associates. Bishop Clinton indorsed the sentiments of his associate, and at some length gave an explanation of some incidental occurrences in the Bishopric and regretted that anything had been said by his associate so as to induce the necessity of a reply.


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        The address was received with satisfaction by the brethren. Thus ended the third day session.

        FOURTH DAY SESSION. Conference assembled at the appointed hour and the Bishops resumed their seats. It was opened in the usual manner. A discussion upon the union was inaugurated from a remark made by some of the lay delegates, who deemed it essential that some instruction should be given the delegates in order that they might know what course to adopt. The question produced considerable excitement. Rev. Jones argued that the General Conference had no right to instruct the delegates, but should submit the matter to the judgment of the delegates, who are fully capable of guarding the interests of the connection. The discussion was interrupted by a telegram from Washington, D. C., informing the house of the dangerous illness of Dr. S. T. Gray. Rev. S. T. Jones resumed his remarks, and asserted that the General Conference had no right to discuss the matter or to dictate to the delegates what to do, or in any way forestall the matter, but await the decision of the convention, which would be submitted to the Annual Conference of each body, whose action should be final. The opponents of the course alluded to by the previous speaker urged that it was essential to discuss the matter, because in this convention there were no lay delegates admitted, and at the Annual Conferences their privileges were limited; hence it was only in the General Conference where the right of expressing


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themselves was allowed. If then no representation in the convention is allowed, no privilege granted them to free their minds, and the terms agreed upon in the convention, ratified by the Annual Conferences, did not suit the laity, they could not be compelled to yield to what may prove detrimental to their interests. The discussion continued one hour, when it was arrested and over-ruled by the following circumstance: A second dispatch was received from Washington, D. C., announcing the death of Rev. S. T. Gray. In respect to his memory, conference adjourned until 2 o'clock, P. M.

        After a brief session in the afternoon, conference adjourned until Thursday morning.

        FIFTH DAY SESSION. Thursday, June 2d, 1864, conference again convened according to adjournment, Bishop J. J. Clinton in the chair, and who presented the episcopal address, in which he referred to the union of the two connections; subsequent to which a resolution prevailed that there be four Bishops elected instead of three. A committee having been appointed to nominate the candidates for the episcopal office and having retired, during their absence an arrangement was made to have the remains of Rev. S. T. Gray brought to Philadelphia for interment. After some further business the conference adjourned.

        SIXTH DAY SESSION. Friday, June 3d, conference again convened and opened with its usual order of exercises; the session was occupied with business


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of an ordinary nature during the session, adjourning at the usual hour, to meet on the following morning.

        SEVENTH DAY SESSION. Saturday morning, June 4th, conference accordingly convened. During this session, which was short, little beyond making arrangements to inter the body of Rev. S. T. Gray was done. Conference then adjourned, to meet the following Monday, June 6th, 1864.

        EIGHTH DAY SESSION. Monday morning according to adjournment conference again met, and thence forward meeting and adjourning each succeeding day up to the 17th of June, 1864, during which time they considered the subjects of temperance, Sabbath-schools, education, slavery, state of the country, the Civil War and the colored people's relation to it; and among other reports was the report of the committee on boundries, as follows:

         I. The New York Conference,--to embrace all that part of the state of New Jersey lying north of the Raritan River, and that part of the state of New York lying east of the Hudson River, including that portion of the state of Connecticut not comprised in the New England Conference, and, also, that part of the state of New York lying west of the Hudson River, bounded by a line commencing at the city of Albany and running southwesterly to the Pennsylvania State line and the British Guiana Mission.

         II. The Philadelphia Conference,--to embrace the state of Delaware and all that part of the state of New Jersey south of the Raritan River, and all that


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portion of the state of Pennsylvania east of Big Valley, including Lewistown; Montrose and Wilkesbarre excepted.

         III. The New England Conference,--to embrace Bermuda, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and all the New England states, except that part of Connecticut lying west of Stamford, until such time as those points in the British Provinces may warrant the resuscitating or setting off a separate annual conference.

         IV. The Baltimore Conference, (formerly called the Southern Conference),--to embrace the state of Maryland, District of Columbia, states of Western Virginia and Kentucky, and all that part of Eastern Virginia north of the James River, including the city of Richmond.

         V. The Allegheny Conference,--to embrace all that part of the state of Pennsylvania lying west of Big Valley, including the states of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, Kansas and Iowa.

         VI. The Genesee Conference,--to embrace all that part of the state of New York not comprised in the New York Conference, including Montrose and Wilkesbarre in the state of Pennsylvania.

         VII. The North Carolina Conference,--to embrace the state of North Carolina, Tennessee, and all that part of Virginia south of the James River or the city of Richmond.

        VIII. The California Conference,--to embrace Upper California and all that part of Lower California


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belonging to the United States, and adjacent Territories.

        IX. The Louisiana Conference,--to embrace those states south of the North Carolina Conference.

        All of which is most respectfully submitted, signed by the committee of ministers:

J. D. Brooks,
G. H. Washington,
J. C. Smith,
Philip Buchanan,
J. H. Hood,
Sampson Talbot,
E. H. Hill,
S. M. Giles.


        Following this was the report of the committee on districting the Bishops, which was as follows:

        First District, New York and New England Conferences: Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop; Second District, Philadelphia and Genesee Conferences: Rt. Rev. J. D. Brooks; Third District, Baltimore and Allegheny Conferences: Rt. Rev. Sampson Talbot; Fourth District, North Carolina, Louisiana and California Conferences: Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton.

        Following the districting of the Bishops were the appointments of the General Conference officers, as follows:

        General Book Steward: Isaac Coleman; Trustees of the Book Operations: S. T. Jones, Wm. H. Decker, Wm. H. Pitts, Jeptha Bancroft, and Jacob Thomas; Officers of Rush academy:--Committee: S. Talbot, J. P. Thompson, Samuel M. Giles; Treasurer: Christopher Rush; Trustees: Jos. P. Thompson, John Tappan, J. W. Loguen, J. H. Smith, Wm.


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Sanford, John Thomas, Edward V. Clark, John Durnel, Henry Travis, Samuel J. Howard, Christopher Brown, James Stockley; Officers of Sabbath Union:--President: Samuel M. Giles; Vice-Presidents: Wm. H. Bishop, S. Talbot, J. J. Clinton, J. D. Brooks; Secretary: Wm. H. Butler; Treasurer: Peter Ross; Standing Committee: G. H. Washington, J. Thomas, G. A. Spywood.

AUXILIARY FINANCIAL STATISTICS.

        The next business of the conference was the report of the financial receipts for the General Conference:

        
Daughters of Conference, Phila., $35.00
Sons and daughters of Trusty, 52.00
Sabbath School at Allegheny City, 5.00
Missionary daughters of Miller, Phila., 20.00
Daughters of Clinton, Phila., 35.00
Sabbath School, Wesley Church, Phila., 10.00
From church collections:
St. Louis, Mo., Church, 5.50
Mission Church, Allegheny City, 5.00
Cranton, R. I., 5.00
Worcester, Mass., 1.00
Providence, R. I., 8.00
John Wesley, Washington, D. C., 10.00
Newburn, N. C., 5.00
Hartford, Conn., 4.00
Middletown, Conn., 2.00
Boston, Mass., 8.00


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        From places not named:

        
By J. Bancroft, 2.00
By John Thomas, 2.00
By John A. Williams, 1.00
By J. W. Loguen, 1.00
By B. Mackall, 2.00
By Wm. H. Pitts, 2.00
By Wm. Sanford, 1.00
By Henry Johnson, 1.00
New York Conference:
Daughters of Conference, New Burgh, 11.00
United daughters of Conference, New York, 60.00
Benevolent daughters, New York, 54.00
Total, 125.00
Daughters of Conference, Hartford 35.00
Daughters of Zion, Bridgeport, 10.00
Juvenile Missionary, Bridgeport, 1.00
Juvenile Sinking Fund, New Bedford, 5.00
Daughters of Conference, 3.00
Juvenile Mission Fund, New Haven, 3.00
Daughters of Conference, Providence, 30.00
Daughters of Clinton, Bridgeport, 10.00
Daughters of Conference, Boston, 18.00
Daughters of Conference Norwich, 5.00
Daughters of Zion, Hartford, 6.50
Daughters of Salem, Bridgeport, 10.00
Sabbath-school, Boston, 2.50
Sabbath-school, Bridgeport, 1.00
Total, 140.00


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        Philadelphia Conference:

        
Sabbath-school, Chambersburg, 10.00
Daughters of Conference, Philadelphia, 35.00
Daughters of Clinton, Philadelphia, 35.00
Daughters of Miller, Philadelphia, 20.00
Sons and daughters of Trusty, 54.00
Total, 154.00
Genesee Conference:
Daughters of Conference, Baltimore, 8.00
Daughters of Conference, Wes. Z. Ch., Wash., 27.00
Daughters of Conference, John Wes. Ch., Wash., 20.00
Total, 55.00

        Following the preceeding were the general statistics as now presented:

        The general statistics of the General Conference of 1864, from seven Annual Conferences.--Report of preachers:

        
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In the New York District, traveling and local preachers, 146
In the New England District, traveling and local preachers, 29
In the Philadelphia District, traveling and local preachers, 77
In the Allegheny District, traveling and local preachers, 55
In the Genesee District, traveling and local preachers, 37
In the Baltimore District, traveling and local preachers, 19
In the North Carolina District, traveling and local preachers, 10

        
Report of members and probationers:
MEM. PRO.
In the New York District, 3,826 500
In the New England District, 1,126 64
In the Philadelphia District, 2,262 346
In the Allegheny District, 779 96
In the Genesee District, 750 5
In the Baltimore District, 857 79
In the North Carolina District, 2,300 350
Total, 13,340

        In this General Conference the following report was made:

        
Churches, 131
Sabbath Schools, 131
Teachers, 988
Pupils, 9,369
Volumes in libraries, 64,000
Paid to support of the Gospel, $9,082.87
Value of church property, $618,100.00
Expended for missionary purposes, $2,883.13


        The Twelfth Session of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church in America convened in the Wesley Zion Church in the city of Washington, D. C., on the sixth day of May, Anno Domini eighteen hundred and sixty-eight. The Bishops


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present were W. H. Bishop, Sampson Talbot, J. J. Clinton and J. D. Brooks.

        FIRST DAY SESSION. At 4 o'clock, P. M., Rt. Rev. Wm. H. Bishop called the conference to order and conducted the opening religious services, which consisted of reading the 89th Psalm, singing a hymn, and prayer offered by Bishop Talbot. On motion of S. T. Jones, Wm. F. Butler was chosen to act as Secretary till a permanent organization was effected. The roll was called and a sufficient number answering to their names, the chair declared that a quorum of the members was present, and the conference proceeded to business. On motion of T. A. Davis, Wm. F. Butler was chosen Secretary of the General Conference and was authorized to nominate four assistants to be elected by the conference. On motion of W. F. Butler, the following resolution was adopted.

        Resolved, that there be a committee of three appointed, consisting of Revs. S. T. Jones, Geo. H. Washington and Wm. F. Butler, to prepare an address to be forwarded to the M. E. General Conference now in session at Chicago, Ill. On motion, conference adjourned to meet at 10 o'clock, Thursday morning. Benediction by Bishop Talbot.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Thursday morning at 10 o'clock conference met pursuant to adjournment, Bishop J. J. Clinton in the chair. The religious services conducted by Rev. Ellis Lavender. On motion of J. W. Hood, the chair was empowered to appoint


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all standing committees. The appointments were then made and confirmed as follows:

        Committee on Revisals: W. F. Butler, Chairman Ky. Conference, J. W. Hood, J. J. Moore, J. P. Thompson, A. Cole.

        Committee on State of the Church: J. W. Hood, Chairman of N. C. Conference, A. E. Anderson, Wm. H. Pitts, Wm. H. Decker, Jehu Holliday.

        Committee of Zion Standard: J. P. Thompson, Chairman N. Y. Conference, S. T. Jones, Wm. H. Decker, M. B. Cross, G. H. Washington.

        Committee on Book Concern: G. A. Spywood, Chairman N. E. Conference, W. H. Decker, J. P. Thompson, J. A. Williams, J. Davis.

        Committee on Episcopacy: J. J. Moore, Chairman Cal. Conference, Jacob Thomas, George A. Spywood, J. B. Trusty, T. J. Smith, J. W. Hood, D. B. Matthews.

        Committee on Boundries: S. T. Jones, Chairman Baltimore Conference, J. W. Hood, Wm. H. Miles, J. P. Hamer, A. E. Anderson.

        Committee on Education: W. G. Strong, Chairman Ala. Conference, James N. Gloucester, N. Stubbs, W. F. Butler, W. H. Hilliary.

        Committee on Appeals: John A. Williams, Chairman Philadelphia Conference, E. Lavender, J. F. Alexander, George Price, John Tappan.

        Committee on Sunday Schools: J. W. Loguen, Chairman Genesee Conference, James A. Jones, D. Kenedy, T. James, R. H. Dyson.


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        Committee on Temperance: John Holliday, Chairman, Allegheny Conference, James Allen, Henry Deboise, Wm. Martin, W. C. Marshall.

        Committee on Statistics: Wm. F. Butler, Chairman, New York Conference, W. G. Strong, J. W. Hood, J. Duch, J. C. Clinton.

        Committee on Finances: John Tappan, Chairman, Baltimore Conference, J. P. Hamer, S. T. Jones, R. H. Dyson.

        Committee on Conference Journals: George H. Washington, Chairman, New England Conference, John James, H. Smith, Richard Bidwell, Leroy Braman, John Duchy, S. Richmond.

        Committee on Memorials: J. J. Moore, Chairman, California Conference, J. Holliday, N. Stubbs, T. A. Davis, Jacob Thomas.

        Committee on Union and Affiliation: S. T. Jones, Chairman, Baltimore Conference, J. W. Hood, T. A. Davis, D. Kenedy, D. B. Matthews, J. W. Loguen, J. A. Williams, James Allen, W. G. Strong, J. C. Clinton, E. Winn, T. G. Campbell, Wm. H. Miles, J. J. Moore, J. McH. Farley, E. Anderson, M. B. Coss, Isaac Deyo, S. O. Birchmore, C. Cruso, T. J. Smith, D. Davis, Wm. Decordeway, A. Murphy, Moses Brown.

        Committee on Ways and Means: J. B. Trusty, Chairman, Philadelphia Conference, John Thomas, G. A. Price, A. Cole, D. Davis, T. J. Smith, N. Stubbs.

        Committee on Districts: James W. Hood.


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Chairman, North Carolina Conference, Dr. J. P. Thompson, W. G. Strong, W. H. Miles, E. Anderson, J. A. Williams, J. P. Hamer, J. Anderson, W. H. Pitts, T. A. Davis, D. B. Matthews, W. F. Butler, J. M. Butler, D. Davis, G. A. Price, M. B. Coss, C. Cruso, T. G. Smith.

        Committee on Nomination: Jacob Thomas, Chairman, New York Conference, D. B. Matthews, Wm. F. Butler, Ky., J. A. Williams, Phila., G. H. Washington, N. E., J. Tappan, Balto., G. W. Price, N. C., John Anderson, Ga., W. G. Strong, Ala., A. Hanno, Lou., J. M. Butler, Cal., Ellis Lavender, Ga. Jere Farley, Va., J. J. Moore, S. C., C. Cruso, Balto., M. B. Coss, N. Y., D. Davis, Ala., S. C. Birchmore, N. E., Wm. Decordeway, Phila., T. J. Smith, Pittsburg, A. Murphy, Gen.

        During this session, the committee on rules and a committee on an address to the M. E. General Conference reported, after which the conference adjourned.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. Friday morning, May 8th, conference met, with Bishop Brooks in the chair; the session opened with the usual ceremonies and proceeded to busines. The regular order of business was suspended to hear an address from Jonathan Davis, Esq., a delegate from the Society of Friends of London, England. He being introduced to the presiding Bishop, and then by the latter introduced to the conference members, addressed the conference as follows, commencing with the Christian


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salutation of the Society of Friends in Great Britain:

        "May all blessings, spiritual and temporal, be multiplied unto you from God, our Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ, ourSavior."

        "Dear Brothers and Sisters, children of the same Almighty Parent who made of one blood all nations of men to dwell on all the face of the earth, receive, we beseech you, these few words from us, your friends across the wide Atlantic. For more than a hundred years, we and our forefathers have sympathized with you in your bondage, have desired and pleaded for your freedom, and have endeavored to aid in procuring it, and we now rejoice with humble thankfulness to God in your having obtained it. Barely, if ever, since the Most High brought his people Israel out of the land of Egypt and from the house of bondage, has so vast a multitude been set free from actual slavery so suddenly and so completely. We are glad to believe that many, perhaps the most, of you regard this great blessing as a gift from God. He who ruleth in the kingdoms of men and giveth them to whomsoever he will, and bringeth good out of evil, has over-ruled the dreadful evil of war in your land, so as to produce the blessed fruits of liberty to the slave. We rejoice to learn that notwithstanding the suddenness of the change of your condition most of you are already living as peaceful citizens, showing that you know, how rightly to value and wisely to use the boon of freedom.


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We have a few things to say to you, and though many may know them already and be well aware of their importance, we believe you will not despise the faithful and loving counsel of your friends. Let the word of brotherly exhortation sink deep into your hearts as we remind you of some of the duties which are called for at your hands, all of them important and a few of them new or enforced by new motives in this your state of freedom. Your duty to your Heavenly Father is to show your love and gratitude to him for the blessing of liberty and for all his mercies, by doing his will as it is set down in his own blessed book, the Bible, and taught you by his Holy Spirit. Your duty to Christ, accepting him as your Redeemer, is to believe, love and obey him, in whom, if you are his sincere disciples, you have a redemption infinitely more blessed than your outward redemption from slavery, even redemption in his blood, from the guilt and bondage of sin and translation into the liberty of the children of God. Your duty to your country and its rulers is to obey the laws, to be subject to those in authority, to maintain order, to fill your bargaing, to be honest, strictly truthful, avoiding all deceit, in words or deeds to labor diligently as freemen for your own support and that of your wives and children, and for the welfare of the great nation of which you now more completely form a part, and to show, as you may be admitted either at once or by degrees to all the rights and duties of citizenship, that you are as capable as


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the white man if properly using and fulfilling them

        As witnesses in courts of justice, be true and careful; as voters, be honest and wise; never be bribed by money, or warped by interest, favor or fear; and if admitted to office, fill the office, whatever it may be, not only respectably in sight of men, but faithfully in the sight of Him who seeth the heart.

        Your duty to yourselves is, with the help of the Lord, to keep yourselves strictly temperate, pure and chaste, and to avail yourselves of every opportunity of acquiring that knowledge of God and of Christ which is life eternal, and that useful learning whereby you will increase your power of rising in the scale of society and of being made a blessing to all around you to an extent which some of you may be hardly able to suppose possible. We know that in your own strength you cannot fulfill all theseduties; you have need like ourselves and like all other men to watch and pray that you may enter not into temptation, and to you as well as to us in the great love and goodness of our Heavenly Father, is the Holy Spirit offered to deliver from temptation and to lead in the way of righteousness. Possibly some of you may have said to yourselves, whilst you were yet slaves, "Oh! how easy it would be to do right and to fulfill our duties, if we were but free," and it may be that you often find, even now that you are free, duty still hard, temptation still strong, and sin still alluring. Be not discouraged by this experience; give not up the struggles, but let this feeling of your


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own helplessness and tendency to evil bring you to the mercy seat and make you more fervent in prayer, that, through Christ strengthening you, you can do that which of yourselves you could not do. We would here offer a few practical hints to such of you as still reside on or near the plantations of those who were formerly regarded by law as your owners. Many of you have, we believed, continued in their employ as free laborers, and conducting yourselves with diligence and integrity, have been treated in return with fairness and with confidence by your employers, a result which we cannot doubt has largely benefitted both parties. There may be other cases of a very different character, those who have heretofore exercised unrestrained power may have found it difficult to adapt themselves to their new position, and some of you may have been treated unjustly and oppressively. Even under such circumstances it is far better and far wiser to suffer wrong and take it patiently than to render evil for evil. We do not say you are to give up independence and rights secured to you by law, but in maintaining or asserting them, let it be with meekness and gentleness. You may often by this conduct so soften the hearts of others as to bring about a change in their behavior towards you, and may thus experience the fulfillment of the truth, "When a man's ways pleaseth the Lord, He maketh even his enemies to be at peace with him," and should trials and disappointments still attend you, how cheering is the assurance


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that all things work for good to them that love the Lord. In conclusion, we would express our trust that, through the blessing of the Most High, there is open to you, our colored brethren, a goodly prospect of an honorable citizenship on earth, and if you are real Christians, and seek to maintain the profession and practice of genuine Christianity without wavering the far brighter prospect of being in the end fellow-sitizens with the saints and members of that glorious family above, of which God is the Father and Christ is the Lord and Savior. That this may be the blessed portion of every one of you at the end of life, is the sincere desire of those who now address you. Farewell."

        Signed by direction and on behalf of a meeting representing the Religious Society of Friends in Great Britain.

Richman Godlen, Clerk.


        After the delivery of the address, the following resolutions were offered by J.J. Moore and seconded by J. W. Hood:

        I. Resolved, That we have listened with profound pleasure and interest to the address of the Society of Friends in Great Britain.

        II. Resolved, That the address be referred to a committee of four, namely: S. T. Jones, Wm. F. Butler, J. J. Moore, G. H. Washington.

        The conference adjourned after reading several memorials from several Annual Conferences on the subjects of education, a connectional journal, etc., all


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of which were read and referred to appropriate committees.

        FOURTH DAY SESSION. Conference met Monday morning, May 11th, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. After the usual preliminaries were disposed of, the reports of committees were called for and proceeded with in order on various subjects, (see Journal). During this session, reports from the Annual Conferences concerning consolidation were presented and referred to a committee on union. The conference adjourned on rule for adjournment.

        FIFTH DAY SESSION. Conference met, Tuesday morning May 12th, Bishop J. D. Brooks in the chair. After the usual opening preliminaries it was on motion resolved that Friday the 15th be set apart as a day of fasting and prayer to Almighty God to so influence the Senate of the United States that they may be enabled to render a verdict that will bring peace and prosperity to our distracted country.

        After some further, ordinary, business the conference adjourned.

        SIXTH DAY SESSION. Conference again convened Wednesday, May 13th, and when the preliminaries were completed, Bishop S. Talbot presiding, the subject Disciplinary Amendments was taken up; also, during this session, the subject of changing the title of our executives from Superintendent to Bishop, in order to complete the plan of consolidation of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church with the African Methodist Episcopal


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Church. A resolution having been passed to this effect, conference then adjourned.

