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Journal of the Senate at an Extra Session of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia,
Convened under the Proclamation of the Governor, March 25th, 1863:

Electronic Edition.

Georgia. General Assembly. Senate


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First edition, 2000
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Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
2000.

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Source Description:
(title page) Journal of the Senate at an Extra Session of the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, Convened under the Proclamation of the Governor, March 25th, 1863
221 p.
Milledgeville, Ga.
Boughton, Nisbet & Barnes, State Printers
1863
Call number 1539 Conf. 1863 (Extra) (Rare Book Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)


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Illustration


JOURNAL
OF
THE SENATE AT AN
EXTRA SESSION
OF THE
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF THE
STATE OF GEORGIA,

CONVENED UNDER THE PROCLAMATION
OF THE
GOVERNOR,
MARCH 25TH, 1863.

BOUGHTON, NISBET & BARNES, STATE PRINTERS
MILLEDGEVILLE, GA.
1863.


Page 3

JOURNAL
OF
THE SENATE
OF THE
STATE OF GEORGIA.

MILLEDGEVILLE, GA.,
Wednesday, March 25TH, 1863.

        The Senate, pursuant to the proclamation of his Excellency the Governor, convened this day in extra session at the Capitol, and was called to order by its President, the Hon. John Billups, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Brooks.

        The roll being called, the following Senators answered to their names, to-wit:

        Messrs. Alexander, Beasley, Benson, Billups, William M. Brown, James R. Brown, Dyer, Echols, Fletcher, Furlow, Gaston, Griffin, James Hilliard, Thos. Hilliard, Jackson, Killen, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake, Stafford, Stephens, Swearingen, Vason, Wright.

        Present 26; absent 18.

        On motion of Mr. Mitchell, the proclamation of the Governor convening the General Assembly in extra session, was read and entered upon the Journal, to-wit:

PROCLAMATION.
By JOSEPH E. BROWN, Governor of Georgia.

To the Officers and Members of the General Assembly:

        I am satisfied that developments have clearly shown the necessity for further legislation at an early day, to secure the use of all our productive labor this year, in the cultivation of our lands in grain and other articles necessary to sustain life, and not in cotton, tobacco or like productions, and to prevent the destruction of articles of food by distillation.


Page 4

        As the public exigencies do, therefore, in my opinion, require that the General Assembly convene at an earlier day than that fixed for your meeting when you last adjourned, I issue this my Proclamation, requiring you, and each of you, to assemble in your respective Halls in the Capitol in this city, on Wednesday the 25th day of this present month, at 10 o'clock, A. M.

        Given under my hand and the Great Seal of the State, at the Capitol, in the city of Milledgeville, this the the 11th day of March, in the year of our Lord eighteen hundred and sixty-three.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.

By the Governor:

N. C. BARNETT, Secretary of State.


        Mr. Furlow offered the following resolution which was taken up, read and adopted, to-wit:

        Resolved, That the Secretary of the Senate inform the House that the Senate has convened in accordance with the proclamation of his Excellency the Governor, and is ready to proceed to business.

        Mr. Mosely offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted, to-wit:

        Resolved, That a joint committee of three from the Senate and a similar committee from the House be appointed to inform his Excellency the Governor that the General Assembly have convened and is ready to receive any communication from him.

        The President appointed on the part of the Senate on said committee, Messrs. Mosely, Furlow and Dyer.

        On motion of Mr. Seward, the Senate adjourned to 11½ o'clock A. M., instant.

11½ O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        Mr. Mitchell offered the following resolution, to-wit:

        Resolved, That the President proceed to the appointment of a Doorkeeper and Messenger of and for the Senate at this its extra session.

        This resolution was not agreed to.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--I am directed by the House of Representatives to inform the Senate that they are now organized and ready to proceed to business.


Page 5

        The House has also concurred in the resolution of the Senate, appointing a joint committee to wait on the Governor, and have appointed as such committee on the part of the House, Messrs. Tatum, Moore and Underwood.

        Mr. Vason offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and laid upon the table for the present:

        Whereas, It is believed that there is a large surplus of corn, peas, bacon, and pickled beef held by many of the citizens of Georgia over and above what is necessary to supply the wants of such holders; and whereas, if this surplus could be made available, it would greatly relieve the wants and sufferings of the army and people of this State; be it therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly, That a joint committee of three from the Senate and five from the House of Representatives be appointed, whose duty it shall be to consult on the subject, and report, by bill or otherwise, the best means in their judgment of reaching such surplus of corn, peas, bacon and pickled beef, and making it available to the army and people of Georgia.

        The following message was received from his Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters, his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--I am directed by the Governor to deliver to the Senate the enclosed message, with accompanying documents.

        On motion, the message of his Excellency the Governor was taken up and read as follows, to-wit:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Milledgeville, March 25th, 1863.

To the Senate and House of Representatives:

        I have felt it my duty to convene you at an earlier day than that fixed for your meeting, when you adjourned.

        In the midst of a revolution of such vast magnitude as that in which we are engaged, the constant change in the circumstances by which we are surrounded, must frequently influence our actions, and develop sufficient reasons for a change of our opinions, or our policy. In December last, we passed an act prohibiting the cultivation of more than three acres of cotton to the hand this year, which virtually legalizes and invites its production to that extent. I am now fully satisfied, if the quantity of land mentioned in that act, is planted in Georgia and each of the other cotton States, the result will be, our subjugation by hunger, and the utter ruin of the Confederacy. Hence, I have felt it my duty, before the crop is planted, to call you together,


Page 6

and recommend the passage of an act, that will make it highly penal, for any one to cultivate exceeding one fourth of an acre to the hand. The enemy has overrun, and now holds a large part of the most productive lands in the Confederacy. As our limits are circumscribed and contracted, many of the loyal people of the sections in the possession of the enemy retire to the interior, and the number of persons to be supported from the products of the lands in our possession, is greatly increased, while the area of productive lands from which the support must come, is almost daily diminished. Most of the white laborers of the country, are now in the army, and new levies are constantly being made from those who remain. As these enter the military service, our fields are left uncultivated, while the women and children are still in our midst, and must be supported. The result is, that the country and the army are mainly dependent upon slave labor for a support. At the present prices of all the necessaries of life, it is impossible for the women and children to support themselves. In my opinion, it will take every acre of land, and every days productive labor which we can command this year, to make our necessary support; and he who employs any portion of his lands and labor, in the production of cotton, tobacco, or any other products that will not sustain life, to that extent, endangers the success of our cause. The present prices of cotton make the temptation to plant it very strong, and the planter will quiet his conscience by the reflection, that the legislature has authorized him to plant three acres to the hand, and will plant his best land, place all his manure upon it, and make it the object of his special care and attention. There is now cotton enough in the Confederacy, to clothe our people for several years, and there is no reason why we should plant more than is actually necessary to keep seed. It may be said, that the planter can make more money out of cotton than grain and vegetables. This is very questionable. But if we admit that he can make double as much, this is no reason why he should be permitted to do it, if by so doing, he hazards the very existence of the States. What will his money, or his cotton, or his slaves, or his lands, be worth to him, if we are subjugated, and the civil and religious liberties, of himself and his posterity are destroyed?

        As the war is now prosecuted by the Lincoln government, for the avowed purpose of abolishing slavery, no class of our people has so much at stake, as our slaveholders, who are generally our chief planters. They are dependent upon our white laborers in the field of battle, for the protection of their property; and in turn this army of white laborers and their families, are dependent upon the slave owners for a support, while thus engaged. The obligation is


Page 7

mutual and reciprocal, and neither party has the right to disregard it.

        The conduct of our planters last year was most patriotic and praiseworthy, and has saved our cause for the present but the temptations held out to the avaricious, are much greater this year, owing to the high prices of cotton in the market; and I consider legislation absolutely necessary, avaricious restrain those who would hazard all for gain. As it is now time to commence planting, I invoke your early attention to this question, in my opinion, second in importance to no other that is likely to come under your consideration. At the present time, money will not buy bread, in a large section of our own State, at any reasonable price. This is caused, partly by the severe drought of last summer, but is probably, owing in a greater degree, to the fact, that the lands in that section of the State, are cultivated almost entirely by white labor, and most of that labor being now in the army, the lands lie idle, and the women and children are destitute of bread. But for the large surplus, in the cotton region, scenes of suffering must ensue, which would be appaling to contemplate, and which must demoralize, if not disband that part of the army, where the husbands and fathers of the sufferers, stand as a bulwark, between us and the enemy. Let not the people of the cotton sections of the State, where there is labor to cultivate all the lands, risk the chances of similar, or worse distress another year, lest consequences ensue, which may cost them, not only their cotton crops, but all that they have, and all that they expect to have in future. We can never be conquered by the arms of the enemy. We may be by hunger, if we neglect to husband all the resources for the supply of provisions, which a kind Providence has placed within our reach. Attempt to conceal it as we may, the fact is undeniable, that the great question in this revolution is now a question of bread. The army must be fed and their families at home supported, or the sun of liberty will soon set in darkness and blood, and the voice of freedom will be forever hushed in the silence of despotism.

THE LAW AGAINST DISTILLERIES.

        Experience has shown that the law against the distillation of grain into ardent spirits, needs amendment. From information received from different parts of the State, I am satisfied that a large portion of the potatoe crop, most of the dried fruit, and a considerable quantity of the molasses in the State, have been, and are being distilled. Under pretence of distilling these articles, it is also said, that quantities of corn are being used by distillers, who keep their doors closed, and refuse to admit visitors who might testify against them. In other sections, it is said, they are running their stills, in open violation of the law, and no one


Page 8

has the nerve to withstand and prosecute them. To arrest these evils, I recommend that the law be so changed, as to make it highly penal during the war, for any one, in addition to the present prohibition, to distil potatoes, dried fruit, or molasses, without a license. And that every person who keeps his distillery locked, and refuses to admit visitors, day or night, when admission is asked, shall be held prima facie guilty of a violation of the law. And, that every person who runs his distillery without a license, shall be presumed to be guilty of distilling grain, or other article prohibited, and the burden of proof shall rest upon him, to show the contrary.

        The law should also make the owner of the distillery liable to the penalties, if his stills are run by an insolvent person. And it should be made the duty of the Sheriff of the county, to call to his aid, all the force necessary, and destroy any distillery which is run in violation of law, as he would abate any other nuisance.

        It has been impossible for the Inferior Courts of some of the counties, under my instructions, to find a person who will take the contract to make the quantity of spirituous liquors or alcohol necessary for medicinal uses, at the prices fixed by the statue. And as it is a violation of the law, for a person distilling under a license, to sell for more than the prices fixed by the statute, I recommend such change, as will authorize the lowest responsible bidder to be licensed, at such price, as may be agreed on between him and the Court, for the supply necessary for the county: the quantity recommended by the Court, to be subject to the approval of the Governor, before he issues the license.

TRANSPORTATION OF PROVISIONS.

        So great is the scarcity of provisions, in the Cherokee Country, that it is impossible to subsist the soldiers families and the poor much longer, without the transportation of corn from South Western Georgia. The rolling stock upon the South Western, and the Macon and Western Railroads, is not sufficient to carry forward the corn, and to do the work required by the Confederate Government. Surrounded by these difficulties, I have thought it best, to direct the Superintendent of the State Road, to put one of his best trains upon the Roads to South Western Georgia, for the transportation of corn to supply bread to those who must otherwise suffer. I shall be obliged to continue this policy till the emergency is passed, though I may not be able to carry over the State Road, all Government freight offered, as promptly as I could wish. I feel it to be my highest duty, to so use the property of the State, as to prevent if possible, suffering, on the part of the poor, or the families of soldiers, for want of bread.


Page 9

SALARIES.

        I earnestly recommend the passage of an act repealing the act of 28th November, 1861, entitled "An Act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes;" and that reasonable salaries be allowed.

        It now takes the whole salary of a Judge of the Superior Courts for twelve months to purchase fifteen barrels of flour, or fifteen hundred pounds of bacon in the markets of this State. The per diem pay of a Judge while on his circuit does not nearly defray his necessary travelling expenses. Is this right? Can any intelligent legislator claim that it is compatible with either the justice or the dignity of a great State?

        The Constitution of Georgia, which we are bound by solemn obligation to support, says, "The Judges shall have salaries adequate to their services fixed by law." Are the present salaries of the Judges, or other officers of the State, adequate to their services? The question, to my mind, is too plain for argument. I trust it is only necessary again to bring it to your attention, to secure prompt action.

THE NEW CODE.

        The Code of this State having gone into operation on the first day of January last, it is a matter of great importance that the public officers be supplied with copies of it, that they and the people may have an opportunity of learning what the law is. It is not in my power to supply copies to even a considerable proportion of those who are entitled to them, on account of the neglect of Mr. John H. Seals. the printer, to comply with his contract. Since the contract was entered into by him, he has represented to the General Assembly his inability to comply with his obligation without additional compensation, and five thousand dollars of extra pay has been allowed him. He has been paid the full amount agreed upon by the original contract for the whole job, and one-half of the extra amount appropriated. After this had been done, he still failed to comply with the contract, alleging that he could not get leather to make the binding. To relieve him from this difficulty, at your session in November and December last, you authorized the Governor to receive the books bound in an-inferior style. Since this action on your part, he has not delivered a single copy, and no assurance is given when the books will be delivered. I have reasons to believe that Mr. Seals has sold a considerable number of copies of individuals or to the trade. I call your attention to this subject, and recommend such action on your part as may be necessary to compel performance on his part, or to take the printed sheets out of his hands, and have them bound by others, at his expense.


Page 10

SMALL POX.

        The physicians' bills sent to this Department by the Inferior Courts of many of the counties, for attention to persons afflicted with small pox, have, in my opinion, been so exorbitant that I have refused to pay them. There are several instances of physicians who have made out bills against the State for one or two months' attention to small pox cases, amounting to larger sums than they would, I suppose, be able to make by one or two years' practice. I respectfully ask that the law be so amended as to establish some just rule by which I am to be governed in the payment of these claims. The act only makes provision for the payment by the State of the expenses incurred at hospstals established by the Inferior Courts of the different counties. Many of the Courts have established no hospitals, and have had the cases treated at the houses of the afflicted, in different parts of the county. It is desirable that the will of the Legislature be more clearly expressed in reference to cases of this character. While I do not think that stronger reasons exist why the State should pay the physicians' bills and other expenses incurred by attention to persons who have small pox, and are treated at home, when they are themselves able to pay, than in cases of other contageous diseases of a malignant character, it may be proper that such payments be made by the State, when the persons afflicted are unable to pay, and might otherwise be neglected on account of their poverty.

IMPRESSMENT OF NEGROES.

        It will be remembered, that Brigadier General Mercer made a requisition upon the State, while you were last in session, for twenty-five hundred negroes, for sixty days, to work on the fortifications around Savannah, and that the Governor was authorized, by the action of the General Assembly, to fill the requisition. A call was afterwards made by authority of General Beauregard, for three hundred negroes to work on the obstructions of the Altamaha River, which requisition was also filled.

        Many of the negroes sent to Savannah, have not yet been discharged, because, in the opinion of the military authorities there, the emergency was such as to make it a military necessity to retain them. New and additional fortifications have been projected, and no one seems to know when they will be completed. It is now required, that the negroes remain ninety days longer; or, if they are discharged, that their places be supplied immediately by a new levy.

        The upper and western portions of the State, have not yet furnished their quota. If a new impressment is made, as the law now stands, it must be from these sections. The warm season is commencing, and the negroes from these


Page 11

parts of the State, are not accustomed to the climate of Savannah. Much sickness, and many deaths must therefore be expected among them. Again, the crop is now being planted, and it is a matter of great importance, that as little labor as possible be taken from the agricultural pursuits of the State.

        In this state of the case, I respectfully ask, that the General Assembly, by joint resolution, or otherwise, give directions, at as early a day as possible, as to the best mode of furnishing the labor to complete the fortifications. It will also be proper that some just mode of ascertaining the value, and compensating the owners for the negroes who have died in the service, and the still larger number who may die during the summer season, be prescribed by law.

MILITARY LAW.

        Section 1040 of the Code provides, that all elections for militia officers, of and above the rank of Captain, shall be ordered by the Commander-in-Chief.

        This will cause a great accumulation of labor in the Executive Department, with much unnecessary delay and expense. I therefore recommend that the old rule be re-established, and that all vacancies below the grade of General, be filled by election ordered by the officer next highest in command, except in case of lieutenants, whose elections should be ordered by the Captain, as prescribed by Act of 11th February, 1850.

        I also recommend the repeal of sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993, of the Code, which provide for the payment of a commutation tax in lieu of military service, as wholly inapplicable to the present condition of the country. The Comptroller General, by my direction, has left the columns relating to this commutation tax, out of the Receivers' Digest, till you shall have considered the question.

RIGHTS OF THE CHURCHES.

        I recommend the repeal of section 1376 of the Code, which prohibits "any church, society, or other body, or any persons, to grant license or other authority, to any slave or free person of color, to preach or exhort, or otherwise officiate in church matters." I entertain no doubt, that negroes are sometimes very useful among their own people as preachers or exhorters. This is a question of which the church of the living God, and not the legislature of a State, is the proper judge. The loyal support which the churches of all religious denominations have given to the Confederate and State Governments, and the aid which they have afforded the government, in the maintenance of our slavery institutions, have demonstrated, that they understand this question, and may safely be trusted. The


Page 12

legislature under pretence of police regulation or otherwise, therefore, has no right to infringe upon religious liberty, or usurp the power which belongs to the churches. Render to Cæsar the things that are Cæsar's, and to God the things that are God's, is an injunction which the State has no right to disregard.

STATE ENDORSEMENT OF CONFEDERATE DEBT.

        I transmit herewith copies of resolutions, passed by the legislatures of of the States of Alabama, South Carolina, Mississippi and Florida, proposing, upon different plans, the indorsement of the debt of the Confederacy by the States. No one can doubt the patriotic motives which have prompted this action of our sister States. But as this is a question of great magnitude, involving important principles, and as our action in the premises, must be followed by consequences seriously affecting the credit of the State, present and prospective, it is our duty to examine it for ourselves, and not to be controlled by the decision and action of others.

        If the proposed endorsement will have the effect of arraying the capital of the country against the Confederacy, and in favor of a reconstruction of the old Union, however laudable the motive, the act would be most unfortunate.

        Again, if the effect will be to level the credit of all the States to an equality, without regard to the manner in which they have managed their financial affairs, or the amount of debt now owed by each, it would be gross injustice to those States which have conducted their affairs so well as to incur but little debt, and have maintained their credit at the highest point.

        Furthermore, if the indorsement of the Confederate debt, by the States, can only be productive of temporary appreciation of Confederate credit, without permanent benefit, and must be followed by serious injury to the credit of the States, the policy is unwise, and should not be adopted.

        Let us consider whether these would not be the legitimate effects of the proposed endorsement.

        At present, almost every capitalist in the country, is the creditor of the Confederate Government, and is directly interested in maintaining its existence, and sustaining its credit. I speak not of individuals, but capital is generally selfish, and controlled more by interest than patriotism. When we have ascertained what will be the interest of capitalists we may generally have but little difficulty in determining what will be their action.

        Suppose the whole debt of the Confederacy to have reached one billion of dollars, as it probably will have done by the time the States have all acted upon this proposition.


Page 13

It is not probable that capitalists, as a matter of choice, would prefer to credit our government with a larger debt than this hanging over it. But having already invested this enormous sum, if they feel that their only hope of payment rests upon the success, and permanent establishment, of the Confederacy, and it becomes necessary to invest another billion to establish the Government and avoid the loss of the sum already invested, interest will prompt them to stand by the government, sustain its credit, and make further advance if they have the means. But suppose at this period, all the States indorse the whole debt, or each indorses its proportion of it, what effect will this have upon the mind of the capitalist? If prior to the act, he looked only to the Confederacy for payment, and having now obtained the legal, as well as moral obligation of the individual States to pay, he is satisfied that this secures the debt, his interest in the permanent success of the Confederacy ceases, and he looks in future to the States for payment. If after this, the old Union should be reconstructed, and the States of our Confederacy should return, and become members of it, the capitalist is not left to look to a Confederacy no longer in existence, for payment, nor to rely on the moral obligation of the States, to assume and pay the debt, but he rests upon the solemn legal indorsement of the individual States, which would be as binding upon them, in one Confederacy as in another.--The capitalists having thus obtained ihe solemn indorsement of the States, for a sum as large as they could reasonably be expected to pay, would naturally desire to prevent an increased liability, on the part of their debtors, the States, which would weaken their ability to pay, and might in future, cause the people to throw off the whole burden, on account of its accumulated weight. Knowing, in other words, that it is possible to increase debt to an amount so onerous, as to drive a people to repudiation, they might prefer to take their chances of payment of one billion of dollars of State debt, in the old Confederacy, rather than of two billions in the new. Hence it would be their interest to oppose the appropriation of the second billion of dollars, to prosecute the war for the establishment of the Confederacy, and to advocate a reconstruction for the purpose of securing an early peace, and of stopping further expenditure, that they may save what is already owing to them.

        The rivers of blood which have been drawn from the veins of our fathers, brothers, husbands, sons and other relatives by the hands of our cruel enemies, form an impassable gulf between us and our wicked invaders. How can we again shake hands with them over the slain bodies of our loved ones, and again embrace them in fraternal relations? Were Georgians to do this, the blood of their


Page 14

brethren, who have fallen martyrs to our glorious cause would cry to them from the ground, and rebuke the dastardly deed. Sooner than reunite with those now seeking to enslave us, and under the name of Union with them, become, with our posterity, hewers of wood and drawers of water for them, let us submit, with more than Roman firmness, to the devastation of our fields, and, if need be, the extermination of our race. But let us do not act hastily, which, however patriotic the motive, may tend to array a powerful class in our midst against the Confederate Government. While Georgia with the dignity of a great State, should firmly maintain her reserved rights, and if need be, restrain the Confederate Government within the limits assigned it by the constitutional compact to which she is a party, she should stand by it, confined within its constitutional limits, with an unyielding determination to sustain it at every hazard, as well against injuries inflicted by the injudicious action of imprudent friends, as against the thrusts of domestic enemies, or the herculean assaults of foreign foes. The future happiness of her posterity is firmly linked with the Confederacy. Thousands of her sons have nobly immolated their lives upon its altars, and the tens of thousands who survive should see to it that no rude hand is uplifted against it, that no false policy undermines its foundations, and that no usurpers destroy the beautiful symmetry of its magnificent structure.

        We should not only sustain the Confederacy at all hazards, but we should also sustain the administration. We may differ from it on constitutional questions, or questions of policy. Such is the nature of the human mind, and such the variety of human intellect, that no two honest men were ever fully agreed in every sentiment. As long as freedom of thought and freedom of speech exist, we should have the independence to express our dissent from what we consider the errors of our rulers, and they should have the magnanimity to tolerate the difference. But while we contend earnestly for what we consider sound principles we should do no act which can seriously embarrass the administration in the prosecution of the war. In my judgment the proposed indorsement would, in the end, array a class of capitalists against the Government which would amount to serious embarrassment.

        Again, it cannot be denied, that some of the States have managed their financial affairs better than others. Some have submitted to the necessary burdens of taxation, and met their liabilities as they were incurred, while others have added much of them to their debts. Hence, the debts of some are much larger, in proportion to their resources, than the debts of others. The consequence is, that the credit of the State that has the greatest resources and the least debt


Page 15

is worth most in the market. But, suppose all the States indorse the immense debt of the Confederacy, what is the result? As each State has its own individual indebtedness, and would then have assumed a legal liability for the debt of the Confederacy, the credit of each State is at once placed below the credit of the Confederacy; and as each would then be liable for as much as it could reasonably be expected ever to pay, the credit of the respective States would be placed, not only at a low point, but very nearly upon a level with each other. This would be injustice to those States which have maintained their credit at the highest point. Take for instance our own State. It may be truly remarked without disparagement to other States, that the debt of Georgia is less in proportion to her resources, than that of any other State in the Confederacy, or indeed any other upon the continent. The consequence is that her credit is worth a higher premium in the market than the credit of any other State in the Confederacy.--Her people are therefore entitled to the benefits of her economy, her wise management, and her far seeing statesmanship. If she and the other States now indorse the Confederate debt, her credit is at once placed upon a level with Confederate credit, if not below it, and very nearly or quite upon a level with that of all the other States. The result is, that the people of the other States, reap the benefits of her better credit, to which the people of Georgia are alone entitled. This would be injustice to the people of Georgia, and to her creditors who have invested in her securities and are entitled to the benefits of her superior credit in the market. If it is said, her people should make sacrifices for the common cause; I reply, that no State has responded more promptly to every call made by Confederate authority for men, money or other assistance, and that she is ever ready to comply with every constitutional obligation.

