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9 images with subject World War, 1914-1918--Military facilities--France.

  • Battery C in camp on the banks of the Moselle River, at Stradtbredimus. On the other side of the river is the German town of Palzem. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • The beautiful log bungalow used as regimental headquarters on the Woëvre sector. Colonel Cox and Lieutenant Colonel Chambers in the picture. This building had been used by a German brigade commander, prior to the American invasion. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • The Entrance of the Camp. Here a watchful M. P. outfit looked them over going and coming. This picture was taken before the era of American Occupation, as the ornaments in the foreground plainly show. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • The interesting part of this picture is the structure at the right with many glass windows, known as the "Officers' Club," where officers not fortunate enough to have company messes existed on French rations, vin rouge and blanc, et cetera. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • A small chateau at Harricourt, France. Used as a supply base of a regiment. From Tar-Heel War Record (In the Great World War).


  • Snowing the street back of the men's quarters. These stone barracks were built by Napoleon I. The first building was part of Headquarters Company's territory, with Battery A next and running on down to the building at the end of the street which housed the Supply Company. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • This point was headquarters of the 89th Division during the St. Mihiel offensive for a time and it also served as headquarters of the 55th F. A. Brigade during the same engagement. It was near Flirey. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.


  • THREE NORTH CAROLINA DOUGH-BOYS PAYING LAST RESPECTS TO THE REMAINS OF THEIR KITCHEN WHICH HAS JUST BEEN HIT BY A BOMB DROPPED FROM A GERMAN `PLANE, "CHOW" BEING SCATTERED IN EVERF DIRECTION. From "Lest We Forget." The Record of North Carolina's Own.


  • The Twin Water Towers that decorated the hill-top and never furnished an adequate supply of water. Al the left an observation tower. The Regimental Guard-house, a stone structure built by Napoleon I, a few feet off to the right, was mercifully left out of the picture. From History of the 113th Field Artillery 30th Division.