        SEVENTH DAY SESSION. Thursday morning, May 14th, conference convened, and its preliminary exercises being performed as usual, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. The conference proceeded to business, which came up in order, consisting of memorials and relating to arrangements to hold the services of Friday, the day arranged by conference for fasting. The meeting then adjourned.

        In the afternoon of this seventh day session conference again assembled, Bishop Clinton in the chair; the regular order of business was suspended to receive a committee from the A. M. E. Church, (for their address see appendix to the conference journal). When their address was read and acted upon, a preamble and resolution were offered by David Stevens on the subject of our General Conference communicating with the General Conference of the M. E. Church then in session at Chicago, Ill., on the question of union with the M. E. Church. The matter was discussed at some length, after which a telegram was sent to the M. E. General Conference on the subject. Conference then adjourned.

        EIGHTH DAY SESSION. Conference again convened Saturday, May 16th, Bishop Brooks presiding. After the usual opening services, the proper order of business was proceeded with. An executive session was called for, which was ordered to consider the address of the committee on union from the A. M.


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E. Church. A committee reported on the resignation of Bishop Wm. H. Bishop as follows:

        WHEREAS, In the order of Divine providence our venerable Bishop, on account of physical disabilities, declines a re-election to the episcopal office;

        Resolved, That as a token of regard for him as a Christian and an earnest and efficient laborer in the executive office for sixteen years, this General Conference make him a life member of all the Annual Conferences of our connection.

        Subsequent to this, the following preamble and resolution were offered by J. J. Moore and adopted by the conference:

        WHEREAS, This General Conference has been officially informed by a committee from the African Methodist Episcopal Bethel Church that they are not prepared to unite with us on the plan agreed upon by the convention of the two connections held at Philadelphia in 1864, and submitted to the Annual Conferences of each connection for ratification; and

        WHEREAS, They decline uniting on the basis agreed upon, but now ask us to meet with them to unite on some other basis or plan; and

        WHEREAS, Our people in adopting the plan proposed by the said convention did it in good faith and did not authorize us to offer or accept any other plan; therefore

        Resolved, That we deem it inexpedient to meet with them according to their proposal.

        Conference then adjourned.


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        NINTH DAY SESSION. Conference met Monday morning, May 18th; the opening exercises being concluded, the conference proceeded with the business in order, which related to the election of Bishops for lite time, or for the term of twelve years instead of four years. After a lengthy discussion, the subject was laid on the table. After some other business, pertaining to finances, the conference adjourned.

        TENTH DAY SESSION. Conference convened Tuesday, May 19th, Bishop J. J. Clinton presiding. The conference rules and minutes being read and approved, the special order of the conference business was taken up, viz: the report of the committee from the A. M. E. Church on union. The committee, consisting of the following gentlemen: Revs. Cain, Johnson, Young, Walker and Warner, then communicated the following:

        WHEREAS, A convention of the A. M. E. Zion and A. M. E. Churches held in Philadelphia, Pa., on the 14th and 16th of June, 1864, for the purpose of forming a plan for the consolidation of the two connections; and

        WHEREAS, There are certain propositions laid down by said convention which were submitted to the people, giving the interval of four years to canvass and take the votes of the people in the several portions of both connections; and

        WHEREAS, There has not been that fulness of the members of our church which is their right; and

        WHEREBS, Those congregations which have


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voted on the subject have expressed a willingness for union, but are averse to the general plan put forth by the convention; therefore be it

        Resolved, That this body do not deem it politic or wise in us to form a consolidation on the basis laid down by the convention in 1864, lest we interfere with the interests of our church and create dissatisfaction among our own members.

        Resolved, That we are willing to form a union, but with such provisions and arrangements as will meet the wishes of our whole connection, as well as satisfy the demand of the age.

        Resolved, That the information in our possession warrants us in believing that to bring about this union on the basis laid down, after it has been rejected by a large body of our churches, where it has been submitted and where it has not been submitted, would be to submit them unprepared to this union on the basis laid down. Therefore

        Resolved, That we meet the members of the A. M. E. Zion Church and arrange a new plan, one which we believe will meet the wishes of both connections;

        Resolved, That, as ministers, we do not claim entire jurisdiction over the people of our churches, but as spiritual advisers and conservitors of the people's interests, are bound to them by every consideration of Christian affection; we with them claim to be satisfied with whatever arrangements we, as their pastors, may make;


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        Resolved, That the committee appointed to wait on the Zion Conference be hereby instructed to lay before that body these resolutions and opinions expressed, and invite that body here in accordance with the resolution and the directions given to the conference as seen in Article X. of agreements.

        After the committee's documents from the A. M. E. Church were read, the following action was taken by our General Conference on the subject:

        WHEREAS, The A. M. E. Bethel General Conference say in their communication or document that while they are willing for a union, they are not ready to unite upon the platform agreed upon by the convention in Philadelphia in 1864; therefore, Resolved, That the whole matter lay on the table until 1872.

        Subsequently, a committee was appointed consisting of J. P. Hamer, W. F. Butler, J. J. Moore, J. Holliday and M. B. Coss to report to the A. M. E. Bethel General Conference the final action of our conference, after hearing the committee's document from the A. M. E. General Conference; which final action of the A. M. E. Zion General Conference was as follows:

        To the General Conference of the A. M. E. Bethel Church:--We have been appointed a committee to inform your honorable body that according to the action of your body on the subject of consolidation, taken on Saturday last, a copy of which is herewith presented, that our body must respectfully


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and peremptorily decline to take any further action on the subject at the present session.

J. P. HAMER, Sec., Wm. F. Butler, Chairman.


        After this action, the subject of consolidation was laid to rest. The next business of the conference was the nomination of candidates for the episcopal office, consisting of the following named gentlemen:

        J. J. Clinton, J. J. Moore, S. T. Jones, Sampson Talbot, J. D. Brooks, J. P. Thompson, J. B. Trusty, J. Thomas, J. A. Williams, A. Cole, G. H. Washington, D. B. Matthews.

        During this session, a committee was appointed to draft proposals to the M. E. Conference of union with that body; which committee reported to the conference the following on union with the M. E. Church:

        To the Bishops and members of the M. E. General Conference:--We are ready to enter into arrangements by which to affilliate on the basis of equality, and to become one and inseparable now and forever. On the condition of full equality with the most favored of the church, we desire the further stipulation, that a sufficient number of those whom we may select to exercise the episcopal oversight of the colored element of the body may be set apart to that office, on the basis of perfect equality with all other Bishops of the M. E. Church; as we have practically demonstrated that a lay representation, especially in the law making department of the


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church, is at once sound, safe and productive of harmony among the people. We hope if at all compatible with views of religious progress that you will adopt the same as the rule of the church.

J. N. GLOUCESTER, Sec., J. J. MOORE, Chairman.


        Following the adoption of the above report, the election of Bishops took place with the following result:

        The first nominee, J. J. Moore, was balloted for; the whole number of votes cast was 74, 38 votes being necessary for a choice; he received 59 and was declared duly elected. The second nominee, S. T. Jones, was balloted for; the whole number of votes cast was 75, necessary to a choice, 38; he received 62 and was declared elected. The third nominee, J. J. Clinton, was balloted for; the whole number of votes cast was 78, necessary to a choice, 40; he received 66 and was declared elected. The fourth nominee, J. D. Brooks, was balloted for; the whole number of votes cast was 80; J. D. Brooks was duly elected. The fifth nominee, S. D. Talbot, was balloted for; the whole number of votes cast was 76; he received 41 majority and was declared duly elected. The sixth nominee, J. W. Loguen, was balloted for; number of votes cast was 72; Loguen was declared by a majority duly elected.

        Conference at this point adjourned.

        THIRTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference again convened May 20th, Bishop Brooks in the chair; the usual preliminaries were passed through. After the


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matter of the election of Bishops was disposed of and some other ordinary business, the conference adjourned.

        FOURTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference again convened May 21st, 1868, Bishop Talbot in the chair; after the opening preliminaries, the committee on the connectional journal, Zion Standard and Weekly Review, reported; in the adoption of which report J. N. Gloucester was elected editor, at a salary of twelve hundred dollars per annum.

        During this session, the following resolution respecting the use of tobacco was passed:

        WHEREAS, It is the judgment of this General Conference in session that the use of tobacco in the house of God is a hindrance to the worshippers discharging their duty; therefore,

        Resolved, That no minister or lay delegate be allowed to use it in the house of God.

        A constitution for a General Fund was read by J. J. Moore and laid on the table for next session. The conference then adjourned.

        THIRTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference convened Friday, May 22nd, Bishop Clinton presiding; the religious exercises being concluded, the order of the day was the adoption of the constitution of the General Fund, which was accomplished. (See General Conference Journal, page 28.)

        During this session, the condition of the Zion Standard and Weekly Review was investigated, and $408.28 was subscribed by the conference for its


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support. Then the episcopal districts were assigned the bishops, as follows:

        First District, New York and New England Conference: Bishop S. D. Talbot; Second District, Genesee, Philadelphia and Baltimore Conferences: Bishop S. T. Jones; Third District, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia: Bishop J. J. Moore; Fourth District, Louisiana, Florida, Alabama and Tennessee Conferences and Texas Mission: Bishop J. J. Clinton; Fifth District, Kentucky, Allegheny, Missouri, Iowa, Kansas, Illinois and Indiana Conferences, including Western Mission: Bishop G. W. Loguen; Sixth District, California and Pacific Coast: Bishop J. D. Brooks.

        After this action of districting, a motion prevailed that the Bishops after two years change districts; concerning which see Journal. The conference then adjourned.

        FOURTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference again met May 23; preliminaries being disposed of, it was then arranged that after two years Bishop Talbot of the First District change with Bishop Clinton of the Fourth District; Bishop Jones of the Second District change with Bishop Loguen of the Fifth District; Bishop Moore of the Third District change with Bishop Brooks of the Sixth District. Following this Bishop Brooks offered his resignation, which was not accepted. Conference thereupon adjourned.

        FIFTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference convened May 25th as usual, Bishop Talbot presiding;


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the religious exercises being completed, reports of committees on ordinary business occupied their attention at this session. Conference adjourned at the usual hour.

        SIXTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference again met Tuesday, May 26th, Bishop Clinton presiding; the usual preliminaries being disposed of the Committee on Memorial presented a reply to the address of the London Society of Friends; for report see appendix to Journal.

        During this session, the Committee on Ministers' salary reported the following:

        The annual allowance of a minister in charge shall not be less than seven hundred dollars with parsonage, or eight hundred without parsonage; but, whenever the people are unable to pay such amounts, he shall have the privilege of making such contract for his services annually as they may agree to; and, in addition thereto, his traveling expenses to and from his place of destination at such time as the Bishop may demand his presence or services in the interest of the connection.

        After the adoption of this report, a Committee on Bishops' salary was appointed. The Committee on Revision of Discipline reported their work. The Committee on Bishops' Salary reported the annual allowance of the Bishops to be fifteen hundred dollars, which was adopted, and which has been their standing salary. The conference here adjourned.

        SEVENTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference convened


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according to rule Wednesday, May 27, Bishop J. D. Brooks presiding; the preliminaries being disposed of, a resolution was offered touching the colored people depositing money in the Freedmen's Saving Bank, as follows:

        Resolved, That the Bishops and Ministers of the Zion Methodist General Conference assembled, do accept and heartily endorse the Freedmen's Bank, and recommend it to the patronage of our people or race; and we recommend the Howard Fraternal Union, as set forth in the remarks of Capt. O. D. Wall this day, as a fit and proper testimonial of the great confidence placed in Major General Howard by the whole people of the United States, and agree each and all of us to do what we can in furtherance of the above object.

        Following this action, the ceremonies of the installation of the elected Bishops took place at 10 o'clock, Rev. William H. Bishop officiating; he announced the hymn "How Beauteous are their feet, who stand on Zion Hill," followed by prayer by Rev. J. A. Jones' reading of two scripture lessons by Revs. Clinton, Leonard, A. E. Anderson and J. Jones, with other appropriate ceremonies. Bishops Joseph J. Clinton, D. D., Sampson Dunbar Talbot, John Jamison Moore and Jerman W. Loguen were installed into the office and set apart for the work of Bishops in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America. Bishop Jones' installation was deferred until Sunday following, May the 31st, he


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being absent as a delegate to General Conference of the M. E. church. See conference Journal, page 37 - On motion conference then adjourned.

        The conference reassembled at 2 o'clock p. m., May 27th, Bishop Brooks in the chair; during this session several committee reports were made, after which the conference resolved itself into a committee of the whole, with Rev. John A. Williams called to the chair. At 5 o'clock, p. m., the committee of the whole rose and reported. They requested the conference to appoint a committee of five on boundaries, which committee consisted of the following: J. W. Hood, I. J. Whitney, A. E. Anderson, Wm. F. Butler, W. H. Miles. Conference then adjourned.

        EIGHTEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference convened May 28th at 10 o'clock, Bishop Talbot presiding; the usual preliminaries being disposed of, a resolution was adopted giving Bishops power to transfer ministers from one conference to another without his choice, providing always the Bishop give the minister two months notice. Following this action the Committee on Conference Boundaries reported as follows:

        

  • I. The New York Conference,--to embrace all that part of the state of New Jersey lying north of the Raritan River, and that part of the state of New York lying east of the Hudson River, including that part of the state of Connecticut not lying west of the Hudson River, bounded by a line commencing at
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    the city of Albany and running southwesterly to the Pennsylvania line.

  • II. The Philadelphia Conference,--to embrace the state of Delaware and all that part of New Jersey south of the Raritan River, and all that portion of the state of Pennsylvania east of Big Valley except Lewistown.
  • III. New England Conference,--to embrace Nova Scotia, Bermuda, New Brunswick, and all the New England states except that part of Connecticut lying west of Stamford.
  • IV. Baltimore Conference,--to embrace the states of Maryland, District of Columbia, Western Virginia, and all that portion of Virginia lying north of Fredericksburg.
  • V. Allegheny Conference,--to embrace all that part of the state of Pennsylvania west of Big Valley, and all that portion of Ohio east of Columbus, Millroy and Lewistown included.
  • VI. The Genesee Conference,--to embrace all of New York State west of Albany, including Montrose and Wilkesbarre in the state of Pennsylvania.
  • VII. The North Carolina Conference,--to embrace all the state of North Carolina not included in the Tennessee and South Carolina Conferences.
  • VIII. South Carolina Conference,--to embrace the state of South Carolina, with such places in North Carolina as are of easy access for that Conference.
  • IX. The Georgia Conference,--to embrace the
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    state of Georgia and those places in North Carolina convenient to Georgia.

  • X. The Tennessee Conference,--to embrace the state of Tennessee, that portion of Virginia lying west of Christianburg, and that portion of North Carolina lying west of the Blue Ridge Mountains, including Cherokee, Macon, Jackson and Hapwood.
  • XI. The Louisiana Conference,--to embrace the states of Louisiana and Texas, until the Texas Conference is organized.
  • XII. The Alabama Conference,--to embrace the states of Alabama and Mississippi.
  • XIII. The Kentucky Conference,--to embrace the state of Kentucky and those counties in Louisiana bordering on the Ohio River, until the organization of the Indiana Conference.
  • XIV. The Virginia Conference,--to embrace all the state of Virginia not included in other conferences, and that portion of North Carolina lying east of the Roanoke River and north of the Albemarle Sounds.
  • XV. The Florida Conference,--to embrace the state of Florida.
  • XVI. The California Conference,--to embrace the states of California and Oregon, and British Columbia.
  • XVII. The North-western Conference,--to embrace the state of Minnesota, and Dakota Territory.
  • The Indiana Conference,--to embrace Indiana and Michigan.
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  • XIX. The Illinois Conference,--to embrace the states of Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska.
  • XX. The Missouri Conference,--to embrace the states of Missouri and Kansas.
  • XXI. The Texas Conference,--to embrace the state of Texas.

        The XVIII., XIX., XX., XXI., XXII. were to be organized.

        The report of the committee as above reported was adopted. After some few further proceedings conference adjourned. (See Journal, page 41).

        NINETEENTH DAY SESSION. Conference met on Friday, May 29th, at the usual hour, Bishop Clinton in the chair. After the usual preliminaries were disposed of, the question of granting lay delegates to the Annual Conference the same privileges as ministers on the conference floor was brought up, and adversely decided upon. The report of Bishop S. T. Jones, who had been sent as delegate to the M. E. General Conference at Chicago, was then read and adopted. The subject upon which he was sent as a delegate to that conference was that of reunion with the Mother Church. Upon the reception of his report the following resolution was adopted, to wit:

        Resolved, That while we gratefully acknowledge our thanks to Almighty God for the safe return to us of our beloved bishop, Singleton T. Jones, from his mission to the M. E. General Conference, in session at Chicago, Ill., we return our thanks for the


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manner in which he expressed the sentiments of this conference to that body, and the prospective success attained by his mission.

        (For full account of report see General Conference Journal, page 42).

        Following this action the journal of the closing session was read and approved, and a motion for a final adjournment was carried, and with appropriate exercises the conference closed sine die.

        Bishops of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church: JOSEPH JACKSON CLINTON, SAMSON DUNBAR TALBOT, JOHN DELAWARE BROOKS, JOHN JAMISON MOORE, SINGLETON THOMAS JONES, JERMAN WESLEY LOGUEN; Secretary: WILLIAM FREDRICK BUTLER; Assistant Secretaries: THOMAS ANDREW DAVIS, WILLIAM HENRY HILLERY, WILBERT GARRISON STRONG, JACOB THOMAS.

        The Thirteenth Session of the General Conference of the A.M.E. Zion Church convened according to the appointment of the Board of Bishops in Clinton Chapel, Charlotte, N. C., at 12 o'clock, M. The session was opened by religious exercises, consisting of the reading of a portion of Scripture by Bishop S. D. Talbot, the selection and announcement of a hymn by Bishop J. D. Brooks, and a prayer offered by Bishop J. J. Moore. Subsequently the conference was addressed by Bishop Talbot, touching upon the great responsibility resting upon the action of this body to properly prepare the minds of the people to grapple with the great questions of the day that involved


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the religious and secular well-being of this nation. Following the address was the appointment of Rev. W. H. Hilliary Secretary, Rev. Robert Harris recorder of the minutes, James A. Jones compiler of the minutes; after which, Committees on Credentials, on Devotion, and on Finances were appointed. The following members composed the roll:

        Bishops J. J. Clinton, S. D. Talbot, J. D. Brooks, J. W. Loguen, S. T. Jones, J. J. Moore;

        Members of the several conferences:

  • I. Alabama Conference: A. Hannan, S. Wilson, L. Oliver, W. Shofridge, J. M. Butler, S. Derry, E. D. Taylor, M. G. Thomas, H. Lawhorn, W. E. Foster, C. Jarret, D. Shackelford, L. Fannin, M. Page, J. Briant, S. W. Jones, L. Butler, W. G. Strong, R. Ford, J. A. Thomas, W. Burrows; Lay delegates; N. Mitchel, S. Tirrel;
  • II. Allegheny Conference: D. B. Matthews, N. H. Williams, Charles Pipkin; Lay delegate: B. F. Pulpress;
  • III. Baltimore Conference: J. P. Hamer, J. B. Trusty, G. Bosley; Lay delegate: P. A. Lee;
  • IV. California Conference: W. H. Hilliary;
  • V. East Tennessee Conference: H. Debose T. H. Hopkins, R. Russel, J. A. Tyler, W. Jones, L. Lucas, J. H. Mitchell, A. B. Griffith; Lay delegates: B. Campbell, W. Franklin;
  • VI. Florida Conference: A. C. Fisher, T. Darling, W. C. Vesta, J. Sexton, H. Williams, H. E.
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    Bryan; Lay delegates: B. Jamison, R. Dupontz;

  • VII. Genesee Conference: J. Thomas, J. C. Gilbert, W. Sanford; Lay delegate: A. Murphy;
  • VIII. Georgia Conferenoe: C. Smith, P. Drayton, H. J. Thomas, G. W. Harris;
  • IX. Louisiana Conference: H. P. Tayler, A. Tasker, James Allen, S. Humphries; Lay delegates: T. Henry, H. M. Cephas;
  • X. Kentucky Conference: S. Sherman, Y. Carr, J. B. Johnson; Lay delegates: J. Flynn, W. D. Lee;
  • XI. New York Conference: J. P. Thompson, D. Kenedy, N. Stubbs, J. Thomas, G. Rice; Lay delegates: I. Deyo, A. Jackson;
  • XII. New England Conference: J. H. Smith, R. H. Dyson, W. H. Decker; Lay delegates: A. Anderson, R. Mason;
  • XIII. North Carolina Conference: E. D. Hill, P. McNatt, T. Henderson, H. McLaughlin, C. Kelly, A. York, T. H. Lomax, D. Blackwell, J. F. Alexander, D. Williams, F. B. Moore, A. Barret, F. House, D. McKoy, W. J. Moore, S. Moore. H. C. Philips, H. Harris, T. Hagins, A. Allison, J. W. Hood, J. Green; Lay delegates: R. Harris, V. A. Crawford;
  • XIV. Philadelphia Conference: J. A. Williams, J. A. Jones, J. H. Anderson, R. Tompkins; Lay delegates: P. Buchanan, G. A. Douglass;
  • XV. South Carolina Conference: D. J. Walker, R. Jackson, A. Moore, I. C. Clinton, R. Wilson, R.
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    Thompson, B. Burton, H. Clinton; Lay delegates: I. Apposta, J. Price;

  • XVI. Virginia Conference: J. V. Givens, S. W. Wood, J. J. Sawyer, G. W. Conner, W. R. Brooks; Lay delegate: J. Goodwin;
  • XVII. W. Tennessee Conference: W. Murphy, G. Simms, A. Coleman; lay delegates: C. Scott, S. Martin.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. June 20th, 1872, convened, Bishop J. J. Clinton in the chair. During this session, committees were appointed on the Examination of Bishops, on Church Extension, on Sabbath-schools, on Education, on Temperance, on Missions, and on Statistics, (of which see Conference Journal, page 7.) The balance of the session was taken up in hearing the reports of several committees. Conference then adjourned.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. June 21st, 1872, conference again convened, Bishop Clinton in the chair. The first business disposed of was the adoption of a plan to raise finances necessary to support the conference (see Journal), after which the Committee on Temperance reported; then a resolution was offered on the division of the connection into two general districts, providing for two General Book Agencies for the Book Concern. After some discussion on this subject, conference adjourned.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. This session took up the subject of the adoption of the Zion Church Advocate as the connectional organ; (this journal had been


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published by Revs. Jacob P. Hamer and John E. Price in Washington City, D. C.) The matter was referred to the Business Committee. During this session a resolution was offered, recommending this conference to enter into ways and means to establish in the District of Columbia a school or college, and that lots suitable for that purpose be procured in a suitable locality. Conference at this point adjourned.