        Having shown, I trust, to your satisfaction, that the proposed indorsement would place the interest of the capitalists of the country, in the scale, against hazarding further appropriations for the establishment of the Confederacy; that it would be productive of injury to the credit of the individual States, and of injustice as between the States themselves; I now proceed to inquire, whether, if we waive these objections, it could be productive of the permanent benefits to Confederate credit claimed by its advocates.

        Before proceeding, however, it is proper that I remark, that the advocates of indorsement are not agreed among themselves, and that two plans are proposed. One proposition contemplates a general indorsement of the whole debt of the Confederacy, by the several States; each to be


Page 16

liable in proportion to its representative weight in Congress.

        The other, which may, I believe, properly be designated the South Carolina proposition, proposes the indorsement of $500,000,000 of the bonds hereafter to be issued by the Confederacy; each State indorsing its proportion of the bonds, on the basis of its relative representative weight in Congress. The latter proposition, is to my mind the less objectionable of the two; as it does not hold out the temptation above mentioned to capitalists, to whom the present debt is owing, to favor the reconstruction of the old Union, to prevent an increase of debt to maintain the further existence of the Confederacy.

        The advantages claimed for both propositions are I believe, substantially the same. The chief of which is, that the proposed indorsement would reassure the confidence of capital, in Confederate credit, and cause its investment in the bonds of the Confederacy, in amounts sufficient to fund all treasury notes issued in redundancy of healthy circulation; and thus reduce the circulation to an amount only necessary to meet the legitimate commercial demand for currency.

        This looks well on paper; and might work well in practice, if there were enough surplus capital in the Confederacy, to convert hundred dollar bills into interest bearing bonds, and lay them away as investment, as fast as all the paper mills in the country can make the paper, and all the engravers can print upon it the likeness of circulating medium, and an army of Government clerks can sign these promises to pay. But here lies the difficulty. Whatever may be the confidence of capitalists in these securities, the country, devastated as it is by a destructive war, cannot yield surplus capital for permanent investment, as fast as hundred dollar bills, or thousand dollar bonds, can be manufactured.

        Prior to the commencement of the war, the surplus capital of the South was invested in State Bonds, Bank Stock, Railroad Stock, Bonds of Corporations &c. Since that time, most of the surplus has been invested in Confederate bonds; and our people have not now, probably the half of five hundred millions of dollars that they can spare, to invest in any securities, however desirable. This measure might afford partial and temporary relief, by inducing some capital not now employed, to seek investment in these bonds. But if the war goes on, and the Government is under the necessity of issuing two or three millions of dollars a day, of its notes, for the next one, two, or three years, it must be admitted, that we have not the capital to absorb them as fast as issued; and the indorsement could only cause a temporary


Page 17

suspension of the depreciation which must follow our over issues; for the ultimate payment of which, no adequate provision is being made.

        The advocates of this plan also contend, that the Government could fund the debt at home, at a heavy premium in its favor, after the indorsement, basing the calculation upon the fact, that State credit is now worth a large premium, when compared with Confederate.

        To show the fallacy of this conclusion, it is only necessary to inquire, why the bonds of the individual States command this premium. The debts of most of the States, are now small, compared with their resources, and their ability to pay; and capitalists naturally conclude, that in case of failure of the Confederacy, or ultimate repudiation by it, the States would pay their individual indebtedness, resting upon both, legal and moral obligation, in preference to their indirect indebtedness resting upon moral obligation, with no further legal obligation than that their people submit to such taxation as may be imposed by Congress to raise the money to pay the debt. Georgia's seven per cent bonds are said to be worth 40 per cent premium, in currency, in the market. Why? Because her resources are great, and her debt small. Increase her indebtedness to one hundred millions, and her bonds will cease to command a premium. If we adopt either of the proposed plans, her debt may soon exceed this sum. When the States have committed themselves to the policy, and have indorsed the present Confederate debt, or have indorsed $500,000,000, they must extend their indorsements as future exigencies may, in the opinion of the Government require, until they have indorsed all future issues to be made by the Government. The advocates of the plan will have much stronger reasons for claiming the extension, when the States are once committed to the policy, than they now have for claiming the first indorsement. It is like a whirlpool, from which, when the States have once placed themselves within its power, there is no return. When the amount indorsed becomes, as it soon must, an enormous sum, the effect of the indorsement will be, to bring down State credit, even below Confederate credit, and not to bring up Confederate credit to the present level of State credit.

        It is again said, that the proposed State indorsement would enable the Government to negotiate its bonds abroad, at a premium, and that there is a sufficiency of foreign capital, to absorb all our issues. The sufficiency of capital in that case is admitted; but the inquiry is, would the indorsement induce its investment in these bonds, at a premium, or at par, or even near to par?

        We are engaged in a gigantic war. Our ports are blockaded. The great powers of Europe refuse, even to recognize


Page 18

us as a Government. Our expenditures are enormous, which cause our debt to accumulate rapidly, and we are not collecting taxes sufficient to pay interest; much less to create a sinking fund for the ultimate extinguishment of the principal. In this state of things, foreign capitalists refuse to invest in Confederate securities, and the credit of the individual States is far below par in foreign markets. How then is it to be reasonably expected, that the indorsement of the Confederate bonds by the States, will give them a value in foreign markets, which is attached to neither the credit of the Confederacy, nor of the individual States? While the war and the blockade last, and while we refuse to submit to taxation sufficient to retire a reasonable proportion of our paper issues, it is vain to expect that we can fund the debt abroad, without the most ruinous sacrifice, no matter how often the paper is indorsed by the parties now morally bound for its payment.

        But it may be said, if the States are now morally bound for the payment of the debt, and their people are legally bound to submit to the necessary tax for that purpose, when imposed by the Confederate Government, why not indorse the bonds, and let the States take upon themselves the direct legal obligation to pay. To my mind, there are very obvious reasons why it should not be done.

        While the Constitutional obligation rests upon the people of the States, to submit to the taxation imposed by Congress, to pay the debts of the Confederacy, the Constitution imposes upon Congress, which is the power that creates the liability, the sole responsibility of devising the means, and assessing the taxes, necessary to discharge the obligation. This is as it should be. The power in the Government that creates the debt, should have resting upon it, the sole responsibility of providing the means for its payment, and of imposing the taxes for that purpose which may be necessary. The people then know how to hold their agents to a proper accountability.

        Suppose, however, the States indorse the debt, and pledge their individual faith as States, for its payment at maturity; and Congress, afraid of its popularity, does not wish to take the responsibility to assess the tax, to meet it. What follows? The States to maintain their individual credit, must themselves assess, and collect the tax, and make the payment. Congressmen finding that they could in this way avoid an unpleasant responsibility, and retain their places with less difficulty, would, after having contracted the debt, when pay day came, turn over the responsibility to the legislatures of the States. Thus we should have one Government to spend the money, and another chargeable with the responsibility of raising it. Congress would then occupy, very much the position of the rich man's prodigal


Page 19

son at college, who, having no responsibility about footing the bill at the end of the year, feels very little concern about the size to which it accumulates.

        Again, sad experience has shown us, that the tendency of our Government, is to consolidation, and that the central Government is ever ready to usurp as much undelegated power, as the States will consent to lose. As the central Government grows stronger, the States grow weaker, and their just rights are disregarded. Now, I can imagine no one act of the States, that will tend so much to strengthen the central Government, at the expense, to them, of the loss of their just powers, as the adoption of the policy now proposed, which binds them individually, to provide for the payment of all the debts which Congress may choose to contract, but may not be willing to impose the taxes to pay. The consummation of the policy is the complete consolidation of the Government, making the States the mere burden bearers of the central superior.

        I may be met here, with the remark often made, that it is no time now to defend the rights of States, or to maintain principles. State Rights, and Constitutional principles are the same in times of war as in times of peace; and should be maintained at all times, and under all circumstances. Power once usurped, with acquiescence, is never relaxed but at the point of the bayonet; and we should not forget, that rights surrendered in war, are never regained in peace. We should therefore do no act tending to destroy the States in one grand consolidation, and lay the foundation of a central despotism upon their ruins.

        Having given some of the reasons which satisfy my mind, that the hopes entertained by the advocates of State indorsement, that the adoption of their policy would retire the excess of the currency, and reduce it to a healthy condition, are entirely delusive, I may be asked if there is no remedy for the evil. My opinion is, that so long as the war is carried on in its present magnitude, requiring the amount of daily expenditure now made, and the demand for all the necessaries of life exceeds the supply as far as it now does, there is no complete remedy for the present evils, of high prices and redundant paper currency. There is one remedy, and only one, which can mitigate the evil, inspire confidence in the stability of the Government, and the ultimate payment of the debt, and induce the investment of surplus capital of the people of other Governments, as well as our own, in Confederate bonds. That remedy is taxation by Congress, sufficient to pay the interest upon the whole debt, in gold or its equivalent, and to create an annual sinking fund, sufficient to extinguish the debt within some reasonable time. Convince capitalists everywhere, that this is the settled policy of the government, and that


Page 20

our people are ready to submit to it, and make all the sacrifices necessary to carry it out, and Confederate securities will be sought after in the market, and most of our excess of circulation funded, without the question being once asked, whether State indorsements have been written upon the bonds.

        In place of the indorsement of the bonds of the Confederacy by the States, I therefore recommend as our response to be made to the propositions of our sister States, and as the Georgia policy in which their cooperation is respectfully asked, the passage of a joint resolution by the General Assembly, urging the Congress of the Confederate States, in view of the full magnitude of the crisis, to come up with nerve and firmness, to the discharge of its duty, by the assessment of a tax adequate to the purposes above mentioned; and pledging the people of Georgia, to a prompt and cheerful payment of their proportion of it. If this be done, I have no misgivings about the result. The good common practical sense of the people, which is seldom properly appreciated by politicians, has already grasped the question. The people understand it. Every practical, business man knows, that paper promises, with paper indorsements, can never sustain our credit, as long as we appropriate, and draw hundreds of millions of dollars annually, from the treasury, and return nothing to it. No matter how many expedients we may try, we shall be constantly driven back to the same point. Government has but one way of raising money to reduce its indebtedness, and that is by taxation, direct or indirect. And as our ports are blockaded, so that we cannot raise money by indirect taxation upon imports, we have no alternative left but direct taxation. As long as we attempt to conduct this war, and maintain our armies upon paper promises alone, we must expect to endure all the evils of depreciated credit, inflated currency, and high prices.

        European Governments are already convinced by the gallant deeds of our armies, that we can never be conquered as long as we can keep and maintain these armies; but they very well understand, that the financial question underlies, and is the foundation upon which the whole structure is built. Thus far our policy has been such, as to afford them but little evidence, that this is with us a sure foundation. Whenever we have convinced them, that we are prepared to make the sacrifices necessary to establish a safe and permanent financial system, we may expect both recognition and credit. Till we have done this, we cannot reasonably expect either.

        Again, we lose almost nothing by submitting to the taxation necessary to pay the interest, and create a sinking fund upon the gold basis. Whenever this becomes


Page 21

the settled policy of the Government, the depreciation is very nearly stopped, and the currency left in our hands is worth almost or quite as much, as all we had, was worth before we paid the tax. To illustrate: The mechanic has one hundred dollars of Confederate Treasury notes. He wishes to purchase a good cow and calf, and he finds it will take the whole sum to pay for them. The currency is still depreciating, and at the end of the next three months it may take one hundred and twenty-five dollars to make the purchase. At this point, suppose the Government assesses a tax of five per cent. to establish the policy above indicated, and he is required to pay five dollars of his hundred to the Collector, The effect of this is to absorb that much of the over issue, and to give confidence in the ultimate redemption of the whole. This will at once stop the decline in the value of the notes, and may cause them to appreciate. The consequence will be, that he can probably purchase the same property with the ninety-five dollars which remain in his hands after the payment of the tax. In a word, by paying back part of the redundant currency into the Treasury, we stop the depreciation of its value, and leave the balance in circulation, worth as much in the purchase of property as the whole was worth before the tax was paid. But suppose the tax to be burdensome, and to absorb a large proportion of our surplus income. Is this a reason why it should not be collected? We must submit to burdens, and make heavy sacrifices to sustain the government, maintain our credit, and support our armies; or all we possess must go down together in a crash, and involve us and our posterity in one common ruin.

        Before closing my remarks upon this subject, I beg leave to express my firm conviction, that the policy advocated by some of assuming the Confederate tax, when assessed, and adding it to the debt of the State, instead of collecting it, has already been carried as far as wise statesmanship or the exigencies of the times will permit. It is simply shifting the burden from one shoulder to the other. Or, in other words, it is an attempt, in another form, to conduct the war upon paper, without its costing us anything. We have no right to turn over all the burdens of the present generation to posterity. This would be as contrary to justice and sound principles as it would be for Congress to contract the debt and turn over to the State governments the responsibility of providing the means for its payment.

        The policy is exceedingly unwise in this also, that it causes the State to borrow the present currency at par, to be paid back, years hence, with interest, in gold. What prudent man would do this, in the management of his own affairs? Suppose one planter owes another ten thousand dollars, would he sell property now at the present high prices


Page 22

in currency and pay the debt, or would he hold on to his property, and pay interest upon the debt till the war is over, and the price of everything is again estimated upon the gold basis, and then sell five times as much property to pay the same debt? If he adopted the latter alternative, we would say, he needed a guardian. If we agree that this policy would be unwise in individuals, we must not forget, that the State is but an association of individuals. When upon a question of this character, we have ascertained what would be the interest of a prudent individual, or a small number of individuals, we have only to enlarge the circle, and we have the interest of the State. This is a rule by which I have been guided in the management of the finances of the State, and I believe it to be the only true and successful one.

        Our people can now pay five millions of dollars in the present currency easier than they can pay one million in gold, in what are usually called hard times, when property is low and money scarce. It may be said, why not keep our property and leave this matter to posterity? Who are to be posterity? Our children. For whom are we laboring? Our children. If, then, our property is expected to descend to our children, why accumulate a debt to hang over it and descend with it, by borrowing money at the rate of twenty cents for a dollar, to be paid back by them out of our property in gold, dollar for dollar, with interest. I trust this policy will find very few advocates.

        It is infinitely better for us to submit to all the taxation, and make all the sacrifices necessary to maintain our Government and sustain our credit, than to permit the enemy to overturn our Government plunder our homes, insult our wives and our daughters, confiscate our property, and enslave ourselves and our posterity. We cannot avoid the one alternative or the other. Humbly imploring a continuation of Divine favor, let us resolve to stand in our allotted places, make all the sacrifices necessary, and place our entire trust in the God of Israel, who is "a very present help in trouble," and all will yet be well.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.


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GOV. SHORTER TO GOV. BROWN.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Montgomery, Alabama, Dec. 4th, 1862.

To His Excellency, Joseph E. Brown,
Governor of Georgia:

        SIR: In transmitting to you the accompanying resolutions of the General Assembly of the State of Alabama, proposing to the several States composing the Confederacy, to guarantee its War debt, I hope for the ready co-operation of your State. Embarked, as we are, in a common cause, with a common destiny, our separate interests are indissolubly linked with the prosperity of our Confederacy, and our separate State action should be so directed as to bear directly upon the advancement of the credit of the Confederacy, to strengthen its hands for the attainment of our common, desire.

I have the honor to be,
Very respectfully,
Your obedient servant.

JOHN GILL SHORTER,
Governor of Alabama.

ALABAMA RESOLUTIONS.

        Joint Resolutions in relation to the war debt of the Confederate States.

        WHEREAS, the Government of the Confederate States is involved in a war for the independence of each of the States of the Confederacy, as well as for its own existence: and whereas the destiny of each State of the Confederacy is indissolubly connected with that of the Confederate Government; and whereas, the Confederate Government cannot successfully prosecute the war to a speedy and honorable peace without ample menns or credit: be it therefore

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Alabama in General Assembly convened, That in the opinion of this General Assembly, it is the duty of each State of the Confederacy, for the purpose of sustaining the credit of the Confederate Government, to guarantee the debt of that Government in proportion to its representation in the Congress of that Government.

        Resolved further, That the State of Alabama hereby proposes to her sister States of the Confederacy, to guarantee said debt on said basis, provided that each of said States shall accept the proposition and adopt suitable legislation to carry it into effect, in which event, these resolutions shall stand as the guaranty of this State, for the aforesaid proportion of the debt of said Confederate Government.


Page 24

        Resolved further, That His Excellency, the Governor be, and is hereby requested to transmit a copy of these resolutions to the Governor of each State of the Confederacy, and to the President of the Confederate States.

        Approved Dec. 1st, 1862.

GOV. MILTON TO GOV. BROWN.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Tallahassee, Florida, Dec. 22d, 1862.

His Excellency, Joseph E. Brown,
Governor of Georgia, Milledgeville, Ga.:

        SIR:--By direction of His Excellency Governor Milton, I have the honor herewith to enclose to you a copy of a resolution passed by the General Assembly of the State of Florida at its late session, viz:

        Resolution to guarantee by the States, the debt of the Confederate Government, and respectfully request that the resolutions may be laid before the Legislature of your State.

Very respectfully,

SAMUEL BENEZENT,
Private Sec'y. of the Governor.

FLORIDA RESOLUTIONS.

        Resolutions to guarantee by the States the debt of the Confederate Government.

        WHEREAS, the Government of the Confederate States is involved in a war for the independence of each of the States of the Confederacy, as well as for its own existence; and whereas, the destiny of each State of the Confederacy is indissolubly connected with that of the Confederate Government; and whereas, also, the Confederate Government cannot successfully prosecute the war to a speedy and honorable peace without ample means and credit:

        Resolved therefore by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Florida, in General Assembly convened, That this General Assembly concurs in opinion with the General Assembly of the State of Alabama, that it is the duty of each State of the Confederacy, for the purpose of sustaining the credit of the Confederate Government, to guarantee the debt of that Government in proportion to its representation in the Congress of that Government.

        Resolved further, That the State of Florida hereby accepts the proposition of the said State of Alabama, to guarantee said debt on said basis; provided each of said States shall


Page 25

accept the proposition and adopt suitable legislation to carry it into effect, and that their resolutions shall stand as the guarantee of this State, of the aforesaid proportion of the debt of said Confederate Government.

        Resolved further, That his Excellency be, and is hereby requested to transmit a copy of these resolutions to the Governor of each State of the Confederacy, and to the President of the Confederate Government.

        Passed the Senate Dec. 13th, 1862.

        Passed the House of Representatives Dec. 15th, 1862.

        Approved by the Governor Dec. 15th, 1862.

GOV. PETTUS TO GOV. BROWN.

Jackson, January 23, 1863.

His Excellency, Joseph E. Brown, Governor of Georgia:

        SIR:--Col. James B. Gladney of this State, a citizen of high standing, and a member of the Legislature, made a contract in November last with the Secretary of the Navy, to build a certain number of war steamers for the Confederate States. For these war vessels Col. Gladney was to receive payment in interest bearing bonds. Owing to the fact that the Confederate States were not yet recognized by the European governments, capitalists are not willing readily to advance their money on our bonds. But it is believed if the individual States will guaranty the bonds and interest that any amount of capital both in this country and in Europe could be at once obtained, that might be necessary to build and equip an efficient navy. At our last session of the Legislature of this State, Mississippi passed an act to guaranty the amount of $200,000,000 of Confederate bonds in conjunction with the other States of the Confederacy. A copy of that law is herewith enclosed to you. By the provisions of the Constitution of this State, no law for a loan of money on the credit of the State, or pledging the credit of the State for the redemption of any loan or debt is obligatory until it has been sanctioned by a majority of two Legislatures. Hence, the above act has been referred for the action of the next succeeding Legislature, which, without any doubt, will pass it. But in the meantime immediate action is necessary to obtain a navy. If each State waits till all the others act, the time for usual action may pass away. Col. Gladney believes, if he can get the immediate endorsement of some solvent State of Confederate bonds for $ for the specific purpose of building war steamers, he could, without any doubt, procure in Europe


Page 26

the number of vessels for which he has contracted with the Secretary of the Navy. Mississippi would without any question give the guaranty, but her Legislature is not in session, and if in session, it would require the action of two Legislatures to be obligatory, and would therefore not be immediately available. The importance of this movement you fully understand. It is vital to our success. I therefore request that you will recommend such action by your Legislature as will facilitate the object in view. Col. Gladney is accredited by me as the agent of the State to represent the views which are entertained here upon this subject. Whatever action your State may take in this matter, when made known to me, will be referred to the Legislature of this State, and I am sure that Mississippi will assume an equal share of any responsibility that your State, or any other in the Confederacy may take for the common cause.

Respectfully,

JOHN J. PETTUS,
Governor of Mississippi.

Concurring fully in the views above expressed by Gov. Pettus, we respectfully urge them upon your consideration.

T. C. TUPPER,
Maj. Gen. Miss. State Troops.

T. G. WHORTON,
Att'y Gen. of Miss.

W. YERGER,
Member of the State Senate.

MISSISSIPPI ACT.

        AN ACT to provide for a guaranty by the State of Mississippi of the Bonds of the Confederate States.

        WHEREAS, The Confederate Government is engaged in a war for the maintenance of the rights and independence of the several States, and it is indispensable to the successful prosecution of the same, that the financial credit of the Confederate Government should be upheld; And whereas, the State of Mississippi has full confidence in the solvency and credit of the Confederate States, and is willing to guaranty the same as fully as by the Constitution the Legislature has power to pledge the faith of the State; therefore,

        Sec. 1. Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of Mississippi, That the Governor of the State, for the time being, be, and he is hereby authorized and directed to indorse the guaranty of the State upon the Bonds of the Confederate States of America, upon the application of the Government of the said Confederate States, to an amount equal to the proportionate share of the State of Mississippi,


Page 27

of the sum of two hundred millions of dollars in the ratio of representation of said State in the House of Representatives of the Confederate Congress, thereby pledging the faith and the funds of the State for the payment of the principal of the said bonds, and the interest to accrue thereon; provided, that such of the bonds as shall be sold within the Confederate States shall be disposed of to the highest bidders; and provided further, that in the sale, either in this country or abroad, of the bonds, this State and the citizens thereof shall have the right to purchase the bonds under the guaranty, in preference to all purchasers at equal bids.

        Be it further enacted, That this law be referred to the next succeding Legislature, and that it be published for three months previous to the next regular election, in three newspapers of this State, to be designated by the Governor; and that the Governor be directed to see that said publication is made, and report to the next succeeding Legislature his action in the premises.

J. P. SCALES,
Speaker of the House of Reps.

JAMES DRANE,
President of the Senate.

Approved January 3d, 1863.

JOHN J. PETTUS.

GOV. BONHAM TO GOV. BROWN.

Executive Department,
Columbia, S. C., Feb. 9th, 1863.

To His Excellency Joseph E. Brown,
Governor of the State of Georgia:

        SIR:--In conformity with the instructions of the Legislature, I have the honor to enclose the following act and resolution.

I am, sir, very respectfully,
Your obedient servant,

M. L. BONHAM.

ACT OF SOUTH CAROLINA.

        AN ACT to provide for a guaranty by the State of the Bonds of the Confederate States.

        1 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives, now met and sitting in General Assembly, and by the authority of the same, That the Governor for the time being, whenever application for such guaranty shall be made to him by the Government of the Confederate States of America, be, and


Page 28

he is hereby authorized and directed to indorse the guaranty of the State of South Carolina upon the Bonds of the Confederate States of America, to be hereafter issued according to a plan to be adopted by Congress, to the amount of thirty-four millions four hundred and eighty-two thousand seven hundred and fifty-eight dollars sixty-two and two twenty-ninth cents, being the proportionate share of the sum of five hundred million of dollars, according to the representation of South Carolina in the House of Representatives of the Confederate Congress; the representation of the States of Missouri and Kentucky being omitted in the calculation.

