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137 images with subject Group portraits.

  • [Freshman Team] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Junior Team] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Marshals] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Photograph] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Senior Team] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Sophomore Team] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • [Special Team] From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • 1,800 lbs. of Tobacco per acre on Mr. John Kent's farm, East Hartford, Conn., in upper view field. Center view, field of Mr. Chas. Andrews, Glastonbury, Conn., who used 3,000 lbs. V-C Fertilizers per acre, giving a yield of 1,800 lbs. per acre. Lower view, Tobacco on farm of Mr. Allen Bidwell, Glastonbury, Conn., who used 3,000 lbs. of V-C Fertilizers per acre, yield 2,000 lbs. per acre. From Tobacco.


  • A Few of the Members of the Wide-Awake Club. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • A Fulton Baseball Nine. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • A Group of the Girl Employes. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • A Group of the Girl Workers. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • A GROUP OF THE PLAYERS (A Midsummer Night's Dream) From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • A Happy Group of Vacation School Children. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • A LaFayette Mill Playground Scene. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • ADELPHIAN SOCIETY From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • After Study Play. Some Scenes in Schoolfield, Va., at the May Day Festival, and the Mammoth Christmas Tree in the Center, Which is an Annual Feature of the Holiday Season. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • At Recreation Park. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION OFFICERS From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • The Author and an English Fellow-Prisoner, from Photograph Taken Three Months Before the Armistice. The Author is Wearing an Old French Uniform With Which he was Fitted Out After Running Away and Losing his Regulation Prison Costume [Frontispiece Image] From The Memoirs of a Swine in the Land of Kultur, or, How it Felt to be a Prisoner of War.


  • BABY REUNION--NATIONAL HOSPITAL DAY, 1938 From Thirty-Eighth Annual Report, 1938.


  • Battery A. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery A. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery B. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery B. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery C. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery C. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery D. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery D. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery E. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery E. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery F. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Battery F. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Bringing in the harvest of fine grown Tobacco at Drake's Branch, Va. Wherever V-C Fertilizers are used wisely a bountiful harvest is always assured. From Tobacco.


  • CAROLINIAN REPORTERS From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • Champion Team 1910 From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • CHILDREN OF REV. M. L. LATTA. [2nd Frontispiece Image] From The History of My Life and Work. Autobiography by Rev. M. L. Latta, A.M., D.D.


  • CHILDREN'S WARD From Thirty-Eighth Annual Report, 1938.


  • COLLEGE CHORUS From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • COLLEGE ORCHESTRA From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • COLLEGE PARTY From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • COLLEGE PARTY From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • COOKING CLASS From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • CORNELIAN SOCIETY From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • EDITORS From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • FACULTY AND STUDENTS. From The History of My Life and Work. Autobiography by Rev. M. L. Latta, A.M., D.D.


  • THE FEEBLEMINDED BREED FEEBLEMINDED WE PAY THE COST From Biennial Report of the State Board of Charities and Public Welfare, December 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922.


  • Fig. 27. Group of Southern Cotton Mill Operatives.--Summer Costume. From Cotton Mill, Commercial Features. A Text-Book for the Use of Textile Schools and Investors. With Tables Showing Cost of Machinery and Equipments for Mills Making Cotton Yarns and Plain Cotton Cloths.


  • Fig. 28. Group of Southern Cotton Mill Operatives. From Cotton Mill, Commercial Features. A Text-Book for the Use of Textile Schools and Investors. With Tables Showing Cost of Machinery and Equipments for Mills Making Cotton Yarns and Plain Cotton Cloths.


  • FRESHMAN CLASS From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • FRESHMAN HOCKEY TEAM From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • GLEE CLUB From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • Group of English Prisoners Working on the Farms of Kossebade. The Author has a Pipe in his Mouth, and Albert, Mentioned in Chapter VI, Stands at his Right From The Memoirs of a Swine in the Land of Kultur, or, How it Felt to be a Prisoner of War.


  • Headquarters Company. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Headquarters Company. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • "In the production of Tobacco of high price, heavy yields and of good quality, V-C Fertilizers exercise a most controlling influence." See last page for evidence of this. From Tobacco.


  • INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUB From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • Joan of Arc Club, a Patriotic Club Started During the War and Continued For Its Good Work During Times of Peace. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • JUNIOR CLASS From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • JUNIOR HOCKEY TEAM From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • Kindergarten Class. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • Last Season's 1919 Carolina Champions. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • LINCOLN HOSPITAL NURSE TRAINING SCHOOL From Thirty-Eighth Annual Report, 1938.


