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25 images with subject Croplands--North Carolina.

  • (1) Beale Johnson Rural Rehabilitation farm, showing bridge over the dam and the grist mill, Wake County. (2) View of lake, Beale Johnson Rural Rehabilitation farm, Wake County. (3) Temporary house built by Rural Rehabilitation Corporation for Rural Rehabilitation client, Perquimans County. (4) Part of canned vegetables and fruit grown and canned by Rural Rehabilitation client on Magnolia farm, Tyrrell County. (5) Sweet potato crop of a Rural Rehabilitation client in Durham County. (6) Sweet potato and corn crops of a Rural Rehabilitation client in Durham County. From Emergency Relief in North Carolina. A Record of the Development and the Activities of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, 1932-1935. North Carolina Emergency Relief Commission, State Administrator, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry. Edited by J.S. Kirk, Walter A. Cutter [and] Thomas W. Morse.


  • (1) Farm of Rural Rehabilitation client, Wake County. (2) A Rural Rehabilitation family enjoying their watermelons, Edgecombe County. (3) First Rural Rehabilitation colt born on Magnolia farm, Tyrrell County. (4) Wheat field of Rural Rehabilitation client ready for harvest, Wake County. (5) Rural Rehabilitation client with his mule and corn crop, Craven County. (6) Rural Rehabilitation client with cotton and corn crops on Tillery Farm, Halifax County. (7) Rural Rehabilitation mules in Wilson County. From Emergency Relief in North Carolina. A Record of the Development and the Activities of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, 1932-1935. North Carolina Emergency Relief Commission, State Administrator, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry. Edited by J.S. Kirk, Walter A. Cutter [and] Thomas W. Morse.


  • (1) Relief clients at work in beet field. (2) Relief clients at work in okra field. (3-4) Preparing vegetables for canning. (5) Canned products and food products ready for distribution to relief clients. (6) ERA commodity storeroom. From Emergency Relief in North Carolina. A Record of the Development and the Activities of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, 1932-1935. North Carolina Emergency Relief Commission, State Administrator, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry. Edited by J.S. Kirk, Walter A. Cutter [and] Thomas W. Morse.


  • (1) Rural Rehabilitation client plowing his field with mule purchased through the Rural Rehabilitation Corporation, Wilkes County. (2) Rural Rehabilitation client with horse and wagon purchased through the Rural Rehabilitation Corporation, Wilkes County. (3) A fine crop of beans, Rural Rehabilitation program, Buncombe County. (4) Rural Rehabilitation clients picking beans, Wake County. (5) Potato sprayer in operation on farm of a Rural Rehabilitation client, Alleghany County. (6) Cabbage field of a Rural Rehabilitation client, Buncombe County. From Emergency Relief in North Carolina. A Record of the Development and the Activities of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, 1932-1935. North Carolina Emergency Relief Commission, State Administrator, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry. Edited by J.S. Kirk, Walter A. Cutter [and] Thomas W. Morse.


  • (1) Rural Rehabilitation clients harvesting Irish potatoes near Rocky Mount, Nash County. (2) Horse and colt belonging to Rural Rehabilitation client, Wake County. (3) Livestock of Rural Rehabilitation client, Durham County. (4) Tobacco crop of Rural Rehabilitation client, Durham County. (5) Rural Rehabilitation client with his peanut and corn crop, Edgecombe County. (6) Colt belonging to Rural Rehabilitation client, Edgecombe County. From Emergency Relief in North Carolina. A Record of the Development and the Activities of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, 1932-1935. North Carolina Emergency Relief Commission, State Administrator, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry. Edited by J.S. Kirk, Walter A. Cutter [and] Thomas W. Morse.


  • (1) Tenant house before purchase by Rural Rehabilitation Corporation, Wake County. (2) Same house remodeled for RR client. (3) Home Economics supervisor teaching canning in RR homes, Mecklenburg County. (4) Home remodeled for RR family, Stokes County. (5) Cabbage grown by RR client, Carteret County. (6) Cash crop—cotton grown by RR client, Craven County. From Emergency Relief in North Carolina. A Record of the Development and the Activities of the North Carolina Emergency Relief Administration, 1932-1935. North Carolina Emergency Relief Commission, State Administrator, Mrs. Thomas O'Berry. Edited by J.S. Kirk, Walter A. Cutter [and] Thomas W. Morse.


  • 900 lbs. of V-C Fertilizers per acre produced this excellent field of Tobacco grown on farm of Mr. R. H. Rigsbee, Durham, N. C., by Mr. W. R. Chamblee. Photo taken August 20th, 1915. From Tobacco.