        2. That the act ratified on the eighteenth day of December, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, entitled "An Act to provide for a guaranty by the State of the Bonds of the Confederate States," be, and the same is hereby repealed.

        In the House, the sixth day of February, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, and in the eighty-seventh year of the sovereignty and independence of the State of South Carolina.

        WILLIAM D. PORTER,
President of the Senate.

        A. P. ALDRICH,
Speaker House of Reps.

IN THE SENATE, FEBRUARY 5TH, 1863.

        Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be requested to send to the President of the Confederate States a copy of the bill passed at this session, to provide for the guaranty by the State of the Bonds of the Confederate States, requesting him to communicate to Congress the action of this General Assembly; and that he be further requested to send copies to the Governors of the several States of the Confederacy, to be laid before their respective Legislatures.

        Resolved, That the Senate do agree to the resolution.

        Ordered, that it be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        By order

        WM. E. MARTIN, C. S.

        IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, FEB. 5TH, 1863.

        Resolved, That the House do concur in the resolution.

        Ordered, that it be returned to the Senate.

        JOHN T. SLOAN, C. H. R.


        Mr. Furlow offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That so much of the Governor's Message as relates to the planting of cotton, be referred to a joint special committee, said committee, on the part of the Senate,


Page 29

to consist of ten members, appointed by the President, one member from each of the several Congressional Districts of the State.

        On motion the rule was suspended and the above resolution taken up.

        Mr. Seward offered the following resolution as a substitute for the above resolution, which was agreed to, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith:

        Resolved, That so much of the Governor's Message as refers to Transportation be referred to a committee of five, to act with such committee as the House may appoint, to-wit: Wm. M. Brown, Mosely, Griffin, Gaston, Shewmake, Jas. Hilliard, Jackson;

        That so much as refers to the Indorsement of Confederate Bonds be referred to a committee of five, to-wit:--Messrs. Seward, Lewis, Vason, Stephens and Killen;

        That so much as refers to the Planting of Cotton be referred to a committee of ten, one from each Congressional District, to-wit: Messrs. Furlow, Stafford, Wright, Harris, Echols, Beasley, Jas. R. Brown, Mitchell, Dyer, Alexander;

        That so much as refers to Distillation be referred to a committee of five, to-wit: Mosely, Harris, Thomas Hilliard, Echols and Pinckard;

        That so much as refers to Small Pox to a committee of three, to-wit: Beasley, Jackson and McRea.

        That so much as refers to the Military be referred to the Joint Standing Committee on Military Affairs.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have adopted resolutions relative to the observance of next Friday as a fast day, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate; and have appointed as a committee under said resolution, Messrs. Mallard, Dumas, Smith of Brooks, Whittle and Briscoe.

        On motion of Mr. James R. Brown the foregoing resolutions were taken up and concurred in.

        The President appointed on said committee, on the part of the Senate, Messrs. Jas. R. Brown, Stafford and Stephens.

        On motion the resolution offered by Mr. Vason in relation to surplus corn, peas, &c., was taken up, read and adopted and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The President appointed on said committee, on the part of the Senate, Messrs. Vason, Echols and Stephens.

        Mr. Pinckard offered the following resolution, which, on motion, was taken up, read and adopted, to-wit:

        Resolved, That one hundred and fifty copies of the Governor's


Page 30

Message and accompanying documents be printed for the use of the Senate.

        Mr. Killen offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted, to-wit:

        Resolved, That the rules adopted for the government of the Senate at its session of 1862, be and they are hereby adopted as the rules of this special session.

        The following bills were reported and severally read the first time, to-wit:

        Mr. Dyer--A bill to compensate the citizens of the State whose slaves have died while in the service of the State.

        Mr. Vason--A bill to re-enact an act entitled an act to provide for the perfecting of titles to land when parties die and have bonds out for titles, &c.

        Mr. Mitchell--A bill to regulate the transportation of provisions on the several roads in this State, and to punish officers and agents who may violate the provisions of this act.

        On motion the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P.M.

3 O'CLOCK P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        Mr. Mitchell reported the following bill, which was read the first time, to-wit:

        A bill to legalize returns to Floyd Superior and Inferior Courts at the Spring term thereof, 1863, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Killen reported the following bill, which was read the first time, to-wit:

        A bill to change the 2488th Section of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Mitchell offered the following resolution:

        WHEREAS, doubts may exist in relation to the legality and propriety of the General Assembly taking up and acting on the unfinished business of the last adjournment of the General Assembly on account of this being a special session of the General Assembly convened by the proclamation of the Governor, therefore

        Resolved by the Senate, the House concurring, That a committee of ---- be appointed by the Senate, to unite with such committee as the House may appoint, to investigate and report to the General Assembly on the propriety of taking up taking up the unfinished business of the last adjournment of the General Assembly.

        Mr. Seward offered the following resolution, to-wit:

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That


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the Governor, in the exercise of the constitutional power to convene the General Assembly, as on extraordinary occasions, having convened the same on this the 25th March, 1863, that the unfinished business of the regular session, adjourned to the 4th Wednesday in April, cannot legitimately be taken up as unfinished business of the session adjourned, and can only be done by assuming the character of a regular session by modifying the resolution providing for the adjournment to 4th Wednesday in April.

        The rule being suspended this resolution was taken up and adopted.

        Mr. Pinckard offered the following resolution, to-wit:

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That the resolution by which this General Assembly at its second session on the thirteenth day of December last agreed to take a recess until the fourth Wednesday in April next, be, and the same is hereby modified so as to terminate the recess on the first day of April next, and the business on hand at the time the recess began be considered then in order for action.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock to-morrow morning.

THURSDAY MARCH 26TH, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Mosely.

        On the call of the roll the following Senators answered to their names:

        Anthony, Bothwell, Fort, Gibson, Gordon, Hansell, Jamison, Kendall, King, Lane, Smith, Ware.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have concurred in the resolution of the Senate to raise a joint committee on supply, and have appointed as such committee on the part of the House, Messrs. Lester, Brawner, Dill, Banning and Horne.

        The House has also concurred in the resolution of the Senate referring the several portions of the Governor's message to joint special committees, and have appointed as such committees on part of the House:

        On Transportation.--Messrs. Cochran, of Glynn, Hargrove, Thrasher, Trammell, Bacon, Robinson, and Tatum.

        On State indorsement of Confederate Bonds.--Messrs. Cabaaniss, Whittle, Lee, Moore, Barnes, Black, and Candler.


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        On Planting Cotton.--Messrs[.] Smith of Brooks, Lawhon, Gibson, Henderson, of Pierce, Jones, of Harris, Stewart, Hutchins, Ezell, Neal, Gresham, Hester, Monk, Bloodworth, Matthews, Cantrell, Kirby, McCamy, Underwood, Nesbit and Giddens.

        On Distillation.--Messrs. Briscroe, Mullins, Dumas, Smith, of Oglethorpe, Mallard, Jones, of Lee, and Heard, of Miller.

        Committee on Small Pox.--Messrs. Cochran, of Wilkinson, Mulkey, Jernigan, Reese and Burke.

        The President laid before the Senate a memorial from J. J. Flournoy, which on motion of Mr. Stephens, was indefinitely postponed without being read.

        The President also laid before the Senate, a communication from Bryan Tyson, relating to a book on the subject of the war, which was on motion of Mr. Harris, indefinitely postponed without being read.

        The following message was received from His Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--I am directed by the Governor to deliver to the Senate a communication in writing nominating a person to fill the office of Judge of the Pataula Circuit.

        Mr. Gordon reported the following bill which was read the first time, to-wit:

        A bill to authorize the consolidation of the Savannah, Albany and Gulf Rail Road Company and the Atlantic and Gulf Rail Road Company, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Lewis reported the following bills which were severally read the first time:

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes, passed Nov. 28th, 1861, and for other purposes.

        Also, a bill to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the amount of compensation the members and officers of the General Assembly shall receive for their services and for other purposes therein mentioned, passed Nov. 30th, 1861, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Mitchell offered the following resolution, to-wit:

        Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be, and he is hereby respectfully requested to communicate to the Senate his actings and doings under authority given him by the General Assembly in relation to the purchase of the cotton card manufactory of Divine & Co., or an interest therein.

        2. To what extent said purchase has been made and for what price?

        3. What arrangement has been made in relation to carrying on said business and with what success?

        4. If cotton cards are manufactured, at what cost and


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what arrangements have been made if any to supply the people therewith? and to what extent the machinery has been duplicated and at what cost? are, or have arrangements been made to manufacture cotton and wool cards clothing, and if so. to what extent?

        5. Is it desirable, in the opinion of the Governor or not that the State should become the entire owner of the said cotton card manufactory? together with all other information and suggestions as his Excellency the Governor may think proper to make in the premises.

        On motion, these resolutions were taken up and adopted:

        Mr. Pinckard offered the following resolutions:

        By the General Assembly of Georgia:

        1. Resolved, That the credit of the Confederate Government is in this crisis of paramount importance, and that honor, fidelity and ability are necessary to secure confidence--the basis of credit:

        2. Resolved, That union of purpose and concert of action are preferable to isolation, and that the success and welfare of the Confederate Government, in which is involved the present and future interests of all the States, is more to be desired than the success and welfare of any one of the States.

        3. Resolved, That it is not good as a principle nor precedent in practice, while engaged in a common struggle for liberty, to charge any one or more of our sister States with weakness on account of her indebtedness, no matter when contracted, and allege it as a reason against a full affiliation with her in her patriotic desires and sacrifices for life and freedom; when she has contributed her all she has contributed as much as any and there is no injustice to any.

        4. Resolved, That the credit and currency of the Confederate States ought at least to be at par with the credit and currency of any one of the States that speculation may be checked and capital have no excuse for seeking an investment in the one over that of the other.

        5. Resolved, That to prevent any portion of the Confederate debt from being at any time repudiated and to aid in establishing and maintaining her credit, we hereby renew to her our plighted faith and will cordially unite with our sister States in indorsing each for herself, her pro rata representative share of the whole indebtedness of the Confederate Government, and for the ultimate redemption of said pro rata share by the State of Georgia, we pledge all her property, power and resources; this is not consolidation but concentration.

        6. Resolved, That we recommend the Confederate Congress to levy at once a tax that will raise money enough to place the credit and currency of the Confederate Government beyond doubt or contingency.


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        The following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Wm. M. Brown.--A bill to prevent slaves in this State from owning or using property as their own without the consent of their owners.

        Mr. Lewis.--A bill to amend section 4708 of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Stafford.--A bill to incorporate the Augusta Fire and Marine Insurance Company. Also,

        A bill to change the time of holding the Superior Courts of Baker county. Also,

        A bill to incorporate and confer certain powers and privileges upon the Citizens' Fire Company of Augusta called and known as No. 8. Also,

        A bill to incorporate an insurance company in the city of Augusta to be called the Commercial Insurance Company of Augusta. Also,

        A bill to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Augusta Fire Company, and to grant them certain exemptions.

        Mr. Seward.--A bill to make legal and valid certain acts of the Notaries Public in this State.

        Mr. Wright.--A bill to protect sheep raisers and encourage the growing of wool.

        Mr. Swearingen offered the following resolution which which was on motion, taken up and adopted, to-wit:

        Resolved, That fifty copies of the journals of the last session be furnished the Senate.

        On motion, the message of his Excellency the Governor, respecting the nomination of a Judge for the Pataula Circuit, was taken up, and the Senate resolved itself into secret session.

        The Senate having returned to open session, the following bills were severally read the second time:

        A bill to regulate the transportation of provisions on the several Rail Roads in this State, and to punish officers and agents who may violate the provisions of this act. Also,

        A bill to change the 2488 section of the Code of Georgia. Also,

        A bill to legalize returns to Floyd Superior and Inferior Courts at the spring term thereof, 1863, and for other purposes. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to compensate the citizens of this State, whose slaves have died while in the service of the State, &c. Also,

        A bill to re-enact an act to provide for the perfecting of titles to land when parties die and have bond out for titles, &c.

        The resolution offered by Mr. Furlow in relation to speculation, was read and adopted.


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        The resolution offered by Mr. Pinckard, relative to the unfinished business of the last adjourement was on motion, referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The resolution offered by Mr. Mitchell on the same subject, was on his own motion laid on the table for the present.

        On motion, Mr. Furlow was added to the Committee on Supplies.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 9 o'clock, A. M. Saturday next.

SATURDAY, MARCH 28TH, 1863.
9 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by Mr. Mosely.

        Mr. Smith from the 20th Senatorial District appeared and took his seat, he having been detained by sickness in his family.

        On motion, leave of absence was granted to Mr. Harris on account of sickness. Also to Mr. Pinckard until Monday next on account of sickness in his family; also, to Mr. Gibson of the 18th district; also to Mr. Kendall.

        Mr. Hansell offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted, to-wit:

        Resolved, That the Senate of Georgia do hereby invite the Rev. Doctors Geo. Pierce and B. M. Palmer, and Brigadier Gen. Doles to seats on the floor of this body.

        Mr. Echols offered the following resolution:

        WHEREAS, the people of those counties whose negroes have been employed on the defenses of Savannah since the month of December, 1862, have the right to have their negroes discharged and others if necessary put in their places,

        Be it therefore resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That the Governor of this State be required to call on Gen. Mercer, and ask for a discharge of all those negroes who have been employed on the said defenses from the time before mentioned.

        The following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Echols.--A bill to prevent the spread of the small pox in the county of Oglethorpe.

        Mr. Gordon.--A bill to establish rates of Dockage, Wharfage and Storage in the city of Savannah, and to repeal all laws or parts of laws militating against the same. This bill was accompanied by a memorial signed by divers citizens of the city of Savannah urging its passage.

        Mr. Jackson.--A bill to regulate the payment of interest in certain cases.


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        Mr. Hilliard.--A bill to be entitled an act to repeal the 1376 and 4496 articles of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Mitchell.--A bill for the relief of certain citizens of the county of Floyd therein named, in whose tax returns mistakes have been made and who have been double taxed without any fault on their part.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to change the 2488th section of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Killen moved to amend said bill by a substitute with the same caption embracing in addition the 2490th section of the Code.

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took us as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to compensate the citizens of the State whose slaves have died while in the service.

        Mr. Hansell and Mr. Gordon each offered an amendment.

        On motion, the bill with the amendments were referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have adopted a joint resolution in relation to the unfinished business of the last session of the General Assembly of this State, which I am directed to transmit forthwith, to the Senate, in which they respectfully ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to legalize the returns to Floyd Superior and Inferior Courts at the spring term thereof, 1863, and for other purposes

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time, and passed.

        The Senate took up the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to re-enact an act entitled an act to provide for the perfecting of titles to land when parties die and have bonds out for titles, &c.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        On motion, the message of the House relating to a resolution of the House on the unfinished business of the last session was taken up.

        On motion of Mr. Seward, this resolution was laid on the table for the present.


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        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to amend section 4708 of the Code of Georgia.

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes, passed Nov. 28th, 1861, and for other purposes.

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the amount of compensation the members and officers of the General Assembly shall receive for their services and for other purposes therein mentioned, passed Nov. 30th 1861, and for other purposes.

        A bill to authorize the consolidation of the stocks of the Savannah, Albany and Gulf Rail Road Company, and the Atlantic and Gulf Rail Road Company, and for other purposes.

        A bill to change the time of holding the Superior Courts of Baker county.

        A bill to incorporate an insurance company in the city of Augusta, to be called the Commercial Insurance Company of Augusta.

        A bill to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Augusta Fire Company and to grant them certain exemptions.

        A bill to incorporate and confer certain powers and privileges upon the Citizen Fire Company of Augusta called and known as No. 8.

        A bill to incorporate the Augusta Fire Insurance Company.

        A bill to prevent slaves in this State from owning or using property as their own with or without the consent of their owners.

        A bill to protect sheep raisers and to encourage the growing of wool.

        A bill to make legal and valid certain acts of the Notaries Public of this State.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Boyd offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith, to-wit:

        Resolved by the Senate, the House concurring, That a joint committee of five be appointed composed of two members from the Senate and three from the House, to confer with the Rev. Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer, and request for publication a copy of each of the able sermons delivered by them on yesterday.

        The President appointed on said committee on the part of the Senate Messrs. Boyd and Echols.

        The rule being suspended, the Senate took up the resolution to discharge negroes from Savannah.

        This resolution was on motion adopted.

        The resolution respecting the unfinished business of the


Page 38

last session, was on motion, laid upon the table for the present.

        The resolutions of Mr. Pinckard relating to the currency, &c., were on motion laid upon the table for the present.

        The rule being suspended, the following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Seward.--A bill to authorize executors, administrators, trustees and guardians to receive payment in Confederate or State Treasury Notes for claims due or to be due estates.

        Mr. James R. Brown.--A bill to amend the oath of tax payers of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes. Also,

        A bill to repeal the 1376 section of the Code of this State.

        Mr. Thomas Hilliard.--A bill to repeal an act to authorize the Superior Court of Ware county to assess an extra tax for the purpose of building a Court-house in said county, assented to Dec. 12th, 1861, also to revive the said repealed act.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 9 o'clock, A. M. on Monday next.

MONDAY, MARCH 30TH, 1863,
9 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Echols.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to prevent slaves in this State from owning or using property as their own, with or without the consent of the owners.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to protect sheep raisers and encourage the growing of wool.

        Mr. Shewmake moved to amend by extending the provisions of said bill to hogs.

        This amendment was lost.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to make legal and valid certain acts of the Notaries Public in this State.


Page 39

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Augusta Fire Company, and to grant them certain exemptions.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize the consolidation of the stocks of the Savannah, Albany & Gulf Railroad Company and the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad Company, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Vason offered the following amendment, which was agreed to, to-wit:

        Provided that nothing herein contained shall relieve or discharge either of said companies from any contract heretofore entered into by either, but the company shall be liable on the same.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the proper administration of the estate of S. L. Trawick, deceased, late of Decatur county.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to repeal all special laws concerning public roads applicable to the county of Burke, in this State, and for other purposes.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Madison and Hart.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to authorize the issuance of a grant to a certain lot of land in Brooks county.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to amend an act incorporating the Georgia Home Insurance Company, assented to December 12th, 1859.

        They have also concurred in a resolution of the Senate appointing a committee to request copies of the sermons of Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer, for publication.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the amount of compensation the members and officers of the General Assembly shall receive for their services, and for other purposes therein mentioned, &c,, passed Nov. 30th, 1861, and for ther purposes.


Page 40

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal an act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes, passed Nov. 28th, 1861, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to change the time of holding the Superior Courts of Baker county.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend section 4708 of the Code of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate and confer certain powers and privileges upon the Citizen Fire Company of Augusta, called and known as No. 8.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate an insurance company in the city of Augusta to be called the Commercial Insurance Company of Augusta.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the Augusta Fire and Marine Insurance Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have adopted a resolution to appropriate a certain fund to compensate the Rev. B. M. Palmer for religious services on Fast Day, and I am instructed to transmit the same to the Senate immediately and ask its concurrence.

        On motion, the rule was suspended, and the above message taken up.


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        On motion, the resolution was concurred in, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time, to-wit:

        A bill to repeal an act to authorize the Superior Court of Ware county to assess an extra tax for the purpose of building a court house in said county, assented to December 12, 1861; also to revive the said repealed act.

        A bill for the relief of certain citizens of the county of Floyd therein named, in whose tax returns mistakes have been made, and who have been double taxed without any fault on their part.

        A bill to repeal the 1376 and 4496th articles of the Code of Georgia.

        This bill was, on motion, referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        A bill to establish rates of dockage, wharfage and storeage in the city of Savannah, and to repeal all laws and parts of laws militating against the same.

        A bill to regulate the payment of interest in certain cases.

        A bill to prevent the spread of small pox in the county of Oglethorpe.

        A bill to authorize executors administrators, trustees and guardians to receive payment in Confederate or State Treasury notes for certain claims due estates.

        A bill to amend the oath of tax-payers of this State for the year 1863.

        A bill to repeal the 1376th section of the Code of this State.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the first time:

        A bill to amend an act incorporating the Georgia Home Insurance Company, assented to December 12th, 1859.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Madison and Hart.

        A bill to authorize the issuance of a grant to a certain lot of land in the county of Brooks.

        A bill to provide for the proper administration of the estate of L. L. Trawick, deceased, late of Decatur county, Georgia.

        A bill to repeal all special laws concerning public roads applicable to the county of Burke, in this State, and for other purposes.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M. instant.


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EVENING SESSION, 3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The rule being suspended, the following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Fletcher--A bill to prevent monopolies and speculations in the renting or leasing salt lands and waters on the Georgia coast, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Furlow--A bill to incorporate the Blanceviille Slate Mining Company of the county of Polk, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker and Clerk of the House and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following resolution of the House:

        A resolution to authorize his Excellency the Governor to draw his warrant on the contingent fund to compensate the Rev. B. M. Palmer.

        Mr. Swearingen offered the following resolution, to-wit:

        Whereas, It is important that the laws of 1862 be furnished the Senate of the State of Georgia; be it therefore

        Resolved, That the laws of 1862 be furnished the Senate immediately by the Governor of this State.

        The rule being suspended, the foregoing resolution was, on motion, taken up and adopted.

        The special committee on the planting of cotton, report by bill an act to prevent and punish the cultivating in the State of Georgia more than a certain quantity of land in cotton or tobacco, during the present year.

        This bill was read the first time.

        The minority of said committee made the following report:

        The undersigned members of the special joint committee to whom was referred so much of the Governor's message as relates to the planting of cotton, beg leave to present the following minority report:

        We have been unable to concur with the majority for the following reasons:

        1st. The recent action of the Legislature restricting the planting of cotton to three acres to the hand was the expression of that body after a full investigation of the subject; and though, in the opinion of many legal and intelligent minds, was of doubtful constitutionality, yet it has met with no positive opposition, but has been acquiesced in by the planters throughout the entire State, wishing thereby to promote the public good. The message of his Excellency the Governor fails to disclose any new reason, and


Page 43

none has occurred to our minds, justifying this sudden change of the law. We are unwilling to admit that we were mistaken in the course pursued by the Legislature in the passage of that law. It was not hasty and inconsiderate legislation, but was the result of mature counsel and deliberation, and met the approval of his Excellency the Governor, after having undergone his accustomed close and critical investigation.

        2d. It is our deliberate opinion, the result both of observation and practice, that the proposed change will not materially increase the production of corn and other grain.

        3d. In order to increase the production of corn, every planter must necessarily add materially to his plow force, which, in the present great scarcity of mules and horses, is both impracticable and impossible.

        4th. Our limited and still diminishing transportation would prevent an increased grain crop from being made available, there already being in Middle, Southern and Southwestern Georgia more corn and other provisions than can, by the present facilities, be distributed, until much of the large supply shall have been wasted by weavels and other causes.

        5th. Many of the cotton planters of Georgia have already planted their crops of cotton in compliance with the law of the Legislature, and it is not within our power by retroactive legislation to interfere with the cultivation of the same.

        6th. To exclude from the operations of the proposed act such as have planted and include those who have not, would be unjust and violative of that clause of the Constitution which prohibits class legislation.

        7th. This sudden change of the law, affecting as it does the honest calling of the planters of this State, not demanded by public necessity, will be viewed by many as a reflection upon their patriotism, and as an unwarranted interference with their private rights.

        8th. The concessions made by the cotton planters during the last year in restricting their crops of cotton, is, to our minds a sufficient guaranty that they as a class are behind none other in patriotism, will make sacrifices when legitimately demanded equal to any other people or class, and need not the stern mandate of the law to restrain them within the line of public duty.

        We therefore beg leave to submit the following resolutions expressive of our views as to the policy this legislature should pursue in the premises:

        The General Assembly of Georgia do resolve, 1st, That any change in the present existing law regulating the planting of cotton, would be impolitic and unwise.

