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34 images with subject Drawings.

  • Chateau at Buzancy, France. Once the headquarters of some German General From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • Chateau de Belle-fille, near Chemire Le Gaudin. Built in 1130. In the olden days of knighthood a beautiful young lady lived here and as all young ladies are, she was deeply in love with a man. He was a man of wealth, fashion and society, a gambler and a drunkard. The priest told him that if he did not stop his evil ways the Lord would destroy him with fire and water. He heeded not the advice, and one day while crossing the Sarth River, lightning struck him and he fell into the water, dead. The young lady, to mourn the loss of her lover, locked herself in one of the rooms in this chateau, and stayed shut in for fifty years, when she died. Today the hole in the wall through which she received her meals, is still there. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • Delousing Machine From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • EIFFEL TOWER, PARIS Named from its projector, Gustave Eiffel. It was completed in 1889, being the leading architectural feature of the Paris Exposition in 1890. The base is 330 feet square, it is 984 feet high, has both elevator and stairs. The top is devoted to an experiment station of the weather bureau of France. During the war it was used as an observation post and wireless station, and was of vast importance to the allies, as it was from this tower that they kept in touch with the entire world. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • The Gate to the Town, Guerande, France From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • A German observation post in the Argonne, camouflaged among the trees on top of a high hill. Notice the camouflaged fox hole at the foot of the trees where the observer slept. A metal plate at this post with arrows pointing to the nearby towns and giving their distance, shows the thoroughness of the Germans. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • A GERMAN UNTEROFFIZER CAPTURED IN THE ARGONNE He could speak a bit of English, and he told us that they were proud of the big P. W. stenciled on their clothes. That to us it meant Prisoner of War, but to them it meant "Papa Wilson." From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • HOMEWARD BOUND "Tramp, Tramp, Tramp, the boys are marching," with smiling faces, uniform packs and the little Red Cross bags. We are on our way to the docks at Brest, France, where we shall embark for the good old U. S. A. While the passenger list was being checked the band was playing and the smiling faces of Red Cross girls were bidding us good-bye and a "bon voyage." From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • Here is a little insect that with all his faults, and they are many, possesses certain virtues. He has solved the problem of race suicide, for he multiplies with astounding rapidity. He adapts himself easily, not to say gracefully, to uncomfortable, even unsanitary surroundings, and if he were permitted to speak in his own defense, would doubtless challenge you to show on all the pages of history any great military success attained by an army not accompanied and "egged on" as it were by cooties. Personally, I believe you would have difficulty in producing such an example. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • IN PARIS The largest Triumphal Arch in the world, began by Napoleon in 1806, to commemorate his victories Ruins of the Ancient Fortress of Batie. Built in the thirteenth century, Vienne, France From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • IN SEARCH FOR BILLETS, BOUZANCY, FRANCE Immediately upon entering a town we looked for shelter, and to find a building with a complete roof was like getting money from home--"seldom done." From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • In the drive of November 1, 1918, prisoners were marched back by the company. This sketch shows a company that has just been captured, being brought back. Near Landres-St. George, France. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • IN THE WAKE OF THE HUNS Closely allied with the Hun's scheme of frightfulness was his policy of destruction, and woe be unto that town within the range of his guns. Not satisfied with the partial annihilation of a town and the hasty depopulation of its inhabitants, they continue their ruthless plan of devastation by hurling shrapnel, gas and high explosives at their doomed objective until the town is an irreparable heap of crumpled walls and ruins. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • INTERIOR OF A BRETON HOME From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • The interior of a house or barracks built by Uncle Sam for his German prisoners. Located at Les Islettes, France. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • Last, but not least, the most beautiful sight of France, leaving for "Home, Sweet Home." From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • MAIN ST. IN THE VILLAGE OF MONTFAUCON The building on the right, housed the Y. M. C. A. canteen, but ten minutes after this sketch was made a shell passed by and took about half of it away. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • Many of you have the idea that a battlefield was a complete system of trenches and a mass of barb-wire entanglements, but such was not the case in the last few months of fighting. Trench warfare was changed to (pen warfare, much to the delight of our soldiers. This is a sketch of one front line just after our boys jumped off at Sommerance, on November 1, 1918. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • A market place on the outskirts of Nice, where the French people meet to barter and sell their souvenirs to tourists who might chance that way. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • MONTE CARLO, FRANCE When one speaks of Monte Carlo, the first thing that enters your head is gambling. But even there all the people do not gamble, and here is the church of St. Devote, where the good people meet. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • NEAR BAYONVILLE, FRANCE There is no tribute high enough that can be paid the lads who fought and fell. Their graves will always be an honor to French soil. These little graves look mighty rough, but it is the best that could be done under the conditions. Even though they are not bedecked with flowers and monuments, they stand for much. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • NEAR FLEVILLE, FRANCE When the artillery opened up on the morning of November 1, 1918, "Fritzie" certainly was anxious to see his "Fatherland," for he pulled out for a home-run. We couldn't keep up with him. Run, why they are the best runners in the world. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • An Old Church near Chemire Le Gaudin, Sarth, France.Built in the year 1200 From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • An old German field piece left deserted in the Argonne From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • OUR FIRST GAS ATTACK Just as we entered the woods near Brocourt we received a welcome that sounded like a hundred thousand Fords--Gr, Gr, Gr, Gr, Gr, then a crack and a boom, boom, then someone said GAS. Scared? No, we were paralyzed--didn't know whether to put on our gas masks or turn and run. Finally our masks were on and then somebody gave: "Permission is given to remove face pieces." We would not mind the gas alarm so much if it wouldn't come around meal times. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • The Road to Avocourt that leads to Montfaucon. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Ruins of the Ancient Fortress of Batie. Built in the Thirteenth Century, Vienne, France From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • Ruins of the Fine Old Cathedral at Montfaucon. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • RUINS OF THE OLD CATHEDRAL AT MONTFAUCON This is the highest point west of the Meuse. In 1914 the Crown Prince stood in the tower of this old Cathedral and watched his armies' furtherest advance. Now on the slopes of this hill is the sight of the largest cemetery of the A. E. F. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • A small chateau at Harricourt, France. Used as a supply base of a regiment. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • SOMMERANCE, FRANCE The Marines jumped off here on the morning of November 1, 1918. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • This sketch will give you some faint conception of the effect of high explosive shells. I take no man's word for this, as it came under my personal observation. People often ask the question: "How does it seem to be hit by a piece of a shell?" And it was probably never better answered than by the British Tommy, who said: "First you 'ears a 'ell of a noise, next you see a nurse bendin' over you, an' 'ear 'er say, 'See if you can drink some of this.'" For months you have been seeing in the papers pictures of demolished villages and shell pitted areas, and perhaps you have wondered whether or not the pictures were overdrawn. Let me assure you that they were not, for many and many a time I have gazed on artillery effects that it would be mpossible to exaggerate. Instances are related of heroic French artillerymen who have shelled their own homes to fragments because German soldiers had taken possession of, and were occupying them. How can Germany or any other nation expect to crush a people of such indomitable resolution? From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • TROOP TRAIN FROM MONTOIR TO LE MANS The little toy engine and the "flat wheel coaches," can we ever forget 'em. Yes, we were lucky on this trip in not having to ride in "Homes 40 and Chaveux 8." (A box car whose capacity is 40 men or 8 horses.) Along the route in each village the population would turn out to bid us "good-bye," and the children would ask for cigarettes. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • We are back at Brest again, and instead of pup-tents for shelter, we have barracks; instead of walking in mud, we have duck boards; and instead of cooking our own meals, we have someone to do it. Uncle Sam is sure good to his boys. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).