        FOURTH DAY SESSION. Saturday morning, June 22d, the session again opened with the usual religious exercises, Bishop Clinton presiding. Rev. Lynch, Fraternal Delegate from the M. E. Church, was introduced to the conference, and was cordially received; he made an appropriate speech. Bishop Jones addressed the conference, referring to the action of the Board of Bishops and saying that he had instructed his conferences accordingly; here the Committee on Revision of Discipline reported. The conference then adjourned.

        FIFTH DAY SESSION. Monday morning, June 24th, 1872, conference met, Bishop Brooks in the chair; after the usual preliminaries, the first business was the hearing of Bishop Jones' statement in reference to the course pursued in his opposition to the action of the Board of Bishops relative to their changing the time and place of the General Conference; the Bishop rose and read to the conference several eulogies he had received from various Annual Conferences


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in regard to his course; he also read his diploma from the Avery College, which had been conferred on him as Doctor of Divinity; the Bishop continued his remarks in defense of the course he had taken until the adjournment of the session.

        SIXTH DAY SESSION. Tuesday morning, June 25, 1872, conference again met, Bishop J. J. Moore in the chair. It was resolved that Bishop J J. Clinton reply to Bishop Jones' defense, sustaining the action of the Board of Bishops and fifteen annual conferences, in changing the time and place of the Eleventh General Conference, and defending the Board against the wholesale charges made by Bishop Jones with reference to the action of the Board. Bishop Clinton occupied the morning session in a masterly and dignified defense, after which a vote of thanks was tendered him by the conference. Bishop Jones was then interrogated as to whether he considered or claimed himself to be a Bishop upon the virtue of his election in the General Conference held by him and his adherents in the city of New York. He claimed to be only standing on a level with his episcopal peers. After Bishop Jones made some explanations touching certain things that he had said respecting Elders J. P. Hamer and J. B. Trusty, which was satisfactory to them, his character passed and conference gave him the right hand of fellowship, and the conference closed with the doxology.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. June 25, 1872, conference assembled, according to rule, Bishop Moore in


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the chair; the Committee on Business reported a recommendation relative to the revision of our hymn book, the officers of the M. E. Book Concern having offered our connection the use of their hymn book, with the privilege of placing the title page of the African M. E. Zion Church Hymn Book and our Bishops' names in place of theirs in the preface, and they to publish it for our exclusive use at a reduced cost per copy; it was further recommended that each minister in active service, and others, advance such sums as he or they are able, for the purpose of enabling us to secure the publishing of this hymn book on the plan proposed to us by those officers of the M. E. Book Cconcern; all of these recommendations were acted upon and adopted by the conference; measures were also adopted for the purchasing of a lot for the erection of a school house or college at Fayetteville, N. C.; the matter was put into the hands of the officers of the Book Concern. At this juncture the conference adjourned.

        SEVENTH DAY SESSION. June 26, 1872, conference assembled, Bishop Loguen in the chair; the session opened with the usual preliminaries, following which Bishop Moore read the Episcopal address of the bench of bishops, which was received and appropriately disposed of. Subsequently the Committee on Missions reported, which recommended the establishment of a General Conference Mission board, also the establishment of missionary societies in each Annual Conference, and that elders be empowered


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to establish missionary societies in their respective charges, all of which recommendations were adopted. The conference then adjourned.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. June 26th conference convened, Bishop Loguen in the chari; a resolution was offered by Elder J. Tyler looking toward a union with the M. E. Church, which was laid on the table; subsequently committees on Sunday Schools, on Revision of Discipline, and other committees reported. Conference then adjourned, according to rule.

        EIGHTH DAY SESSION. Friday morning, June 28, 1872, conference convened, Bishop Jones presiding; after the usual preliminaries of singing and prayer, calling the roll, and reading minutes of previous sessions, the Committee on Episcopal Districts reported, the discussion of which occupied the morning session. After the adoption of the report the conference adjourned.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. Conference convened, Bishop Talbot presiding; the Committee on Revision of Discipline reported progress; after which a resolution was passed, giving a majority of the bishops, in case of emergency, power to change the time and place of meeting of the General Conference. After the adoption of the report of the Committee on Revision, the conference adjourned.

        NINTH DAY SESSION. Saturday morning, June 29, 1872, conference convened; the usual exercises being completed, the committee on nomination of


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candidates for the two General Agencies reported, after which some business respecting the interests of local churches was enacted. The conference then adjourned.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. Conference convened, Bishop Clinton in the chair; minutes read and approved; a Committee on Bishops' Salaries reported, fixing the bishops' salaries at not less than twelve hundred dollars, nor more than fifteen hundred dollars, and that each member pay not less than twentyfive cents for the support of the Bishops, the same to be collected by the ministers in charge and paid to the Bishops of the district; the Committee on Finances reported the sum of $123.32, received from several churches for the support of the conference. Conference then adjourned.

        TENTH DAY SESSION. Monday morning, July 1, 1872, conference met at the usual hour, Bishop Brooks in the chair; opening exercises performed; the Committee on Episcopal Nomination reported; their report was received. A motion then prevailed that a General Agent to collect for the general fund be elected after Bishops. The Committee on Revision then reported progress; in their work a disciplinary provision was made, requiring Bishops to meet semiannually, at which meeting they were to elect their president, the said president to have no extraordinary power except to call special meetings, when in their judgment it may be thought necessary. The conference further enacted that a General Conference


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Secretary should be elected at the time the Bishops were elected, to serve for four years, his duty to be to furnish the Bishops with certificates of ordination, and certificates for the Bishops; the remainder of the session was occupied in discussing topics of general interest until adjournment.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. Conference convened, Bishop Brooks in the chair; minutes read and approved; the conference then went into the election of Bishops; tellers being appointed, the election took place with the following result: First Ballot: Bishop J. J. Clinton, 88; T. H. Lomax, 21. Second Ballot: S. D. Talbot, 78; Elder E. D. Taylor, 14. Third Ballot: Elder J. W. Hood, 51; J. W. Loguen, 38; 3 scattering. Fourth Ballot: Bishop J. J. Moore, 81; Elder J. A. Jones, 11.

        ELEVENTH SESSION. Tuesday morning, July 2d, 1872, conference met at the usual time, Bishop J. J. Moore in the chair; the usual opening exercises being completed, roll called, minutes read and approved, the election of Bishops was resumed: Fifth Ballot: Bishop S. T. Jones, 66; Elder W. Wilson, 19. Sixth Ballot: J. W. Hood; Seventh Ballot: Bishop J. W. Loguen, 68; J. D. Brooks, 24. The Chairman declared the following duly elected Bishops to serve four years, until their successors are elected and installed: J. J. Clinton, S. D. Talbot, J. W. Hood, J. J. Moore, S. T. Jones, J. W. Loguen. Elders J. B. Trusty and Landa Fannin were elected General Collecting Agents, and Elder J. A. Jones


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General Conference Secretary. Conference then adjourned.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. Conference met, Bishop J. J. Moore in the chair; minutes read and approved. Elder Hood offered a ritual for the ordination of elders, deacons, and laying the corner stones of churches, which was adopted; the Committee on general work for General Agents reported; also on Education, each of which were adopted, after which a motion prevailed fixing the next General Conference meeting at Louisville, Ky. Some ordinary business followed, after which conference adjourned.

        TWELFTH DAY SESSION. Wednesday morning, July 3d, 1872, conference convened, Bishop J. W. Loguen in the chair; the religious exercises being performed and minutes read, a motion prevailed making it the duty of the Secretary of each Annual Conference to send a list of the ministerial and lay delegates for the General Conference to the Secretary of the General Conference, after their election, and to inform the minister in charge where it is to be held and of the time of its meeting. A resolution was passed fixing 25 per cent. as the pay of General Collecting Agents; a resolution giving lay delegates in Annual Conferences the right to discuss and vote in common with the ministers, except on the examination of the ministers' characters and in the election of Ministerial delegates to the General Conference, was passed.

        AFTERNOON SESSION. Conference assembled


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at 3 o'clock, according to rule, Bishop Clinton in the chair; the Bishop suggested to the conference to suspend business, in order to hear a discourse on the duty of a Bishop, by Bishop Brooks, preparatory to the installation of the newly elected Bishop Hood. He delivered a discourse in his usual style, after which Elders Lomax and Jones presented J. W. Hood, who was solemnly installed a Bishop in the A. M. E. Zion Church in America, for the four years next ensuing. For the rest of the proceedings see journal. The minutes were then read and approved, and conference adjourned to meet on the third Wednesday in June, A. D. 1876, in Louisville, Ky., in the Fifteenth Street Church at 10 o'clock A. M.

        Bishops: Joseph J. Clinton, Philadelphia; Sampson D. Talbot, Washington, D. C.; Singleton T. Jones, Washington, D. C.; John J. Moore, Lincolnton, N. C.; J. W. Loguen, Syracuse, N. Y.; J. W. Hood, Charlotte, N. C. Secretary of General Conference: James A. Jones.

The episcopal address of the Bishops of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America, delivered at the Eleventh General Conference of the said church, at Charlotte, N.C., June, 1872.

        "BELOVED BRETHREN: A gracious Providence has brought us together again in our quadrennial council; we have met again to review and deliberate upon the work and general interests of that branch of God's Zion of which the great Head


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of the church has made us stewards; to Him is due our unfeigned gratitude for the kind and preserving care He has exercised over us during our quadrennial term; in the plentitude of goodness He has permitted us to survive a number of our fellow laborers, who have fallen at our side since we last met in general session. Dear Brethren: returning as we have from our different fields, to report in a general way the condition of our beloved Zion, and to council for the future work in the best interests of our connection, and take new obligations, we trust that the deepest manifestations of the spirit of our Divine Master may characterize the procedure of our entire session; and that all measures upon which we may pass may have our faithful and most judicious disposal. We then, in accordance with the policy of our church, would most happily submit to this honorable body our episcopal message, in which we have furnished you with a brief but faithful index of our connectional position, as noted and gathered from the statistical resources at the close of this quadrennial term; with also a recommendation for your consideration of such measures as will meet the pressing wants of our beloved Zion; also setting forth those embarrassments under which the connection labors. Statistically, we would represent as follows:

        First. Of our episcopal arrangements: At the General Conference convened at Washington, D. C., 1868, there were six episcopal officers appointed


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over an equal number of districts; in these six districts were established seventeen Annual Conferenences, operating in twenty-seven States of the Union and two territories; in these Annual Conferences were 1,000 itinerent ministers, 200,000 laymen, or communicants, 18,000 Sunday-School teachers, 85,000 Sunday-School pupils; church property, in value, $14,000,000; expenditures for support of mission work, $70,000 in twelve years.

        Secondly. Our Spiritual Condition: In this great and important interest, during the four years, each annual record has given the most encouraging accounts of the spiritual developments of the numerous churches throughout the connection, showing God's gracious favor to Zion. Nevertheless, that our church should make greater advancement in this direction is most desirable; spiritual power is one of the greatest necessities of the Christian Church; we would recommend that we, as ministers, keep constantly in view and urge upon the layity, the increase of Christian holiness among us--which is the salt of the church.

        Thirdly. Financial matters: Financial embarrassment has been one of the difficulties we have had to grapplewith; through it our connectional Journal has been suspended for nearly two years; also our missionary work has been much hindered; also from pecuniary embarrassment we have been prevented from making the desired progress in the work of the establishment of educational institutions for the education


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of the ministers. Dear Brethren, you can more fully appreciate our need of money to extend and support our connection, when we remind you of the two great monied religious bodies we have to grapple with--the M. E. Church north, and the M. E. Church south, who make their money a means of proselyting our preachers, in many cases, especially the former body, and the step taken by our body at our last General Conference toward consolidation with the M. E. Church has been used by unscrupulous agents of that church to proselyte our ministers and members, creating distraction among us and sometimes ruptures in our churches, which course no Christian body could sanction, in the light of the golden rule: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." In relation to the question of affiliation and consolidation with the M. E. Curch, we could wish, as expressed in our General Conference in 1868, that all branches of Methodists on this continent were united; but from the unfortunate developments connected with this movement, we are compelled to recommend the suspension of future action on the subject until the great obstacle to this happy result is farther removed; that is, the prejudice of caste that still exists in the mother (the M. E.) church; yet we shall still cultivate a friendly and Christian feeling toward our mother until she has reached the proper position on this question of caste. Now, Dear Brethren, as the general assembling of our body lays unusual responsibilities upon


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our legislative abilities, let us see to it that wisdom, discretion, integrity and unanimity characterize our deliberations, looking to God for aid in our legislation now before us; let us

  • I. Aim to secure harmony in the episcopal department; in this, wise legislation is necessary. (1) Their constituted and discretionary powers should be explicitly indicated by law. (2) A proper financial system to insure their support should be definitely laid down.
  • II. Proper legislation to permanently establish our Book Concern.
  • III. We must adopt a general practical financial system; such a system as will secure a general support to our connectional institutions.
  • IV. We must adopt some plan for the establishment of a suitable educational institution for our young ministers entering our itinerancy.
  • V. We should take necessary steps to establish a connectional journal.

        With these interests properly provided for, with God's blessing, Zion will ultimately fulfill the grand mission for which God in his gracious providence has ordained her.

Bishops.
J. J. CLINTON,
S. D. TALBOT,
S. T. JONES,
J. D. BROOKS,
J. J. MOORE,
J. W. LOGUEN.



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        The Fourteenth Session of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church assembled in the Fifteenth Street Church, Louisville, Ky., at 10 o'clock, Wednesday, June 1st, 1876, according to adjournment. The Senior Bishop, Rt. Rev. J. J. Clinton, called the conference to order, read for a lesson the 52d chapter of Isaiah, and for a second lesson, the 4th chapter of 1st Corinthians. He added: "May the contents of that to which you have listened find a lodgment in your minds and impress themselves upon your memories." Bishop Jones read, and the conference, led by the choir, sang the 217th hymn: "High on his everlasting throne, the King of saints his work surveys." Bishop Moore then offered a feeling prayer. Bishop Clinton read, and the conference, led by the choir, sang the 290th hymn: "There is a fountain filled with blood, drawn from Immanuel's veins." Bishop Clinton then delivered an address of greeting to the members of the conference. He referred to the fluctuating scenes through which we had passed during the last four years; referred to the fact that this was the fourteenth quadrennial session of this conference, and suggested that our spared lives attested the goodness of God, to whom we owe praise and thanksgiving for the evidence of God's loving kindness; and let us offer from the altars of our hearts the bloodless sacrifice of our prayers, our praise and our thanksgiving. The Bishop then spoke of the interest clustering around the meeting, and characterized


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the occasion as solemn, as we were met to do work for God and his Church.

        At this point, Bishop Hood and a large number of delegates arrived, and, Bishop Clinton concluding, Bishop Jones followed him. This speaker said that he shared the general joy; God had wonderfully preserved us. Our loss had been comparatively small, showing that God's blessing rested upon us. He expressed the hope that peace would be with us and that we should work first for God and then for our beloved Zion, that we might be able to emphasize the poet's words: "Blest is the pious house, where zeal and friendship meet;" let us practically carry out this idea.

        Bishop Moore addressed the conference in earnest words; said that the faces of the members of conference indicated that we were for the Lord and for Zion. The Bishop feelingly alluded to the deaths of Bishops Loguen and Brooks, who had been struck down since we last met, and expressed his gratitude to God that he himself had been spared to come one thousand miles and meet the brethren there that day. The Bishop spoke of the progress of the cause in his district and throughout the land, declaring that the borders of Zion were being largely extended.

        Bishop Hood arose and greeted the brethren, apologizing for himself and large delegation from his section for their tardiness, owing to a providential detention. He endorsed all the sentiments expressed


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by his colleagues in reference to the work for God and Zion, and hoped that the conference would endeavor to complete its business in as short a time as possible.

        Bishop Clinton announced to the conference the demise of the following fathers and brethren: Bishops Christopher Rush, James Simmons, Wm. H. Bishop, J. W. Loguen, J. D. Brooks, and Elder James A. Jones. The Bishop added: "May they rest in peace," which was responded to by the conference with a fervent "Amen." The Bishop then announced the appointment of Prof. Wm. Howard Day, in place of Rev. J. A. Jones, as Secretary of the conference. Bishop Clinton then announced the Committee on Credentials as follows:

        Committee on Credentials of ministerial and lay delegates: Jacob Thomas, G. H. Washington, Thomas W. Biddle, N. H. Turpin, J. B. Trusty, J. W. Miry, A. Tasker, Wm. H. Pitts, I. C. Clinton, J. McH. Farley, J. M. Butler, H. H. Thomas, W. G. Strong, C. M. White, J. H. Mitchell, L. J. Scurlock, W. H. Hillery.

        On motion it was resolved to permit the General Secretary, Prof. Day, to name his assistants. The following were subsequently named and, by vote of conference, appointed: C. R. Harris, North Carolina, W. H. Ferguson, Tennessee, L. J. Scurlock, Mississippi, Assistant Secretaries; M. M. Bell, Philadelphia and Baltimore, J. McH. Farley, Virginia, Statistical Secretaries.


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        The chair announced the Committee on Devotion as follows:

        Jehu Holliday, S. C. Birchmore, Abraham Allison, J. A. Williams, Solomon Derry, Wm. H. Hillery.

        The chair announced the Committee on Rules:

        M. H. Ross, C. E. Ripkins, E. H. Curry, Barney Burton, E. D. Taylor.

        The chair stated that the Secretaries of the several conferences were requested to furnish the Secretary of this conference with the minutes of their last annual conference. The Committee on Devotion announced the appointments for the evening:

        At Fifteenth Street Church, 7:30 o'clock, E. D. Taylor; at Vine Street Church, 7:30 o'clock, R. H. Simmons; at Washington Chapel, Browntown, 7:30 o'clock, D. I. Walker.

        Conference adjourned with benediction by Bishop Moore.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. The conference met June 22d, Bishop Jones presiding; the session opened with the usual preliminaries. This day's proceedings consisted in the consideration and the adoption of rules for the government of the conference, and also the appointment of various important committees. At the proper hour conference adjourned with benediction.

        THIRD DAY SESSION. The conference convened June 23d, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding, who read the Scriptural lesson, followed by singing and


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prayer; the latter offered by D. I. Walker. The business of this day's two sessions consisted of the completion of several committees, with some other ordinary business. The list of committees was completed as follows:

  • 1. Committee on Credentials.
  • 2. Committee on Devotion.
  • 3. Committee on Rules.
  • 4. Committee on Revision.
  • 5. Committee on Episcopacy.
  • 6. Committee on Book Concern.
  • 7. Committee on Journal.
  • 8. Committee on Business for Gen. Conference.
  • 9. Committee on Education.
  • 10. Committee on Temperance.
  • 11. Committee on Sunday Schools.
  • 12. Committee on Mission Work.
  • 13. Committee on Financial System.
  • 14. Committee on Superan. Preachers' Fund.
  • 15. Committee on Finances.
  • 16. Committee on Bishops' Salaries.

        On all these subjects the committees reported, and important matters were discussed and adopted. During this conference, Revs. Wm. H. Hillery, Jos. P. Thompson and Thomas H. Lomax were made Bishops. After thirteen days' session, the Bishops were districted as follows:

        First District, Bishop J. J. Clinton;

        Second District, Bishop J. J. Moore;


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        Third District, Bishop J. W. Hood;

        Fourth District, Bishop J. P. Thompson;

        Fifth District, Bishop S. T. Jones;

        Sixth District, Bishop Wm. H. Hillery;

        Seventh or Mission District, Bishop T. H. Lomax;

        Deceased Bishops were reported at that conference as follows:

        Bishops J. W. Loguen, J. D. Brooks, Christopher Rush, James Simmons, Wm. H. Bishop.

        Secretary of the General Conference deceased since 1872: Elder James A. Jones.

        Delegations from the several conferences reported:

        Alabama Conference: E. D. Taylor, W. G. Strong, Samuel Wilson, Miles Page, C. Jarrett, W. Burrows, Joseph Gomes, Solomon Derry, John Bryant, D. Mackelford, Lewis Oliver, James A. Thomas, H. C. Banks, Allen Hannon, S. W. Jones, Jeremiah Ware, Robert Ford, Lewis Butler, Charles Ellington, G. W. Watson, Laudy Fannin; Lay delegates: Jeremiah Barnes, R. C. Robinson.

        Allegheny Conference: John E. Price, Dr. D. B. Matthews, Charles E. Pipkins, George Bosley, John W. Tiry; Lay delegates: Benjamin Pulpress, Anthony Harris.

        California Conference: Wm. H. Hillery; Lay delegate: Samuel E. Freeman.

        East Tennessee Conference: W. H. Ferguson, J. H. Mitchell, S. Oliphant, R. Tompkins, R. Russell,


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J. Pew, Marcus Montgomery; Lay delegates: W. S. McTeer, J. J. Murphy.

        Florida Conference: J. M. Butler, Joseph Sexton, Thomas Darley, W. C. Vesta; Lay delegates: James Brown, D. McGee.

        Genesee Conference: Wm. T. Biddle, Basil Mackall, Wm. Sanford; Lay delegates: R. Jeffrey, Andrew Washington.

        Georgia Conference: C. Smith.

        Kentucky Conference: Jehu Holliday, Richard Bridwell, Samuel Shewman, E. H. Curry, C. M. White, J. R. Irvin; Lay delegates: John Alexander, H. K. West.

        Louisiana Conference: A. Tasker, James Allen, Frank Loney, J. P. Brown; Lay delegates: Anderson Aaron, J. Davis.

        New England Conference: Samuel Birchmore, R. H. Dyson, G. H. Washington; Lay delegates: Thomas Gaskins, W. H. Johnson.

        New Jersey Conference: N. H. Turpin, C. W. Robinson.

        New York Conference: Wm. H. Decker, H. M. Wilson, H. Dumpson, J. H. Smith, M. H. Ross, Jacob Thomas, ex off., Dr. J. P. Thompson, ex off; Lay delegates: T. E. G. Thomas, Elias Washington.