        Resolved, 2d, That we request such planters who are living


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near the lines of transportation, and who can increase their plow force, to restrict their planting of cotton to such limits as will be necessary only for home consumption.

        (Signed) Robert Hester, W. D. Stewart, R. S. Neal, A. G. Jones, Joel Matthews, R. H. Hutchings, House Committee.

        T. M. Furlow, J. H. Echols, J. B. Wright, S. F. Alexander, B. T. Harris, excepting one or two propositions, S. S. Stafford, Senate Committee.

        On motion of Mr. Swearingen, one hundred copies of the foregoing reports were ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock, A. M., to-morrow.

TUESDAY, MARCH 31ST, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Boyce.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to legalize the signing of certain change bills issued by the Western and Atlantic Railroad, and to make it penal to counterfeit or alter the same, and for other purposes.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the charter of the Brunswick and Albany Railroad Company.

        A bill to be entitled an act to prescribe the mode and manner of selecting, drawing and summoning tales jurors for the trial of criminal cases in the Superior Court of the county of Chatham, and for other purposes therein mentioned, approved Dec. 11th, 1858.

        A bill to be entitled an act amendatory of an act to incorporate the Trustees of the Masonic Hall in the town of Milledgeville; approved December 26, 1831, and to repeal an act similarly entitled, approved March 5th, 1856, and to appoint and confirm a new Board of Trustees for said Masonic Hall in the city of Milledgeville.

        The House has also passed by a constitutional majority of two-thirds, by a vote of ayes 98, noes 21; the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the charter of the Macon and Brunswick Railroad Company.


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        The following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Beasley--A bill for the relief of Louisa S. White, Executrix, and John T. White, Executor, of the last will and testament of William M. White, late of Troup county, deceased.

        Mr. James R. Brown--A bill to provide for and prescribe the mode of ordering elections for militia officers in this State, and to repeal so much of the Code of Georgia, as is in conflict therewith.

        Mr. Furlow--A bill to compel the planting of a provision crop in this State during the existing war with the Abolitionists.

        On motion, fifty copies ordered to be printed.

        Mr. Hansell--A bill to incorporate the Atlanta and Roswell Railroad Company.

        Mr. Simmons--A bill to repeal what is usually called the stay law, so far as relates to debts and liabilities which have been or may be created for rents of houses and lands, passed on the ---- day of December, 1862, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Vason--A bill to incorporate the town of Smithville alias Renwick in the county of Lee in this State.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole a bill to establish rates of dockage, wharfage and storage in the city of Savannah, and to repeal all laws or parts of laws militating against the same.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the 3d time and passed.

        The Senate took up the report of the committee of the whole, a bill for the relief of certain citizens sf the county of Floyd therein named, in whose tax returns mistakes have been made and who have been doubled taxed without any fault on their part.

        On motion this bill was laid on the table for the present.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole a bill to prevent the spread of small pox in the county of Oglethorpe.

        On motion this bill was referred to the Committee on Small Pox.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole, a bill to authorize Executors, Administrators, Trustees and Guardians to receive payment in Confederate or State Treasury Notes for claims due or to be due estates.

        Mr. Vason offered the following amendment which was agreed to, to-wit: Insert "and Interest-bearing Confederate Notes" after the words "State Treasury Notes."

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.


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        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole, a bill to repeal the thirteen hundred and seventy-sixth section of the Code of this State.

        On motion this bill was laid upon the table.

        Mr. Seward, Chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report:

        The Judiciary Committee have had the following bills under consideration, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal the 1376 and 4496 articles of the Code of Georgia;

        And recommend that it be amended by striking out in the caption of the bill the words, "and 4496," and report the first section as a bill and recommend it do pass; also, the second section be amended by striking out the words, "to read," and substituting therefor a new bill, recommend the same do pass.

        Also, a bill to re-enact an act entitled an act to provide for the perfecting of titles to land where parties die and have bonds out for titles. Recommend the same do pass.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole, a bill to repeal the 1376 and 4496 Sections of Code of Georgia.

        The Judiciary Committee to whom this bill had been referred reported the same back with amendments and recommend that the same as amended do pass.

        Mr. Jackson offered the following amendment in the nature of a substitute for the bill, which was not received, to-wit: strike out of the 1376 Section of the Code the words "or otherwise officiate."

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time, and upon the question, Shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 22, nays 12.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Boyd, Brown, James R., Furlow, Gibson, Gordon, Hansell, Harris, Hilliard, James, Hilliard, Thos., Killen, Lane, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Pinckard, Seward, Simmons, Stephens, Swearingen and Vason.--22.

        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Benson, Brown, Wm. M., Dyer, Fletcher, Gaston, Griffin, Hill, Jackson, Mosely, Smith and Wright.--11.

        Yeas 22, nays 11. So the bill was passed.

        The following message was received from his Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters, his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--I am directed by the Governor to deliver to the Senate a communication in writing in response to the resolution of inquiry in relation to Cotton Cards.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of


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the whole, a bill to amend the 4496 Section of the Code of Georgia.

        This bill was reported by the Judiciary Committee with a recommendation that it do pass.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time, and upon the question, Shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 17, nays 16.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Beasley, Boyd, James R. Brown, Echols, Furlow, Gibson, Gordon, Hansell, Harris, James Hilliard, Lane, Lewis, Mitchell, Pinckard, Seward, Simmons, Swearingen, Vason.--17.

        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Benson, Wm. M. Brown, Dyer, Fletcher, Gaston, Griffin, Hill, Thos. Hilliard, Jackson, Killen, McRae, Mosely, Shewmake, Smith, Stephens, Wright.--16.

        Yeas 17, nays 16. So the bill was passed.

        Mr. Gordon offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That so much of the Governor's Message as refers to the impressment of negroes be referred to a special committee of one from each Congressional District to be appointed by the President of the Senate.

        The rule being suspended the resolution was taken up and adopted.

        Whereupon the President appointed Messrs. Gordon, 1st, Vason, 2d, Gibson, 5th, Pinckard, 7th, Wm. M. Brown, 3rd, Jackson, 10th, Echols, 6th, Dyer 4th, Hansell, 8th, Boyd, 9th.

        On motion the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

THREE O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole, a bill to re-enact an act entitled an act to provide for the perfecting of titles to land when parties die and have bonds out for titles, &c.

        The Judiciary Committee to whom this bill was referred reported the same back to the Senate with a recommendation that it do pass.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole, a bill to amend the oath of tax payers of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes.


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        This bill was, on motion, referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time.

        A bill to repeal an act to authorize the Inferior Court of Ware county to assess an extra tax for the purpose of building a Court House in said county, assented to Dec. 12th, 1861, and also to revive said repealed act.

        This bill was, on motion, laid on the table for the present.

        A bill to prevent monopolies and speculations in the renting or leasing salt lands and waters on the Georgia coast, and for other purposes.

        A bill to incorporate the Blanceville Salt Mining Company of the county of Polk, and for other purposes.

        A bill to prevent and punish the cultivating in the State of Georgia more than a certain quantity of land in cotton or tobacco during the present war.

        The majority and minority reports of the joint special committee on State Indorsement of Confederate Debt, were taken up and read, and one hundred copies ordered printed.

        The Special Committee to which was referred so much of the Message of his Excellency the Governor, with the accompanying documents, as relates to "State endorsement of the Confederate debt," have had the same under consideration, and a majority of the committee make the following

REPORT.

        The currency of the Confederate States consists almost exclusively of notes issued by the Confederate Government, and is rapidly depreciating from excessive issue. It is liable to depreciation of another kind, and from another cause, which is perhaps more pernicious than the other. The fact cannot be concealed that there is a distrust of the ability of the Confederate Government to redeem the notes, which have been and may be issued.

        The depreciation arising from excessive issue contributes to the depreciation of the other kind to which allusion has been made. The remedy for the first is to reduce the circulation, but that alone will be no remedy for the other. If the amount of notes in circulation should be reduced by being funded in interest bearing bonds, so that the circulation shall approximate the amount required by the business of the country, the depreciation from a distrust of the solvency of the Government will not be removed; for funding the notes will merely change the form of the indebtedness, but will not reduce its amount, nor make its payment more certain and secure; on the contrary it will be increased to the extent of the interest which the bonds will bear.


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Though funding the notes may, to some extent, remedy the depreciation from excessive issue, it will not prevent the other depreciation alluded to, and which is the most hurtful of the two. There may be a redundancy in bonds, as well as in notes, for capitalists will be as unwilling to hold the bonds as they are the notes, when they distrust the ability of the government to meet its liabilities. Being thrown upon the market in large amounts from an apprehension of their ultimate failure, depreciation must necessarily ensue

        To remove depreciation from excessive issue, funding of the notes is recommended. That may prove an effectual remedy for the first evil complained of in the currency, but it is only one step towards sustaining the credit of the notes. Something more is necessary or that step will be unavailing.

        It has been suggested that to make them a legal tender in payment of debts would have the effect to sustain their credit, but that would neither reduce the volume of circulation, nor remove the apprehension of the ability of the Government to redeem its notes. They are promises to pay money, and to make them a legal tender would not change the contract, or release the Government from its obligation to redeem them when they fall due; if it would, the effect would be practical repudiation.

        Taxation is also recommended as a remedy for the evil complained of. Taxation is necessary and should be resorted to, but that alone will not accomplish the object. It would simply reduce the circulation, for the time being, the amount of the taxes paid, and no more; but in time of war, and when, as in the case of our Government, the expenses are met almost exclusively by the issue of Treasury notes, the annual tax, which may be levied, will be insufficient for the wants of the Government, and therefore ineffectual to reduce the amount of notes in circulation to the usual and proper level of the currency. Taxation is necessary, and in conjunction with other measures, will have a beneficial effect. But the great necessity which is upon us, is to give credit to the Government issues; and to sustain it, something is necessary besides retiring the circulation, and changing the form of the indebtedness. What is wanting is confidence; an abiding confidence that the notes and principal and interest of the bonds will be paid.

        How is this confidence to be inspired? In the first place, by a strict observance of good faith; by avoiding repudiation, and everything leading to it.

        Secondly, by providing the means, as far as practicable, for the payment of the interest of the public debt, and a fund for its ultimate redemption. Such a fund should be


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accumulated gradually, and applied in extinguishment of the debt, as its accumulation may justify. And to remove the danger which now threatens the public credit, and to insure confidence, in the third place, the States of the Confederacy should come to the aid of the Government, and support its credit by endorsement of its bonds.

        Credit is the main, and indeed the sole, dependence of our Government for the means of defense in the war with the United States. Under present circumstances, no revenue can be raised from duties on importations, or if any, it will be inconsiderable in amount. Taxation cannot raise the means rendered necessary by the war in which we are engaged.

        Wars are expensive. The most wealthy nations are compelled to resort to loans and extraordinary means to raise money in time of war. The ordinary revenues of no country in such a time are sufficient for its wants.

        Our Confederate Government, just struggling into existence, cannot be expected to be exempt from the lot common to all nations. Credit is the chief reliance of all, of the wealthiest as well as the poorest, nations, to meet the expenses necessarily incurred by war.

        The only resource of our Government in the present emergency consists in the issue of notes promising to pay money. The necessities of our country require the daily, and constant issue of such notes. It is a duty due to the people, who are the holders of these notes, to protect them against depreciation. Patriotism demands that their credit be sustained. If that be destroyed our means of defense will be gone, and submission to an odious despotism, or subjugation by it, will be the inevitable result. These notes constitute the debt incurred by the Government in defense of the people of the Confederate States, and the people of the States must pay the debt.

        Loans of money cannot be obtained with which to prosecute our defense. Our Confederate Government is yet unrecognized by Foreign Governments, and it cannot be expected that foreign capitalists will loan money to a Government, whose independence and existence among the nations of the world have not been established. Loans cannot be obtained from our own people, for the reason that they have but little active capital, and nothing like an amount sufficient for the purposes of government in time of war.

        Necessity then compels the issue of notes promising to pay money, and in large amounts. We are engaged in a war of gigantic proportions, and our necessities and expenditures correspond with the magnitude of the war. Why should not the States guarantee the payment of the debt thus incurred in their behalf?

        The States by their secession from the United States induced


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the war, which is now upon us--it is a war in defense of the right of secession--and the right of the States to to hold their property in peace and security. Who must and will bear the expenses of this war, but the people of the State? The means must come from their pockets, whether the debt be paid by the States, or the Contederate Government, and whether the money for the payment of the public debt be raised by taxation, or by duties on importations, the people are and will be the payers in both cases. If direct taxation should be resorted to by the Confederate Government, there will be no property subject to taxation, but that owned and possessed by the people of the States. The Confederate Government has no community, no people, but the people of the States. Neither territorially, nor as a body politic, is there any such nation or people, as the Confederate nation. There are Confederate States, or States confederated, and the people of each is a distinct, separate, sovereign community.

        The Confederate Government is the agent of these Confederate States, and is as much their government, as are their respective State governments. The government of the Confederate States is the government of the people of Georgia to the extent of the powers granted, as well as their own State government. Both are the agents of the sovereign people of the State for specified purposes, and her people are as much bound to maintain one in the legitimate exercise of the powers granted, as the other. There is an obligation upon them to support both. They are bound to support their State government, and are just as much bound to contribute their share to the support of the other.

        Now if the Confederate Government has incurred, and is incurring a heavy debt, as the agent of Georgia, and her co-States, and in their defense, why should not each bear her proportionate share of that debt? What satisfactory objection can be urged against it? Will it be said that the debt was incurred by the Confederate Government, and therefore that government should pay it? The answer is, the Confederate Government incurred it for the benefit of the people of the States, and as their agent, and the means of payment, if it shall ever be paid, must come from them. They can come from no where else. Why not then let the States indorse the debt, which their people must ultimately pay? It may be said that this is tantamount to a man's indorsing his own note. The cases are not strictly analogous. It would be more proper and correct to say, that it would be the principal recognizing and indorsing the act of his agent. In such a case the validity of the act of the agent would be placed beyond dispute. So in the case under consideration. Let the States indorse the payment of the Confederate debt, it will be equivolent to an indorsement of the


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acts of their agent, and assuming a liability which their agent incurred in their behalf, and for their benefit.

        And the great controling reason is that the effect of such indorsement will be to strengthen the credit of the Confederate bonds and notes, but without their credit may suffer material injury, and with its loss, if that should unfortunately occur, we lose everything valuable in this life--credit, property, liberty, independence--all will be buried in one common grave. When this credit is gone, with it will go our means of defense--when we lose our means of defense, subjugation, or submission will follow. To avert so dire a calamity, every effort, and all means should be used to sustain the credit of the Confederate Government.

        To this end and for this purpose, we think the measures indicated in the following resolutions indispensably necessary.

        1. Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, That it is expedient for the purpose of sustaining the credit of the Confederate Government, that the several States of the Confederacy should guarantee the payment of such bonds as may be issued by the Government of the Confederate States for funding the Treasury notes now in circulation, and hereafter to be issued, each State guaranteeing her respective proportionate share of the amount of bonds so issued, according to her representation in the Confederate Congress, omitting in the calculation the States of Kentucky and Missouri.

        2. Resolved, That in the opinion of this General Assembly, it is the duty of the Confederate Congress to raise by taxation annually an amount sufficient to pay the interest on the bonds issued by the Confederate Government, as it falls due, and to create a sinking fund upon such plan as may be adopted by Congress for the gradual and ultimate extinguishment of the public debt.

        The Committee also report by bill.

        All which is respectfully submitted.

E. G. CABANISS,

GEO. S. BLACK,

J. A. S. LEE,

L. N. WHITTLE,

MILTON A. CANDLER,

B. B. MOORE,

GEO. T. BARNES,
From the Committee of the House.

D. A. VASON,
From the Committee of the Senate.


MINORITY REPORT.

        The minority of the Committee to whom was referred so much of the Governor's message as relates to the indorsement


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of Confederate bonds by the State, submit the following as embracing their views briefly upon the subject, and referring also to such incidental facts and circumstances as may have a bearing upon the question under consideration:

        We learn from the report of the Secretary of the Treasury to the 31st December last, made to Congress on its assembling on the 10th January of the present year, "that the issue of Treasury notes on the last of December amounted to $290,149,692, exclusive of interest bearing notes," and of this latter class, $120,480,000. The interest bearing notes seems not to be considered by Mr. Memminger as part of the currency, although its circulation and use have a decided influence upon the business of the country.

        In estimating the volume of the currency he puts down $290,149,692 of Treasury notes, and about $20,000,000 of bank and State Treasury notes.

  • The Government Treasury notes then amounts to . . . . . $290,149,692
  • Interest bearing notes amounts to . . . . . 120,480,000
  • Let us then add bonds and stocks . . . . . 145,475,370
  • Making public indebtedness . . . . . $556,105,062

        The aggregate amount of issues which the country has accepted as currency, bearing a relative value to the marketable and exchangeable commodities of the people, seems, in the mind of the Secretary, to be the chief difficulty in regulating the trade and finances of the Confederacy. The Secretary, after referring to the outstanding circulation, assumes that entire confidence exists in our currency, though the increase of the volume of currency had advanced prices in a corresponding degree with the increase of the circulation.

        This theory is true in a modified sense. The question is, will prices advance in proportion as the circulation becomes augmented? If this be so, what will be the ratio of increase? That the superabundance of currency and the cheapness of that currency will effect prices, is not denied. The rise and fall in prices is chiefly regulated by the character of the circulation used as money, and its commercial value fixed by those with whom we deal. If the Government should fail to prevent citizens of the Confederacy from trading with those with whom we are at war, and the importation of goods and merchandise from the enemy's country, the value of Confederate money will continue to depreciate. The demand for gold and silver to be used within the enemy's lines, will constantly increase, and the rate at which it can be purchased will advance. The bills of the banks of the States are purchased for the purposes of illicit


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trade, also. Bank bills and coin are sought after to be used in the purchase of merchandise in the United States, where Confederate currency is prohibited from being used. In this anomolous condition of trade and currency, so long as merchandise is bought from our enemies, and brought within our lines for sale, the effect produced, first, is to advance the premium on gold and silver and bank notes, and a corresponding depreciation in the value of Treasury notes; and as the coin and bank notes become scarce, in the same ratio will the Confederate Treasury notes suffer in value. The value of our money is made to depend on the price of goods in the United States, and the probable profit to be realized in the sale of goods in Confederate money, and the prospect of re-investing Confederate currency in gold and silver to be re-invested in further supplies of foreign goods--the coin still appreciating in value--the prices of goods still advancing, not in proportion to the volume of currency, but in proportion as gold and silver becomes more valuable, and in this proportion will the price of goods advance, and so of all other supplies, just in proportion as the commercial classes exact enormous prices, growing out of the illicit trade carried on with our enemies.

        The same effect would be produced if goods were regularly imported from the United States, so long as that Government prohibits the circulation of Confederate currency. It will thus be seen that the laws of the United States, excluding our currency, and the illegal trade carried on between the citizens of the two Governments, control the value of our currency.

        This condition of trade has inflated the price of every article of merchantable value, and will continue to do so, so long as this wicked traffic is carried on. As long as the Government permits this trade with our enemies, and gold commands from 375 to 425 per cent. premium, just so long will the people distrust the currency and the ultimate value of the public securities.

        If Mr. Memminger's assumption be true, "that entire confidence exists in our currency," then it must be equally true that entire confidence exists in our bonds. The one is as good as the other, the only difference being the interest accruing upon the bonds.

        Our currency has a commercial value, determined by the state of trade carried on by our people with the United States, and this is made the test of the value of Confederate currency.

        What is the rate of excess of currency over and above the actual value of articles of prime necessity? The present state of the market shows that it is about five to one, if the excess beyond the ordinary amount of circulation alone controls this question.


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        The value of gold in the absence of any fixed rate of exchange, because there is no foreign exchange, is the best criterion. Gold is worth about five for one. Every article for sale is bought with Confederate currency upon this basis of value. That there is a redundancy of currency, no one can deny, but the opinion that an excess of issues alone has produced the present enormous prices is certainly fallacious and unsound.

        The Secretary insists that two-thirds of the volume of currency must be withdrawn to remedy this evil. Congress attempted to keep the currency within proper bounds by making Treasury notes fundable in 8 per cent. bonds. This effort has proved ineffectual, and notice has been given that after the 22d April the Treasury notes would no longer be fundable in these bonds.

        Mr. Memminger states that "these measures, although well timed, have been overpowered by the necessity which compels the Government to increase its issues." The daily absorption of the currency under this funding system has not diminished the amount of circulation.

        By the depreciation of these notes, the value of the interest has been impaired, and eight per cent. bonds, we are officially informed, has become in effect a four or three per cent. bond. "The inducement to take these bonds is thus destroyed, and the bonds themselves cease to afford relief. They offer still less inducement to any foreign purchaser, because his interest will be paid in currency, which must be exchanged for his own, at the rate of three dollars for one." This statement coming from the Treasurer, is conclusive as to the causes which have forced the bonds out of the market.

        The minority beg leave to remark, from this view of the case, that because of the depreciation of the value of the currency with which the interest is to be paid, and which makes the rate per cent. in value only equal to 3 per cent., the bonds are not sought after. This is the reasoning of the Secretary, and is no doubt the true reason.

        If, then, the value of our currency could be so improved as to pay the interest in funds at par value, the Government issues would soon be funded. If this be correct, the inquiry may be well made, is it possible that 6 per cent. bonds, endorsed by the States, with the interest paid in funds so depreciated, can induce domestic or foreign capital to seek such an investment, the real value of the interest being 2 per cent?

        This demonstrates that neither class of bonds can cure the difficulty until the value of Treasury notes shall command something like their nominal value. If an 8 per cent. bond, owing by the same people, issued by the Confederate States, cannot be used for retiring the currency, how can a


Page 56

like bond bearing 6 per cent., endorsed by the States and owing by the same people, be used for that purpose?

        Capitalists will not invest their money in either class of bonds until they can be assured of their interest in funds of par value.

        The only means by which the Government can uphold its credit is first to look for some means by which the interest can be paid in par funds.

        We must gradually approximate this end by a judicious system of taxation upon income and property, letting the tax upon property be levied with regard to the condition of the people who are to bear it, guarding against levying taxes of any magnitude upon the property of the soldiers in the army.

        To afford a remedy for existing evils, a reduction of the currency must be brought about gradually; not by a rapid reduction of two-thirds of the circulation.

        If we take $290,142,692 as the present circulation, this reduction would be $192,433,128, only leaving $96,716,564 as the remaining circulation. This abridgment of the facilities of trade would accelerate upon the country a fearful and alarming panic, a sudden diminution in the value of property, and such a sacrifice as could not be borne.

        The Government would be compelled to resort to other issues, which would in its turn inflate the price of every species of property.

        A gradual withdrawal of the superabundant circulation should take place so as to keep in check the probable excess of issues from the necessities of the Government, taking care to guard against a too sudden change of value.

        The only means to be relied upon to sustain the public credit is taxation. Without it there is no foundation upon which the credit of the Government can rest. Without it we cannot secure public confidence. In the language of the Secretary, "Such a tax is the corner stone of the whole fabric."

        Mr. Memminger, after stating that the depreciated currency with which interest had to be paid, had rendered the bonds unavailable for retiring the excess of circulation, strangely argues that to provide for any future redundancy, bonds should be indorsed by the States amounting to 4 or 5 hundred millions of dollars at 6 per cent.

        The minority of the committee present the pertinent inquiry, how can this latter class of bonds be used to retire future issues of Treasury notes subject to a like depreciation? The interest is to be paid in no better currency on the 6 per cent. bonds than on the 8 per cent. bonds.

        To make the argument of any force, it must be shown that 6 per cent. interest is worth more to the bondholder than 8 per cent. payable in the same currency.


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        Taxation must come to our relief on the second class of securities as well as on the first class. "It is the corner stone of the whole fabric."

        Having demonstrated, as we think, that the proposition for the State to indorse the bonds is but a delusive promise, if made, and can result in no good to the Confederacy, we insist further, besides not benefitting the Confederate Government, it will work out infinite mischief to the State and her people, and inflict a vital and dangerous stab to the dearest rights of the citizens of this youthful Republic.