  • Mr. Edmond Fox's Tobacco Fields, East Hartford, Conn., who used 3,000 lbs. per acre of V-C Fertilizers, producing a yield of 1,900 lbs. of fine Tobacco per acre. It pays to use V-C on Tobacco. From Tobacco.


  • Mr. Jackson Dr. Foust Mr. Brown Miss King Miss Lawrence Miss Elliott Mr. Kindeman Miss Mayer From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • [N. Jacobi Hardware Company] From Wilmington Up-to-Date: The Metropolis of North Carolina Graphically Portrayed. Compiled under the Auspices of the Chamber of Commerce. Also a series of Comprehensive Sketches of Representative Business Enterprises.


  • N.C. SUPERINTENDENTS OF PUBLIC WELFARE, PHOTO by Wolcotts, Black Mtn., N.C. From Biennial Report of the North Carolina State Board of Charities and Public Welfare, July 1, 1938 to June 30, 1940.


  • No. 1--NEW YEAR'S DAY AT ATHERTON MILLS, CHARLOTTE N. C. Mr. Hine was refused permission to photograph children in the mill. These doffer boys were photographed at the noon hour. No. 2.--HIGH SHOALS. Mill running at eight p. m. Mr. Hine was forbidden to photograph children. This mill and one at Atherton, where also photographing was forbidden, are under the management of D. A. Tompkins, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the "National Child Labor Commission." From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 10.--DANIEL MANUFACTURING COMPANY, LINCOLNTON, N. C. Six years old. Stays all day in the mill where his mother and sister work. Is beginning to "help" a little and will probably soon be regularly at work, though his name may not appear on the payroll. No. 11.--GASTONIA, N. C. Boy on right of picture is ten years old. Has worked three years in the mill, though in school part of the time. Boy on left said he was twelve years old. Has worked in the mill two years and at night nine months. Work below the age of twelve years in factories, even as apprentices, is illegal. Work at night is illegal before the fourteenth birthday. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 12.--SCOTLAND MILLS, LAURINBURG, N. C. Tallest lad about fourteen years old, has worked eight years in mill, six years at night. The next in height has worked there three years. No. 13.--DICKSON MILL, LAURINBURG, N. C. Children of night superintendent. Bessie runs four sides, his worked two years at night. Frank (smallest) doffer, has worked two years at night. George (largest) doffer, has worked three years at night. Was proud that he could write his name. Night work of all these children is illegal. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 14.--ANOTHER NIGHT SHIFT. Going to work at 6 o'clock on a cold, dark, December night. They came out at 6 o'clock in the morning, drenched by a cold rain. Two of the smaller girls, with three other sisters, support a big, lazy father, who complains that he is not well enough to work, the oldest of the sisters having been in the mill for seven years and the two youngest for two years each. Three smaller children at home will recruit the family purse soon. The two girls at the extreme left of the picture looked to be twelve years old. Both had been in the mill two years and one had worked six months and the other one year at night. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 15--1. DILLON MILL, DILLON, S. C.--Tallest girl has helped six months in mill; Mamie, holding baby, three years. 2. MAPLE MILL, DILLON S. C.--Larger sister one year in the mill; the mother said the little sister "helps", but a bystander said "She works regularly". 3. IVEY MILL, HICKORY. N. C.--Doffers and sweepers. The president of this mill says: "Not over ten per cent of the mills observe it" (the child labor law). 4. SPRINGSTEIN MILLS, CHESTER, S. C.--Saturday ball game. Boy with ball is twelve years old, fifty-two inches tall, a weaver running six looms. Two years in mill. 5. EUREKA COTTON MILL, CHESTER, S. C.--Tallest, ten years in the mill; second three years; shortest, ten years old fifty-two inches tall, two years in the mill, spinning, earns sixty cents a day. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 16.--NEWBERRY MILLS, S. C. Noon hour. All are employees. The unguarded wheel and belt at the left are sinister neighbors for little girls' arms, skirts and braids. There was no factory inspection in South Carolina. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 17 WYLIE MILL, CHESTER, S. C. The barefoot lad, now thirteen years old, has worked since he was six. He has lost part of a finger in machinery. The other boy, now eleven, has worked a year. No. 18. TYPES OF ADULT OPERATIVES, CLINTON, S. C. No. 19. MAPLE MILLS, DILLON, S. C. Taller boy has doffed four years, gets forty cents a day. Shorter boy, ten year old, three years in the mill, runs three sides; gets thirty cents a day. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 20.--WHERE MILL CHILDREN GO TO SCHOOL AT LANCASTER, S. C. Enrollment 163, attendance usually about 100. There are more than 1,000 operatives in the mill. The mill is geographically part of Lancaster, but on account of the taxes has been kept just out of the corporate limits. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 25.--GOING HOME AFTER DARK. A group of employees at the Clinton, S. C. Mill, going home from work after dark. The photograph was taken by flashlight, as the superintendent would not allow pictures to be taken in the mill. From this it appears that even where there is no night work, the eleven-hour day requires children to go to work while it is yet dark and to work till after nightfall. No. 26.--"BACK TO THE FARM." Wylie Mill, Chester, S. C.--The boy holding the calf, which he is raising for beef, has worked in the mill two years. Next to him is his little brother, a "helper" in the mill. Next stands another worker. The father says: "Just as soon as the boys get big enough to handle a plow we go straight back to the farm. The factory is no place for boys." Let us hope that this plan will be realized in time to save the two babies! From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 5.--COTTON MILL, WHITNEL, N. C. On the night shift, waiting for the whistle. Smallest boy and girl about fifty inches tall. Smallest girl had been in mill two years, six months at night. One medium sized boy had doffed four years, partly at night, and gets sixty cents a night. Work after eight p. m. is illegal for children under fourteen years. No. 6.--COTTON MILL, WHITNEL, N. C. Spinner, fifty-one inches tall, runs four sides, earns forty-eight cents a day. Two years in the mill. Ten boys and girls about this size on day shift and ten on night, among fifty employees on each shift. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • No. 7. KESSLER MANUFACTURING CO. SALISBURY N. C. Superintendent Mason (only man in the picture) consented to taking photograph on condition that "things must be represented as they were." Here they are! No. 8. LORAY MILL, GASTONIA, N.C. Closing hour after twelve-hour day. One of the smallest boys said he had been in the mill two or three years. He is now twelve years old. No. 9. WAMPUM MANUFACTURING CO. LINCOLNTON, N. C. Photograph taken at noon hour. Investigator not allowed to take pictures inside the mill. From Child Labor in the Carolinas: [A]ccount of Investigations Made in the Cotton Mills of North and South Carolina, by Rev. A. E. Seddon, A. H. Ulm and Lewis W. Hine, under the Direction of the Southern Office of the National Child Labor Committee.