        North Carolina Conference: E. H. Hill, W. H. Pitts, H. Williams, Joseph Green, J. A. Tyler, R. H. Simmons, B. B. Bonner, H. C. Philips, Wm. H. Thurber, David Williams, D. Blacknall, Amos York, F. House, Wm. J. Moore, C. R. Harris, H. W.


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Jones, T. H. Lomax, A. G. Kessler, N. M. Barrett, P. McNatt, S. B. Hunter, A. Allison, R. D. Russell, Prince W. Howard, A. B. Smyer, J. H. Brown; Lay delegates: Virgil A. Crawford, Prof. R. Harris.

        Philadelphia and Baltimore Conference: M. M. Bell, S. S. Wales, J. V. Givens, J. H. Anderson, ex off., John A. Williams, J. B. Trusty, J. P. Hamer, ex off.; Lay delegates: Wm. H. Day, T. H. Cross.

        South Carolina Conference: I. C. Clinton, B. Burion, M. M. Moore, H. Clinton, P. Jackson, R. Allen, E. Lindsey, P. Thomson, J. Price, C. A. King, M. Jones, A. Russell, R. McLain, Hon. D. I. Walker; Lay delegates: Hon. F. A. Clinton, Hon. David Lyles.

        Virginia Conference: J. McH. Farley, C. Heath, W. C. Butler, E. Overton, A. Paxton, H. B. Pettigrew; Lay delegates: Simon Gee, Hugh Gale.

        West Tennessee and Mississipi Conference: L. J. Scurlock, I. J. Manson, William Murphy, T. A. Hopkins, A. J. Coleman; Lay delegates: M. McNear, M. Scott.

        Bishops: J. J. Clinton, J. J. Moore, J. W. Hood, S. T. Jones, J. P. Thompson, Wm. H. Hillery, T. H. Lomax. Secretary: Prof. Wm. H. Day.

        The Fifteenth Session of General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church convened in State Street A. M. E. Zion Church, Mobile, Ala., on Wednesday, May 5th, 1880, at 10 o'clock A. M.

        Rt. Rev. J. P. Thompson, M. D., took the chair at the appointed hour, and conducted the opening


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devotional services; the 5th chapter of the Epistle of Paul to the Ephesians was read; Rev. S. Wilson announced the sixteenth hymn, which was sung, and Rev. E. D. Taylor led the General Conference in prayer; Rev. A. English was elected Secretary pro tem. Bishop Thompson delivered an appropriate address, urging the brethren to work for God and to sustain the dignity of the gospel ministry; he earnestly desired that the Great Head of the church might preside over the deliberations of this General Conference, and that the benediction of Heaven might rest upon each member during its session and forever. The Board of Bishops previously recommended that the place of holding the General Conference be changed from Mobile to Montgomery, Ala., to reduce the traveling expenses of the delegates from the Northern Conferences. The General Conference adjourned to meet in Clinton Chapel, Montgomery, Ala., on Thursday morning, at 10 o'clock, May 6th, 1880; singing by the conference, and benediction pronounced by Bishop Thompson.

        SECOND DAY SESSION. Thursday, May 6th, 1880, conference convened, Bishop Singleton T. Jones, D. D., in the chair; Bishop J. P. Thompson announced the hymn commencing "And are we yet alive," which was sung by the General Conference; Bishop J. W. Hood read the 46th Psalm and 6th chapter of Hebrews, and Bishop Wm. H. Hillery led in prayer; the journal of previous session was read and approved; Bishop Jones then briefly addressed


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the conference, alluding to the kind providence of Almighty God in bringing us together in another session. He also referred to the affliction of Bishop J. J. Clinton, D. D., which prevented him from being present. The Bishop then suggested that the brethren give each other the hand of fellowship, which they did while they sang, "Children of the Heavenly King, As we journey let us sing."

        The officers elected were as follows:

        Secretary: Rev. Cicero R. Harris, of the Central N. C. Conference; Assistant Secretary, Rev. Alfred Day, of Philadelphia and Baltimore Conference; Journal Secretary: Rev. C. C. Petty, of South Carolina Conference; Statistical Secretaries: Rev. J. B. Small, of New England Conference; Rev. C. May Manning, of Georgia Conference; Editor of the Star of Zion: Rev. J. A. Tyler, of Central N. C. Conference; Reporter of the Star of Zion: J. C. Dancy, Layman, of North Carolina Conference; Reporter to Daily Press: Rev. J. McH. Farley, of Virginia Conference; Compiler: Rev. M. M. Bell, of Philadelphia and Baltimore Conference; Marshals: Rev. A. G. Kesler, of N. C. Annual Conference; H. L. Simmons, Layman of C. N. C. Conference.

        Roll of members was then announced as follows:

        Bishops: J. J. Clinton, D D., S. T. Jones, D. D., J. P. Thompson, M. D., Wm. H. Hillery, J. J. Moore, D. D., J. W. Hood, T. H. Lomax.


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DELEGATES.

        First District, New York Conference--Ministerial: N. H. Turpin, Jacob Thomas, G. E. Smith, Abram Anderson, Wm. H. Decker, H. M. Wilson; Laymen: Abram Bolin, Wm. Philips.

        New England Conference: R. H. Dyson, J. B. Small, J. W. Brown, G. H. Washington; Laymen: J. J. Smith, Thomas Taylor.

        New Jersey Conference: Anthony Jackson, J. A. White, Joseph P. Thompson; Laymen: Thomas B. Richardson.

        Second District, Philadelphia and Baltimore Annual Conference: J. P. Hamer, J. B. Trusty, M. M. Bell, S. S. Wales, Alfred Day; B. T. Grant, Thomas Cross.

        Allegheny Conference: J. S. Cowles, J. V. Givens, J. H. Brownson; Layman: J. F. Lease.

        Genesee Conference: Wm. T. Biddle.

        Third District, North Carolina Conference: W. Moore, G. B. Farmer, E. H. Hill, J. C. Price, Amos York, T. B. Hunter, A. G. Kesler, A. W. Allison, Z. T. Pearsall, J. H. Mattock, Wm. H. Thurber, H. C. Philips, D. Williams, F. B. House, P. J. Holmes, S. J. Adams; Laymen: J. C. Dancey, A. V. Crawford.

        Virginia Conference: J. McH. Farley, Abraham Paxton, H. H. Whidby, C. Windfield, Alfred Newby, N. L. Overton, R. A. Fisher; Laymen: Hugh Dale, J. J. W. Green.

        South Carolina Conference: I. C. Clinton,


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D. I. Walker, R. Allen, Jos. Price, E. Henton, C. C. Pettey, H. Clinton, N. A. Crockett, J. P. Jackson, J. H. Jackson, S. L. James, M. Jones, E. Lensey, M. Moore, Rev. King; Laymen: J. W. Massey, A. E. Rice.

        Central N. C. Conference: J. A. Tyler, C. R. Harris, John Hooper, R. S. Reeves, T. F. Blackman, M. Barrett, R. H. Simmons, B. B. Bonner, A. W. Marsh, J. M. Hill, A. F. Moore, J. W. Davis, A. F. Gosling; Layman: H. L. Simons.

        Fourth District, Alabama Conference: A. Hannon, W. L. Oldfield, E. D. Taylor, L. Fannon, M. Page, Israel Furby, S. Wilson, S. R. Evans, Robert Ford, B. A. Cook, John Bryant, L. D. Cunningham, J. A. Thomas, H. Sawhorn, H. Shuford, J. H. Cradox, P. Caffary, W. J. Henderson, A. English, W. G. Strong, W. Spencer, S. W. Jones, L. Oliver, Jos. Gomez, F. Hunter, J. Ware, C. Jarrett, A. White, H. C. Banks, E. R. Rose, D. Shackleford, Solomon Derry, W. Burrows, W. Worth, V. Burk, F. Perry, G. W. Drakes, J. Lee, L. Derry, M. Hankes; Laymen: Charles Jefferson, Stower Richards.

        Georgia Conference: J. L. Sipkins, E. W. Gibson, C. Max Minneng, A. R. Spencer, E. Jones, C. Smith, P. Drayton, J. H. Thomas, J. J. Thomas, G. W. Harris, J. White Head, J. Dunbar, C. Dorsey, B. Smith; Layman: C. H. Morris.

        Louisiana Conference: A. Fasker, J. P. Wesley, Obedia Smith, Isum Nicklas.


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        Florida Conference: Thomas Darley, M. J. Butler, C. W. Vesta, G. Saxton, Jos. Saxton, Alexander Robinson, Mingo Stokes; Laymen: Alfred Sadler, B. D. Mathews.

        Fifth District, Kentucky Conference: F. J. Page, A. W. Foreman, Smith Claiborn, Samuel Shermon, Jerry Washington, H. E. Curry; Laymen: Joseph Wells, Willes Adams.

        Tennessee Conference: J. L. H. Sweres, Wallace Jones, Thomas Warren, D. W. Wells, W. H. Ferguson, M. Montgomery; Laymen: L. Irvin, Baily Jones.

        West Tennessee and Mississippi Conference: F. A. Hopkins, J. L. Scurlock; Laymen: Martin Scott, J. D. Adams.

        Sixth Episcopal District not represented.

        Seventh Episcopal District, Canada and Michigan Conference: Moses Gales.


        THIRD DAY SESSION. Friday, May 7th, conference again opened with the usual religious exercises, Bishop J. J. Moore occupying the chair. The business of this day consisted of the reporting of committees on ordinary business.

        FOURTH DAY SESSION. Conference convened Saturday, May 8th, W. H. Hillery in the chair; the usual religious preliminaries being completed, the minutes of the previous session were read and approved. The Episcopal address was then read by Bishop J. W. Hood, which was very interesting and important; in it were furnished the general statistics


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of the seven episcopal districts; which see on the concluding page of the account of this General Conference.

        FIFTH DAY SESSION. Conference assembled Monday, May 10th, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding; after the usual preliminaries, several resolutions were passed in the regular business of the session with regard to the order of business in the procedings of each session.

        SIXTH DAY SESSION. Conference convened Tuesday, May 11th, Bishop T. H. Lomax presiding. Nothing but ordinary business occupied this day's session.

        SEVENTH DAY SESSION. Wednesday, May 12th the session again opened with the usual preliminaries, Bishop J. P. Thompson in the chair. During this session a committee was appointed, consisting of Bishops S. T. Jones, J. W. Hood and Jacob Thomas, to negotiate with Bishop J. J. Clinton to secure the completion of the work on the exposition of the Church Discipline, which Bishop Clinton had partly finished. A resolution was passed providing that, in case the work was completed before the sitting of the General Conference of 1884, the Board of Bishops were empowered to accept the work at his hands.

        EIGHTH DAY SESSION. Thursday, May 13th, the session opened with the customary preliminaries, Bishop S. T. Jones occupying the chair. During this session, Rev. Jacob Thomas, the General Book


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Agent, made his report, which was received, and he and Bishop J. J. Moore were tendered a vote of thanks for their faithful and successful management of the Book Concern, of which Bishop Moore was the President. On this subject, see the article in this work on the Book Concern. At this meeting, petitions were read from the several episcopal districts, asking for a re-appointment of the same Bishop for another quadrennial term. Also, in this session, the committee on the examination of the Bishops reported.

        NINTH DAY SESSION. Friday, May 14th, the session opened with the usual preliminaries, Bishop J. J. Moore in the chair. The business of this day was of an ordinary character.

        TENTH DAY SESSION. Saturday, May 15th, the session opened with the usual preliminaries, Bishop Wm. H. Hillery presiding. Nothing of special interest was transacted this session, except the appointments to preach on the following Sabbath. Some of these were as follows: In the U. S. Court room, at 11 o'clock, A. M., Bishop S. T. Jones, D. D.; in Clinton Chapel, A. M. E. Z. C., at 11 o'clock, A. M., Bishop J. P. Thompson; in U. S. Court room, at 3 o'clock, P. M., Bishop W. H. Hillery; in Clinton A. M. E. Z. Chapel, at 3 o'clock, P. M., Bishop J. W. Hood; and at 3 o'clock, P. M., same place, Bishop J. W. Hood; in Clinton Chapel, at 8 o'clock, P. M., Bishop T. H. Lomax.

        ELEVENTH DAY SESSION. Monday, May 17th,


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conference assembled as usual, Bishop J.P.Thompson presiding; the preliminaries being completed, the session proceeded to business. At this session it was decided that we have six bishops. A committee was appointed to nominate candidates for the bishopric.

        TWELFTH DAY SESSION. Tuesday, May 18th, the session was opened with the usual preliminaries, Bishop T. H. Lomax presiding. This session's business consisted principally in hearing matters read by the committee on the revision of the Discipline.

        THIRTEENTH DAY SESSION. Wednesday, May 19th, the session opened with the usual ceremonies, Bishop Thompson in the chair. In this session, the Committee on Finance Plan reported, with other committees; the report on financial plan was rejected and referred to a special committee. In this session it was decided that when the conference finally adjourned it would adjourn to meet in Bleeker street, New York City, 1884, the first Wednesday in May. In this session, the committee on the revision of the Discipline were instructed to report an article that would elect our bishops for life.

        FOURTEENTH DAY SESSION. Thursday, May 20th, the session opened in the usual manner, Bishop Jones presiding. In this session's action, a Home and Foreign Mission Board was established. See General Conference minutes for 1880.

        FIFTEENTH DAY SESSION. Friday, May 21st, the conference met, Bishop J. J. Moore presiding,


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In this session, the re-election of Bishops took place; the judges of the election consisted of M. M. Bell, J. W. Davis, S. W. Jones, J. L. H. Sweres, J. P. Hamer, George E. Smith and J. C. Daucy. On motion, Bishop J. J. Clinton was re-elected by acclamation. Bishop J. J. Moore was balloted for and re-elected, he receiving 118 votes, and his opponent, A. Anderson, 9 votes; Bishop Moore's re-election was made unanimous. Bishop S. T. Jones received 115 votes, his opponent, S. Sharman, 6 votes; Bishop Jones' re-election was made unanimous. Bishop J. W. Hood received 121 votes, his opponent, Wm. H. Thurber, 5 votes; his re-election was made unanimous. Bishop J. P. Thompson received 113 votes, his opponent, A. Hannon, 5 votes; his re-election was made unanimous. Bishop W. H. Hillery received 108 votes, his opponent, R. H. G. Dyson, 19 votes; his re-election was made unanimous. Bishop T. H. Lomax received 98 votes, his opponent, A. York, 9 votes; his re-election was made unanimous. On motion, Elder C. R. Harris was re-elected Secretary of the General Conference. In this session a resolution was passed, setting apart the first Friday as a connectional fast day, continuously. The rest of this session was occupied in passing complimentary resolutions to the rail road companies and to the people of Montgomery County for their hospitality.

        SIXTEENTH DAY SESSION. Saturday, May 22, the session opened in the usual way, Bishop W. H. Hillery in the chair. During this session, various


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committees reported; the Committee on Journals reported; in the adoption of which, the Star of Zion was turned over to the General Conference and a board of managers appointed to supervise it. (See article on Journal in this work or the minutes of the General Conference.) The Committee on Book Concern also reported; for details, see the account of the Book Concern in this work; also the General Conference Journal. The Committee on Home and Foreign Mission Board reported this session; for which, see minutes of the General Conference.

        During this session a resolution was adopted, abolishing the quadrennial re-election of bishops and fixing their term of office during good standing and efficiency for duty. At this meeting also, a financial plan was adopted; for which, see minutes of General Conference. Also, a constitution for Sabbath Schools was adopted; see General Conference minutes.

        SEVENTEENTH DAY SESSION. Monday, May 24th, the session opened with the usual preliminaries, Bishop J. W. Hood presiding. In this session, nine trustees were appointed to represent stock in the Star of Zion; for which, see appendix of the Conference Journal. In this session, the subject of the Zion Wesley Institute was considered and acted upon. In considering it, the following was the result:

        "We recommend that the Zion Wesley Institute be made the chief theological institution of the entire connection; and whereas, the North Carolina


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Annual Conference, at its session in Goldsboro, November, 1878, did unanimously vote to petition this General Conference to turn over the Rush University property at Fayetteville, N. C., to the use of the Zion Wesley Institute; we, therefore, recommend that said petition be granted and that this General Conference do at once transfer said property to the Zion Wesley Institute."

        The petition was granted; for further information on the subject, see the account of the Institution in this work. During this session, a resolution was passed, recommending the establishment of a High School by one or more conferences in each episcopal district, and the property of said schools to be subject to trustees appointed by the Annual Conference. For details on this subject, see the minutes of the General Conference Journal. At this session was reported the Petty High School, located at Lancaster, C. H. South Carolina, which was established in 1879. This school was under the management of trustees elected by the South Carolina Conference; it had 135 students; the principal of the school was Rev. C. C. Petty. For further information on the subject, see General Conference minutes of 1880.


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CHAPTER VIII.

A RECORD OF OUR CONNECTIONAL INSTITUTIONS.

        An account of our General Educational Movements. The first movement made in our connection toward the establishment of a connectional institution of learning was an action taken in the General Conference, convened in New York City in 1844, in which conference a committee of five was appointed to draft a constitution, as a basis for the establishment of a Connectional Manual Labor School, under the supervision of the General Conference. The committee consisted of Revs. Jehial C. Beaman, John P. Thompson, Leonard Collins, Abram Cole, and Peter Ross. This action resulted in the calling of a Literary Connectional Convention at York, Pa., to be composed of delegates from the New York and Philadelphia Annual Conferences, to convene in 1847. Revs. D. Stevens, S. T. Scott, Leonard Collins and J.J. Moore were delegates from the Philadelphia Conference to the said convention. The result of the action of said convention was the taking initiative steps in the next General Conference, (which convened in 1848) for the establishment of a Connectional Manual Labor School in Essex County, New York State; in view of which


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the following preamble and constitution were adopted, to wit:

        WHEREAS, We, the ministry of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church in America, feeling as we do that many of the difficulties against which we have to labor, grow out of the fact that there is a great lack of education among us; and,

        WHEREAS, Man, viewed as a being susceptible of happiness and capable of responsible action, sustains a thousand relations, involving as many duties; whatever, therefore, tends to increase this susceptibility and enlarge this capacity, must exalt his nature and promote the benevolent purpose for which he was created, and as such is the tendency of a well directed education, of virtuous example, of sound philosophy and theology, indeed, of everything which gives the understanding a controlling influence over the grosser passions, of everything which purifies and regulates the feelings without diminishing their order or depriving them of their appropriate objects; and since among the many causes which conspire to produce this effect, none is so efficient as a well directed education; therefore, these persons whose names are here connected do agree to form an institution, having for its objects the establishment of prominent schools of education preparatory to the ministry, and for other useful information calculated to elevate our whole people, do agree to be governed by the following Constitution and By-Laws, which seem to be found necessary for carrying out


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or effecting the object set forth in this preamble.

CONSTITUTION.

        Article I. This Institution shall be known by the name of the "Rush Academy," Essex county, State of New York.

        Article II. Every subscriber of one dollar and fifty cents, or more, per annum, shall be a member of this institution, and shall be entitled to the privileges of membership.

        Article III. The fund raised by annual subscription, or otherwise, shall be appropriated under the directions of the Committee of Managers for defraying the necessary expenses, as well as the general expenses of the institution.

        Article IV. Every subscriber at the time of subscribing, shall direct to what particular department the amount of his or her subscription shall be appropriated--all donations shall be deemed the permanent property of the institution. The institution may, however, at its annual meeting or other legal meetings, authorize a sale of any of its permanent property for the purpose of re-investment for others more desirable or advantageous.

        Article V. The officers of this institution shall consist of a President, four Vice-Presidents, Corresponding and Recording Secretaries, a Treasurer, a committee of twenty, five of which shall be located


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in and about the city of New York with the Corresponding and Recording Secretaries. Each set of committees provided for in this constitution shall have power to appoint their own secretaries and agents.

        Article VI. It shall be the duty of the President to preside at the annual meetings of the institution, to watch over its interests generally, to recommend such measures as he may deem calculated to promote the objects of the institution, and to call meetings of the same when he may think the good of the institution require it, or when requested so to do by the Committee of Management. The Vice-Presidents shall sit as chairman in their different sections of the committee, possessing all the power of the President in their respective bodies.

        Article VII. It shall be the duty of the Corresponding Secretary to institute and carry on the correspondence between the General Committee of Management, the Secretaries and Agents of the different departments, and to lay before the General Committee all letters and communications he shall receive; to pay over to the Recording Secretary monthly, or oftener if required, all monies that shall come into his hands, and to perform such other duties appertaining to his office as may be prescribed by said committee of managers.

        Article VIII. It shall be the duty of the Recording Secretary to keep the records of the institution and of the General Committee of Management,


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to receive all the monies of the institution and to pay over the same monthly, or oftener if required, to the Treasurer, taking his receipt therefor. He shall have in charge the seal of the institution, and shall affix the same to such documents and papers, and in such a manner as shall be ordered by the Committee of Management; and he shall attend to and perform such other duties appertaining to his office as the President may direct.

        Article IX. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to receive all the monies of the institution from the Recording Secretary, and disburse the same as shall be directed by the General Committee or by such sub-committee as they shall appoint or substitute, keeping regular books of entry and accounts of all such receipts and disbursements, and to report to the Committee of Managers the state of the treasury as often as required so to do. He shall, one week previous to the annual meeting of the institution, in each year render to the Committee of Management a full and complete report both of all monies received anddisbursed by him and of the state of the treasury.

        Article X. The general Committee of Management shall have the supervision and management of the interests and affairs of the institution; they shall open and conduct all negotiations for the purchase of any property for the institution, taking care, however, to respect each branch of the committee, and acting as the funds of the institution may warrant; they shall provide for the preservation and increase


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of the property of the institution; they shall have power to appoint committees or agents, as the interest of the institution shall seem to them to require; to prescribe their respective duties and fix their compensation, and they may adopt and execute generally such measures as shall to them appear to be proper in emergencies and necessary to carry out the objects of this institution.

        Article XI. The Committee of Management shall at every annual meeting of the institution render a full report of their proceedings during the year, stating the principles governing them in their selections or purchases, entering into such details as they shall think proper and of interest to their associates.

        Article XII. All annual subscriptions to the institution shall be for the current year, expiring on the first day of the following year; no subscriber shall be entitled to the privilege of membership until his subscription has been paid.

        Article XIII. It shall be the duty of the Committee of Management to frame a code of By-laws for their own as well as the further government of the institution, providing such By-laws are not repugnant to this institution; which By-laws shall be submitted to the members at a meeting of the institution for their approval.

        Article XIV. The constitution may be altered or amended at the annual meeting of the institution, or at a meeting called for said purpose by a two-third vote of the members present.