        Congress by the Constitution has power to declare war, to levy and collect taxes, duties, imposts and excesses for revenue necessary to pay the debts, provide for the common defense, and carry on the Government of the Confederate States. Congress should exercise this power for the safety of our common country and the preservation of our liberties. Have the people ever failed to respond to the call of their Government for aid? They are still true to the Government. They call upon Congress to provide for the collection of taxes to meet the necessities of the country. Congress delays from some cause incomprehensible to your committee. The Legislatures are called upon to intervene between the citizens and Confederate Government. The people are defending the Confederacy with their lives and fortunes. Every battlefield attests their fidelity, and every grave is a silent and sacred monument to their honor and good faith, and the living of this day have sworn in their hearts that our honor and glory shall remain untarnished on the battlefield, and the odium and dishonor of repudiation shall never disgrace the land they live in.

        We ask, why should the Legislature, upon suspicion of dishonor, attempt to put fresh bonds upon the people, like the distrustful creditor would upon a fleeing debtor?

        When the people of Georgia attempt to repudiate, when they refuse to pay their taxes, then, and then only, should the counsel and aid of the Legislature be invoked.

        The Legislature of Georgia has no right to step between the Confederate States and its citizens, to interrupt and disturb the obligation of protection on the one side, and support on the other. The Government promises protection, the people have agreed to pay all necessary taxes for the support of that Government. This is the obligation between them, not effecting the relation existing between the State of Georgia simply as a State, and the Confederacy.

        What right has the Legislature to assume a sort of Congressional power, and directly or indirectly levy taxes not legitimately within the scope of its duty or power, when she has delegated this power to Congress? Let Congress do its duty. The people of Georgia are ready to do theirs without the uncalled for behests of the Legislature that


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never consulted them. Such an act upon our part would be a meddlesome and unjustifiable intervention between the people and Congress, and would furnish a pretext to Congress for inexcusable and dangerous delinquencies of duty in not providing for the public debt on the one side, and unheard of prodigality of appropriations of money, should the responsibility of raising the money be shifted from Congress and placed upon the State Legislatures. If the States indorse the bonds, Congress may neglect or refuse to levy and collect taxes to pay either principal or interest. Congress may raise and collect taxes or imposts to maintain and support the central Government in its organization, and leave the States to pay these indorsements. Let us maintain our true relation between representatives and people in the State Legislatures, and let the like relation between representatives and people in Congress continue to exist without any change or diminution of responsibility.

        The Legislators of Georgia are not the judges of the faithfulness of the representatives of the people in Congress. They are responsible to on enlightened constituency.

        We are called upon to intervene and endorse the future action of Congress in defiance of the judgment of the people. The representative is responsible to his constituents, and his electors have a right to review his conduct. Congress has made no call upon us, but it is said that other States have proposed this guarantee for the redemption of any further redundancy of currency.

        In fact Mr. Memminger regards this measure, if carried out, as relieving the Confederate Government from any further anxiety in regard to further issues. He says that "we are happily relieved from this necessity." The necessity to guard against any future redundancy.

        In providing for the absorption of an over amount of currency, it seems to be forgotten that even should the bonds perform this office that the amount of bonds accumulate in the same ratio, and adds largely to the interest debt, and as long as the currency is depreciated the difficulty in paying the interest will be increased. The Treasurer's reports exhibit a statement of the bonds and stocks of the Confederate Government amounting to $145,475,370. So far as this class of securities has been employed for that purpose, to that extent the currency has been reduced.

        At this early period in our financial history, with only this amount of stocks and bonds, the States are called upon to become parties as endorsers to $500,000,000 of bonds.

        If the State enters upon this stupendous scheme, it will have, through its Legislature, to provide revenue to pay the debts of the Confederacy, while the duty and power to do this is entrusted to Congress by the Constitution. The


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local Legislatures become the servants of Congress, and the States the mere financial ministers of the Confederacy, with the Congress to instruct them what they shall do. Such a condition of subserviency and subordination the States should never occupy.

        Georgia stands pledged to aid in the prosecution of this war, she intends nobly to redeem the pledge. She intends to aid the administration and stand by it, and will be the last in this fearful struggle to doubt or hesitate. Her motto is, to fight and fight to the last rather than reconstruct the Union--to live with a race of people opposed to humanity and civilization, and enemies to God.

        In 1862 South Carolina agreed to indorse her proportion of $200,000,000. She now proposes to indorse her proportion of $500,000,000 of bonds to be hereafter issued, omitting Missouri and Kentucky from the calculation. Alabama and Florida propose to indorse the whole debt of the Confederacy, provided all the Confederate States will do likewise. Mississippi agrees by a resolution of her Legisture to indorse her proportion of $200,000,000, dependent upon the act of a subsequent Legislature, the resolution to be published three months before the succeeding Legislature. It will be seen that there is no concert of action as to the amount assumed, and the policy and pre-requisite conditions of that assumption besides the proposition of neither of these States except South Carolina, to be binding only upon condition that their particular propositions be acceded to.

        Congress has not designated or even suggested any plan. Nor has Congress asked for any indorsement. There is no common agreement as to a plan, amount or terms.

        Georgia therefore could not, if she desired, make her action consistent with the four States mentioned. It will be kept in mind that there are thirteen States included within the Confederacy, and that we have no information in regard to the policy of the other States.

        Intimately connected with the subject of finance and the future defenses of the country, we would suggest that the Government might employ the cotton crop of the Confederacy, as the basis of security for money to be obtained in Europe, for procuring munitions of war, and increasing our navy so as to enable us to drive the blockading fleet from our coast.

        The cotton is of substantial and real value, and more nearly approximates the value of money than bonds or indorsements of any character.

        Georgia, for the purpose of producing unity of feeling and purpose among the several States, and expressing her views to Congress, and also, to her own immediate Senators and Representatives, as well also as to make a suitable


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response to her sister States, herein presents her views in regard to the topics herein discussed, and adopts the following resolutions as embodying concisely those views.

        1. Resolved by the General Assembly of Georgia, That they recommend to Congress to levy and collect such taxes as may be consistent with the means of the people of the States, the maintenance of the public credit, and necessary for the public defense, without delay.

        2. Resolved further, as the sense of this General Assembly, That Georgia will cheerfully contribute, not only her proportion to the support of this war, by taxation, but she will husband her resources to meet the contingencies of this cruel and unjust war waged against us by the abolitionists.

        3. Resolved, That Georgia abhors repudiation in all its forms, and will never compromise her honor by avoiding any debt, created or contracted by the Government for the public defense.

         Resolved, That the Confederate Government has within its reach ample resources for conducting its foreign exchanges, and making foreign purchases, in the article of cotton, to be purchased by the Government from the people of the Confederacy, and sold at the large profits which it now commands in the markets of Europe. The only obstacle in the way of this process is the difficulty of delivery, and this obstacle can be surmounted by obtaining in the first instance, advances upon a pledge of the cotton, and then using those advances in procuring a fleet which shall open and keep open at least one Confederate port, and thus place the cotton where it can be reached by neutral ships, without any breach of the law of blockade, and therefore carried to its destination under the inviolable protection of neutral flags.

JAMES L. SEWARD, Chm'n.

M. W. LEWIS,

SAMUEL D. KILLEN,

SAMUEL STEPHENS.


        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have adopted the following resolutions, which I am instructed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, and ask their concurrence in the same, to-wit:

        Resolutions instructing Tax Receivers and Collectors as to the manner in which they shall receive returns of taxable property.

        The rule being suspended the foregoing message was taken up and the resolution referred to the Judiciary Committee.


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        On motion the message of his Excellency the Governor relating to the manufacture of Cotton Cards was taken up and read.

        Mr. Mitchell offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That the communication of his Excellency the Governor in response to the resolution of the Senate on the subject of the Cotton Card Manufactory purchased by the State from Divine & Co., be referred to a committee of three, who are instructed to examine fully into the state, condition and success of the enterprise, and particularly into the reasons why the quantity of wire said to belong to, and be a part of the stock embraced in the purchase, has not been delivered, and into all such other matters and things connected with the State's interest in said enterprise that may be deemed expedient and calculated to further the success of said business, and that they report by resolution, bill or otherwise.

        The rule being suspended the said resolution was taken up, read and adopted, and the following committee appointed: Messrs. Mitchell, Hill and Stephens.

        The following bills from the House were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to authorize the issuance of a grant to a certain lot of land in the county of Brooks.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Madson and Hart.

        A bill to amend an act incorporating the Georgia Home Insurance Company, assented to Dec. 12, 1859.

        A bill to provide for the proper administration of the estate of S. L. Trawick, deceased, late of Decatur county, Georgia.

        A bill to repeal all special laws concerning public roads applicable to the county of Burke in this State, and for other purposes.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the first time:

        A bill to amend the charter of the Brunswick and Albany Railroad Company.

        A bill amendatory of an act to incorporate the Trustees of the Masonic Hall in the town of Milledgeville, approved 26th December, 1831, and to repeal an act similarly entitled, approved March 5th, 1856, and to appoint and confirm a new Board of Trustees for said Masonic Hall in the city of Milledgeville.

        A bill to legalize the signing of certain change bills issued by the Western & Atlantic Railroad, and to make it penal to counterfeit or alter the same, and for other purposes.

        A bill to amend the charter of the Macon and Brunswick Railroad Company.

        A bill to prescribe the mode and manner of selecting,


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drawing and summoning jurors for the trial of criminal cases in the Superior Court of the county of Chatham, and for other purposes therein mentioned, approved Dec. 11th, 1858.

        On motion the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock, A. M. to-morrow.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1st, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Smith.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of the Cherokee Insurance and Banking Company.

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Harris and Talbot.

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize F. W. C. Cook, James T. Pittard, N. Nickerson, and their associates to open and navigate the Oconee river.

        A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of Andrew Hamilton, of the county of Whitfield.

        A bill to be entitled an act to alter and amend the second section of an act entitled an act to define the liabilities of the several Rail Road Companies in this State, for injuries to, or destruction of live stock killed or injured, or for destruction of or injury or damage to property other than live stock, by the running of cars, engines. locomotives or other machinery upon Rail Roads in this State.

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Harris and Talbot.

        A bill to be entitled an act to add lot of land No. 41, in the 30th District originally Lee now Schley county to the county of Sumter.

        Mr. Mosely made a motion to reconsider so much of the journal of yesterday as relates to the passage of a bill to repeal the 1376th section of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Beasley called for the previous question, and upon the question shall the main be put? the yeas and nays were recorded and were yeas 12, nays 23.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Benson, Wm. M. Brown, Dyer, Fletcher, Gaston, Griffin, Harris, Hill, Jackson, Mosely, Smith, Wright.


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        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Boyd, James R. Brown, Echols, Furlow, Gibson, Gordon, Hansell, James Hilliard, Thomas Hilliard, Killen, Lane, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake, Simmons, Stephens, Swearingen, Vason.

        Yeas 12, nays 23. So the motion to reconsider the journal relating to the passage of the bill to repeal the 1376th section of the Code of Georgia did not prevail.

        The rule being suspended Mr. Gibson reported the following bills which were severally read the first time, to-wit:

        A bill to prevent and punish the circulation of foreign paper currency in the State of Georgia.

        Also a bill to punish the refusal of Confederate Notes or attempts to depreciate the same.

        Mr. Seward chairman of the Judiciary Committee, to whom was referred the resolution of the House upon the subject of the mode and manner of valuing property given in as taxes, reports the resolution on the amendments with a recommendation that it do pass; they recommend that the 1st resolution be amended by striking out at the last of said resolution the words, "or the currency of the country." Also to strike out the 3d resolution, and that the resolution as amended do pass.

        The rule being suspended, the foregoing report was taken up, and on motion, recommitted to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. Gordon, of a special committee made the following report:

        The special committee to whom was referred so much of the Governor's message as relates to the impressment of slaves, have had the same under consideration and recommend the passage of the following resolution:

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Georgia, That his Excellency the Governor, be, and he is hereby authorized and instructed to fill the requisition of the Confederate General at Savannah for fifteen hundred negroes for ninety days according to the resolutions of this General Assembly, passed in 1862, with this amendment thereto, that the Governor shall, as far as practicable impress first such negroes as are engaged in other than agricultural pursuits; Provided the impressment shall not be made from necessary house servants.

Signed.

GEO. A. GORDON, Chairman.


        The rule being suspended, the foregoing report was taken up.


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        Mr. Echols offered the following amendment which was accepted:

        Provided that said impressment shall not be made in any of the counties in this State, which have already furnished their full proportion of hands for the defense of Savannah.

        Mr. Mitchell offered the following amendment:

        And provided further, that in regulating such impressment of slaves under the original resolution the amount or number of slaves heretofore pressed into the service of the Confederate Government shall be counted or estimated therein.

        The report as amended was agreed to, and the resolution ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        Mr. Seward chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to compensate the citizens of this State, as a substitute for the original bill.

        This bill was read the third time and on motion, made the special order of the day for 3 o'clock, P. M. inst.

        Mr. Hansell by leave offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed by the President of the Senate to procure the services of the Reverend Clergy of Milledgeville and vicinity, to open the daily sessions of the Senate with prayer.

        The rule being suspended, the above resolution was taken up and adopted, whereupon the President appointed as said committee Messrs. Hansell, Mosely and Jas. R. Brown.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Beasley reported the following bill which was read the first time:

        A bill to amend the laws authorizing the appointment of Solicitors General pro tempore.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Hansell reported the following bill which was read the first time:

        A bill to amend the four thousand five hundred and ninety-second section of the Code of Georgia.

        On motion the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M. inst.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The special order being suspended, the Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize the Inferior Court of Ware county to assess an extra tax for the purpose of building a Court-house in said county, assented to Dec. 12th, 1861, also to revive the said repealed act.


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        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. William M. Brown reported the following bill, which was read the first time, to-wit:

        A bill to incorporate the Confederate Express Company.

        On motion of Mr. Seward, the special order for 3 o'clock was taken up by sections:

        1st Sec. Mr. Jas. R. Brown moved to amend by inserting in their proper connection the words "and by reason of said service or in consequence of any fault upon the part of the State or her agents." This amendment was not agreed to. Section 1st was agreed to.

        2d. Sec. Mr. Boyd offered the following amendment:

        Provided said appraisers shall obtain the service of some reputable physician to examine and report to them before making their award as to the nature and character of such disease or diseases of which such slave may be afflicted and the owner of such slave shall pay said physician reasonable compensation for his professional services.

        Mr. Jackson offered the following amendment:

        Strike out the words "Inferior Court," and insert "one arbitrator to be selected by the Governor on the part of the State--the umpire to be chosen by the arbitrators."

        This amendment was not agreed to.

        The second section as amended was agreed to.

        Third section was agreed to.

        Fourth section was agreed to.

        Mr. Hansell offered the following amendment, which was agreed to.

        Sec. 5. Be it further enacted, That all the provisions of this bill shall apply to such slaves as may hereafter enter said service.

        The report as amended was agreed to.

        Upon the question, shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 23, nays 10.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Benson, Wm. M. Brown, Dyer, Fletcher, Furlow, Gaston, Gordon, Griffin, Hansell, Harris, Hill, Killen, Lane, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake, Smith, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Boyd, Jas. R. Brown, Gibson, James Hilliard, Thos. Hilliard, Jackson, Mosely, Simmons, Swearingen, Vason.

        Yeas 23 nays 10. So the bill was passed.


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        The rule being suspended, the following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Gordon--A bill to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Company No. 1, of Savannah.

        Mr. Gibson--A bill to regulate the sale and exportation of corn, bacon, wheat and other articles.

        On motion, one hundred copies of this bill were ordered to be printed.

        Mr. Seward--A bill to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        Mr. James R. Brown--A bill to repeal sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993 of the Code of Georgia.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock, on tomorrow morning.

THURSDAY, APRIL 2d, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by Mr. Mosely.

        Mr. Jamison and Mr. Anthony appeared and took their seats.

        The rule being suspended Mr. Furlow moved to take up the bill in relation to the planting cotton.

        This motion was agreed to.

        On motion, it was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Furlow moved to take up the bill in relation to compeling the cultivating of provision crops.

        This motion prevailed.

        The bill was taken up and read the second time, and on motion, referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Superior Courts of this State to appoint persons to assign and set off dower, and to prescribe the mode of proceeding therein.

        A bill to be entitled an act to raise the fees of Jailors in this State.

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Association of the city of Columbus.

        A bill to be entitled an act to define the qualifications of voters at the elections to be held in the city of Columbus for Mayor and Aldermen and other officers in said city, whose


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election is given to said voters by law, and to provide for the registry of all persons entitled to vote at elections for city officers, to prevent persons whose names are not registered from voting, to prescribe an oath for voters, and to punish violations of this act in regard to said elections and voters.

        The House of Representatives have also passed the following bill, which I am directed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act to compensate managers of elections in Warren, Chattooga and Greene counties, and for other purposes, approved December 19th, 1859, so far as relates to the county of Chattooga.

        The rule being suspended, the Senate took up the majority and minority reports of the special committee on State Indorsement of Confederate Notes.

        On motion, these reports were made the special order of the day for to-morrow at 11 o'clock, A. M.

        Mr. Hansell reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to amend the four thousand five hundred and ninety-second section of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Jackson offered the following resolutions:

        1 Resolved, That in the opinion of the General Assembly of Georgia, the teaching of negroes to read is contrary to the best interest and safety of society and tending to mischievous results in furnishing a medium for concert of action in rebellion and insurrection which is dangerous to the rights of property and safety of the people.

        2. Resolved, Public declaiming by negroes preaching is contrary to sound policy and is not essential to the good government of slaves.

        3. Resolved, That the assembling of negroes in large bodies is unsafe and should not be permitted, except to attend church to listen to the preaching of the Gospel by a white Minister who in the opinion of the General Assembly is the proper medium to preach the Gospel to negroes in time of peace and more especially in time of war and during the present war; negro preaching should not be tolerated by the various churches; and that masters should not permit the teaching of their negroes to read until peace is declared.

        Mr. Seward chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report, having had the following bills under consideration, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to compensate the citizens of the State whose slaves have died while in the service of the State, report a substitute in lieu of the original bill, recommend it do pass. Also,

        An act to be entitled an act to regulate the payment of


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interest in certain cases, recommend the same do not pass. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the oath of tax payers of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes, recommend the same do not pass.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        An act to prevent monopolies and speculations in the renting or leasing salt lands and waters on the Georgia coast, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to; The bill was read the 3d time and passed, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal the (1376) section of the Code of Georgia.

        On motion of Mr. James R. Brown, laid on the table for the balance of the session.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the Blanceville Slate Mining Company of the county of Polk, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time, and passed, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to regulate the payment of interest in certain cases.

        The Judiciary Committee to whom this bill had been referred reported it back to the Senate with a recommendation that the same do not pass.

        Upon the question of agreeing to the report, the yeas and nays were recorded and were yeas 23 nays 10.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Benson, Wm. M. Brown, J. R. Brown, Dyer, Echols, Fletcher, Gordon, Hansell, Hill, James Hilliard, Thomas Hilliard, Jamison, Killen, Lane, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Simmons, Vason, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Beasley, Boyd, Gaston, Gibson, Griffin, Harris, Jackson, Shewmake, Stephens, Swearingen.

        Yeas 23, nays 10.

        The Senate took us as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend the oath of tax payers of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes.

        This bill was on motion, laid on the table for the present.


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        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to regulate the sale and exportation of corn, bacon, wheat and other articles.

        A bill for the relief of Louisa S. White, Executrix, and John T. White, Executor of the last will and testament of William M. White, late of Troup county, deceased.

        A bill to provide for and prescribe the mode of ordering elections for militia officers in this State, and to repeal so much of the Code of Georgia as is in conflict therewith.

        A bill to incorporate the Atlanta and Roswell Rail Road Company.

        A bill to authorize the guarantee by the State of Georgia of the bonds of the Confederate States of America so far as to guarantee her proportionate share of the sum of five hundred millions of dollars.

        A bill to amend the laws authorizing the appointment of Solicitors General pro tempore.

        A bill to repeal what is usually called the stay law so far as it relates to debts and liabilities which have or may be created for rents of houses and land passed on the day of Dec. 1862, and for other purposes.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The rule being suspended, the following bills were reported:

        A bill to incorporate the town of Smithville, alias Renwick, in the county of Lee in this State.

        The rule being suspended, the following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Vason.--A bill to regulate the fining of defaulting jurors and the means of collecting the same, &c.

        Mr. Seward.--A bill to make legal and valid the acts of the several Clerks of the Ordinaries of this State in certain cases, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Hansell.--A bill to authorize the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess and collect a tax on the proceeds of sales made by commission merchants in said city.

        Leave of absence was granted to Mr. Stafford on account of illness.

        Leave of absence was granted to Mr. Gaston for a few days.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time:


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        A bill to amend the four thousand five hundred and ninety-second section of the Code of this State.

        A bill to punish the refusal of Confederate Notes or attempt to depreciate the same.

        A bill to suppress and punish the circulation of foreign paper currency in the State of Georgia.

        A bill to incorporate the Confederate Express Company.

        A bill to repeal sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 992 and 993, of the Code of Georgia.

        A bill to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Company No. 1 of Savannah.

        A bill to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to repeal all special laws concerning public roads applicable to the county of Burke in this State, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the 3d time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to provide for the proper administration of the estate of Singleton L. Trawick, deceased, of Decatur county, Georgia.

        Mr. Vason offered the following amendment to come in after the first section:

        That for the purpose of securing the heirs at law of said estate from any loss, and as further indemnity and security, the said A. B. Trawick be required to execute a mortgage in writing to the Ordinary of said county before he shall grant or issue letters of administration to her, mortgaging the whole of her separate and individual property, both real and personal including her interest in said estate conditioned to a faithful discharge of the duties of said administration, and which shall stand in lieu of her bond.

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to amend an act incorporating the Georgia Home Insurance Company, assented to December 12th, 1863.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the line between the counties of Madison and Hart.


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        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill amendatory of an act to incorporate the Trustees of the Masonic Hall in the town of Milledgeville, approved December 26th, 1831, and to repeal an act similarly entitled, approved March 5, 1856, and to appoint and confirm a new Board of Trustees for said Masonic Hall in the city of Milledgeville.

        A bill to prescribe the mode and manner of selecting, drawing and summoning Tales Jurors for the trial of criminal cases in the Superior Court of the county of Chatham, and for other purposes therein mentioned, approved Dec. 11th, 1858.

        A bill to amend the charter of the Brunswick and Albany Rail Road Company.

        A bill to amend the charter of the Macon and Brunswick Rail Road Company.

        A bill to legalize the signing of certain change bills issued by the Western and Atlantic Rail Road, and to make it penal to counterfeit or alter the same, and for other purposes.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the first time:

        A bill for the relief of Andrew Hamilton, of the county of Whitfield.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Harris and Talbot, also another bill of precisely the same caption.

        A bill for the relief of the Cherokee Insurance and Banking Company.

        A bill to add lot of land No. 46 in the 30th District, originally Lee now Schley county to the county of Sumter.

        A bill to authorize J. W. C. Cook, James D. Pittard, R. Nickerson and their associates to open and navigate the North Oconee river.

        A bill to alter and amend the second section of an act entitled an act to define the liabilities of the several Rail Road Companies of this State for injury to or destruction of live stock, killed or injured or for destruction of or injury or damage to property other than live stock by the running of cars, engines, locomotives or other machinery upon a rail roads in this State, assented to Feb. 20th, 1854.

        A bill to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Association of the city of Columbus.

        A bill to raise the fees of Jailors in this State.

        A bill to authorize the Superior Courts of this State to appoint persons to assign and set off dower and to prescribe the mode of proceeding therein.

        A bill to define the qualifications of voters at the elections to be held in the city of Columbus for Mayor and Aldermen, and other officers in said city whose election is


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given to the people by law and to prescribe for the registry of all persons entitled to vote for city officers in said city, &c.