  • "The average Tobacco grower does not use half as much Fertilizer as would be most profitable and often four times the amount commonly used per acre would give in return more than four times this profit from the use of the greater quantity." From Tobacco.


  • BEAN FIELD--ATLANTIC COAST LINE. From North Carolina and Its Resources.


  • A common sight where V-C Fertilizers have been applied. This bountiful field of Tobacco is evidence of the efficacy of V-C Fertilizers as a crop and soil builder. From Tobacco.


  • An enthusiastic Tobacco grower is Mr. John W. Lambert, of Germantown, N. C., who has learned to appreciate the ample and wise use of V-C Fertilizers, as this view of his Tobacco crop proves. From Tobacco.


  • Gathering a bountiful harvest where V-C Fertilizers have been applied is almost a universal custom throughout the South. From Tobacco.


  • Giants on the Pilot Mountain, N. C., farm of Mr. McR. Smith. That this is a giant tobacco crop is evidenced by this picture. which shows Mr. Smith on the left whose height is 6 feet 2 inches, and the other man's height is 6 feet 8 inches. Mr. Smith is an enthusiastic V-C Fertilizer user. From Tobacco.


  • Mr. J. E. Parkerson's Tobacco on one of Mr. C. T. Munford's farms near Greenville, N. C. Mr. Parkerton tried. V-C Fertilizers on this patch with results as indicated in this picture; on another patch where V-C was not applied the Tobacco was about half the size shown above. GROW THE FINEST AND UNIFORM TOBACCO "I bought this spring a quantity of V-C Fertilizers for Tobacco, and I can safely say it is all you claim for it, as I have given it a thorough test this year, and have grown the finest and most uniform field of Tobacco I have ever seen. My crop is quite the largest in my community. It started growing early, and V-C held its strength to the last. I can safely recommend it to anybody desiring to raise fine Tobacco." RICHARD WINGATE, Ayden, N. C. From Tobacco.


  • Mr. W. A. Erwin, President of the Erwin Cotton Mills Co., of Durham, N. C. knows the great value of V-C Fertilizers as is here evidenced. The excellent field of Tobacco was grown on his farm with the aid of V-C. From Tobacco.


  • No. wonder Mr. J. Rufus Creech, of Pine Level, N. C., is such an enthusiastic user of V-C Fertilizers. He used only $50 worth of V-C on this 5 acre tract which produced a crop of excellent Tobacco which sold for $1,000 without being graded. $50 for cultivation; $50 for V-C Fertilizers--cost $100, profit $900. From Tobacco.


  • Ordinary crop of Tobacco is topped 8 to 12 leaves, and 14 to 16 leaves is considered Big Tobacco. The above crop on farm of Mr. O. L. Joyner, near Greenville, N. C., is topped 24 to 30 leaves. Mr. Joyner uses V-C Fertilizers exclusively; no wonder his Tobacco is a Record Crop. From Tobacco.


  • Part of a field of 7 acres of splendid Tobacco grown by Mr. Purvis Tilley, near Bahama in Durham Co., N. C. Mr. Tilley is one of the largest Tobacco growers in the county, and uses V-C Fertilizers exclusively on all his crops. Mr. Tilley sets 6,000 plants to the acre, and uses 200 pounds of V-C Fertilizers to the thousand, making 1,200 pounds of Fertilizer to the acre. Mr. Tilley studies his Tobacco plants closely from the time they are set until the cured Tobacco is marketed. He has experimented with a number of different brands and grades, but finds that V-C goods give him better Tobacco than anything else he has ever used, and that Tobacco grown with these goods is of finer texture and cures up more evenly than any Tobacco raised with other brands. Mr. Tilley also makes a specialty of raising Tobacco seed for sale. From Tobacco.


  • PRODUCTS of the FARM From Drummond's Pictorial Atlas of North Carolina.


  • SAND-HILL LAND IN VINEYARD--SEABOARD AIR LINE. From North Carolina and Its Resources.


  • STRAWBERRY FARM--ATLANTIC COAST LINE. From North Carolina and Its Resources.


  • This excellent Tobacco was grown on the farm of Mr. John W. Lamberts, Germantown, N. C., who used V-C Fertilizers to be assured of a fine crop and an increased yield. From Tobacco.


  • This is the kind of Tobacco grown when well fed with V-C Fertilizers. Tobacco grown on the farm of Mr. R. H. Rigsbee by Mr. W. R. Chamblee, Durham, N. C., using about 900 lbs. of V-C per acre. From Tobacco.


  • TOBACCO FIELD--SEABOARD AIR LINE. From North Carolina and Its Resources.


  • TRUCKING--ATLANTIC &NORTH CAROLINA RAILROAD. From North Carolina and Its Resources.