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        The constitution being thus provided with the proper officers, the Central Committee was authorized to draw up a plan of the buildings for the school and estimate their cost; thus preparations were made to lay the foundation for practical school operations. Having secured the land and some funds, practical operations were soon expected to be commenced. An agent was also appointed to collect funds for the institution. From the report of the Board of Trustees of the institution but little progress had been made by the institution from informalities in its management; of which, see account in the General Conference Journal. The subject of the institution was brought before the General Conference of 1872 at Charlotte, N. C. In the furtherance of this project or purpose nothing was effected except the procuring of a piece of land in Essex County, state of New York, and the incorporation of a Board of Trustees to manage the institution, and the collection of some money with which to erect suitable buildings and to make all necessary provisions for the establishment of the school. This is all that was done practically in that movement. In an action on the subject of education at the General Conference of 1872, the Rush Academy was turned over by the trustees into the hands of the General Conference, and the General Conference authorized Rev. Thomas H. Lomax to sell the land belonging to the Rush Academy, and purchase land at Fayetteville, N. C. Rev. Lomax did not sell the land, but an


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agent, J. McH. Farley, was sent out to collect money with which to purchase land there and establish an institution on that site, to be called the Rush University. To this end was collected a sum of money, and a lot purchased at Fayetteville, N. C. Nothing further was effected in that movement and nothing further in the way of establishing an institution of learning, until the project was undertaken that lead to the establishment of the Zion Wesley Institute, which has proved to be a grand success so far.

        History of the Zion Wesley Institution up to Date. The following are the facts connected with the history of the Institute. The scheme to establish Zion Wesley Institute originated with Elder Thurber while stationed at Concord, N. C., in the year of 1877. Seeing the project to establish Rush University at Fayetteville, N. C., for two or three years apparently at a standstill, he in connection with A. S. Richardson, Esq., got up a plan to establish a similar institution in Western N. C., believing circumstances offered a better assurance of success.

        This plan was submitted to the N. C. Conference in session at Salisbury in November, 1877, and adopted. A board of nine trustees was elected and a committee chosen to incorporate the institution. On the 9th of May, 1878, a meeting of the trustees was held in Concord, at which Bishop J. W. Hood was elected President, Bishop T. H. Lomax, Vice President, and C. R. Harris, Secretary and Treasurer. Concord was selected as the site for the building,


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seven acres of land being donated for the purpose by the trustees of Zion Wesley Institute. The plan provided for the sale of shares or scholarships was to sell them at ten dollars each, which entitled the holder to one year's tuition in the institute. The funds thus raised, together with subscriptions, would, it was expected, erect the building. The N. C. Conference voted to raise a collection in the churches for the benefit of the institution. In the following November, when conference met in Goldsboro, it was found that little had been done, only two churches having contributed any thing. A fresh effort was made; Diplomas of Honor provided for, which were to be given to every donor of five dollars to the institution; an agent was appointed to distribute the diplomas, and stir up an interest among the churches. The board of trustees was enlarged so as to include all the bishops of the connection and several elders from each of the annual conferences. Honorarytrustees were appointed in most of the counties of the state, who also, it was hoped, would work for the success of the cause. Next year an appeal was made to the ministers to raise funds for the construction of a temporary building. This appeal seemed in vain, but at the conference in Lincolnton, November, 1879, proceeds were brought in, which, with donations from the conference and from Bishops Hood and Lomax, amounted to $155.04. The trustees were instructed to open school on the first Monday in January, 1880; accordingly the Board met and appointed


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C. R. Harris as principal, who agreed to teach for seventy-five cents a month per scholar, the tuition charge being one dollar. Thus the school was to be carried on, and all receipts from churches and donations to be used toward the building to be erected.

        At the General Conference at Montgomery, Ala., the deed for the property at Concord was presented, and the conference ordered a special collection to be raised in all the churches for the support of the institution.

        At the session of the C. N. C. Conference in Fayetteville, November, 1880, the principal reported that the school had been taught for seven months, that the second session had commenced and a teacher employed at a salary of $25.00 per month, as the principal, in consequence of other duties, unable to serve longer as teacher. A. S. Richardson was then chosen as principal, and taught throughout that session, which lasted eight months. During this year very little was collected for the institution; the balance in the treasury was but $12.74.

        In the meantime, our delegates to the Ecumenical Conference, which assembled in London, September, 1881, Bishops Thompson and Hood, Elder Farley and J. C. Price seized the opportunity of presenting the wants of our connectional school to the English people, who have ever been the firm friends of our race in America. Elder Price was appointed agent to solicit funds for the institution. He remained


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in Europe nearly twelve months, during which he collected a sum total of $9,000, as reported in the Star of Zion. With a portion of this money, in addition to subscriptions from friends in Salisbury, a valuable site called Delta Grove, containing 38¼ acres of land in the suberbs of Salisbury, has been purchased at a cost of $4,600. The property includes a fine dwelling house with ten large and several small rooms, besides a good garden and outbuildings. The balance of the net proceeds is, I suppose, in the hands of the special treasurer of the firm of Messrs. Geo. Bouden and Wm. W. Pocock, London, England.

        The Petty High School. This institution was established in 1879 in Lancaster, South Carolina, by Rev. C. C. Petty. It consists of one building, 50x35 feet, two stories high, and two acres of land. It has 135 students attending it. The institution is under the management of a Board of Trustees elected by the South Carolina Annual Conference. It is the property of the connection and its principal is Rev. C. C. Petty. It bids fair to become a good institution; for further information in reference to it, see General Conference minutes of 1880, session held at Montgomery, Ala.

        Our Book Concern. This institution was established in the New York Annual Conference in 1841, in the city of New York. Rev. Jacob D. Richardson was appointed our first General Book Steward; with him was associated Rev. Nathan


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Blunt; they formed a publishing committee; they published our hymn books, disciplines, minutes, and other connectional matter. The General Steward had his Book Room at No. 82 Sullivan street, New York. The Concern was under his supervision until he deceased, in 1844. It was then put under the management of a committee of three ministers appointed by the General Conference, consisting of the following members: Revs. J. P. Thompson, Wm. H. Bishop and T. Eato. On account of the unfortunate schism that occurred in the connection between the General Conferences of 1848 and 1856, we have not been furnished with a connected account of the Book Concern. In 1856, at the General Conterence, Jos. P. Thompson, Samuel M. Giles and Christopher Rush were appointed a General Book Committee; they had the entire supervision of the Concern. This committee, at the General Conference that convened in Philadelphia in 1860, reported the Book Concern as having a stock in hymn books to the value of $327.38. At that General Conference Singleton T. Jones, Samuel M. Giles, John P. Thompson, J. D. Brooks and Joseph P. Thompson were elected Trustees of the Book Concern, and Henry Johnson, Abraham Cole and J. W. Loguen Book Stewards for the several Annual Conference Districts. At the General Conference convened at Philadelphia City in 1864, the following trustess were elected: Revs. S. T. Jones, Wm. H. Decker, Wm. H. Pitts and J. Barcroft, with Isaac Coleman as General


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Book Steward. At the General Conference of 1868, convened at Washington, D. C., the last named committee reported that the Book Concern was in an embarrassed condition for the want of funds, and they were in debt. The connection needed hymn books, and there were none on hand; also disciplines were wanted. At this conference Rev. J. Thomas, General Book Agent, was authorized to publish the old hymn book and the disciplines, yet without any means except his own with which to accomplish the work. The agent, however, went forward and published, but by small invoices, which increase the price of printing, as he stated, they being in limited demand; the sales were small, and the proceeds did no more than meet the outlays. In the General Conference of 1872, at Charlotte, N. C., the committee of the Book Concern appointed the previous General Session reported the non-success of the working of the Concern; that they were unable to supply or print hymn books and disciplines to supply the connection, for the want of means. At this General Conference the constitution of the Book Concern was revised and a Board of Officers appointed, consisting of a president, vice-president, secretary, treasurer, corresponding secretary, finance committee of five, and two collecting agents. At that General Conference, at the suggestion of Rt. Rev. S. T. Jones, from a previous understanding with him and the managers of the M. E. Book Concern, it was agreed that we adopt the hymn


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book of the M. E. Church. The General Book Agent was authorized to make arrangements to secure that book, with our imprint, and publish the same for the A. M. E. Zion Church, which he did. In that General Conference the Concern was located at Washington City, with a majority of its executive officers in and thereabout. Rev. Jacob Thomas, the General Agent, was instructed to publish hymn books according to the plan and instructions of the General Conference. At the end of the four years, in 1876, the agent was in debt to the publisher $200, principally from bad debts.

        At the General Conference held in 1876 at Louisville, Ky., the Board of the Book Concern, of which Bishop J. D. Brooks was president, with J. Anderson, J. B. Trusty, J. E. Price, J. P. Hamer and George Bosley, all connected with the Board of the Concern, the Connectional Journal, and the Zion Church Advocate, reported the Book Concern as being without funds or stock, and in debt $287.80. At this conference a new board was appointed. Rev. J. Thomas was again appointed General or Publishing Agent. There being a demand for hymn books and disciplines, and the agent having no funds belonging to the Concern, but being treasurer of the New York and New Jersey Mission Board he contracted with that institution to come to the aid of the Connection's Book Concern and publish the books we needed, which they did, and received what profit accrued from the sale until the Board of Bishops met.


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        In 1877 the Board of Bishops at their semi-annual meeting, reorganized the Board of the Book Concern, appointing Bishop J. J. Moore President of the Board, Rev. Jacob Thomas Vice-President, Rev. Henry M. Wilson Secretary, Rev. C. Leonard Treasurer, Rev. C. W. Robison Corresponding Secretary, and Bishops Hood, Jones, Thompson and Lomax a Financial Committee, to supervise the Book Concern. The Bishops arranged, and, through the Executive Board of the Concern, purchased from the Mission Board the capital stock it held in hymn books and disciplines it had published for the Book Concern, with the fixtures and conveniences of the book room they occupied, for the sum of $600, to be paid by installments. To pay the first installment the Executive Committee, embracing J. Thomas, H. M. Wilson, C. W. Robison and C. Leonard borrowed the following sums: From Bishop Thompson, $100; Bishop Hood, $50; Bishop Moore, $35; other parties, $40. Whole amount, $225. Thus the board proceeded in conducting the Concern. They at once had 1,000 hymn books printed, supplying the several conferences; they had also several hundred disciplines printed, having $46.50 toward paying for the printing of the books. During 1879 the Executive Board decided upon a plan to raise funds to assist them in successfully running the Book Concern, and for the financial relief of other general connectional institutions. They called a district convention, composed of delegates


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from the different Annual Conferences of the first episcopal district, which convened in Jersey City, N. J. By action of the convention, it was decided that Bishop J. J. Moore be appointed on an agency to England to collect funds to relieve our financial institutional wants. The Board of Bishops at a subsequent meeting, deputized Bishop Moore on agency to England, at the convention's request, which agency he filled with very good success, collecting $2,300, of which he paid over to the Book Concern $1,100. Through this means the Concern got a happy start.

        At the General Conference convened in Montgomery, Ala., in 1880, the Board reported having a capital in stock worth from three to four thousand dollars. All this was the work of four years untiring efforts, with God's blessing; while others of our general institution have reaped a portion of the benefits of the Board's efforts in its special financial measures, and in the appointment of its foreign agency, of which see Journal of the General Conference of 1880. In the General Conference of 1880 the system of operation was enlarged. Our General Book Steward, Rev. Jacob Thomas, was salaried; he is one of the most worthy and faithful sons of Zion, who has given for many years his service without pay to save our Book Concern from utter failure; when he could do no better, he would carry it in his trunk from conference to conference. The last General Conference has so provided that we now


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have a fine Book Room at No. 183 Bleeker Street, New York City, with a fine stock of our own literature and general assortment of books; we can now say that our connection has the finest Book Concern of any colored denomination in the United States; all that is necessary to make it one of the grand financial resources of the connection is, that our Bishops and Ministers every where faithfully and constantly lay its claims before our members, and friends generally; if it fails it will be the fault of the ministry. In all the conflicts through which it has passed its motto has been, taken from the Burning Bush, nec tamen (not yet consumed). In the following we publish the Board of officers as it now stands organized:

        General Board of Book Concern: President, Rev. H. M. Wilson; Vice-President, Rev. G. H. Washington; Secretary, Rev. J. B. Small; General Agent, Rev. Jacob Thomas; Rev. Charles W. Robinson, Rev. M. M. Bell. Auditing Committee: Rev. Abram Anderson, Rev. Alfred Day, Rev. Anthony Jackson.

        The History of our Journalistic Movements. The first movement made toward establishing a connectional journal was made in the New York Annual Conference, convened in New York City in 1841, in which the following action was taken:

        WHEREAS, a connectional journal is indispensible as a proper exponent and advocate of our connectional interests; therefore be it


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        Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed from this body, to draft a prospectus for a connectional news paper; which paper shall be named the Zion Wesley;

        Resolved, That said committee be authorized to issue monthly the said paper, as soon as a sufficient number of subscribers can be obtained to justify the publishing of it; with the concurrence of the Philadelphia Conference, the first sheet to contain the prospectus.

        The following were the committee appointed: Jehial C. Beaman, Jacob D. Richardson and Nathan Blunt.

        Resolved, That each preacher be required to act as an agent for the paper, and that he remit monthly to the Sr. Superintendent or Bishop the subscription money, the concluding resolution only to apply to the N. Y. Conference.

        The following was the action of the Philadelphia Conference on the subject:

        Resolved, That the Philadelphia conterence concur with the New York Conference on the subject of the publication of a paper for our connection.

        Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed from this conference to confer with the New York Committee on the subject of publishing the paper.

        The following persons were appointed: David Stevens, G. Galbreath and L. Collins.

        The committee above named not being successful


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in establishing the above named periodical, as they had hoped, the subject was again brought before the General Conference of 1860, and the following action was taken on the subject:

        Resolved, That some plan be adopted to start a monthly periodical for the benefit of the connection.

        The following preamble and resolution were adopted:

        WHEREAS, A paper has been started in this city, entitled The Weekly Anglo-African, and said paper being devoted to the interest and general good of our people; therefore

        Resolved, That we, as a body in General Conference, will give it our hearty co-operation and support, recommending it to our respective charges as the proper organ of our people, it being worthy of the highest regard and merits the influence of every minister of the connection. (See Journal, pp. 66, 122, 126.)

        In the General Conference of 1864, the following action was taken in relation to the same paper:

        WHEREAS, The paper known as The Anglo-African has been used by the members of this connection as a medium of communication for several years in the interest of our church; therefore

        Resolved, That it is the duty of each minister to labor for the increase of its circulation, as well for the interest of our connection as for the paper;

        Resolved, That a committee be appointed by


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the chairman to consult with the editor to the end of gaining information in regard to purchasing a press.

        The following committee was appointed: W. F. Butler, R. H. G. Dyson, J. W. Hood, J. H. Smith, B. Pulpress.

        Between the General Conferences of 1864 and 1868, the trustees of the Zion Church in New York and some laymen established a weekly paper, under the auspices and editorial management of their pastor, Rev. S. T. Jones, who was regularly installed as its first religious editor, with Wm. H. Day as its secular editor,--a most creditable paper, named the Zion Standard and Weekly Review, which was published under the auspices of Zion Church, New York, with its business management and publication under Samuel Howard and M. B. Coss. It was a fine weekly journal, published mostly in the interest of Zion Connection. In the General Conference of 1868 convening in Washington, D. C., the publishing board turned over the whole concern, consisting of type and printing press, debts, pro et con, to the General Conference; the action thereon is embraced in the reports of the following committees, submitted to the conference.

        I. Report of the Committee on Zion Standard. The Committee on Zion Standard respectfully submit the following for adoption by the General Conference: We find the whole amount due to the Trustees of Zion Chuch, of New York, to be


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$8,749, and we recommend the General Conference to assume the debt, and take possession of the paper on the 1st day of June, 1868.

M. B. Coss, Sec'y. Jos. P. THOMPSON, Pre .


        II. Report of the Committee on Zion Standard. The committee respectfully state that of the amount due to Zion Church of New York, she will donate to the General Conference $4,500, upon the fulfillment of the following conditions, namely: That the conference pay $1,200 cash, $1,000 in six months, and $2,000 in two years from the first installment, making the total amount to be paid $4,200. Your committee recommend that we take the paper upon the above condition.

M. B. Coss, Sec'y. J. P. THOMPSON, Pres.


        III. Report of the Committee on Zion Standard. The purchase of the paper: We the members of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion church, now in session in the City of Washington, District of Columbia, May 20, 1868, do hereby promise and agree, and have now entered upon that agreement with the Trustees of the A. M. E. Zion Church, New York City, for the purchase of Zion Standard and Weekly Review, of the said city, now the property of said Trustees; to purchase the said paper with all its appurtenances (all its outstanding debts, obligations or encumbrance excepted) from the 1st of June, 1868, for the sum of $8,750. The said corporation of said church, the second party of the above contract, agree upon the fulfillment of the


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said terms, that is to unite upon signing this agreement; the first party of the contract, the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Church, do promise to pay the said corporation, of the second part, the sum of $600, and the further sum of $600 on the 1st of August, 1868, and the further sum of $1,000 on February 1st, 1869, and the further sum of $2,000 on June 1st, 1870, with interest at seven per cent, except the last payment of $2,000, which is to be without interest. We the parties of the second part, Trustees of the A. M. E. Zion Church corporation, do bind ourselves, and successors in office, to fully comply with the terms of this agreement, and to donate to the conference the sum of $4,550 out of the $8,750 mentioned in the contract of purchase. Signed, sealed, and delivered in behalf of the General Conference.

M. B. Coss, Sec'y. J. P. THOMPSON, Pres.


        IV. Report of Committee on Editor of Zion Standard. Your committee recommend: 1st, That the Editor receive twelve hundred dollars for one year; 2d, That he pay his clerk and office hire out of his salary; 3d, That he have the business management of the paper, subject to the advice and control of the following named Board of Managers: J. P. Thompson, Elder of Zion Church, New York; W. H. Decker, G. H. Washington and Jacob Thomas.

M. B. Coss, Secretary.


        From this action of the General Conference in the purchase of the paper its fate was soon sealed,


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and soon Zion Standard and Weekly Review was defunct, leaving the connection without an organ. Between the General Conferences of 1868 and 1872, a paper was started and published by Revs. Jacob P. Hamer and J. E. Price, titled the Zion Church Advocate, which was published semi-monthly in the interest of Zion Connection. At the General Conference convened at Charlotte, N. C., in 1872, the Zion Church Advocate was turned over to the General Conference by Revs. Hamer and Price, and was adopted by the conference as the connection's organ. The General Conference in its action on the subject put its management under the supervision of the Executive Committee of the Book Concern, but its management did not prove a success, and in the interim of the General Conference its publication was suspended, and finally it became defunct.

        In the General Conference held in 1876 at Louisville, Ky., the journal question was again brought up, and the following action was had on the subject, to wit: The report of the Committee on Journal:

        To the Bishops and members of the General Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Connection. Fathers and Brethren: Your Committee on Journal, or Church Organ, respectfully report that they have carefully considered the matter relative to the subject placed in their hands, and recommend the following: 1. The establishment as soon as possible of a journal or organ of the connection, with as little


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outlay of money as possible, consistent with making it efficient upon the plan marked "A" and submitted to the conference. 2. That the journal be kept separate from the Book Concern, as far as its sustainence is concerned. 3. That this General Conference, or the Bishops, elect a Religious Editor, to assist in carrying out the editorial portion of this plan, and edit said journal as soon as practicable. 4. That each delegation present elect now for the Annual Conference which they represent, and elect annually, an assistant editor to represent that conference in the editorial conduct of the journal. 5. That we recommend the establishment and publication of a Sunday-School paper, to be named the A. M. E. Zion Sunday-School Banner, under the auspices of the A. M. E. Zion Connection, at as early a date and as cheap as possible, the International Lessons forming a feature of the Sunday-School Journal. 6. That to make this work a success each elder or preacher in charge of a circuit or station, throughout the extent of our connection, shall personally carry out the 13th article of the plan, viz: to subscribe and pay for two copies, at least, of the journal, at $2.25 per copy each year in advance. If this be not done, a good reason should be shown at the Annual Conference, of which the conference shall be the judge. 7. That the editor or publisher, elected by the General Conference, or the Bishops, shall also be held amenable to his Quarterly, Annual or General Conference for dereliction of duty in connection with


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this work. 8. That the members of this conference, and other ministers and friends present, be offered an opportunity to subscribe either for the paper or the stock, or for both, before we finally adjourn.

        Respectfully submitted on behalf of Committee.

WM. T. BIDDLE,

Secretary.

WM. HOWARD DAY,

Chairman.


        The following is the plan "A" presented by Prof. Wm. H. Day to the conference; to wit:

        To the Rt. Rev. J. J. Moore, and Board of Bishops of the A. M. E. Zion Church in America: Plan for establishing a newspaper which shall also be the general organ of the A. M. E. Zion Connection:

  • 1. Name: Our National Standard.
  • 2. The place of publication: At Harrisburg, Pa., with other places suggested. See Conference Journal, page 284.
  • 3. The character of the paper: A weekly home journal of the North, South, East and West.
  • 4. Motto: Mind constitutes the majesty of man, or taking the motto from the Burning Bush, nec tamen: Not yet consumed.
  • 5. Size of paper: During the first year five or six columns on each page; second year seven columns.
  • 6. Departments of paper: Educational, religious, including church news; political, defending the rights of the people; industrial, local, etc
  • 7. Editors: Educational editor-in-chief, religious
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    editor-in-chief, with assistants in every Annual Conference; local editors for general news in every part of every State in the Union, etc.; conferences, conventions, and general important meetings to be specially reported; the religious editor-in-chief always to be named by the General Conference or the Board of Bishops, to whom he shall be subject.

  • 8. Stock of the paper: Ten thousand (10,000) shares.
  • 9. How owned: One half or five thousand shares to be offered to and to be owned in the interest of the connection, and one half to be offered and owned outside of the church interest, the connection to have the privilege of purchasing the whole ten thousand shares if so desired.
  • 10. . Value of shares: Each share valued at par at five ($5.00) dollars, making the value of the stock fifty thousand dollars.
  • 11. After expenses are paid, at the close of each paper year, a dividend interest of six per cent. shall be paid, or as large an amount as the business will justify.
  • 12. Control of the paper: Each share shall count as one vote in the choice of trustees or business board and in all questions of general business, but the connection shall be entitled to two members of the Board of Control or directors at all times, and more including these two in proportion to the shares of church stock held.
  • 13. Each elder or preacher in charge throughout
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    the connection to subscribe and pay for two copies at least in his circuit or station in the interest of the connection each year.