        A bill to repeal an act to compensate managers of elections in Warren, Chattooga and Greene counties, and for other purposes, approved December 19th, 1859, so far as relates to the county of Chattooga.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Hansell reported a bill to amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors in Georgia, assented to 22d Nov. 1862.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. James R. Brown reported the following resolution:

        Whereas, it is represented to the Senate that some one or more of the Rail Road Companies of this State is or are not employing all the means at their command for the purpose of transporting provisions and such other freights as are necessary for the comfort and support of our army and people and which are presented to said Road for transportation, and whereas, it is also represented that it is believed that at least one of the Rail Roads of this State is violating its chartered rights by charging more for the transportation of freights than said road is allowed by its charter to charge therefor:

        Resolved by the Senate, That a committee of three be appointed to inquire whether or not any Rail Road in this State is wilfully refusing to carry over their Road as much freight as they have the means of carrying, and whether or not any of said Roads are violating their chartered rights by charging more for freights than they are allowed to charge by the terms of their charters and to report to the Senate by bill or otherwise.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock, A. M. tomorrow.

FRIDAY, APRIL 3D, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Fulwood.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend an act passed on November 28th, 1861, entitled an act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes.


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        Mr. Jackson moved to reconsider so much of the Journal of yesterday as relates to the rejection of the bill repudiating the payment of interest in certain cases.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The rule being suspended, on motion, said bill was taken up and referred to a special committee of five.

        The President appointed on said committee Messrs. Vason, Jackson, Gibson, Seward, Hansell.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 994 of the Code of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill for the relief of Louisa S. White, executrix, and John T. White, executor of the last will and testament of Wm. M. White, late of Troup county, deceased.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to provide for and prescribe the mode of ordering elections for militia officers in this State, and to repeal so much of the Code of Georgia as in conflict therewith.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the Atlanta and Roswell Railroad Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        Mr. Seward, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report:

        Having had the following bill under consideration, to-wit: An act to prevent and punish the cultivating in the State of Georgia more than a certain quantity of land in cotton or tobacco, during the present war, report the same back and recommend it do not pass.

MINORITY REPORT.

        The undersigned members of the Judiciary Committee, to whom was referred the bill usually called the cotton planting bill, dissent from the report of the majority in relation to the constitutionality of said bill, and believe that


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said bill is not objectionable on any constitutional grounds. Respectfully submitted.

D. R. MITCHELL,

J. M. JACKSON,

JAMES R. BROWN,

ANDREW J. HANSELL,

JOHN R. DYER.


        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to prevent and punish the cultivating in the State of Georgia more than a certain quantity of land in cotton or tobacco, during the present war.

        The Judiciary Committee, to whom this bill was referred, reported the same back with a recommendation that the same do not pass.

        Mr. Seward moved to postpone the bill and both reports indefinitely.

        Upon the question of agreeing to this motion, the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 19; nays 14.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Anthony, Beasley, Wm. M. Brown, Echols, Fletcher, Furlow, Gaston, Harris, Hill, James Hilliard, Killen, Lewis, Pinckard, Seward, Smith, Swearingen, Vason, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Benson, Boyd, J. R. Brown, Dyer, Gibson, Hansell, Thos. Hilliard, Jackson, Lane, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Shewmake, Simmons, Stephens.

        Yeas 19; nays 14. So the motion to postpone indefinitely prevailed.

        On motion, the special order of to-day was laid on the table for the present.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Dyer offered the following resolution, which, on motion, was taken up, read and adopted:

        A vacancy having occurred in the Committee on Enrollment, by reason of the resignation of Hon. D. J. Both well and the continned absence of Hons. Messrs. Fort and Ware, the President appointed on said committee, Messrs. Pinckard, Shewmake, Swearingen.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Swearingen reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to make uniform the laws of this State for the compensation of grand and petit jurors, the collection of costs, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported


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as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate--

        An act to authorize the issuance of a grant to a certain lot of land in the county of Brooks.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Hansell reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to incorporate a Warehouse, Insurance and Deposit Company in the cities of Americus and LaGrange, Georgia.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend the laws authorizing the appointment of Solicitors General pro tempore.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend the 4,590th section of the Code of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the Southern Express Company.

        This bill was, on motion, referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to prevent and punish the circulation of foreign paper currency in the State of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the town of Smithville alias Renwick, in the county of Lee in this State.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to punish the refusal of Confederate notes or attempts to depreciate the same.


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        On motion, this bill was laid on the table for the present.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to regulate the sale and exportation of corn, bacon, wheat and other articles.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Committee on Supplies.

        On motion, Mr. Gibson was added to the Committee on Supplies.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Co., No. 1, of Savannah.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Boyd reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to authorize teachers of common schools of this State to charge and collect fifty per cent., for their services, on the customary amount heretofore allowed such teachers in their respective localities, for the year 1863.

        The following bills were taken up and read the second time:

        A bill to authorize the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess and collect a tax on the proceeds of sales made by commission merchants in said city.

        A bill to make legal and valid the acts of the several clerks of the Ordinaries in this State in certain cases, and for other purposes.

        A bill to regulate the fining of defaulting jurors, and the manner of collecting the same.

        A bill to amend the 4,592d section of the Code of Georgia.

        A bill to amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consamption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors in Georgia, assented to 22d Nov., 1862.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to amend the charter of Brunswick & Albany Railroad Company.

        On motion, the report was agreed to.

        On the question, shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 21; nays 5.


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        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Anthony, Beasley, Benson, Echols, Fletcher, Furlow, Gordon, Hansell, Harris, Thos. Hilliard, Jamison, Killen, McRae, Pinckard, Seward, Simmons, Stephens, Swearingen, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Boyd, J. R. Brown, Gibson, Lane, Lewis.

        Yeas 21; nays 5. So the bill having received a constitutional majority, was passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to legalize the signing of certain change bills issued by the Western & Atlantic Railroad, and to make it penal to counterfeit or alter the same, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Trustees of the Masonic Hall in the town of Milledgeville, approved Dec. 26th, 1831, and to repeal an act similarly entitled, approved March 5th, 1856, and to appoint and confirm a new board of Trustees for said Masonic Hall in the city of Milledgeville.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to prescribe the mode and manner of selecting, drawing and summoning tales jurors for the trial of criminal cases in the Superior Court of the county of Chatham, and for other purposes therein mentioned, approved Dec. 11th, 1858.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize the Superior Courts of this State to appoint persons to assign and set off dower, and to prescribe the mode of proceeding therein.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the committee on the Judiciary.

        On motion, the following House bill was taken up and read the first time:

        A bill to amend an act passed on November 28th, 1861.


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entitled an act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes.

        On motion, leave of absence was granted to Mr. Harris until Monday evening next.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock to-morrow morning.

SATURDAY, APRIL 4TH, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        Mr. Jackson moved to reconsider so much of the Journal of yesterday as relates to the indefinite postponement of the bill to restrict the planting of more than a certain quantity of Cotton.

        Upon the question of agreeing to this motion, the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 20, nays 13.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Benson, Boyd, Wm. M. Brown, Jas. R. Brown, Dyer, Fletcher, Gibson, Griffin, Hansell, Thos. Hilliard, Jackson, Lane, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake, Simmons, Stephens.

        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Alexander, Anthony, Beasley, Echo's, Furlow, Gordon, Hill, James Hilliard, Jamison, Killen, Smith, Vason, Wright.

        Yeas 20, nays 13. Motion to reconsider prevailed.

        Mr. Dyer, Chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives, and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate the following acts which originated in the House, to-wit:

        An act to amend an act incorporating the Georgia Home Insurance Company, assented to Dec. 12th, 1859.

        An act to repeal all special laws concerning public roads applicable to the county of Burke in this State, and for other purposes.

        An act to change the line between the counties of Madison and Hart.

        On motion leave of absence was granted to Mr. Smith for a few days, also to Mr. Lewis for a few days.

        The following bills were reported and severally read the first time:


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        Mr. Anthony--A bill to incorporate an insurance company in the town of Fort Gaines, to be called the Chattahoochee Insurance Company.

        Also, a bill to incorporate the town of Fort Gaines in county of Clay, to define its jurisdictional limits, and for other purposes.

        Mr. James R. Brown--A bill to amend a part of Section 4220 of the Code of Georgia.

        Also, a bill to define the liability of the Western and Atlantic Railroad for injuries done to persons and property, and to extend the provisions of the act entitled an act to define the liabilities of the several Railroad Companies of this State, for injury to persons and property, to prescribe in what counties they may be sued, and how served with process, approved March 5th, 1856.

        Also, a bill for the relief of Mary E. Cannon and Mary A. Prince.

        Mr. Gibson--A bill to charter and incorporate a Bank in the city of Augusta by the name and style of the Traders and Importers' Bank.

        Mr. Gordon--A bill to incorporate the Georgia Locomotive and Tool Works.

        Also, a bill to confirm to the Confederates States of America the occupancy of certain lands in the county of Richmond in this State, heretefore held by the late United States of America, and to assent and confirm the purchase of other lands in said county, and to grant to the said Confederate States of America exclusive jurisdiction over the same.

        Mr. Jackson reported the following resolution:

        Resolved, That a committee of two on the part of the Senate be appointed to meet three on the part of the House to take into consideration the Cotton Bill, and unite the action of the Legislature on that subject and harmonize the views if possible, and submit the same to the people and the army in the field.

        Mr. Smith reported the following resolution:

        The General Assembly of the State of Georgia do resolve,--

        1st. That Georgia respectfully declines to accede to any of the plans which have been proposed by some of her sister States, or to any plan for the assumption or endorsement of Confederate debt by the several States; not because she feels any distrust of the success of the Confederate Government, for she entertains a firm confidence in the invincibility of a nation determined to be free; nor because she feels any indifference towards the common cause of independence, for she regards her own honor and existence as inseparable from the triumph of that cause, but because she is convinced that the credit of the Confederate Government


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is to be maintained, not by indorsements, but by payments, by the inauguration of such a system of payment as will inspire confidence in the early reduction of the public debt, and in its ultimate entire redemption.

        2d. As the legitimate and only possible means to accomplish this end she points, first to taxation, equal, just and judicious, but firm and rigorous taxation. Not only will she submit to it, but she invites it, and pledges her people never to shrink from their due share of it, and scouts all idea of repudiation. Second to cotton, to be purchased by the Government from the people of the Confederacy, and sold at the large profit which it now commands in the markets of Europe. The only obstacle in the way of this process is the difficulty of delivery, and this obstacle can be surmounted by obtaining, in the first instance, advances upon a pledge of the cotton, and then using these advances in procuring a fleet which shall open and keep open at least one Confederate port, and thus place the cotton where it can be reached by neutral ships without any breach of the law of Blockade, and therefore carried to its destination under the inviolable protection of neutral flags.

        Mr. Vason, Chairman of the Committee on Supplies, reported the following joint report:

        The Committee on Supply to whom was referred an act to regulate the sale and exportation of corn, wheat, &c., have had the same under consideration and have required that it should report said bill with the following amendments and recommend the same should pass, to-wit: In first section, second line, strike out words "from and" and insert "twenty days." In the seventh line of same section strike out "Judges" and insert "Justices." In twelfth line of same section strike out word "five" and insert "fifteen." In thirteenth line strike out word "charges" and insert words "actual expenses incurred in transporting to and preparing the same for sale." In eighteenth line strike out "five" and insert "fifteen"; strike out "and" and insert "or". In next line strike out "charges" and insert "actual expenses incurred in transporting to and preparing the same for sale." In third section, first line strike out "Judges" and insert "Justices." In fifth section, first line, strike out words "from and after the passage of this act". In third line same section strike out words "Governor of the same" and insert "Justices of the Inferior Court of the county from which the same is proposed to be exported".

        Also to add two additional sections thereto, to-wit:

        "Sec. 7th. The Clerks of said Court shall be entitled to receive for each license issued by him and recording the affidavit from each dealer the sum of five dollars.

        Sec. 8. Be it further enacted, The dealer shall disclose to the party proposing to purchase or purchasing any of


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said enumerated articles, if required so to do by him, the name and residence of the person or persons from whom such article was purchased, and the price paid by him for the same, and the cost and charges on such articles, and the name of the person to whom the same was paid. His refusal so to do shall be deemed a violation of this act and subject such dealer to all the pains and penalties thereof.

        The committee have also instructed me to report the following joint resolution for the purpose of increasing the supplies of food for sale, to-wit:

        Be it resolved by the General Assembly, That the planters in this State, for the purpose of increasing the supplies of meat to feed the destitute and maintain the army, be requested to decrease the rations of Bacon for each grown hand to two pounds per week, and other members of the families in the same proportion, from May to the first of November next, and that in each county there should be a voluntary organization, each member of which shall pledge to place in the market all the surplus of meat, corn, flour and all other bread-stuffs which can be spared from their farms or families; that they will under no circumstances sell the same to a speculator but as far as practicable to consumers in need of such articles; that each county shall appoint an agent in the county to whom shall be reported, by each planter the surplus of food he may have for sale, and that after full maintenance is made for the poor and destitute of the State, that the balance shall be freely sold at a moderate price for the support of the Army of this State and of the Confederate States, and that it is the opinion of this General Assembly that such persons as refuse to enter into these pledges and withhold their supplies from the market shall be first visited by the impressing agents of the Army.

        The committee agreed to instruct the chairman of House committee to report in that body a resolution instructing his Excellency the Governor, upon receiving information of the desire of any citizen of this State to contribute, or sell at less than the market price, any amount of corn, wheat or other food for the relief of the destitute residing in other sections of the State, he shall furnish the necessary number of sacks and have the same transported by Railroad to the nearest depot to such destitute persons, free of expenses; which said bill and resolution the committee recommend do pass. All of which is respectfully submitted.

DAVID A. VASON,
Chairman Senate Committee.

GEORGE N. LESTER,
Chairman House Committee.


        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M


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3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The regular order being the reading of bills the third time, the following were taken up and read, to-wit:

        A bill to regulate the fining of defaulting jurors and the manner of collecting the same.

        On motion the same was laid on the table for the present.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to authorize the guarantee by the State of Georgia of the Bonds of the Confederate States of America, so far as to guarantee her proportionate share of the sum of $500,000,000.

        On motion the same was laid on the table.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President: The House of Representatives have concurred in the resolution of the Senate to appoint a joint committee to take into consideration the "Cotton Bill", and have appointed on their part Messrs. Cabaniss, Hester and and Render as such committee, and I am instructed to inform the Senate of the same forthwith.

        The following message was received from His Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters, his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--I am directed by the Governor to deliver to the Senate a communication in writing accompanied by a copy of Resolutions from the Legislature of Texas.

        A bill to be entitled an act to punish the refusal of Confederate Notes or attempt to depreciate the same.

        On motion the bill was laid on the table.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess and collect a tax on the proceeds of sales made by commission merchants in said city.

        The report was agreed to, the bill read the third time and passed.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to make legal and valid the acts of the several Clerks of the Ordinaries of this State in certain cases.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        On motion the report of the Judiciary Committee on a bill to be entitled an act to regulate the sale and exportation of corn, wheat, meal, flour, bacon, salt and other articles produced in the State of Georgia, or kept therein, was taken up by sections.

        Mr. Jas. R. Brown moved to amend the report by inserting after the word "person or persons" in the ninth line of


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the printed bill the words, "his or her agent", which was rejected.

        Mr. Jackson moved further to amend by inserting the following proviso to the first section:

        Provided, That this act shall not apply to one farmer or producer selling as agent bona fide for another producer or farmer without profit or commission; which was agreed to.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        The fourth section being under consideration, Mr. Gordon moved to strike out of said section the words following, to-wit: "shall be guilty of perjury and suffer and be punished with all the pains and penalties thereof"; which motion was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Hansell the first and fifth sections were amended so as to read from and after the publication of this act, instead of from and after the passage of this act; agreed to.

        The report of the Judiciary Committee as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        Mr. Gordon, Chairman of the Committee on Banks, reported back a bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Confederate Express Company, accompanied by the following report:

        The Committee on Banks to whom was referred a bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Confederate Express Company have had the same under consideration, and have instructed me to report an amendment in the shape of an additional section and recommend that the bill as amended do pass, to-wit:

        Be it further enacted, That it is hereby incorporated as an express condition of this charter that one-half of the capital stock of said Company shall be bona fide held and owned by citizens of Georgia and shall so appear in the semi-annual statement provided to be made to the Comptroller General in 13th section, and a failure to comply with this provision of this section shall work a forfeiture of this charter.

        On motion the report was taken up.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        On motion the following message of his Excellency the Governor was read, and on motion of Mr. Boyd, fifty copies of the message and accompanying documents, were ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate to-wit:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Milledgeville, April 4th, 1863.

To the General Assembly:

        I herewith transmit copies of resolutions passed by the


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Legislature of the State of Texas, which I have received by the last mail. The Legislature of that State has, it seems, had the subject of the indorsement of the Confederate Debt under consideration, and has refused to indorse; but has pledged the faith of that gallant State, should she from any cause withdraw from the Confederacy before the debt is paid, to then assume and pay her pro rata part of it.

        In the event a State should withdraw from the Confederation of States, the powers of Congress to impose and collect taxes from her people to pay her proportion of the debt, would cease; and if the State did not then assume and pay her proportion of it, as a State, she would be guilty of bad faith. Every State in the Confederacy is therefore bound in good faith, in the event she should ever retire from the Confederacy, to assume and pay her part of the debt; and the people of all are bound while they remain in the Confederacy, to submit to the taxation imposed by Congress for that purpose. As the Resolutions of the State of Texas only affirm a principle about which there can be no dispute, there can be no objection to the concurrence of Georgia in these Resolutions as obligatory upon her own people in case she should ever place herself in position where the principle can be applicable.

        As long, however, as the States remain confederated, the Constitution confers upon Congress ample power over this question; and it is, in my opinion, best to leave it where the Constitution leaves it, and where our sister State of Texas has left it. If Georgia and some other States, without any constitutional obligation to do so, indorse the Confederate debt, and Texas and other States, without the violation of any constitutional obligation, refuse to do so, there is then no concert and no equality between the States. Again, suppose Congress, after the indorsement, refuses to do its duty and assess the taxes necessary to pay the interest and finally extinguish the debt, and turns over the burden to the State legislatures, and part of the States which have indorsed, should repudiate after the indorsement; other States which refused to repudiate would be left with a very unequal burden upon them. When Congress imposes the tax, the law acts upon the individuals of all the States alike, and the Confederate collectors can compel payment from individuals by levy and sale, if necessary, without reference to the State governments. This equalises the burden among the people of all the States, and is just and right. He who studies our system carefully, cannot fail to admire the wisdom of our fathers who framed the Constitution of the old government, and of the conventions which lately retained these great principles of equality and justice in our present Constitution.

        While we should pledge ourselves most solemnly never


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to repudiate our proportion of the debt by refusing to pay the taxes imposed in the constitutional manner for its extinguishment, we should, in my humble judgment, leave the responsibility of raising the money where the constitution places it.

        So far as I am informed, neither Virginia, North-Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri, Louisiana, Arkansas nor Texas, has agreed to the proposition to indorse. There may be an exception in case of some one of these States; if so, I have no information of the fact. Four States, Alabama, South-Carolina, Florida and Mississippi, have agreed to indorse; the latter State subject to the action of her next legislature. Of these four States, only two, Alabama and Florida, agree on the plan and amount to be indorsed. There is, therefore, no concert of action between the States, and no equality in case part endorse and others refuse. The constitutional plan of leaving the responsibility with Congress, combines concert of action with perfect equality; and in case Congress refuses to do its duty and make provision for the payment of the debt, the people have an ample remedy, by turning those who fail to do their duty, out of power, and returning in their places, those who will regard their constitutional obligations and provide the means to sustain the public credit.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.


        The Senate then adjourned till 10 o'clock Monday morning.

MONDAY, APRIL 6TH, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        On motion of Mr. Seward, the reading of the Journal was dispensed with.

        On motion of Mr. J. R. Brown, leave of absence for a few days was granted to Mr. Gordon, Senator from the 1st district.

        On motion, the rules were suspended to allow Mr. Mosely to introduce the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of widows of deceased solders.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following acts of the House, to-wit:


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        An act to amend the charter of the Macon & Brunswick Railroad Company.

        Also, an act amendatory of an act to incorporate the Trustees of the Masonic Hall in the town of Milledgeville, approved December 26th, 1831, and to repeal an act similarly entitled, approved March 5th, 1856, and to appoint and confirm a new Board of Trustees for said Masonic Hall in the city of Milledgeville.

        An act to legalize the signing of certain change bills issued by the Western & Atlantic Railroad, and to make it penal to counterfeit or alter the same, and for other purposes.

        An act to prescribe the mode and manner of selecting, drawing and summoning tales jurors for the trial of criminal cases in the Superior Court of the county of Chatham, and for other purposes therein mentioned, approved December 11th, 1858.

        On motion of Mr. Seward, the Senate then took up the special order of the day, being the report of the special joint committee on State indorsement of Confederate debt, on a bill to be entitled an act to authorize the guarantee by the State of Georgia of the bonds of the Confederate States of America, so far as to guarantee her proportionate share of $500,000,000.

        The report was ably and eloquently discussed by Messrs. Pinckard and Gordon, when, on motion of Mr. Gibson, the further consideration of the report was adjourned until tomorrow at 11 o'clock, A. M.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned till 3½ o'clock, P. M.

3½ O'CLOCK, P. M.

        Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to amend the 4,592d section of the Code of Georgia.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors in Georgia, assented to 22d Nov. 1862.

        Mr. Hansell moved to amend the report by inserting in the second section of the bill the words, "upon satisfactory


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evidence being produced before the Governor;" which was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        On motion of Mr. Boyd, the rule was suspended to allow him to report a bill to relieve certain soldiers in the military service of the Confederate States, of the State of Georgia, from the payment of taxes in certain cases.

        The following bills were severally taken up and read the second time, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Chattahoochee Insurance Company of Fort Gaines.

        A bill to be entitled an act to make uniform the laws of this State for the compensation of grand and petit jurors, the collection of costs, and for other purposes.

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize teachers of common schools of this State to charge and collect fifty per cent,, for their services, on the customary amounts heretofore allowed such teachers in their respective localities, for the year 1863.

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate a Warehouse, Insurance and Deposit Company in the cities of Americus and LaGrange, Georgia.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have concurred in the amendment of the Senate to the House bill to be entitled an act to provide for the proper administration of the estate of S. L. Trawick, deceased, late of Decatur county, Georgia.

        The following message was received from his Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters, his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--I am directed by the Governor to deliver to the Senate a communication in writing, with an accompanying document from the Adjutant and Inspector General.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, which I am instructed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to alter and amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors in this State, approved November 22d, 1862.

        The House of Representatives have also adopted a resolution calling on his Excellency the Governor for certain


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information relative to the office of Adjutant and Inspector General of this State, in which they respectfully ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        On motion of Mr. Hansell, the order was suspended, and the Senate took up the House bill to alter and amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers, &c.

        The bill was read the first time, and fifty copies ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate.

        The Committee on Transportation, to whom was referred the bill to regulate the transportation of provisions on the several Railroads in this State, &c., submitted a report through Mr. Brown, its chairman.

        On motion, 50 copies of the report and the bills reported by them were ordered to be printed.

        On motion, the message from his Excellency the Governor, with accompanying documents, were taken up, read and referred to Committee on Military Affairs.

        On motion of Mr. Jackson, the Senate took up the resolution relating to negro preaching, &c., which on motion, was indefinitely postponed; and upon which motion the yeas and nays were recorded.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Boyd, J. R. Brown, Dyer, Echols, Furlow, Hansell, James Hilliard, Thos. Hilliard, Jamison, Killen, Lane, Pinckard, Seward, Simmons, Swearingen, Vason.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Benson, W. M. Brown, Fletcher, Griffin, Hill, Jackson, McRae, Mosley, Stephens, Wright.

        Yeas 19; nays 10. So the motion to postpone indefinitely prevailed.

        On motion of Mr. Seward, the Senate took up the bill to amend the charter of the Brunswick and Albany Railroad Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        On motion, the Senate took up the House resolution calling on the Governor for certain information relative to the office of Adjutant and Inspector General.

        The resolution was read, and, on motion, concurred in.