  • NORTH CAROLINA'S BEST CROP--HER CHILDREN From Biennial Report of the State Board of Charities and Public Welfare, December 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922.


  • OBERON, TITANIA AND ATTENDANTS (A Midsummer Night's Dream) From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • Officers of the One Hundred and Thirteenth Field Artillery and N. C. O. regimental staff in field equipment. This picture was made at Le Mans, France. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • OFFICERS OF THE ONE HUNDRED AND THIRTEENTH FIELD ARTILLERY. Top row--left to right: 1st Lieut. J. P. Dodge, 1st Lieut. W. B. Duncan, 1st Lieut. Eugene Allison, 1st Lieut. M. S. Barnett, 1st Lieut. W. P. Whittaker, 2d Lieut. J. F. McManus, 2d Lieut. I. S. Suplee, 2d Lieut. A. J. Chapman, 2d Lieut. C. R. Dosker. 2d row--left to right: 2d Lieut. W. T. Chiles, 1st Lieut. W. E. Baugham, 1st Lieut. C. K. Burgess, 1st Lieut. W. A. Crenshaw, 2d Lieut. E. J. Higgins, 2d Lieut. E. M. Heddon. 3d row--left to right: Capt. W. V. Bowman, Capt. P. B. Smith, 1st Lieut. H. C. Bennett, Capt. E. E. Boyce, 1st Lieut. C. E. Mears, 1st Lieut. O. H. Guion, 1st Lieut. Joel W. Massey, 1st Lieut. L. C. Hand. 4th row--left to right: Capt. N. B. Vairin, Capt. R. R. Morrison, Maj. L. P. McLendon, Chaplain B. R. Lacy, Maj. L. B. Crayton, Maj. R. M. Hanes, 1st Lieut. J. G. Hoffman. Bottom row--left to right: Capt. R. P. Beaman, Maj. A. L. Bulwinkle, Maj. C. L. Pridgen, Col. Albert L. Cox, Lieut.-Col. S. C. Chambers, Maj. T. G. Stem, Capt. K. M. Hardison, Capt. R. D. Dixon, Capt. B. S. Royster. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • ORPHANAGE BAND, LATTA UNIVERSITY. From The History of My Life and Work. Autobiography by Rev. M. L. Latta, A.M., D.D.


