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Christopher Rush, 1777-1873
A Short Account of the Rise and Progress of the African M. E. Church in America, Written by Christopher Rush, Superintendant of the Connexion, with the Aid of George Collins. Also, a Concise View of Church Order or Government, from Scripture, and from Some of the Best Authors on the Subject of Church Government, Relative to Episcopacy.
New York: J. J. Zuille, 1866.

Summary

Christopher Rush, a superintendent and ordained preacher in the African Methodist Episcopal Zion (A.M.E.Z.) Church, first published A Short Account of the Rise and Progress of the African M. E. Church in America in 1843 in order to "present the view of the members of the Church in particular, and the public in general, the manner in which the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church was formed and established in the City of New York, and how she became the Mother Church of the African Methodist Episcopal Church in America" (5). Rush traces the history of the establishment of the Zion Church from its emergence in 1796 New York City. Discussing the emergence of the "Allenites," the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church in New York, Rush explains the rivalry--and ultimate reconciliation--between the two black church movements.

Drawing upon church reports and addresses, Rush gives details of the Church's founders and the establishment of a hierarchy, including the names of church deacons and elders. Rush also includes the articles of agreement between the General Conference of Methodist Episcopals and the A.M.E. Zion Church (16) and the 1820 articles of agreement between the Asbury and Zion Churches (52). Another useful addition is the listing of the number and locations of A.M.E.Z. Churches in existence in 1820 (88). Readers interested in A.M.E.Z. church history and African American history will find A Short Account of the Rise and Progress of the African M. E. Church in America a useful resource.

Nora Rubel

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