        Mr. Hansell, the rules being suspended, offered a resolution to appoint a joint special committee to audit the claim of David Irwin, for superintending the publication of the Code of Georgia.

        On motion, the resolution was taken up and adopted.


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        On motion, leave of absence was granted to Mr. Shewmake, of the 17th, and Mr. Echols, of the 30th district.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 9 o'clock, A. M., tomorrow.

TUESDAY, APRIL 7TH, 1863.
9 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by the Reverend Mr. Hawkins.

        The following bills were reported and severally read the first time:

        Mr. Hansell.--A bill to incorporate the Augusta and Dahlonega Mining Company. Also,

        A bill to incorporate the Chestatee River and Town Creek Gold Mining Company.

        Mr. Jackson.--A bill to incorporate the Confederate Coal Mining Company.

        Report of Joint Special Committee on the culture of cotton:

        The special joint committee to which was referred the bill to prevent and punish the cultivating in the State of Georgia, more than a certain quantity of land in cotton or tobacco during the present war, have had the same under consideration, and report a substitute for said bill, and recommend that as it proposes to raise revenue, it be laid on the table until the action of the House shall be had on a like bill to be reported to that body, and if it shall pass the House and be transmitted here, the Senate can then act on it. Respectfully submitted.

Signed.

JOHN M. JACKSON and others.


        On motion, the foregoing report was laid on the table for the present.

        On motion of Mr. Boyd, the following House bill was taken up and read the second time, to-wit:

        A bill to alter and amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors in this State, approved November 22d, 1862.

        The following message was received from His Excellency the Governor, Mr. Waters, his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--I am directed by the Governor to deliver to the Senate a communication in writing.

        On motion, the said communication was taken up and read as follows:


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EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Milledgeville, April 6th, 1863.

To the General Assembly:

        The armies of the Confederate States are composed, in a great degree, of poor men and non-slaveholders, who have but little property at stake upon the issue. The rights and liberties of themselves and of their posterity are, however, involved; and with hearts full of patriotism, they have nobly and promptly responded to their country's call, and now stand a living fortification between their homes and the armed legions of the Abolition Government. Upon their labor their families at home have depended for support, as they have no slaves to work for them. They receive from the Government but eleven dollars per month, in depreciated currency, which, at the present high prices, will purchase very little of the necessaries of life. The consequence is, that the wives of thousands of them are now obliged to work daily in the field to make bread--much of the time without shoes to their feet, or even comfortable clothes for themselves or their little children. Many are living upon bread alone, and feel the most painful apprehensions lest the time may come when enough even of this cannot be afforded them. In the midst of all the privations and sufferings of themselves and their families, the loyalty of those brave men to the Government cannot be questioned, and their gallantry shines more conspicuously upon each successive battle field. Freemen have never, in any age of the world, made greater sacrifices in freedom's cause, or deserved more of their country or of posterity.

        While the poor have made and are still making these sacrifices, and submitting to these privations to sustain our noble cause and transmit the rich blessings of civil and religious liberty and national independence to posterity, many of the rich have freely given up their property, endured the hardships and privations of military service, and died gallantly upon the battle field. It must be admitted, however, that a large proportion of the wealthy class of people have avoided the fevers of the camp and the dangers of the battle field, and have remained at home in comparative ease and comfort with their families.

        If the enrolling officer under the Conscript act has summoned them to camp, they have claimed exemption to control their slaves, or they have responded with their money, and hired poor men to take their places as substitutes. The operation of this act has been grossly unjust and unequal between the two classes. When the poor man is ordered to camp by the enrolling officer, he has no money with which to employ a substitute, and he is compelled to leave all the endearments of home and go. The money of the rich protects


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them. If the substitution principle had not been recognized, and the act had compelled the rich and poor to serve alike, it would have been much more just.

        Again, there is a class of rich speculators who remain at home preying like vultures upon the vitals of society, determined to make money at every hazard, who turn a deaf ear to the cries of soldiers' families, and are prepared to immolate even our armies and sacrifice our liberties upon the altar of mammon. If laws are passed against extortion, they find means of evading them. If the necessaries of life can be monopolized and sold to the poor at famine prices, they are ready to engage in it. If contributions are asked to clothe the naked soldier or feed his hungry children, they close their purses and turn away. Neither the dictates of humanity, the love of country, the laws of man, nor the fear of God seem to control or influence their actions. To make money and accumulate wealth is their highest ambition, and seems to be the only object of their lives. The pockets of these men can be reached in but one way, and that is by the tax gatherer; and, as they grow rich upon the calamities of the country, it is the duty of patriotic statesmen and legislators to see that this is done, and that the burdens of the war are, at least to some extent, equalized in this way. They should be compelled to divide their ill-gotten gains with the soldiers who fight our battles; both they and the wealthy of the country, not engaged as they are, should be taxed to contribute to the wants of the families of those who sacrifice all to protect our lives, our liberties and our property.

        I consider it but an act of simple justice, for the reasons already stated, that the wages of our private soldiers be raised to twenty dollars per month, and that of non-commissioned officers in like proportlon, and that the wealth of the country be taxed to raise the money. I therefore recommend the passage of a joint resolution by the legislature of this State, requesting our Senators and Representatives in Congress, to bring this question before that body, and to do all they can, both by their influence and their votes, to secure the passage of an act for that purpose, and to assess a tax sufficient to raise the money to pay the increased sum. This would enable each soldier to do something to contribute to the comfort of his family while he is fighting the battles of his country at the expense of his comfort and the hazard of his life.

        I respectfully but earnestly urge upon you the justice and importance of favorable consideration and prompt action upon this recommendation.

        Let the hearts of our suffering soldiers from Georgia be cheered by the intelligence that the Legislature of their State has determined to see that justice is done them, and


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that the wants of themselves and their families are supplied, and their arms will be nerved with new vigor when uplifted to strike for the graves of their sires, the homes of their families, the liberties of their posterity, and the independence and glory of the Republic.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.


        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives has adopted the following resolution as a substitute for Senate resolution in relation to impressment of slaves to work upon the defenses of Savannah, to-wit:

        A resolution to appoint a joint committee of the House of Representatives and Senate to report permanent regulations in regard to the impressment of slaves under the recent act of the Confederate Congress on that subject, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate, and have appointed on their part as such committee Messrs. Norwood, Trammell and Gresham, and I am instructed to inform the Senate of the same.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. James R. Brown offered the following resolution, which on motion, was taken up, read and adopted, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith:

        Whereas, his Excellency the Governor has brought the question of the justice and propriety of increasing the monthly pay of the privates and non-commissioned officers of the army of the Confederate States before the General Assembly; and whereas, the General Assembly concurs in the justice and importance of this recommendation, therefore,

        Resolved 1st, That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be, and they are hereby requested to bring this question before the Congress of the Confederate States, and to do all in their power, by their influence and their votes to procure the passage of an act to raise the monthly pay of privates in the army to twenty dollars per month, and of non-commissioned officers in like proportion, and to procure the assessment of a tax sufficient to meet the increased expenditure to be levied as far as practicable upon the incomes of speculators and extortioners, and upon the wealth of those who are not in the army.

        Resolved 2d, That the Governor be requested to forward a copy of these resolutions to the President of the Confederate States, and to the Governor of each State in Confederacy, and to each of our Senators and Representatives in Congress.

        Mr. Hansell, chairman of sub committee on behalf of the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report:


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        The Judiciary Committee to whom was referred the bill to be entitled an act to repeal what is usually called the stay law as far as regards rents, &c., have had the same under consideration, and beg leave to report the same back to the Senate, with a bill which they recommend as a substitute for said bill.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate a Ware House Insurance and Deposit Company in the cities of Americus and LaGrange, Georgia.

        Mr. Hansell moved to amend the same by striking out the seventh section and amending the caption so as to make it conform to the bill as amended.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        Mr. Seward chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report, having had the following bills under consideration, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Superior Courts of this State to appoint persons to assign and set off dower and to prescribe the mode of proceeding therein, recommend it do pass. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the laws authorizing the appointment of Solicitors General pro tempore, report the same back by inserting in third line of second section the words "amount of," and in the fifth line insert the words "is now allowed by law," and also by striking out a portion of the fifth line with the whole of the sixth line, recommend it do pass. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to regulate admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified, report the same back by inserting in the thirteenth line of the first section the words "by his or her own oath," recommend it do pass.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize the Superior Courts of this State to appoint persons to assign and set off dower and to prescribe the mode of proceeding therein.

        The passage of this bill was recommended by the Judiciary Committee to whom it was referred.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend the laws authorizing the appointment of Solicitors General pro tempore.

        The passage of this bill with certain amendments was


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recommended by the Judiciary Committee to whom it was referred.

        The amendments were accepted.

        On motion, this bill was indefinitely postponed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        The passage of this bill was recommended by the Judiciary Committee to whom it had been referred.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Miller and Early. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize Francis C. David of the county of Harris, and George W. Fackler, of the county of Marion, to practice medicine and to charge and collect for the same, and to authorize Austin W. Berry, of the county of Hancock, to prepare, compound and sell drugs. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the 981, 1040, sections of the Code of Georgia, also to suspend during the war sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992, 993 of said Code.

        The Senate took up the special order to-wit:

        The majority and minority reports of the joint special committee upon the subject of State indorsement of Confederate bonds.

        Mr. Mitchell moved for leave to publish a speech which he had prepared on the "special order" as if delivered, without consuming the time of rehearsing the same.

        On motion, the special order was postponed to 11 o'clock, A. M. to-morrow.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The roll being called there was no quorum in consequence of the absence of, without leave, the Doorkeeper, Messenger, and the following Senators:

        Alexander, Anthony, Beasley, Bothwell, Boyd, Dyer, Echols, Fort, Gaston, [with leave,] Gordon, [with leave,] Hansell, Harris, Kendall [with leave,] King, Lewis, [with


Page 95

leave,] McRae, Mitchell, Seward, Shewmake, [with leave,] Smith, [with leave,] Stafford, [with leave,] Stephens, Vason, Ware, [with leave.]

        A quorum having appeared the Senate proceeded to business.

        The Senate took us as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal what is usually called the stay law so far as relates to debts and liabilities which have or may be created for rents of houses and lands passed on the day of Nov. 1860.

        The passage of this bill with an amendment in the nature of a substitute was recommended by the Judiciary Committee to whom it had been referred.

        Mr. Pinckard moved to amend by striking out all after the word "fieri facias" when it first occurs to the word "provided" where it first occurs.

        Mr. Vason offered an amendment in the nature of a substitute for the substitute.

        Mr. Griffin moved to lay the whole matter upon the table; this motion did not prevail.

        On motion of Mr. Swearingen, the bill was recommitted to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize teachers of common schools of this State to charge and collect fifty per cent for their services on the customary amounts heretofore allowed such teachers in their respective localities, for the year 1863.

        Mr. Mitchell offered the following amendment in the nature of a proviso, that no male teacher between the ages of 45 and 18 shall be entitled to the benefit of this act.

        On motion, this bill was indefinitely postponed.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate the following acts, to-wit:

        An act to amend the charter of the Brunswick and Albany Rail Road Company.

        An act to provide for the proper administration of the estate of Singleton S. Trawick, deceased. Also a resolution calling on his Excellency the Governor, for certain information relative to the office of Adjutant and Inspector General of this State.

        The rule being suspended, the Senate took up so much of the message of the House as relates to the impressment of slaves.

        This resolution was concurred in, and the President appointed on said committee on the part of the Senate, Messrs. Vason and Harris.


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        The following message was received from the House of Representotives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President.: The House of Representatives have adopted a resolution upon the subject of cotton planting, providing for the appointment of a joint committee to consider the same, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate, and have appointed as such committee on their part, Messrs. Stephens, of Hancock, Hester and Norwood, and I am instructed to transmit the same to the Senate.

        The House has also concurred in the resolution of the Senate providing for the appointment of a joint committee to audit the claims of the Hon. David Irwin, for superintending the publication of the Code of Georgia, and have appointed as such committee on the part of the House, Messrs. Culberson, Love and Cabaniss.

        The rule being suspended, the Senate took up so much of the message of the House as relates to joint resolution respecting the planting of cotton.

        On motion, this resolution was concurred in and the Senate appointed on said committee on the part of the Senate Messrs. Furlow and Hansell.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to make uniform the laws of this State for the compensation of Grand and Petet Jurors, the collection of costs, and for other purposes.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate an insurance company in the town of Fort Gaines, to be called the Chattahoochee Insurance Company.

        The report was agreed to; the bill was read the 3d time and passed.

        The following bill was taken up and read the second time:

        A bill to repeal and amend a part of section 4220 of the Code of Georgia.

        The rule being suspended, the following House bill was taken up and read the second time:

        A bill to amend an act passed November 28th, 1861, entitled an act to fix the compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes.

        Leave of absence was granted to Mr. Lane and Mr. Gibson after Saturday next.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 9½ o'clock, A. M. tomorrow.


Page 97

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 8TH, 1863,
9½ O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Smith.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State to appoint trustees in certain cases therein mentioned, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Dyer, Chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following act and resolution of the House, to-wit:

        An act to authorize the Superior Courts of this State to appoint persons to assign and set off dower, and to prescribe the mode of proceeding therein.

        Also, the resolutions on the subject of cotton planting in this State.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal and amend a part of section 4220 of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Jackson moved to postpone this bill indefinitely. This motion was not agreed to.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to confirm to the Confederate States of America the occupancy and use of certain lands in the county of Richmond.

        A bill to incorporate the Georgia Locomotive and Coal Company.

        The Senate took up the special order for 10 o'clock, A. M., to-wit: the subject of State indorsement of Confederate debt.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have adopted a resolution to compensate the Hon. David Irwin for superintending the publication of the Code of Georgia, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate; and I


Page 98

am instructed to transmit the same to the Senate forthwith.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President--

        A resolution of the House to appoint a joint committee of the House of Representatives and the Senate to report permanent regulations in regard to the impressment of slaves under the recent acts of the Confederate Congress on that subject.

        On motion, the special order was postponed to 3 o'clock, P. M., instant, and the reading of bills for the second time resumed, to-wit:

        A bill to incorporate the town of Fort Gaines in the county of Clay, to define its jurisdictional limits, and for other purposes therein mentioned.

        A bill to charter and incorporate a bank in the city of Augusta by the name and style of the Traders' and Importers' Bank.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Gibson offered the following resolution:

        Whereas, The cotton bill having been finally disposed of and the immediate necessity for the assemblage of the General Assembly having now been acted upon, it is therefore,

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That the called session of this General Assembly will adjourn to-morrow, the 9th instant, at 12 o'clock, M., sine die.

        The reading of bills the second time was resumed.

        A bill to define the liability of the Western & Atlantic Railroad for injuries done to persons and property, and to extend the provisions of the act entitled an act to define liabilities of the several Railroad companies of this State for any injury to persons or property; to prescribe in what counties they may be sued, and how served with process, approved March 5th, 1856.

        A bill to relieve certain soldiers who now are or hereafter may be in the military service of the Confederate States, or of the State of Georgia, from the payment of taxes.

        A bill for the relief of Mary E. Cannon and Mary A. Price.

        A bill for the relief of deceased soldiers.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        A bill to incorporate the Chestatee River and Town Creek Gold Mining Company.

        A bill to incorporate the Confederate Coal Mining Company.

        A bill to incorporate the Augusta and Dahlonega Mining Company.


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        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill for the relief of the Cherokee Insurance and Banking Company.

        A bill for the relief of Andrew Hamilton, of Whitfield county.

        A bill to raise the fees of Jailors in this State.

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to repeal an act to compensate managers of elections in Warren, Chattooga and Greene counties, and for other purposes, approved December 19th, 1859, so far as relates to the county of Chattooga.

        A bill to alter and amend the second section of an act entitled an act to define the liabilities of the several Railroad companies of this State for injuries to or destruction of live stock, killed or injured, or for destruction of or injury or damage to property other than live stock, by the running of cars, engines, locomotives, or other machinery upon a railroad in this State, assented to Feb. 20th, 1854.

        A bill to add lot of land No. 46 to the 30th district of originally Lee now Schley county to the county of Sumter.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Harris and Talbot.

        A bill to authorize J. W. C. Cook, James D. Pittard, R. Nickerson, and their associates, to open and navigate the North Oconee River.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M., instant.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        Leave of absence granted to Mr. Boyd on account of indisposition.

        The Senate proceeded to the consideration of the special order of the day.

        After discussion, on motion, the special order was postponed until 10 o'clock to-morrow.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Harris reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to authorize Austin Berry, of Hancock county, to prepare and vend drugs and medicines, and to do all other things pertaining to said branch of business, as a regularly licensed druggist.

        The message of the House so far as relates to the joint resolution to compensate Hon. David Irwin for superintending


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the publication of the Code of Georgia, on motion, this resolution was laid upon the table for the present.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to alter and amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain, &c.

        On motion this bill was taken up by sections.

        Mr. James R. Brown offered the following amendment, which was agreed to, to-wit:

        For each day or part of a day that he, she or they shall violate this act, or the act of which this is amendatory.

        Mr. Harris offered the following amendment, which was agreed to, to-wit: Strike out "fifteen" and insert "twenty."

        Mr. Swearingen offered the following amendment, which was not agreed to, to-wit: Strike out "twelve months after the war."

        Mr. Gibson offered the following amendment, which was not agreed to--to add "for their own use not to exceed ten gallons to each family."

        Mr. Gibson offered the following amendment, which was not agreed to:

        Provided nothing in this act shall prevent the Inferior Courts of this State from licensing druggists in their respective counties to manufacture such quantities of alcohol as may be necessary in the preparation of medicine."

        The first section as amended was agreed to.

        Mr. Killen offered the following amendment:

        Strike out all of 2d section after the words "public good" in the 8th line, and insert "and issue license therefor upon the terms of the act of which this is amendatory."

        Upon the question of agreeing to this amendment, the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 10; nays 18.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Beasley, Gibson, Griffin, Jamison, Killen, Lane, Smith, Swearingen, Vason, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Anthony, Benson, J. R. Brown, Dyer, Fletcher, Hansell, Harris, Hill, James Hilliard, Thos. Hilliard, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Simmons, Stephens.

        Yeas 10; nays 18. So this amendment was not agreed to.

        Mr. Seward offered the following amendment: Strike out "by and with the advice of three or more competent physicians," &c.

        This amendment was agreed to.


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        Mr. Vason offered the following amendment, which was not agreed to: "to make a report to the Governor of the quantity or quality of spirits distilled."

        Mr. Gibson offered the following amendment, which was lost:

        After the word "establish," add "if any court licenses more to be stilled in any county than one-half gallon to each person in said county over five years of age."

        The second section as amended was agreed to.

        Mr. Seward called for the previous question. The call was seconded. The main question was ordered to be put.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock to-morrow morning.

THURSDAY, APRIL 9th, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Tucker.

        Mr. Jackson moved to reconsider so much of the Journals of yesterday as relates to the passage of the bill to alter and amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain, &c.

        This motion did not prevail.

        The President laid before the Senate a communication from Dr. E. B. Ridley respecting an improved fire arm, which was read, and, on motion, referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Beasley offered the following resolution:

        Resolved by the General Assembly, That the Journals of the last day's regular session of the Legislature be turned over to the State printer for publication, being hereby confirmed and approved.

        Mr. Dyer reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to amend the laws of this State in relation to the selection of jurors in civil and criminal cases.

        Mr. Furlow reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to add an additional section to the 8th division of the penal code, further defining the offence of conspiracy, and prescribing a penalty for such offence.

        The Senate took up the special order for 10 o'clock, A. M., to-day.


Page 102

        Mr. Vason offered the following amendment:

        Strike out "five hundred millions" and insert "two hundred millions;" strike out "fifty eight millions one hundred and thirty-nine thousand three hundred and twenty-five dollars and fifty-eight and six forty-third cents" and insert "twenty-three millions two hundred and fifty-five thousand eight hundred and thirteen dollars and ninety-five and fifteen eighty-sixth cents."

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the auditing and payment of claims against the State of Georgia in favor of persons who have heretofore furnished guns to the troops of said State, by the authority of the State, and which have not been returned to said persons.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to authorize David Dickson and Henry Rogers, executors of the estate of John Dickson, late of Hancock, deceased, to sell the real estate of said deceased known as the homestead tract, and to invest the proceeds of such sale.

        Also, the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Atlanta & Roswell Railroad Company.

        The joint committee to whom was referred a resolution requiring them to report a plan for establishing regulations by which impressments of slaves should be made in this State by Confederate authority, have had the same under consideration, and your committee beg leave to report, that the committee are of opinion, from the great diversity and contrariety of views entertained in either branch of the General Assembly on this subject, as evinced in the many discussions which have arisen thereon, as well as by the abortive efforts of four several committees to report a satisfactory plan for impressment, that there is no possibility of agreement on this subject, either in this house or between the two branches of the General Assembly:

        And whereas, it may be thought by some that the resolutions adopted by this General Assembly, and approved on the 14th Nov., 1862, regulating the hiring or impressment of slaves for work on the defenses of Savannah, are still of force:

        And whereas, the work for which said labor is required does not admit of delay; therefore be it

        Resolved, That the resolutions passed by the General Assembly and approved Nov. 14th, 1862, authorizing the hiring or impressment of slaves to work on the defenses around Savannah, be, and the same are hereby rescinded.

        2d. Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be, and


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he is hereby requested to inform the General commanding this department, that he can proceed at once, under the act of Congress providing for impressment of slaves, to obtain the laborers required for the works around Savannah.

(Signed)

D. A. VASON,
Ch'n Senate Committee.

T. M. NORWOOD,
Ch'n House Committee.


        The Senate rescinded the consideration of the special order, and, on motion, postponed to 10 o'clock, A. M., tomorrow morning.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have adopted the following resolutions, to-wit:

        Resolutions in relation to impressment of laborers for the defenses of Savannah; and I am instructed to transmit the same forthwith to the Senate.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following act of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to incorporate the Atlanta and Roswell Railroad Company.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to regulate the transportation of provisions on the several railroads in this State, and to punish officers and agents who may violate the provisions of this act.

        The passage of this act was recommended by the joint committee on transportation, to whom it had been referred.

        Mr. Furlow offered the following amendment, which was agreed to, to-wit:

        Add after the word "agents," "having control of transportation from any point."

        Mr. Hansell offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Provided the party seizing has the right under the law to seize the articles so seized.

        Mr. Hansell offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Insert at the proper place, "from and immediately after the passage of this act."

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

To the General Assembly of Georgia:

        The joint special committee appointed to examine into and report upon the condition of the Quartermaster's and


Page 104

Commissary's Department of the State of Georgia, beg leave to report, that a meeting of your committee was appointed to be holden in Atlanta, the headquarters of the Quartermaster and Commissary Generals, on the first Monday in February last, which was subsequently postponed, on account of the prevalence of small pox in that city, to the 17th February; that the committee met in said city to prosecute their labors on the last mentioned day, but finding the small pox largely on the increase, they adjourned to reassembly on the 24th March, giving themselves one month before the re-assembling of the Legislature, trusting that by that time, as indeed proved to be true, there would be a considerable subsidence of that dangerous and loathsome disease.

        The convening in extra session of the Legislature has prevented a further meeting, and your committee respectfully ask further instructions as to the wishes of the General Assembly in the premises; adding only, that in the opinion of your committee, a faithful discharge of their duties imposed by the resolution will occupy them from twenty to thirty days.

ANDREW J. HANSELL, Ch'n,

M. W. LEWIS,

JOHN M. JACKSON,

A. T. BURKE, Ch'n House Com.

ROBERT HESTER,

SAMUEL SHEATS,

MILTON A. CANDLER.


        On motion, the above committee were relieved from any further action in the premises.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the town of Fort Gaines in the county of Clay, to define its jurisdictional limits, and for other purposes therein specified.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to charter and incorporate a bank in the city of Augusta by the name and style of the Traders' & Importers' Bank.

        The report was agreed to. Upon the question, shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 23; nays 5.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Anthony, Beasley, Benson, Wm. M. Brown, Fletcher, Furlow, Gaston, Gibson, Hansell, Harris, Hill,


Page 105

Jackson, Jamison, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Shewmake, Simmons, Swearingen, Vason, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Boyd, J. R. Brown, James Hilliard, Thos. Hilliard, Killen.