  • 14. The Board of Control or Directors shall consist of thirteen members, five of whom shall be a quorum to transact business.
  • 15. For the present, two pages of the paper to be devoted to church matters and religious news, subsequently one half of the paper.
  • 16. No one to be responsible for any debts beyond the par value of his or her share or stock.

Respectfully submitted,

Wm. Howard Day.


        The above plan was adopted by the General Conference and Wm. Howard Day was appointed editor-in-chief with an assistant from each annual conference. The plan however failed in its application on account of many of its operators' apathy and their not conforming with its requirements.

        The following is a statement that was made by Bishop J. W. Hood at the General Conference held in Montgomery, Ala., May, 1880, to wit:

        At the close of the last General Conference the members of this district returned home with high hopes of the success of the journal project we had adopted. An effort was made to obtain subscribers and the preachers were urged to subscribe according to the plan proposed. There was much enthusiasm manifested; $50 were raised and over $20 more during the fall; much more was promised and would


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have been forthcoming, but not a paper came after this money was sent. There soon arose a cry from those who had paid their money, "Where is the paper?" Elder Tyler, who had taken the lead in getting subscribers, was pretty roughly handled. Elder Harris, to quiet those whose money he had received, subscribed for the Weekly Witness for them, paying for it out of his own money. Elder Tyler could not thus pay off all whose money he had taken, for the number was too great; yet something had to be done to quiet the claim. Bishop Hood and Elder Tyler compared notes and found that they had both hit upon the same plan. A number of circulars was sent out, asking persons to pay a dollar per month for the support of a monthly paper until it should become self-sustaining. It is regretted that the circulars were not sent to more persons at first, but it was an oversight at the time. Much effort has been made since to increase the number of stockholders, but not much has been accomplished in that direction. By the stockholders' subscription and what other subscriptions could be obtained, the Star has been continued, a press has been purchased, and the whole business is now conducted by our own people. Much credit is due to Elders Tyler, Moore, Harris and Petty, who have had the editorial and business management of the paper, and also to the stockholders who have generously paid twelve dollars and some even more to sustain the paper. We determined from the start


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to pay whatever was necessary to sustain the paper, and it has never failed to appear for a single month from its commencement, except last February, when it was in its transition state. The two issues in April make the numbers complete up to this month. It is comparatively little in debt. We now have, therefore, a fair opening for a weekly paper at no distant date.

        The Star having been run for over two years by a joint stock company of twenty persons, during this time they expended five hundred dollars of their own funds. At the General Conference of 1880 at Montgomery, Ala. they turned the paper over to the General Conference, and the latter appointed A. S. Richardson the editor and C. R. Harris the publisher. It was published a while at Charlotte, N. C., then at Concord, N. C., and then at Salisbury. General Conference having put it under the supervision of the Board of Bishops, at their meeting in Chester, S. C., September, 1882, they appointed Rev. J. McH. Farley the editor and publisher, and it was then removed to Petersburg, Va., where it is at the date of the writing of this history. In 1884, Rev. Farley purchased a new press and type at the cost of seven hundred dollars; thus it stands at this date and is now issued weekly.

        Zion Wesley Institute, incorporated 1879--opened 1880, Salisbury, N. C. General statement: It is evident that there is a growing and urgent demand for the establishment of a greater number of


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schools of high grade for the educational work among the colored people in the South.

        Much has been done already in this direction; and we are not without a keen and grateful appreciation of the goodness of friends who have contributed to the wonderful progress of the last twenty years. But that which is yet to be done is greater by far than that which is done. "There remains much land yet to be possessed."

        The education of 4,000,000 of people is not accomplished in a few days. The intellectual and moral perversions of centuries cannot be righted in a score of years. It is unreasonable to expect it. But the 4,000,000 have grown to nearly 7,000,000. We are forced to believe that the facilities for their training have not been equal to this rapid increase of the people.

        In confirmation of this belief, we have but to notice that all the institutions of high grade in the South, and even in the North, founded for the education of the colored people are crowded every year. Recently many sought admission to such institutions and had to be turned away on account of inadequate facilities for their accommodation.

        This fact may be a conclusive answer to those persons who seriously ask--"Is the negro anxious to learn?"

        He only asks a fair opportunity, and he will learn with a success that is very commendable and often astonishing to his best and most sanguine friends.


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        As the common school system of the South, as a whole, is far from what is desirable, the establishment of schools of high grade here, is particularly necessary. They greatly facilitate the work of the State in the preparation of competent teachers and in the general diffusion of intelligence among the people. In fact a great many worthy young men and women would be crippled in their efforts for improvement were it not for the work of these higher institutions.

        A desire to help meet this long felt necessity led to the establishment of the Zion Wesley Institute. This institution is under the auspices of the African M. E. Zion Church in America. But persons of all evangelical denominations are welcomed, and a respectful deference is given their denominational proclivities. Members of the various branches of the Christian church are already included in our list of students.

        Incorporation: By an enactment of the General Assembly of North Carolina the Institute was incorporated on the 14th day of March, A. D. 1879, under the corporate title of "Zion Wesley Institute."

        Section 1 of the Act declares, that J. W. Hood, T. H. Lomax, C. R. Harris, W. H. Thurber, Z. T. Pearsall, A. York, Wm. J. Moore, R. H. Simmons, A. B. Smyser, and their associates and successors in office be, and they are hereby created and constituted a body politic and corporate by the name and style of "Trustees of Zion Wesley Institute."


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        First Session: The first session of the Institute began on rented premises at Concord, N. C., the 1st of January, 1880, with Rev. C. R. Harris as principal. A part of his parsonage was used as recitation rooms. The enrollment for the session was 11 students.

        Second session: This session began in the fall of 1880. There was an enrollment of 23 students. Prof. A. S. Richardson, LL. B., was principal. Each year made it clear to the trustees that more convenient accommodations were urgent. The Lord graciously opened a door.

        Great Britain's generous aid: During the Methodist Ecumenical Council held in London in September, 1880, Bishop J. W. Hood, President of the Board of Trustees, requested Rev. J. C. Price, A. M., (as he intended to remain in the country) to travel in the interest of the Zion Wesley Institute. Mr. Price gave up his own plans and consented to do so. He was in Europe, principally in Great Britain, nearly twelve months. He advocated the claims of the Freedmen to a Christian education--higher, more complete and more widely diffused than that hitherto enjoyed by them. While Mr. Price spoke on the general work among the Freedmen, he also made special appeals in behalf of the particular work he was commissioned to represent.

        It was a "bad year." There were many local claims that could not be ignored. Notwithstanding these drawbacks the friends of the Negro in Great


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Britain, especially in England, responded most generously to these appeals. The amount raised was between nine and ten thousand dollars. The money was left in England in the hands of Rev. George Bowden, W. W. Pocock, Esq., and the Rev. George Penman, who had kindly consented to act as sub-treasurers in England for the Trustees, and held all money subject to their order.

        The purchase of a permanent site: While Mr. Price was in England, the Trustees selected a most beautiful site for the Zion Wesley Institute. The cost of it was four thousand six hundred dollars. More than one thousand dollars were subscribed by friends at Salisbury. A check for the balance was sent to Bishop J. W. Hood and the purchase was completed. We now have the deed for the same.

        Location: This site is in and near Salisbury, Rowan county, North Carolina. It consists of 40 acres of land, one main building which cost in 1868, $6,000, and two smaller buildings.

        Salisbury is in the western part of the State and situated at the junction of the Western North Carolina and the Richmand & Danville--North Carolina Division--Railroads. Thus it will be seen that it is very accessible. Persons coming from places South of us reach here, via Charlotte, easily; those from the West, Kentucky, Tennessee, &c., either via Charlotte or the Western North Carolina Railroad; and those from the North and East by the Richmond & Danville Railroad, via Washington and Richmond.


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        For beauty of situation there is scarcely a more desirable site for an educational institution in the State. Being near the famous mountains of Western North Carolina, Salisbury partakes of those salubrious and health-giving features of that section of this State whose delightfulness causes it to be termed the "Land of the Sky." Consequently we are almost entirely free from those miasmatic and malarious influences which are so objectionable in some parts of this and many other Southern States.

        Part of the 40 acres is within the corporate limits of Salisbury. But we are neither too near nor too far from the center of town. Fifteen minutes' walk brings one to the business portion of the town.

        New Faculty: At the semi-annual meeting of the Board of Bishops at Chester, S. C., September 1882, the following named persons were elected officers and instructors in the Zion Wesley Institute: Rev. J. C. Price, A. M., President; Rev. C. R. Harris, Curator; Prof. E. Moore, A. M., Secretary, and Mrs. M. E. Harris, Matron.

        Third Session: This session began the 9th of October, 1882, on our own premises, for which we feel gratefully indebted to all our friends, especially to our liberal donors in Great Britain. We have now (May, 1883) an enrollment of 94 students. Three States, and 25 cities and towns are represented.

        Our success has been far beyond our most sanguine expectation. God has surely blessed our


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efforts here, not only in giving numerical strength, but also in the happy conversion of some of our promising young men and women. Nineteen students have professed religion during this session. At the meetings held in the Institute in observance of the Week of Prayer, nine were converted. During a more recent revival, ten professed faith in Christ. God has thus evidenced His favor; we can only trust for the favor of men.

        A Young Men's Christian Association has been organized, and a committee of five or six of the members hold services at the jail one hour every Sunday afternoon.

        Some of the candidates for the ministry take work regularly every Sabbath in the vicinity of Salisbury; and two of them walk 20 and 42 miles respectively to their appointments on the Lord's day.

        Improvements: From applications for admission received in the early part of the session we were satisfied that our accommodations were inadequate. So we had a two story building erected as a temporary dormitory hall for young men. The young ladies are in the main building with the teachers.

        Notwithstanding our enlarged accommodations we find ourselves crowded almost beyond endurance. Some of the classes have been compelled to recite in one of the dining rooms. This causes us great inconvenience

        Enrollment doubled: We are assured, from letters already received and through other sources


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of information, that our number will be doubled next session. Since we are crowded now, an enlargement of our work is a necessity. To thus widen the scope of our usefulness we look prayerfully to the Christianity of Christians and to the consideration of philanthropic friends everywhere.

        Buildings among our most urgent needs: Who will help us say "yet there is room" to those young men and women who being worthy seek an opportunity to have their hearts and minds improved? A hall for young men, one for young ladies, and a chapel are among our special wants.

        Building fund of $25,000--Generous promise of the late Hon. Wm. E. Dodge: As a people, and many of us as individuals, we owe a debt of gratitude to this prince among philanthropists that we can never pay, unless it be by earnest and best endeavor to glorify Christ in whose Cross he gloried, and to elevate our people about whose elevation he was so greatly concerned. A few months prior to his death he manifested his interest in our work here by the following generous promise:

New York, Nov. 20th, 1882.

        In order to secure the sum of $25,000 for new buildings for the Zion Wesley Institute, at Salisbury, N. C., I agree that whenever they shall have secured new subscriptions amounting to $20,000 towards the object, I will add as below:

Wm. E. Dodge, $5,000.


        In conversation with the President of the Institute


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Mr. Dodge stated that with this $5,000 he would erect the hall for the young men, and he would build it, if it cost more. This building is to be known as "Dodge Hall."

        We are assured by the Rev. D. Stuart Dodge that if the condition is fulfilled, the amount promised by his father will be given at the legitimate time.

        We now kindly appeal to our friends for the hall for young ladies and for the chapel. We have already secured small subscriptions to the amount of $5,000. For the completion of this fund so kindly started by Mr. Dodge we earnestly solicit $15,000.

        General information: This Institution for the training of young men and women for religious and educational work in this country and in Africa, is under the control of the A. M. E. Zion Church in America. It is open alike to male and female students.

        Courses of study: Three courses of study are provided, viz: 1. Normal Course, for the thorough training of teachers. 2. Theological Course, for the preparation of candidates for the Ministry. 3. Classical Course, for a more complete acquaintanceship with Languages and Belles Letters. A Preparatory Department is also provided for the purpose of qualifying students for entering the Normal Course.

        Devotional exercises: All students in the Institute are required to attend religious services on the Lord's day, and such exercises of instruction and recitation as may be assigned to them. Devotional exercises, consisiing of reading the Scriptures, singing


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and prayer, are held with the students in the Chapel every day. A prayer meeting is held by the students one evening every week.

        Terms of admission: Applicants for admission must be over twelve years of age, and must bring certificates of good moral character. Each pupil should bring a Bible. It is needed for private reading, for the Sunday School, and for the weekly Bible lesson. It is well to bring the text books formerly used, as they may be exchanged. All should be provided with warm clothing. Young women should have rubbers and waterproofs.

        Expenses: Students, not boarders, will be charged one dollar per month for tuition.

        Tuition, Board, Washing, Fuel and Lights, eight dollars per month, payable in advance at the first of each month. Boarders must furnish their own pillows, sheets, quilts, blankets and towels. Students will be allowed to board in private families or at their own rooms, provided special permission be first obtained from the principal. All pupils are required to work for the Institution at least one hour each day; but no services will be required that are calculated to hinder them in their studies. Scholarships will be furnished at eighty dollars per session.

        Rules: Students are required: 1. To comply with all regulations for the promotion of health and cleanliness; to keep their rooms in good order, and at all times open to the inspection of the matron or any of the teachers. 2. To observe strictly the hours


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of study, rest and labor, as prescribed by the President or his assistants. 3. To make good all damage done by them to the buildings or furniture. 4. To rise in the morning at the ringing of the first bell, put their rooms in order and proceed to study one hour before breakfast. 5. To put out all lights at the appointed time. 6. To see that all garments are plainly marked before putting them into the wash. 7. To report in advance inability to perform any assigned duty. 8. To maintain at all times, in the buildings, a quiet demeanor, and carefulness in all movements. 9. To render a cheerful obedience to all the requirements of any teacher.

        Students are forbidden: 1. To leave the grounds of the institution without permission obtained from the President or person acting in his stead. 2. To send or receive mail of any kind, except through the President or Matron. 3. To call on or hold conversation with those of the opposite sex in the school rooms or on the grounds, without special permission. 4. To drink intoxicating liquors unless prescribed by a physician, or to use profane language, or tobacco in any form. 5. To deface the buildings inside or outside, by marking, whittling, or by any other means.

        Students are at all times considered members of the Institution until they complete their course, or regularly terminate their connection with it.

        Trustees of Zion Wesley Institute: Bishop J.


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W. Hood, Fayettevillle, N. C.; Bishop T. H. Lomax, Charlotte, N. C.; Bishop J. J. Moore, D. D., York, Pa.; Bishop S. T. Jones, D. D., Washington, D. C.; Bishop J. P. Thompson, Newburgh, N. Y.; Bishop W. H. Hillery, San Francisco, Cal.; Rev. C. R. Harris, Salisbury, N. C.; Rev. W. H. Thurber, New Berne, N. C.; Rev. Z. T. Pearsall, Tarboro, N. C.; Rev. A. York, New Berne, N. C.; Rev. Wm. J. Moore, Wilson, N. C.; Rev. R. H. Simmons, Fayetteville, N. C.; Rev. A. B. Smyer, Beaufort, N. C.; Hon. Hugh Cale, Elizabeth City, N. C.; J. R. Nocho, Esq., Greensboro, N. C.; Thomas Scott, Esq., Petersburg, Va.; Rev. A. Hannon, Montgomery, Ala.; Rev. G. H. Washington, Providence, R. I.; J. H. Butler, Esq., Baltimore, M. D.; Rev. C. C. Petty, Montgomery, Ala.; Jackson Parker, Esq., Louisville, Ky.; Benjamin Maynard, Esq., Knoxville, Tenn.

        Officers of the Board: Rt. Rev. J. W. Hood, President; Rev. C. R. Harris, Sec. and Treas.

        Faculty: Rev. Joseph C. Price, A. M., President, Professor of Mental and Moral Science and Theology; Edward Moore, A. M., Professor of Greek and Latin Languages and Literature, and Sacred Geography and Biblical Antiquities; Rev. Cicero R. Harris, Professor of Mathematics, Natural Science and Homiletics; Rev. W. Harvey Goler, A. M., (Halifax, Novia Scotia) Professor of Rhetoric, Greek Exegesis, Biblical Literature and History; Wm. J. Curry, A. B., Instructor in Higher English.


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Mrs. S. L. M. Moore, Teacher in Preparatory Department; Miss Ellen Dade, (of Philadelphia,) Instructor of Vocal and Instrumental Music; Mrs. M. E. Harris, Matron; Rev. W. H. Goler, Librarian.


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CHAPTER IX.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF THE PRELATES OF THE AFRICAN METHODIST EPISCOPAL ZION CHURCH IN AMERICA.

        The writer's object in furnishing these sketches is to give the present and also the future membership of our church some knowledge of the men that have been entrusted with the helm of the grand old ship of Zion, a galaxy of episcopal dignitaries whose records Zion's sons can read appreciatively. It is useless to attempt by eulogistic efforts to pay becoming tributes to their cherished memories, their deeds that have bequeathed to us and our children our glorious connection. In them has been left a monument that will outlive human encomiums; a monument that awakens in every heart of Zion's sons sentiments of gratitude, that engrave themselves upon the immortal marble of our souls, as lasting as time and eternity. Their Christian deeds have been crystalized into an epitaph on time's memory, that he who hears the first blast of the resurrection trumpet will read.

        Bishop James Varrick was born in the State of New York, near Newburg. He was one of the nine male members that made the first movement

Illustration

        BISHOP J. VARRICK, NO. 1, A FOUNDER.

        BISHOP C. RUSH, NO. 2, A FOUNDER.

        MOTHER CHURCH, IN N. Y.

        BISHOP WM. MILLER. NO. 3, A FOUNDER.

        BISHOP G. GALBREATH, NO. 4, A FOUNDER.


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towards establishing the Zion Church in 1796, New York City, which was the first colored Methodist organization established in America, separate from the white Methodist Church. He was one of the first trustees of Zion Church, and in 1821 he was made District Chairman over the societies or churches embraced in the New York Conference District. In 1882 he was elected the first superintendent of the Zion's Connection. He was a man of great firmness, patience, perseverance, forethought, caution and uprightness. Plain, but orthodox in his preaching, his memory is one of the revered relics of the history of Zion's Connection.

        Bishop Christopher Rush was born in the State of North Carolina, Craven County, in 1777, (the same year that slavery was abolished in the State of Vermont); his parents were of slave descent, he was of genuine African type. He embraced religion in 1793, at the age of sixteen years. He came to New York in 1798, five years after he embraced religion, being then twenty-one years of age; in 1803 he joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church (afterwards known as the African M. E. Z. Church); in 1815 he was licensed to preach, and in 1822 he was ordained a deacon, and elder on the same day in the first Annual Conference. On the 18th day of May, 1828, in General Conference he was elected General Superintendent or Bishop of the connection;


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In this office he served twenty-eight years. He was the second man that filled the episcopal office in our connection. His discontinuance in the office some years before his decease was in consequence of the loss of his sight, which was not only grievous to him, but also to the Zion Connection; it was an irreparable loss.

        His personal constitution: Physically: he was of low stature, of prominent muscular development, a bilious temperament and a healthy constitution; he was capable of great physical endurance. Mentally: his intellectual faculties were deep seated, strong and vigorous; as a reasoner, he was clear and cogent; as a contestant, he was insuperable; as a theologian, he was profound; as a Scriptorian, replete. His fund of knowledge was vast and varied; his mental ability and general knowledge were so ample that he was ever prepared to hold sway with public criticism on all popular and great questions of the day. Although he was debarred by the prejudice of caste (tolerated in this nation) from collegiate training, yet by his extraordinary work of self culture, his scholarly attainments astonished all that came in contact with him.

        His moral constitution: He was possessed of radical moral sensibilities; in this, nature had made him a favorite, and by his tenacious adherence to moral principles he stood as a moral paragon; in social ranks his sense of human justice and equity no one could impeach; his religious nature was the


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sovereign development of his moral constitution; his early espousal of Christianity, and his constant and eager search after its great truths, and his maintainance of an unimpeached Christian deportment (of eighty years), all go to establish the fact of his strong religious endowments.

        His manners: He was reserved in manners, stern in address, but agreeable and entertaining in his conversation, always instructive. He was an uncompromising foe to slavery, to intemperance, to American negro prescription, to episcopal dominancy, and to ecclesiastical oligarchy; equally uncompromising to human pride, ostentation and vanity.

        His common personal demeanor: In his deportment he was plain, unassuming and uninsinuating; he was homely in his attire, common in his diet, and easy to serve; it was a studied habit with him to give as little trouble as possible to his attendants, either at home or abroad; this was a style of deportment he vigorously inculcated among all the young ministers, with many other highly important lessons, from many of which instructions the writer received great benefit.

        His ministerial bearing: His deportment as a clergyman was always grave and dignified in all circles of society; in the pulpit he was always very earnest, indicative of his ever consciousness of the responsibility of the work laid upon him. He was very observant of the conduct of his young ministers and always had a word of good advice to give them


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in relation to their studies for their calling or on their ministerial deportment. He was ever willing to share with the hardships of his ministers and took common fare in life with them.

        His style as a preacher: As a preacher his style was commanding; his voice was full, clear and musical; he was profound in thought, earnest and pungent, and sometimes vehement. He maintained at all times great selfpossession in the pulpit, never aimed at embellishment in his discourses, but impressed his subjects upon attentive hearers, edifying the religious and awakening the unconverted.

        His ministerial work: He entered the itinerency early in his ministerial career, and as a traveling preacher was very constant, zealous and successfull in his evangelical labors; he had to suffer hardships and privations, which were the lot of all colored ministers in his day. But his love of Christ, of the salvation of souls, his interest in the church and the well-being of his race prompted him to endure hardships as a good soldier. He was possessed of extraordinary legislative ability, was far-sighted in scanning the doubtful results of ecclesiastical measures, and his opinion generally controlled church legislation. He was most conclusive in his deductions on all questions submitted to his judgment, and was peculiarly cautious in making any new departure in the economy of the church government. After being elected to the office of Bishop, he filled the position with great ability and to the full satisfaction of


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all his subordinates, whether ministerial or lay; during the entire period of episcopal office, he conducted the executive affairs with the highest degree of efficiency, and when deprived of his sight, being disqualified for executive duties, his counsel was eagerly sought by his successors in office and the church generally; and although thus afflicted, he would attend the annual and general conferences, that he might take part in their legislation on vital subjects. This he continued to do until he became too feeble to visit the conferences. He was finally confined to his room, which continued for several years before his demise; being ripe for the kingdom of glory, God took him to his inheritance on high.

