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Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
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Letter from Thomas Erskine to the North Carolina Council of Safety, including cover letter
Erskine, Thomas
September 28, 1776
Volume 10, Pages 822-823

[From MS. Records in Office of Secretary of State.]
Letter from Thomas T. Erskine, Prisoner of War, to the North Carolina Council of Safety.

Sir,

Encouraged by your former goodness I once more take the liberty to trouble you, which I hope you will pardon, When Your consider my unhappy situation. There is no appearance of my recovering my health in this Country, which is the cause of the present application.

Sir I earnestly beg that you would present the inclosed to the Honble the Council of Safety—if you think it proper—otherwise I must be content—for should you think well of it—I know not who will take the liberty to think otherwise. I pray you to condescend to inform the bearer when he may call for an Answer.

I have the Honr to be Sir Your Most Obliged
Most Obedt Most Humble Servant.
T. T. ERSKINE.

Sepr 28th, Sunday Morng.

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Gentlemen,

I presume to think that you all must be sensible that I have no chance to be exchanged, after what I have done and said against the friends of the Government of England—were I inclined to Accept of Such an exchange, which I never would (and am positive no powers in America would compell me nor desire it against my inclination). The channel is stopt from whence I use to be Supplied with money, consequentially I must become a charge to the publick which will be extremely distressing to me.

I am aflicted with a complication of distempers, which makes my life most miserable—Gentlemen—the above considered, I beg leave to hope you will commisserate my unhappy condition, and permitt me to go to Scotland in the Schooner Liberty, Capt Buckner Comr, which is advertised in the Virginia papers, now at the falls of James River. I shall (if desired) make oath that I will neither speak nor act against America. Gentlemen it is the desire of life, so natural a passion, that makes me wish to go to sea, which I expect may be the means of prolonging it.

I have the Honr to be
Gentlemen with Great Respect
Your Most Humble Obedt Servt
T. T. ERSKINE.

Sept 28th, Sunday Morn .