  • OTHER MEMBERS OF THE REGIMENTAL N. C. O. STAFF. At the Top--Left to right: Bat. Sgt. Major Marvin M. Capps and Corporal E. W. Harrington. Center: Sergeant Arthur B. Corey. At Bottom--Left to right: Color Sergeants George N. Taylor and Wilbon O. Huntley. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Part of the Regimental N. C. O. Staff--Left to right: R. S. M. Jacob E. Lambert, Jr., R. S. M. William A. Allen, R. S. M. Kenneth J. Nixon, B. S. M. Hugh A. Pollard, R. S. M. Laudie E. Dimmette. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • PORTIA AND NERRISSA From the Merchant of Venice, Given by the Adelphian Society From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • Proximity Kindergarten Children. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • RESIDENT STAFF--1938-1939 From Thirty-Eighth Annual Report, 1938.


  • REV. M. L. LATTA AND WIFE. [1st Frontispiece Image] From The History of My Life and Work. Autobiography by Rev. M. L. Latta, A.M., D.D.


  • Sanitary Detachment. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • SENIOR HOCKEY TEAM From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • SERGEANT LUFBERY In one of the new Nieuports in which he convoyed the bombardment fleet which attacked Oberndorf. All the American flyers have an Indian head painted on their machines From Flying for France. With the American Escadrille at Verdun.


  • Shorthand Girls From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • SOME OF THE AMERICANS WHO ARE FLYING FOR FRANCE Left to right: Victor Chapman (killed), Elliot Cowdin, Bert Hall, Lieut. William Thaw, Capt. Thénault, Lieut. de Laage de Mux, Norman Prince (killed), Kiffin Rockwell (killed), and James McConnell From Flying for France. With the American Escadrille at Verdun.


  • Some of the Operating Heads in Lancaster Cotton Mills. 1--F. Gordon Cobb, general superintendent. 2--B. L. Still, superintendent No. 1 and 3 Mills. 3--L. T. Curry, overseer No. 2 weaving. 4--O. J. Whitehead, general overseer of power. 5--J. O. Edwards, general overseer No. 2 carding. 6--C. C. Brigman, overseer No. 2 spinning. 7--L. F. Hilton, overseer slashing, tyeing-in, etc. 8--C. R. Harris, night superintendent No. 3 mill. 9--O. T. Hayes, secretary to the general superintendent. Other overseers not shown in group are J. G. Brown, weaving No. 1; J. W. Mehaffey, cloth room. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • SOPHOMORE CLASS From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • SOPHOMORE HOCKEY TEAM From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • SPANISH CLUB From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • SPECIAL HOCKEY TEAM From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • The Supply Company. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • Supt. H. P. Fort (center); Z. L. Canady and E. C. Lanier at left and right of Mr. Fort; and Some of the Expert Workers in Orion Knitting Mills. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • Supt. Lee and his assistants and overseers at Pinkney, Ridge and Rankin Mills. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • The 1920 Baseball Team of Pinkney Mills. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • THE COURT OF THESEUS (A Midsummer Night's Dream) From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • The Glenn Lowry Y. M. C. A. Band. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • the Highland Park School, From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • The Kindergarten at Dunean Mills. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • The Marlboro Mills Concert Band. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • The School Children at Play. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • The Second Nine. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • The Sewing Class of Miss Perry, the Welfare Director. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • The Small Girls' Club at Dunean. From Mill News. Vol. XXII, no. 16 (Oct. 14, 1920).


  • THIS LIFE WE LEAD From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • "TOPS" WE HAVE KNOWN Group of veteran First Sergeants. Two of these, First Sergeant Blount, of Battery B, and First Sergeant Harris, of Battery A, were Saumur graduates and were attached to their old batteries. First Sergeant Tuttle, of Battery E, was the only one of the group to serve as "Top" from the organization of his outfit to demobilization. Left to right they are: Top row--Henderson, Headquarters Company; Crowell, Battery D; Bell, Battery A. Middle row--Blount, Battery B; Harris, Battery A; Hill, Battery F. Bottom row--Carroll, Battery C; Latham, Battery B; Tuttle, Battery E; Conrad, Supply Company. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • VARSITY HOCKEY TEAM From Pine Needles, 1921.


  • WELL BABY CLINIC From Thirty-Eighth Annual Report, 1938.


  • "WHISKEY" The lion and mascot of the American flying squadron in France From Flying for France. With the American Escadrille at Verdun.


  • WHOLESOME RECREATION AT ONE OF THE ORPHANAGES From Biennial Report of the State Board of Charities and Public Welfare, December 1, 1920 to June 30, 1922.


  • Y. W. C. A. CABINET From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.


  • Y. W. C. A. CABINET OFFICERS From The Carolinian, Edited by the Senior Class, 1909.