        Bishop William Miller was born on the 23d of August, A. D. 1775, in Queen Ann County, State of Maryland; he became a resident of the City of New York, where he lived some time and worked at the cabinet business. Being a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he became impressed with the sacred calling; in 1808 he received license to preach in the M. E. Church, and after some time he was ordained a deacon by Bishop Asbury of the same church, and later, having joined Bishop Allen's party, he attempted to re-ordain him. On becoming attached to the Zion connection, he labored ardently in that connection in its original difficulties, and upon evincing a great interest in that connection, he enlisted


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the confidence and affections of ecclesiastical department and connection in general, and in 1840 he was elected Assistant Superintendent, the duties of which office he discharged with dignity. Having moved from New York, he took up his residence in the city of Philadelphia, where he enjoyed the highest boon of domestic life, till in 1845, in September, afflictions took the advantage of his declining years, and brought him to the pillow of languishing; in a short time he was compelled to surrender to the ravages of disease, and on December 6th, 1845, he was summoned to the tribunal of Almighty God, to answer for his stewardship. Wm. Miller was an example to the Christian community, in Christian ardor and zeal; as a preacher he was simple, but clear and pathetic, commanding great precision, always evincing the highest Christian affection; his beneficent hand was always ready to be extended; his treatment of the subordinate ministers was highly commendable, impartial and unprescribed; council was always in await for the humble solicitant among the ministry--but, alas! our father, brother and friend, is gone.

        This Religious man, who was thus highly characterized, and upon whom paramount responsibilities have been imposed, was thus hurled from his transcendent position in mortal association; his spirit was convoked to the God of its origin--the father of its first breath--the fountain of its chief ecstasies. Death sometimes only makes blood kin


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and family circle feel his authority and submit to his ravages, but in this case he has thrust his irresistible hand beyond this limit, striking from his sphere a functionary of the highest religious responsibility--breaking up the great deep of affections--clothing a religious connection in habiliments of mourning--leaving a consort, kindred and friends, to pay homage at the altar of bereavement. But he is gone!--who could stay his spirit. Memory can but cherish a fond recollection of him that's gone.


                         The aged sire is gone to rest,
                         He left the world below,
                         To rest upon the Savior's breast,
                         Escaping every foe.


                         Though consort, kindred, friend might mourn,
                         He could no longer stay;
                         On angels' pinions swiftly borne
                         To realms of endless day.


                         His silver locks no altars wreath;
                         Nor voice earth's temple fill;
                         But where enraptured spirits breathe,
                         His voice the regions thrill.


                         Melodious strains his notes control,
                         Proclaiming love divine;
                         While him angelic throngs behold,
                         'Midst cloudless glory shine.

        Bishop George Galbreath was born in Lancaster County, Pa., March 4th, A. D. 1799. The names of his parents were Adam and Eve, they were at the


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time of his birth slaves, and belonged to Dr. Galbreath. He, (Bro. Galbreath) was raised in the family of Mr. Moses Wilson, in Hanover Township, Pa., who sent him to school with his own children, and there he acquired a common school education. He continued with this gentleman until within two years of the time he was to be emancipated. He learned the carpenter's trade in Lancaster County with Mr. John Miller, and traveled with him through the States of Pennsylvania and Maryland building barns, etc. He subsequently learned the cabinetmaker's trade with Mr. John Okey of Middletown, Pa., where in 1826 he embraced religion among the Winebrenarians, and joined the M. E. Church, and remained with them until Rev. J. D. Richardson organized the Wesleyan Society at that place, at which time he joined the society and was licensed to preach. He joined the Philadelphia Annual Conference of the A. M. E. Zion Connection, held in the 1st Colored Wesley Church in Lombard Street, Philadelphia, on the 14th of June, 1830, and was appointed to the Harrisburg Circuit, in charge of Rev. David Stevens.

        As a man, Bishop Galbreath possessed a vigorous, active, firm and benevolent mind. He thought with energy and quickness, and he dreaded not the labor of thinking. In promptitude of conception and readiness of utterance few were his equals. These qualities in early life enabled him to preach with a frequency of which the instances are rare, and


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through life they gave him a consequence and utility in deliberative bodies to which few can attain. To the opinions which he formed, he adhered with steadiness. He was never frightened from them by the number of his opponents, nor soothed by the respectability of their characters or stations. His behavior indeed was the farthest removed from disrespect, but he was in an eminent degree a man of undaunted spirit. The firmness of his mind was a leading trait, a prominent feature of his whole character. It enabled him in all vicissitudes and under the severest trials of life--and he was familiar with them--to maintain an equanimity of conduct which seemed to flow from the fortitude of the philosopher mingled with the patience and resignation of the Christian. His kindness and benevolence were great and extensive, they were the ornament of his other virtues. As a husband, a father, a brother, a friend, he was singularly indulgent, tender, and affectionate, but his benevolence was not confined to these limits; it led him to be in a peculiar manner the friend of the oppressed; he espoused their cause and advanced their interests with the warmest zeal. In his death the oppressed have lost one of their best friends and warmest advocates. It was this part of his character which led him to connect himself with certain humane institutions, and which rendered him one of their most active, attentive and valuable members It was his benevolent temper likewise which rendered him so highly esteemed by almost every denomination


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of Christians, and which disposed him to unite an extensive charity for those who differed from him in matters of faith or opinion with an earnest contention for what he esteemed the truth. Benevolence was indeed a shining part of his character; he took an exquisite pleasure in communicating or increasing happiness wherever and whenever he had opportunity. Had it been in his power, he would have made every human creature happy, and as far as it was in his power, he never failed in doing so in the most effectual manner. His desire and study was to do all possible good to mankind in general, yet, without breaking in upon this plan, some were the objects of his more peculiar attention. This may be justly said of his younger brethren who served with him in the itinerency, who always experienced in him the kindness of a father. His seniority and his superior influence gave him frequent opportunities of doing them good offices which he never failed to improve with as much pleasure to himself as they produced to them. His own improvement as a scholar and as a clergyman abundantly qualified him for the direction of his younger brethren, and none ever followed it without finding it to his advantage to do so.

        As a Scholar, he was considerably distinguished. He early discovered a thirst for knowledge. Original genius was peculiarly his attribute. The native qualities of his mind qualified him to penetrate into


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the different sciences, and his unremitted diligence left no field of knowledge unexplored. There were no limits to his curiosity. His inquiries were spread over the whole face of nature. The study of man seemed to be his delight, and if his genius had any special bias, it lay in discovering those things that made men wiser and happier. As truth was the sole object of his researches, he embraced no system which that did not authorize. In short, he laid the whole volume of nature open before him, and diligently perused it. As a Christian, he shone conspicuously. He lived the religion which he professed. The spirit of the gospel seemed to have tinctured his whole mind and to possess a constant and powerful influence on his heart. He was truly and remarkably an example of the life of God in the soul of man. His fellowship with the father of his spirit, and his conversation with heaven, appeared to be almost uninterrupted. Nor was he less distinguished in active duty. He sought all occasions of serving his Lord. Of him it may be said with truth that he went about doing good. He had a serious and pious turn without any mixture of that melancholy which unfortunately too often attends it and renders it useless to the world. He never seemed forgetful of his obligations to Almighty God, and his immediate dependence upon him--he always acknowledged him in all his ways, owning his power, adoring his wisdom, and referring himself and all his concerns to his righteous disposal. He had the


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highest esteem for the peculiar doctrines of revelation; and especially as they are explained in the gospel of Christ--and he considered even with rapturous admiration and gratitude the wonderful plan of redemption and the still more wonderful execution of it by the incarnation and sufferings of the Son of God. His faith in the divine promises was strong, active, and vigorous, being conscious of having sincerely endeavored to the best of his power to perform the condition on which they are suspended. With such faith and resignation as this, he went on from year to year, promoting the glory of God, advancing the happiness of his fellow-creatures, and perfecting himself, till at length, having finished the work assigned him, and being ripe for immorality, God was pleased to translate him from the wilderness of this world to the city of the living God--the heavenly Jerusalem from the company of his earthly friends to that glorious society which consists of angels and archangels as well as of the spirits of just men made perfect.

        As a preacher of the gospel, he was indefatigable, evangelical, and successful. He was a workman that needed not to be ashamed, rightly dividing the word of life. He was remarkably animated in his public addresses, and unusually popular. An intimation that he was to preach was the sure signal of a crowded auditory. His manner was always warm and forcible, and his instructions always practical. He had a talent of touching the conscience


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and seizing the heart, almost peculiar to himself. He dwelt much on the great, plain and essential truths of the gospel. He was also one properly and peculiarly qualified for planting and organizing churches in places destitute of the regular administration of gospel ordinances.

        The closing scene of Bishop Galbreath's life: We will relate in detail the information given by those who were eye-and-ear-witnesses. Bishop Galbreath was confined to bed some nine or ten weeks in Philadelphia with the asthma. He was visited, during his sickness, by Rev. David Stevens, who was then Pastor of Wesley Church, Lombard Street, Philadelphia. He took occasion to interrogate the Bishop relative to his prospects of heaven. To which he answered that his confidence in God was strong, and he could say as did Job: "And though after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see God, whom I shall see for myself, and my eyes shall behold, and not another's." He furthermore said, "I am nothing, as one thrown among the rubbish, yea, a crumb, but God will magnify that crumb." He remarked to his nurse the day previous to his death, that there had been a great deal said about dying, but that no one knew anything about death until they came to try it. "I have," said he, "been preparing for death for many years, and yet I know nothing of the change or feelings of it." He was frequently heard to say that he was God Almighty's man, and that the Lord was pleased with


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him. Between 3 and 4 o'clock in the morning on the day that he died, he said to those who were in the room, "How hard it is to stand in Jordan between two worlds, for the water is cold, and I feel chilly from the bottom of my feet to my heart." A few minutes after 4 o'clock, he cried out, "I am standing in the middle of Jordan, I have let the world go, and I have got my right hand on Eternity." These were the last words he was heard to utter. In a few minutes subsequently his spirit winged its flight to its home in Heaven to be forever with the Lord.


                         Our Superintendent the haven has gain'd
                         Outflying the tempest and wind,
                         His rest he has sooner obtained,
                         And left his brethren behind;
                         With songs let us follow his flight,
                         And mount with his Spirit above;
                         He's escaped to the Mansions of Light,
                         And is lodg'd in the Eden of Love.

        Bishop Joseph Jackson Clinton, D. D., was born October 3, 1823, in Philadelphia, Penn. He studied the common branches of English education in the famous Mr. Bird's school in Philadelphia; thence went to the Allegheny Institute. He embraced religion when fifteen years of age, and was licensed as a local preacher when seventeen. In 1843 he joined the itinerancy, and became a traveling preacher; in 1845 he was ordained a deacon; in 1846 he was ordained an elder; in 1856 he was

Illustration

        BISHOP W. H. BISHOP.

        BISHOP J. J. CLINTON.

        BISHOP G. A. SPYWOOD.

        BISHOP J. SIMMONS.

        BISHOP S. T. SCOTT.


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elected superintendent; in 1864 made a bishop; and died May 24, 1881, at Atlantic City, N. J., after a protracted affliction of a paralytic nature.

        In speaking of this distinguished and lamented son of Zion, with what propriety and emphasis we can say of his demise, "There is a prince and a great man fallen."

        There are few really great men in this world, when we consider what properly constitutes a great man. It is not simply genius, or a high development of some one or two superior talents, or intellectual powers, or a vast fund of accumulated knowledge; that makes a great man; many men have these, yet they are far from being truly great men. A great man is one in whom concentrates an unusual number of those native qualities and attainments that are most elevating and ennobling to mankind--such native qualities as a love of divine things, a deep veneration for God; a love of humanity or mankind; a deep sense of human justice. Men who have been benefactors of mankind while they lived, and after death--by the devotion of their native talents, their attainments, and time, and the sacrifice of life; men seeking the happiness of others at the sacrifice of their own--such illustrious specimens of humanity as the great Charles Sumner, William Lloyd Garrison, Garret Smith, Wilberforce, and Howard--such men, who lived only to glorify God and bless mankind, may be reckoned among great men.

        May we not say of our lamented Bishop Clinton,


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that he was a true representative of those human excellences? (1.) In his noble nature was a profound love of divine things; this was developed in his early espousal of religion (at the age of fifteen years), and this ennobling nature, prompted by the tuition of a Christian mother, found a strong development at that early period of his life.

        (2.) His heart, in its natural promptings, went out after the common and special well-being of his fellow men; this was evidenced in his early engagement in the work of the Christian ministry. The further attestation of the strength of his philanthropic nature, was his connection with the underground railroad (in the palmy days of slavery), in which he was frequently exposed to great personal dangers.

        (3). He had a high and holy ambition to make himself qualified to do good among his fellow men; hence, when he was but a youth, he would sacrifice comforts and pleasures to pursue his studies successfully, even in his early school going; this is the testimony of his faithful matron.

        (4.) His sympathetic nature was strongly developed; sanctified as it was by the spirit of Christianity, he was always willing to share the sufferings of others.

        (5.) He was naturally faithfully devoted to the cause he espoused, and with his Christian principles, no service was too hard, no sacrifice too great to serve his cause. I have been side by side with him


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in ministerial hardships, when he seemed to take pleasure in enduring them.

        (6.) His attainments were of no ordinary character: 1. His knowledge of human nature. 2. The importance of his holy calling. 3. His social relations--filial, conjugal, parental--these had their true development in his whole life's deportment; in his common social relations he rendered to all classes their just dues, from the highest to the lowest. 4. All good institutions had his favor and co-operation--to many of which he was a contributing member and official representative.

        Surely, then, we may rank him among the truly great men of our day; "There is a prince and a great man fallen." May we not justly designate him a prince? Speaking of his death, may we not say, as said the royal singer, a "prince has fallen?" As a prince, he stood at the head of his rank of distinguished men. 1. The work of his ministerial labors during life was princely; through his instrumentality, during his ministerial efforts, 100,000 Sunday School scholars were brought into our connection; during his episcopal office he organized ten annual conferences in the Zion connection; he also took into the connection 700 itinerant preachers.

        2. He was a princely executive officer. In this high function he had no superior; for twenty-five years he filled the office with complete success and satisfaction to his Church.

        2. He was a prince in the pulpit, in power, dignity,


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and effectiveness. There was in his oratory the happiest result of nature and art combined; his eloquence would sometimes seem to be charged with divine electricity, thus wrapping in heavenly rapture his whole audience, while his heart would seem to be charged with the fire of pathos, stirring the most stoical. The topical was generally his method of homiletical arrangement; in his discourses he was concise, perspicuous, forcible and masterly; in their rendition, his language was never wanting in chasteness--therefore efficiency never failed to yield his efforts success. But this "prince and great man has fallen,"--with us he is no more.

        We humbly bow to the divine mandate that bereaves us of this bright star that scintillated in the horizon of Zion's spreading hopes. In his last converse with his kindred ones, as they stood by to watch his departing spirit as it took leave of time and mortal sense--with ministers and other friends that gathered around his last pillow of life--he said to them, just as he sunk into the shades of death, "All is well; I am ready for the glorious change,"--then fell asleep, and bad us all on earth adieu.


                         This mortal sleeps beneath the sod,
                         There arduous cares in rapture end;
                         His spirit borne aloft to God,
                         With purest saints immortal blends.


                         A crown immortal is his due;
                         For our loss and grief, but tears remain.
                         With a robe of white, forever new,
                         We hope with him to meet again,


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Illustration

        BISHOP S. D. TOLBOT

        BISHOP P. ROSS.

        BISHOP J. TOPPAN.

        BISHOP J. D. BROOKS.

        BISHOP J. W. LOGUEN.


                         His work will coming ages bless,
                         And generations yet unborn,
                         When those now living sink to rest;
                         With sacred tributes strew his tomb.

        Bishop James Simmons was born in Accomac County, on the eastern shore of Maryland; he became religious early in life, entered the ministry when young, was made a Bishop in 1854, and died in 1870. He was a man irreproachable in his character, of stern demands in his requirements in Christian duty, and very rigid in exacting the requirements of church government. He was plain in his style, and simple in his preaching; he was gentlemanly in his bearing and very self-reliant; he served his connection faithfully and died in advanced years ripe for the kingdom of glory.

        Bishop John Tappan was born in North Carolina, of slave parents; he was a very successful preacher in Zion connection, and was a member of the New York Annual Conference during the most of his ministry. He was a very plain but spirited and forcible preacher. He was made Bishop in 1854, and died in 1870 or 1871.

        Bishop John J. Moore, D. D., was born in Berkley County, West Virginia, of slave parents about the year 1818. His mother was born free but at the age of fifteen years was kidnapped in


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Maryland and sold into slavery in West Virginia, where she married the Bishop's father, a slave. Her maiden name was Riedoubt and her husband's name was Hodge, but a change of owners caused him to adopt the surname of Moore. When the Bishop was six years old his parents by the advice and assistance of friendly Quakers attempted a flight from slavery with their six children, of whom the Bishop was the youngest. They were recaptured, however, and the oldest four children sold South. A second attempt to gain their liberty was successful, and the Bishop's parents with their remaining two children after many hardships and sufferings reached Bedford County, Pennsylvania. Here a friendly farmer gave them employment and the two boys, William and John, were bound out for a term to his son, also a farmer. Owing to the pursuit of their former owner, the Bishop's parents were obliged to leave the settlement, but the Bishop remained secure on the farm. He was taught to read and write by his employer, and acquired a knowledge of farming. The last part of his apprenticeship was served to a brother-in-law of his former master, who exacted six months over the proper time and did not furnish the schooling or clothes and cash provided by law after the expiration of the term.

        After leaving his ungenerous master, he worked for six months for a farmer in the settlement at seven dollars per month. Having saved about fifteen dollars, he concluded to visit Harrisburg, and walked


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the sixty miles to that place in two days. Harrisburg opened a new world to him, and he regarded the change from his early surroundings with amazement. His small capital becoming exhausted, he sought employment and labored for several months as a hod carrier. He then worked at hotel waiting and finally became messenger in a bank, where he remained some time, saving his earnings and making some advancement in a common education.

        In 1833, he became religiously impressed and experienced a spiritual change of heart. Leaving Harrisburg, he visited his old home in the mountains, where he remained some time, having obtained employment as porter in a store. He became deeply impressed upon the subject of preaching the gospel, in 1834, and after a severe mental struggle, he yielded, and returning to Harrisburg, sought and obtained an exhorter's license. Nearly a year later he received a license to preach. The greatest obstacle he felt to his acceptance of the call was his illiteracy, he simply being able to read, write and cipher a little. So in 1836 and the following year he employed teachers to instruct him in English grammar, geography, arithmetic and other studies. From the English branches, he engaged in the study of Latin, Greek and Hebrew, in which he acquired some proficiency, and he has continued his earnest efforts of self-culture until the present day.

        In 1839, he became connected with a body of itinerant ministers composing the Philadelphia Annual


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Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church. Of this Conference he continued a member until 1868, when he was elevated to the dignity of Bishop. During his connection with that Conference he traveled on numerous circuits and filled stations in various parts of Pennsylvania, Maryland and Ohio. Crossing the Allegheny Mountains as a traveling preacher, he proclaimed life and salvation to the fugitive slaves, who had found an asylum in these mountainous regions. Among the coal and iron mines he carried the gospel on foot, walking thirty miles a day and preaching at night. He left Baltimore in 1852 for California, where he established several churches, one in San Francisco worth fifty thousand dollars, the colored people in this country having none which excel it. Returning to the East with his family in 1868, he was made Bishop, in which capacity he has served for fourteen years, having discharged in that office a mission to England and also to British America.

        Bishop Moore has always taken an active part in contending for the rights of the oppressed of his race. While in San Francisco, he was engaged five years in teaching school, during which time he represented a constituency of that city and county in three State Conventions called for the purpose of securing the abolishment of the Black Laws, disqualifying colored persons to bear testimony against whites in criminal cases. He also took part in the agitation for the appropriation of school funds for


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colored children. During his busy life of religious labor, Bishop Moore has encountered many perils, being three times shipwrecked at sea, and among hostile Indian tribes while the bullets were flying, but he came out of all mercifully preserved for further works of good among his people.

[Bishop Moore in England--A notice in a London paper: The writer adds the following prominent notice given him in a London journal published by Rev. Dr. Parker of the London Temple; a paper called the Fountain.]

        Most persons who are reasonably well-informed will have heard something of the marvellous exodus of the negro population which is now taking place in the Southern States of America. The slaves who were set at liberty fifteen years ago have found that their so-called freedom was, in one sense, a cruel mockery, and that, in reality, they had but exchanged one form of bondage for another. They still remained under the power of their former masters; and their last state was in many respects worse than the first.

        This last yoke has at last become so intolerable that they have resolved, at all costs, to throw it off, and as their only chance of escaping the oppressor's cruelty is to flee from him, they have resolved upon flight; and they are leaving their homes in thousands to take up their abode in the State of Kansas. Those who wish to know the nature and causes of this remarkable movement cannot do better than hear Bishop Moore, a negro minister, who is now in this country advocating the cause of the freedmen.


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I had the opportunity of hearing the Bishop myself last Wednesday evening, in Dr. Edmond's Lecture Hall; and, for the benefit of those who may not have a similar privilege, I will give an epitome of his story. And first of all about the Bishop himself:

        Bishop Moore has a life story of thrilling interest to tell. He was born in slavery, his mother having been kidnapped. Through the bravery of that mother his freedom was procured; for she ran away from her master, and carried her child with her. It was an heroic flight. She traveled till her shoes fell from her feet--till she was so foot-sore that she might have been tracked by the blood she left upon the ground. She stripped her clothing from her body, and wrapped it round her boy, to keep him from freezing. A mother's love! It is the same mighty passion the world over. It is as strong in Hagar the slave, as in Sarah the mistress. But young Moore, though free, could not get any education. He was not allowed to look inside a school. So he resolved, like a wise youth, to educate himself; and he used to prosecute his studies by firelight. In his youthful days he used to think with rapture of England, the negro's friend, and when he heard it said that no bondsman could exist on British soil, he experienced an intense longing to breathe the air and touch the soil of this great and free country. His desire had been granted, and he was here, pleading the cause of four millions of freed slaves, and representing a religious body which had 220,000 members,


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Illustration

        BISHOP J. J. MOORE.

        BISHOP S. T. JONES.

        BISHOP J. W. HOOD.

        BISHOP J. P. THOMPSON.

        BISHOP T. H. LOMAX.

        BISHOP W. H. HILLERY.

100,000 Sunday-School scholars, and 1,500 ministers.

        Bishop Moore is about the average height, and is sparely built. He has an intelligent countenance, which is always brightened by the sunshine of kindness. He is 68 years of age, though he looks much younger, and has been for 48 years a preacher of the gospel. He speaks with a natural eloquence and a manly simplicity, which are quite charming. His addresses are evidently unstudied, and his utterances spring from a warm heart. He talks fluently, in good English, and there is no rant, or vulgarity, or eccentricity either in his manner or matter. He is full of his theme, and talks about it like a man in earnest.

        Bishop Singleton T. Jones was born in Wrightsville, Pa., March 8, 1825. He embraced religion in Harrisburg, Pa., in February, 1842. He was licensed to preach by Rev. George Galbreath in Allegheny, Pa., in September 1846. He joined the Allegheny Conference, August 23, 1849, was ordained an elder in 1851 by Bishop Galbreath. He was elected bishop in the General Conference convened in Washington, D. C., May, 1868. He obtained the degree of D. D. in Avery College, in Allegheny. Bishop Jones is one of our strong men; he is distinguished as an energetic worker, as a pulpit orator, an eloquent and impressive preacher. He is a great disciplinarian, a most rigid constitutionalist;


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clear and lucid in his preaching, in his dealing with antagonisms; his irony is keen and withering. In his associations he is cheerful, pleasant and entertaining. His uniform Christian life and efficient labors in his career, have won the esteem of his connection. Long may he live to glorify God and bless his race.

        Bishop James Walker Hood was born in Kennett Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania. His father, two uncles, a brother and two cousins were all ministers of the gospel. Between the age of 9 and 14 he attended school about one year and nine months. He experienced religion when 11 years of age, was licensed to preach in 1856, joined the New England Conference in 1859, was appointed a missionary to Nova Scotia in 1860, was ordained an elder in 1862, and was stationed at Bridgeport, Connecticut in 1863; was sent as a missionary to North Carolina January, 1864, and during that year he gathered into Zion's connection about 3,000 members and nine ministers. In 1867 he was elected to the North Carolina State Convention, and took so prominent a part in modeling the Reconstructed Constitution of the State that the constitution adopted was titled the Hood Constitution. In 1868 he was appointed Assistant Superintendent of Public Instruction for the State, and canvassed the greater portion of the Sta e in the interest of education, and got a large number of colored children into the public


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schools. In the General Conference of the Zion Connection, convened at Charlotte, N. C., July 3, 1872, he was elected and ordained a Bishop, and has filled the office with extraordinary ability. Bishop Hood has a temperament, composed of the bilious and sanguine, the bilious predominating, hence he is not sensative or excitable. He is distinguished for his coolness and deliberation in excitement. He is a great projector of measures in council, a great concilliator, a deep reasoner, and a self-sacrificer for the cause to which he is devoted. He is an impressive preacher. His Christian integrity stands unimpeached. He is a great worker, and of an invulnerable spirit. Very discerning, genial and affable in his personal bearing, and kind to friend and foe, aged and young.

        Bishop Joseph P. Thompson was born in Virginia on April 18th, 1818. He acquired a good common school education in early life. At the age of fifteen he experienced religion, and at the age of twenty he was licensed to preach as a local preacher, in 1838 he traveled as a local preacher. In 1844 he joined the New York Annual Conference; in 1846 he was ordained a deacon; in 1847 he was ordained an elder. He held the pastoral charge of all the prominent churches in the New York Annual Conference, and has been a missionary to Nova Scotia; he had charge of the Zion Church in New York three years, and has had charge of all the churches


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on the Hudson River. In 1876, on the 4th of July, he was elected and ordained Bishop of the A. M. E. Zion Church in the General Conference in Louisville, Kentucky. He has traveled considerably in the South, where he has held conferences; he also organized an Annual Conference in the Bahama Island in 1878. He, in connection with his ministry, has studied and practiced medicine successfully as a physician. He was a delegate in company with Bishop Hood to the Eccumenical Council held in London in 1882. He is Zion's "Old Battle-Axe," one of her advanced sentinels. In his personal character he is self-reliant, independent, generally guided by his own judgment, scrutenizing and dogmatic with contestants, generous in helping a good cause, especially in the interest of his connection; eccentric in his demeanor, prompt and reliable in his engagements; he is a lover of Christian principles; he stands respected and honored by his connection as one of its worthy sons.

        Bishop Thomas Henry Lomax was born in the county of Cumberland, North Carolina, on the 15th of January, 1832. He joined the Methodist Episcopal Church South in 1855, and in 1858 he experienced religion and connected with the Sunday School, and was taught in a class by the Hon. Charles C. Leek, a member of the church. In the Sunday-School he got his Biblical instructions that laid the foundation for his ministerial work. In


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1850 he connected himself with a night school, in which he learned to read and write. At the close of the civil war, he and other brothers, employed one Dr. Sanford, a learned gentleman, to teach them privately; thus he aimed to prepare himself for some usefulness in life. In 1864 he was licensed to preach by Bishop Hood in the Zion Connection. On November 25th, 1867, he was ordained a deacon, by Bishop J. J. Clinton, and in 1868 he was ordained an elder by Bishop J. J. Moore, at Wilmington, N. C., on the 1st of December; on the 4th of July 1876 he was ordained a Bishop, at the General Conference held at Louisville, Ky.

        Bishop Lomax is an energetic worker; his labors have been chiefly confined to the Southern States; he had charge of the Michigan and Canada Conference two years; he has been very successful in the South; he is very calculative and far-seeing, is energetic and persevering, seldom fails in his calculations. He is in his personal character open and frank; as a preacher he is plain, practical, orthodox, unpretending and earnest; he loves Christian honesty, and lives above reproach, and is loved and respected by his church. It is hoped that God will prolong his life for usefulness.



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APPENDIX.

GENERAL STATISTICAL TABLE.

        Connectional Geographical Extent. We extend into the following States, Territories and Countries: States of New York, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Delaware, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, Florida, Maryland, District of Columbia, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Texas, California and Oregon; in other countries, as Canada, Bahama Islands, and Africa.

        Ecclesiastical Arrangements. We have seven Episcopal Districts, which are presided over by seven Bishops. We have twenty-one Annual Conferences embraced in the seven Episcopal Districts included in the States above named, extending their jurisdiction into Canada, the Bahamas, and Liberia in Africa.

        General Officials. At the present date we have six Bishops, seven District Stewards, one General Conference Secretary, one General Book Steward, three Auditors in the Book Concern, (A. Anderson,


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Alfred Day, Anthony Jackson), one Journalist, Home and Foreign Mission Board, composed of the following persons: Bishop S. T. Jones, President Bishop J. W. Hood, Vice President; Bishop J. P Thompson, Treasurer; Rev. Mark M. Bell, Secretary; Members of the Board: For the First Episcopal District, Rev. J. Thomas; Second Episcopa District, S. S. Wales; Third Episcopal District, W J. Moore; Fourth Episcopal District, S. W. Jones Fifth Episcopal District, E. H. Cruey; Sixth Episcopal District, J. B. Handy. The members of the Female Home and Foreign Board: Mrs. Bishop S T. Jones, President; Mrs. C. R. Harris, Secretary; Mrs. Bishop J. P. Thompson, Treasurer; Mrs. N. Turpen, Cor. Secretary. All the above are General Officers.

        Numerical Extent. Ministerial: we have 2,500 itinerant and local preachers; Communicants: we have reported from 250,000 to 300,000 church members and 800,000 church attendants; we have 30,000 Sabbath-school teachers, 120,000 Scholars, and 300,000 volumes in the libraries. Church property valued at sixteen million dollars. We have two well established institutions of learning, valued at twenty thousand dollars. We have a Book Concern with stock valued at three thousand dollars, a printing press and type valued at one thousand dollars a journal published weekly, and a Sunday-school paper published monthly, with thousands of subscribers.


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[A brief sketch of the establishment of Methodism in America, taken from Rev. J. B. Wakeley's work of the "Lost Chapters of the Early History of American Methodism."]

        The cradle of American Methodism was rocked in New York City. The first Methodist Society organized in America was organized in Barrack street or Park Place in the City of New York. It was organized by a local preacher named Philip Emburg, who emigrated from Limeric County, Ireland. He descended from Germans that had settled in that part of Ireland which Mr. J. Wesley frequently visited, and in which he preached with great success. The people among whom he thus labored were called Valatines. Among those who were converted through his preaching was a man named Philip Emburg, who lived at a place called Billingarne; he became a local preacher among the Methodists of that place. In the early part of 1760, he emigrated to America with a number of Methodist emigrants from the Emerald Isle. He with them settled in New York City. Mr. Emburg took up his residence in Barrack street, or Park Place; he there pursued his occupation as a carpenter, and did not fulfill his sacred calling as a preacher. The other Methodist members having no preaching, became indifferent about religion and were retrograding in their religious lives, to which the preacher, Philip Emburg, seemed to give no attention. Mrs. Barbara Hicks, one of the emigrants that came to this country with him, being a very devout Christian and


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a zealous Methodist, called on Mr. Emburg and boldly reproved him for neglecting his sacred calling and prayed him to continue his preaching and save them from hell. Her appeal moved him to action, and he appointed preaching in his own hired house, and in March, 1760, there were six persons at the first meeting, at which the first Methodist sermon in America was preached. In this carpenter's hired house was organized the first Methodist Society and class meeting in America, in 1760.

        While conducting meetings in his own hired house, he was joined by Captain Weebb, a preacher also. His house soon became too small for them to worship in, and they rented a large room in the same street; it also became too small for them. They next rented a rigging loft on Horse and Cart street, now Williams street. The room was 18×60 feet in dimensions. Here the first Methodist Society in America worshipped until they built the church on John street, where the first Methodist church in America was erected, in 1770, about twenty-eight or thirty years before Zion's church was erected on the corner of Church and Leonard streets in New York City. (For these facts see Rev. Wakeley's work, pp. 34-44.) There is a wonderful coincidence between the establishment of our Zion connection and our mother church in our incipient movements. The first M. E. Society, organized by Mr. Emburg, which laid the foundation for American Methodism, convened in a private house. The founders of the


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Zion Church, Peter Miller and his coadjutors, in laying the foundation of our Zion, met in private houses, having no church proper to meet in. Again, the first organized Methodist Society in America met in a rigging loft. The first organization of the Zion's connection worshipped in a room used also by a cabinet-maker. And again, the first M. E. Society organized in America was organized by a local preacher. These are remarkable coincidences between the Mother Church and Zion Church in the beginning of their history.

        Another feature connected with the early history of American Methodism is the colored man's connection with it. As early in the history of the Methodist Society organized in New York as 1771, Mr. Asbury in his journal speaks of the colored people communing at the Lord's Table, and says he was greatly affected with the sight of the negroes, beholding their sable faces at the Lord's Table. There were a number of colored members connected with the first Methodist Society in New York, when they worshipped in the rigging loft; some of these joined Zion Church when it was organized in 1796. And among the most noted of those colored members that worshipped with the Methodist Society when they occupied the rigging loft was Peter Williams; he was then identified with that little flock of Methodists. He was converted under the preaching of Philip Emburg. He was born in Beekman street and belonged to the Boorite family, who owned his


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parents as slaves (slavery then existed in New York State); Peter was born a slave; his owner kept a fine cow; Peter was born in the building where the cow was stabled. He was honored with a lowly birth-place, like his Saviour. He was a tobacconist, the business of his owner. Peter Williams was noted for his uprightness and Christian character. He was distinguished for his benevolence and for the deep interest he took in the welfare of his own race. He was employed as the third sexton in the Wesley Chapel in 1798 on John street, and served the church in that position for a number of years. For seven years he lived in the old parsonage and took care of the preachers; he and his excellent wife, Molly, were great favorites of the preachers. When the Zion connection was organized, Peter left the mother church and became one of the founders of Zion Church; he put down the corner stone of the Zion Church when it was erected in 1801, became a trustee of that church and circulated a subscription for it. He was sexton of the Wesley Chapel, the first Methodist church built in America, from 1778 until 1795, seventeen years. His portrait is engraven in the work of Rev. J. B. Wakeley An account of his official services rendered in the establishment of Zion'sChurch is given in the first chapter of this work.

        Minutes of the Yearly Conferences, of the A. M. E. Zion Church, in America. The Yearly Conference of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion


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Church, met in the city of New York on the 17th of May, 1834, which was opened with singing and prayer. An address was delivered by the Superintendent upon the goodness of God, and recommending to the brethren, peace, union, and brotherly love, as the bond of perfection, and the prosperity of the connection in general. The names of the preachers attached to the conference are Christopher Rush, Superintendent; Jacob Matthews, Secretary; David Smith, Henry Drayton, Henry Johnson, Jehial C. Beaman, William Bishop, John W. Lewis, Daniel Vandevere, Adam Ford, William Serington, John Tappan, William Miller, Peter Vanhass, Timothy Eatto, William Carman, George Garnet, John W. Robertson, George D. Matthews, David Blake, William Fuller, Dempsey Canady, Hosea Easton. Commencing business with the examination of the characters and standing of the preachers, after a plain and proper investigation on the subject, the whole body stood fair.

        The following questions according to the form of discipline, were then asked: Q. Who are admitted on trial this year? A. William Serington, Dempsey Canady. Q. Who remain on trial this year? A. George D. Matthews, John Williams, John Tappan, John W. Lewis. Q. Who are admitted into full connection this year? A. William Fuller, James Simmons, Daniel Vandevere, John P. Thompson, Henry Johnson, Hosea Easton, David Blake. Q. Who are eligible to Deacon's Orders?


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A. None. Q. Who are eligible to Elder's Orders? A. Hosea Easton, James Simmons, William Bishop, John W. Robertson, John Tappan. Q. Who have located this year? A. None. Q. Who have withdrawn this year? A. None. Q. Who have died this year? A. None. Q. Who have been expelled this year? A. None. Q. What numbers are in Society this year? A. Zion Church, 734; Asbury Church, 329; Middletown, Conn., 26; Hartford, Conn., 46; Nantucket, Mass., 41; Newark, N. J., 96; Morristown, N. J., 18; Long Island circuit, 160; Newburg, 51; Fishkill, 23; Yorkville, 23; Rochester circuit, 41; Ethica, 44; Troy, 33; Canandaigua, 26. Q. Are there any appeals this year? A. None. Q. Where are the preachers stationed this year? A. New York City; Zion Church: Jacob Matthews, elder in charge; preachers under his charge, Wm. Fuller, George Garnet. Yorkville Station: Peter Vanhass, elder in charge; preachers under his charge, David Blake, Adam Ford. Troy Station: Wm. Bishop, elder in charge. Newburg Station: George D. Matthews, elder in charge. Long Island Circuit: William Carman, elder in charge; under him George Tredwell. Hartford, Conn., Station: Hosea Easton, elder in charge. Morristown, N. J., Station: Henry Drayton, elder in charge. Nantucket, Mass., Station: John W. Robertson. Asbury Church: Timothy, elder in charge; preacher under his charge, Daniel Vandevere. Rochester Circuit: Henry Johnson, elder in charge; preacher under his


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charge, Dempsey Canady. Canandaigua Circuit: John Tappan, elder in charge. Fishkill Station: John Williams, in charge. Middletown, Conn., Station: Jehial C. Beaman, elder in charge. Newark, N. J., Station: David Smith, elder in charge. Q. Where and when shall our next conference be held? A. In the city of New York, in the Asbury Church, the third Saturday in May, 1835.

        Resolved on motion, That the preachers receive eighty dollars, and their wives receive forty dollars, and their traveling expenses.

        Resolved on motion, That the allowances of the traveling preachers and their wives, should be printed in the minutes this year.

        The names of the Elders, Deacons and Preachers of the District of New York. Elders: William Miller, Jacob Matthews, David Smith, Henry Drayton, Timothy Eatto, Peter Vanhass, William Carman, Henry Johnson, John W. Robertson, Leven Smith, Hosea Easton, George Tredwell, Wm. Bishop, John Tappan, James Simmons, Jehial C. Beaman, John P. Thompson. Deacons: George D. Matthews, George Garnet, John W. Lewis. Preachers: David Blake, William Serington, Daniel Vandevere, William Fuller, John Williams, Adam Ford, Dempsey Canady.

        Minutes of the Philadelphia Annual Conference. The conference met in the city of Philadelphia, June 14, 1834, which was opened with singing and a fervent and solemn address to Almighty God, performed by the Rev. Christopher Rush, Superintendent


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of the connection. J. P. Thompson was appointed Secretary. Names of the preachers belonging to the conference: Rev. C. Rush, Superintendent; Edward Johnson, Jacob D. Richardson, George Galbreath, Thomas Boilston, Durham Stevens, Geo. Stephenson, David Jennius, Arthur Langford, Samuel Johnson.

        After an examination of the characters of its members, the following questions were then asked: Q. Who are admitted on trial? A. None. Q. Who remain on trial? A. None. Q. Who are admitted into full connection? A. None. Who are eligible to deacon's order. A. Arthur Langford. Q. Who are eligible to elder's orders? A. None. Q. Who are located this year? A. None. Q. Who have withdrawn this year? A. Henry Harden, John Marchal and David H. Crosby. Q. Who have died this year? A. None. Q. Who have been expelled this year? A. None. Q. What number are in Society this year? A. Wesley church. Q. Are there any appeals? A. None. Q. Where are the preachers stationed under him? A. Wesley Church, Edward Johnson, elder in charge; Arthur Langford, Thomas Bouston, George Stevenson. Q. Where and when shall our next conference be? A. In the city of Philadelphia, the second Saturday in June, 1835.

        Rules, as adopted for the regulation of the Annual Conference, at its last sitting:


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  • 1. The conference shall be opened by singing and prayer.
  • 2. The roll of membership shall be called.
  • 3. No subject shall be introduced by any of the members while there is a question on the table for discussion.
  • 4. The members shall, when addressing the Chairman, stand and pay their address to him in a becoming manner.
  • 5. No speaker shall be interrupted while speaking, unless his statements be foreign from the subject in discussion; in such case he may be called to order through the chairman.
  • 6. No member shall speak more than five minutes at a time, nor more than twice on the same subject, except by permission.
  • 7. No member shall leave the house without permission.
  • 8. The members shall assemble at 10 o'clock A. M.
  • 9. Any member violating these rules shall be subject to a discretionate reprehension by the chairman.
  • 10. Any member being absent half an hour after the roll is called, shall be subject to pay the sum of 25 cents for each and every such offence, (the money to be appropriated to the Conference Fund,) unless such neglect be obviated by a lawful excuse.
  • 11. After the ordinary business of the conference
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    is finished, what time remains unoccupied may be employed in discussing questions pertaining to the interest of the church and the cause of God in general.

        Minutes of the Little York Conference, August 3, 1834. Through the blessings of God and his divine Providence, the conference met according to a resolution in 1833, for the Conference 1834, in the House of God, in Little York, Pa. Opened with singing and prayer, and a suitable address delivered by the Superintendent, on the propriety as well as the utility of brethren dwelling together in love and harmony, whilst transacting the business of the Church of Christ, which he purchased with his precious blood. Commencing the examination of the characters and standing of the preachers. The subject being investigated, the preachers stood approved.

        The following questions, according to the form of our discipline, were then asked: Q. Who are admitted on trial this year? A. William Jones, John Darsey, Leonard Collins, William W. Gross. Q. Who remain on trial this year? A. David Jennings and David Dedford. Q. Who are admitted into full connection this year? A. None. Q. Who are eligible to deacon's orders? A. None. Q. Who are eligible to elder's orders? A. None. Q. Who have located this year? A. None. Q. Who have withdrawn this year? A. None. Q. Who have died this year? A. None. Q. Who have been expelled


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this year? A. None. Q. What numbers are in Society this year? A. Little York circuit, 63; Wrightsville, 5; Barrens, 26; Harrisburg circuit, 147; Dauphin Town, 4; Hanover, 16; Haldermans Town, 10; Fio Forge, 7; Pottsville, 7; Middletown, Lewistown circuit, Lewistown, 26; Neponose township, 44; Bellefonte, 26; Northumberland, 20; Chambersburg circuit, Chambersburg, 50; Shippinsburg, 30. Q. Where are the preachers stationed this year? A. Little York and Harrisburg circuit: Jacob D. Richardson, elder in charge; preachers under his charge, George Galbreth, David Jennings and David Dedford. Chambersburg circuit: Samuel Johnson, elder in charge; preachers under his charge, William W. Gross, Leonard Collins. Lewistown circuit: David Stepens, elder in charge; preacher under his charge, John Dorsey. Q. Where and when shall our next conference be held. A. In the city of Philadelphia, the second Saturday in May, 1835.

        Resolved, There be a Preacher's Fund, and that each member of each conference respectively pay to the said fund, the sum of one dollar, annually, for the support of the conference to which he is a member.

        Whereupon the following Preamble and Constitution is connected as emanating from the Little York, Pa., Conference:

        WHEREAS, We, the preachers of the itinerent, all having labored under many disadvantages from time to time in our pecuniary affairs, do agree to


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form ourselves into a Society, to raise a fund for the purpose of aiding and assisting each other, agreeably to the articles of this Constitution; praying that Almighty God may sanction our undertaking and bless our endeavors.

        ARTICLE I. This society shall be known by the name of "The Itinerent Preacher's Fund Society of the African Methodist Church in America.

        ARTICLE II. This society shall consist of all the preachers belonging to the itinerancy. The officers of this society shall consist of a Treasurer, a Secretary, and a Committee of seven persons; their Superintendent shall preside at all the annual meetings of the society. The officers of this society shall be annually nominated by the President, and elected by the members during the session of the annual conference.

        ARTICLE III. It shall be the duty of the Treasurer to hold all monies and other valuables belonging to the Society.

        ARTICLE IV. It shall be the duty of the Secretary to keep all the accounts against the Treasurer, and they shall have their accounts open for inspection at each and every annual meeting of the society, or at any time called for by the committee.

        ARTICLE V. The seven as a committee shall consist, namely, of three Elders, two Deacons, and two Preachers, whose duty it shall be to transact all the business of the society during its intervals.

        ARTICLE VI. Each member shall pay to the


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Treasurer one dollar entrance for the use of this society; and it shall be in the power of this society to revise this Constitution from year to year as a majority may determine.

Committee
DAVID STEVENS,
EDWARD JOHNSON,
WILLIAM W. GROSS.