        Yeas 23; nays 5. So the bill was passed by the constitutional majority of two-thirds, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith to the House.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3½ o'clock, P. M.

3½ O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to relieve certain soldiers who now are or hereafter may be in the military service of the Confederate States, or of the State of Georgia, from the payment of taxes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the Confederate Coal Mining Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the Augusta and Dahlonega Mining Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to incorporate the Chestatee River and Town Creek Gold Mining Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill for the relief of Mary E. Cannon and Mary A. Price.

        On motion, this bill was laid on the table for the present.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--


Page 106

        A bill to incorporate the Georgia Locomotive Engine and Tool Works.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to confirm to the Confederate States of America the occupancy and use of certain lands in the county of Richmond.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for the relief of the Cherokee Insurance and Banking Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up the resolution relating to an adjournment sine die.

        Mr. Gibson moved to amend by striking out 9th inst. and insert in lieu thereof Friday next.

        On motion, this resolution was adopted.

        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to authorize Austin W. Berry, of Hancock county, to prepare and vend drugs and medicines, and to do all other matters and things pertaining to said branch of business, as a regularly licensed druggist.

        A bill to amend 2041 section of the Code of Georgia, limiting the liability of common carriers.

        House bill to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Association of the city of Columbus.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Killen reported the following bill, which was read the first time:

        A bill to relieve William J. Anderson, of the county of Houston, and other persons, from the pains and penalties of the laws of this State against the issuing and circulating of change bills, upon certain conditions, and for other purposes.

        The Senate resumed the reading of House bills for the second time:

        A bill to define the qualification of voters at the elections to be held in the city of Columbus for Mayor and Aldermen and other officers in said city whose election is given to the people by law, and to provide for the registry of all persons entitled to vote for city officers in said city, &c.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the first time:

        A bill to amend the 981st and 1040th sections of the


Page 107

Code of Georgia, and to suspend during the war sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990 and 993 of said Code.

        A bill to authorize David Dickson, and Henry Rogers, executors of the estate of John Dickson, late of Hancock county, deceased, to sell the real estate of said deceased known as the homestead tract, and to invest the proceeds of said sale.

        A bill to authorize Francis C. David, of the county of Harris, and George W. Fackler, of the county of Marion, to practice medicine and charge and collect for the same; and to authorize Austin W. Berry, of the county of Hancock, to prepare, compound and sell drugs.

        A bill to authorize the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State to appoint trustees in certain cases therein mentioned, and for other purposes.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Miller and Early.

        A bill to authorize the auditing and payment of claims against the State of Georgia in favor of persons who have heretofore furnished guns to the troops of said State by the authority of the State, and which have not been returned to said persons.

        Mr. Gibson offered the following resolution:

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That his Excellency the Governor be, and he is hereby authorized and required to furlough all the troops now in the State service, except such portion as may be necessary to guard the bridges on the State Road, after the first of June until the first of January next, unless the position of the enemy and the defense of the State should, in his judgment, require them to be called out at an earlier day.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock, A. M., to-morrow.

FRIDAY, APRIL 10, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by Mr. Crawford

        The following Message was received from his Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--I am directed by the Governor, to deliver to the Senate a message in response to a joint resolution, calling on his Excellency for certain information relative to the office of Adjutant and Inspector General.


Page 108

        The Senate resumed the consideration of the special order to-wit:

        The indorsement by the State of the Confederate States debt.

        Mr. Jackson offered the following amendment in the nature of a substitute for the majority and minority reports of the joint special committee, to-wit:

        A bill for the purpose of Confederate loan by the State of Georgia to the Confederate States of America, which was read the first time.

        Mr. Pinckard offered the following resolution:

        Whereas, there is a diversity of sentiment in the Senate upon the subject of the State's indorsing the bonds of the bonds of the Confederate Government; and whereas unanimity of sentiment and harmony of action is much to be desired:

        Be it therefore resolved, That the majority and minority reports and also the bill now before the Senate, reported by the majority on that subject, and all amendments, substitutes and resolutions, be referred to a committee of five for the purpose of devising and reporting a plan that will unite the sentiment and secure the harmonious action of the Senate as near as possible.

        And resolved further, That said committee report as early as possible.

        Mr. James Hilliard offered the following as a substitute for the resolutions offered by Mr. Pinckard, to-wit:

        Resolved by the General Assembly, That the whole question of indorsement of Confederate bonds by the State of Georgia, be referred to a decision of the people to be decided by them on the 1st Wednesday in October next, and that the whole question now under consideration be laid upon the table.

        Mr. Lewis offered the following as a substitute for the above substitute, which was accepted, to-wit:

        Whereas, the subject of State indorsement of the Confederate debt was not considered by the voters of Georgia in the election of members of this General Assembly; and whereas, unlike all other new questions which the emergency of the existing war have brought before the General Assembly for their determination, a step forward in this new enterprise cannot be retraced, but on the contrary a failure to take this step can be remedied by our successors; and whereas none of the Confederate States have adopted the policy of State indorsement unconditionally except South Carolina, but on the contrary, the States of Alabama and Florida by the terms of their resolutions in view of the subsequent action by the Legislature of Texas are released from any obligation to indorse, which was imposed upon their States by said resolutions; and whereas, the State of


Page 109

Mississippi as required by her Constitution has submitted the question of indorsement to a vote of her people, therefore,

        Resolved, That in the next election of members of the General Assembly in Georgia, the voters of the State, and soldiers in the service legally entitled to vote, be and they are hereby requested to express their views upon this great and important question at the ballot box by indorsing on their ballots "indorsement" or "no indorsement," as they may deem proper, and that such expression of their opinions be considered by the succeeding Legislature in order that they may take such action in the premises as their judgment and patriotism may dictate.

        Mr. Mosely offered to amend said resolution by bringing on such expression of the opinion of the people, to take place by election on the first Wednesday in July next.

        This motion was not agreed to.

        Mr. Pinckard moved to amend by inserting on their ballot after the word "indorsement" and State credit, or no indorsement and no State credit.

        Upon the question of agreeing to this amendment the yeas and nays were recorded and were yeas 7, nays 26.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Boyd, Wm. M. Brown, Furlow, Mosely, Pinckard.

        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Benson, James R. Brown, Fletcher, Gaston, Gordon, Griffin, Hansell, Harris, Hill, James Hilliard, Thomas Hilliard, Jackson, Jamison, Kendall, Killen, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Seward, Shewmake, Simmons, Smith, Stephens, Swearingen, Vason, Wright.

        Yeas 7 nays 26. So the amendment was not agreed to.

        Upon the question of adopting the substitute offered by Mr. Lewis as amended, the yeas and nays were recorded and were yeas 25 nays 10.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Benson, Boyd, Wm. M. Brown, J. R. Brown, Fletcher, Gaston, Gordon, Griffin, Hansell, Harris, Hill, James Hilliard, Thomas Hilliard, Jackson, Jamison, Killen, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Seward, Simmons, Smith, Stephens, Swearingen, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Dyer, Furlow, Gibson, Kendall, Mosely, Pinckard, Shewmake. Vason.

        Yeas 25, nays 10. So the resolution was adopted.


Page 110

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Campbell and Fayette.

        They have also passed the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Blanceville Slate Mining Company of the county of Polk, and for other purposes.

        The House has also concurred in the amendments of the Senate to the bill of the House, entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors in this State.

        The House has also concurred in a resolution of the Senate in relation to raising the pay of private soldiers and non-commissioned officers in the Confederate army, with an amendment in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate, and I am instructed to transmit the same to the Senate forthwith.

        The House of Representatives have also passed the following bill to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Cassville Female College, located in the town of Cassville, Georgia, and to incorporate the Cherokee Baptist College located at the same place and to confer on the Commissioners of Cassville, the power to grant license to retail ardent spirits and for other purposes, and to prevent the forfeiture of the charter of said Colleges and for other purposes, and I am instructed to transmit the same to the Senate forthwith.

        On motion the Senate adjourned to 3½ o'clock, P. M.

3½ O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize Austin W. Berry, of Hancock county, to prepare and vend drugs and medicines and to do all other matters and things pertaining to said branch of business as a regularly licensed druggist.

        Mr. Harris moved to amend said bill as follows: add after the words "prepare and vend drugs" the words "in Hancock county only."

        This motion was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.


Page 111

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President the following act of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to incorporate the Blanceville Slate Mining Company of the county of Polk, and for other purposes.

        A bill to be entitled an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors within this State, approved November 22d, 1862.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed resolutions to rescind the resolutions of 25th Nov. 1862, authorizing the seizure of factories, tanneries, &c., and I am directed to transmit the same forthwith to the Senate.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend 2041 section of the Code of Georgia, limiting the liability of common carriers.

        On motion, this bill was referred to the committee on the Judiciary.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill for the relief of Mary E. Cannon and Mary A. Price.

        Mr. Mitchell offered an amendment in the nature of a substitute which was agreed to, to-wit:

        A bill to declare the liabilities of the Western and Atlantic Rail Road for damages done in running locomotives, cars and other machinery thereon; to regulate the mode of bringing suits therefor, and to declare suits brought for the same since the adoption of the Code, legal and valid.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following bills were taken up and read the second time:

        A bill to amend the laws of this State in relation to the selection of jurors in civil and criminal cases.

        A bill to add an additional section to the eight division of the Penal Code further defining the offense of conspiracy and prescribing a penalty for such offense.

        The Senate took up the message relating to a resolution to compensate the Hon. David Irwin for superintending the publication of the Code of Georgia.

        On motion, this resolution was concurred in.

        The message from the Governor was taken up and a communication from him read as follows:


Page 112

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Milledgeville, Ga., April 10TH, 1863.

To the General Assembly:

        Your resolution has been communicated to me, calling for the information in my possession touching the necessity for a longer continuance of the office of Adjutant and Inspector General of this State.

        While I am not aware that I possess any important information upon this subject which is not common to the General Assembly, and to all intelligent citizens of this State who have any knowledge of military offices, I do not suppose there can be a doubt upon the mind of any one who has any connection with the military system and operations of the State, that the office is a very important one, especially during the continuance of the war.

        It is the duty of the Adjutant and Inspector General to keep a fair record of all orders which he shall from time to time receive from the Commander-in-chief; to require annual returns from the Major and Brigadier Generals of the State, from which he shall make out a general return of the whole strength of the militia force of this State, and make out accurate abstracts of these returns, with exhibits, &c., &c., and to issue all military commissions. This includes the commissions of all militia officers to fill vacancies in regiments, battalions or companies from this State, now in the service of the Confederate States, which entered the service under the requisition of the President.

        All military orders are issued through the Adjutant and Inspector General; and it is his duty to attend all public reviews when the Commander-in-chief shall review any part of the forces. It is also his duty to inspect and keep under his charge the arsenals and armories of the State. All orders to the State troops are issued through, and all commissions by, the Adjutant and Inspector General.

        In addition to these and the other duties of his office proper, not here enumerated, the present General Assembly, at a former session, has made it his duty to prepare a book in which shall be recorded the name of every citizen of this State who has entered the military service during this war, with a statement of the number and names of all who have been killed, wounded, &c.

        The preparation of this book of honor, which will be a most important record for the State, will cost him and two or three clerks several months of labor. As there is no complete record of the names of those who have gone into service from the State, at Richmond, owing to the confusion which has grown out of the overwhelming pressure upon the departments there, and none could be kept in the State on account of the irregular manner in which many of the


Page 113

troops entered the service, I shall be obliged to send an aid de camp to visit the regiments upon the field, and get the information necessary to complete the record from the regimental and company rolls.

        If it is asked whether all this labor now required of the Adjutant and Inspector General could not be performed at the Executive office without the assistance of that officer, I reply that it could not, without an increase of the number of assistants in the Executive office, which would cost about as much as it costs the State to have the work done as it now is, under a regular military system. So great is the pressure of business in this office, I am obliged, in addition to two Secretaries, to employ a recording clerk, and to keep on duty part of the time, an aid de camp to assist in the military and other correspondence. It is impossible to keep up the business of the office without such assistance. I may add, that I know of no State in the Confederacy that does not have and employ an Adjutant and Inspector General.

JOSEPH E. BROWN.


        The rule being suspended, Mr. Gordon reported the following bill which was read the first time:

        A bill to extend the charter of the Washington Fire Company of the city of Savannah.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the line between the counties of Harris and Talbot.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the 3d time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to raise the fees of jailors in this State.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to repeal an act to compensate managers of elections in Warren, Chattooga and Greene counties, and for other purposes, approved Dec. 19, 1859, so far as relates to the county of Chattooga.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following House bills were taken up and read the second time:

        A bill to authorize David Dickson and Henry Rogers, executors of the estate of John Dickson, late of Hancock, deceased, to sell the real estate of said deceased, known as the homestead tract, and to invest the proceeds of such sale


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        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for the relief of Andrew Hamilton, of the county of Whitfield.

        Mr. Hansell moved to amend said bill by striking out all of the preamble after the word "kidnapping" in the tenth line to the word "and" in the fourteenth line.

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time, and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to add lot of land No. 46 in the 30th district originally Lee now Schley county to the county of Sumter.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to authorize J. W. C. Cook, James D. Pittard, R. Nickerson and their associates to open and navigate the North Oconee river.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to alter and amend the second section of an act entitled an act to define the liabilities of the several Rail Road Companies of this State for injuries to or destruction of live stock killed or injured or for destruction of or injury or damage to property other than live stock, by the running of cars, engines, locomotives or other machinery upon a Rail Road in this State, assented to Feb. 20, 1854.

        Mr. Mitchell offered to amend said bill by inserting between the words "State" and "shall" in the third line of the second page, the words, "the Western and Atlantic Rail Road included."

        This amendment was agreed to.

        Mr. Griffin moved to amend by adding a section.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to amend the act passed November 28th, 1861, entitled an act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers therein, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to.

        Upon the question, shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 19, nays 9.


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        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Benson, Wm. M. Brown, Dyer, Fletcher, Gaston, Griffin, Hansell, Hill, Jamison, Kendall, Killen, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Seward, Simmons.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Gibson, James Hilliard, Thos. Hilliard, Mosely, Pinckard, Shewmake, Stephens, Vason, Wright.

        Yeas 19, nays 9. Se the bill was passed.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the first time:

        A bill to amend an act to incorporate the Cassville Female College, located in the town of Cassville, Georgia, and to incorporate the Cherokee Baptist College, located at the same place, and to confer on the Commissioners of Cassville the power to grant license to retail ardent spirits, and for other purposes, and to prevent the forfeiture of the charter of said Colleges, and for other purposes.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Campbell and Fayette.

        Mr. Seward chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report, having had the following bill under consideration, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to make uniform the laws of this State for compensation of Grand and Petit Jurors, the collection of costs, and for other purposes, report back a substitute in lieu of the original bill, and recommend it do pass. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act to grant relief to the banks and people of this State, &c., passed on 30th November, 1860, report back a substitute in lieu of the original and recommend it do pass.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to make uniform the laws of this State for the compensation of Grand and Petit Jurors, the collection of costs, and for other purposes.

        The Judiciary Committee to whom this bill had been referred reported the same back to the Senate, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute and recommend that as amended, the said bill do pass.

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal what is usually called the stay law so far as relates to debts and liabilities which have or may be created


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for rents of houses and land, passed on the day of Dec. 1862, and for other purposes.

        The Judiciary Committee to whom this bill was referred reported the same back to the Senate with an amendment in the nature of a substitute, and recommend that said bill as amended do pass.

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Hansell reported the following bill which was read the first time:

        A bill to authorize John A. C. Anderson a minor of eighteen years to administer on the estate of John A. G. Anderson, late of Cobb county, deceased.

        This bill was accompanied by a petition signed by divers citizens urging its passage.

        The resolution offered by Mr. Gibson relating to furloughing State troops was taken up.

        Mr. Benson moved to postpone this resolution indefinitely. This motion was not agreed to.

        Mr. Hansell offered an amendment for this resolution in the nature of a substitute, which was accepted, to-wit:

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That his Excellency the Governor be and he is hereby authorized to grant furloughs either in whole or in part to the State troops now in service, without rations during such furlough at any time from and after the first of May next for any period he may think proper, in his discretion, to be reassembled under his order as the exigencies of the service may require.

        The resolution as amended was agreed to.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Association of the city of Columbus.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize Francis C. David, of the county of Harris, and George M. Fackler, of the county of Marion to practice medicine and to charge and collect for the same, and to authorize Austin W. Berry, of the county of Hancock, to prepare, compound and sell drugs.

        Mr. Mitchell moved to amend said bill by extending its provisions to Dr. Rufus Barker of the county of Floyd.

        This amendment was accepted.

        On motion, this bill was indefinitely postponed.

        On motion, leave of absence was granted to the Messenger until Tuesday morning next.


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        Leave of absence was granted to Mr. Vason and Mr. Furlow until Tuesday morning next.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 10 o'clock, A. M. to-morrow.

SATURDAY, APRIL 11TH, 1863.
10 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by the Reverend Mr. Hawkins.

        Mr. Wm. M. Brown moved to reconsider so much of the Journals of yesterday as relates to the rejection of a bill to authorize Francis C. Daniel, of the county of Harris, and others to practice medicine &c.

        This motion was agreed to.

        On motion this reconsidered bill was taken up as the report of the committee of the whole.

        Mr. Wm. M. Brown moved to amend said bill by restricting its provisions alone to Dr. Daniel.

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

Mr. President:

        --The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to enable the Coroners of this State te hold inquests in certain cases with juries consisting of six men.

        On motion the call of the roll for the introduction of new business was dispensed with.

        Mr. Thomas Hilliard reported the following bill which was read the first time:

        A bill to incorporate the Georgia Agricultural Implement and Lumber Manufacturing Company.

        On motion leave of absence was granted to Mr. Jamison after Tuesday next.

        The Military Committee to whom was referred the message of his Excellency the Governor in reference to the joint resolution of the General Assembly calling on him for the information in his possession touching the necessity for a longer continuance of the office of Adjutant and Inspector General of this State have had the same under consideration and beg leave to report that, in their opinion, the response of his Excellency is full and satisfactory touching the information sought for by the resolution, and it is further the opinion of your committee with their knowledge


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of the duties of said office, that its continuance during the existing war at least, is not only a necessity but indispensable to the requirements of the military establishment of State.

        All which is respectfully submitted.

(Signed)

SAMUEL D. KILLEN, Ch'n.


        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill for the relief of deceased soldiers' widows.

        Mr. Seward moved to amend as follows:

        "And be it further enacted, That where any widow or family shall remove from the county where they resided at the time of the passage of the act of which this is amendatory, they shall be entitled to the same benefits under said act as if they had not removed, and shall receive their proportion of the fund from the county from whence they removed.

        This amendment was accepted.

        On motion of Mr. Jackson, this bill was indeffinitely postponed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend the laws of this State in relation to the selection of jurors in civil and criminal cases.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to relieve William J. Anderson of the county of Houston, and other persons, from the pains and penalties of the laws of this State against the issuing and circulating of change bills, upon certain conditions, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the concurrence with an amendment of the House to Senate resolution relating to raising the pay of private soldiers and non-commissioned officers in the Confederate Army.

        On motion the resolution as amended was agreed to.

        Mr. Lewis offered the following resolution:

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of Georgia, That the ability and success with which the Chief Magistrate of the Confederate States of America has discharged the duties devolved upon him by his high and responsible office, have commanded the admiration and secured the confidence of his countrymen, and Georgia hereby pledges herself to furnish all the means at her disposal to


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enable him to bring to a successful termination the cruel and unjust war now being waged upon her citizens.

        On motion this resolution was agreed to, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Military Committee to whom was referred a communication in writing from his Excellency the Governor to the General Assembly, in relation to a report of Col. Henry C. Wayne upon the imperfections of the militia laws of this State, as contained in the new Code, and having had the same under consideration with accompanying documents, report the same back with a bill to revive and declare of force the militia laws of this State prior to the first day of January, 1863, and recommend it do pass. (This bill was read the first time.)

        Also, a resolution requiring the appointment of the Adjutant General of this State to prepare a system of militia Laws to be presented to the General Assembly for its consideration and action at its next session, and having considered the same recommend it do pass.

(Signed)

S. D. KILLEN, Ch'n.


        The rule being suspended the resolution above named was taken up, read and adopted and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

Report of the Joint Committee on Transportation.

        The joint committee of the Senate and House of Representatives on Transportation, have had under consideration the matters referred to them by the General Assembly. We most sincerely concur with his Excellency the Governor of the State, in the important suggestions he so eloquently and feelingly presents in his message on this subject. The question of transportation is one of painful interest when considered with reference to the supply of bread, meat, salt and other necessaries to the people of the needy sections of Georgia; but its proportions and magnitude become vast when considered with reference to the general interests of the Confederacy and the final success of our cause. The supply of the rolling stock and machinery of our several Rail Roads, and the condition of their road beds, is such that, unless measures are taken to meet their necessities, the days of transportation by rail in the Confederacy are numbered. We are glad to have been informed by the intelligent and patriotic R. Road managers of the State, in the interesting conference the committee had with them, that there are steps that can be taken which will not only ameliorate the condition of the country, but which if promptly adopted and industriously pursued, will improve our Rail Roads and insure their continued usefulness. In this work it will be necessary to have the co-operation and favor of both the Confederate and State Governments.


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        The Governor and the managers of most of the Rail Roads of the State having been present at our deliberations, partaking in them freely by our invitation, many subjects of necessary supply, and plans to obtain the same, were discussed; and abuses materially interfering with the success of transportation were brought to our knowledge. Prudential considerations render it improper that we refer to these in detail; but believing that his Excellency is fully imbued with a sense of the importance of this subject, and that the willingness of the State to render aid and encouragement will be met by the R. R. companies with a determination to make every effort ingenuity can devise and industry accomplish, to keep up their needful supplies and business, and thus preserve their status as highly respectable and useful institutions of the country, we unanimously recommend the adoption of the following resolution:

        Resolved, That the Governor is hereby requested to appoint a commissioner to repair to Richmond with plenary powers, to confer with the President and other officers of the Confederate Government upon subjects touching the providing of supplies for Rail Roads and the regulation of transportation thereon.

CORN SUPPLY.

        The problem presented by this subject, is how to supply the needy of the northern part of the State with grain from the southern part of the State. The roads leading from the suffering regions into southern Georgia, in the opinion of the officers managing them, are able to carry 133,333 bushels of corn per month. These gentlemen declare their painful sense of the condition of our citizens, and pledge to do all they can to increase their carriage for them and prevent suffering. In this the managers of other roads concur. Of this amount, it is calculated that as much as 100,000 bushels per month will be needed by the Confederate Government for the army, leaving 33,333 to be supplied from the South Western R. Road and Macon and Western R. Road. The Central R. R. and Geo. R. R. companies are also heavily engaged in carrying corn to the more eastern counties, and the Atlanta and Westpoint Road, is taking out corn from the region along its line. We are glad to have been assured that the supply may be reasonably expected to be sent forward in time to prevent actual want. But all that can be done consistent with other necessities should be done. It is suggested that agents to purchase corn carry with them a certificate of the Inferior Court of their respective counties under seal of the county, that their errand is to buy for supply, and be prepared to make affidavit to that effect, also that they should not all seek one market, but so distribute their purchases as to keep each and every agency of transportation


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that can be commanded to the work in active and regular employment. We notice with pleasure the fact that the Governor has sent a train from the Western and Atlantic R. R. to engage in this work, and unanimously recommend the following resolution:

        Resolved, That the action of the Governor in sending a train from the W. and A. R. Road to South Western Georgia, to transport corn and other supplies to the suffering people of northern Georgia, meets our most hearty approval. We request him to continue the train on the work during such time as he may find it necessary, and also to adopt such other regulations and arrangements as, in his judgment, the exigencies of the case may require. We but express the sentiments of every Georgian when we say, these people are our people--with them we will live or with them we will die--their fate shall be our fate.

SALT SUPPLY.

        Your committee are informed that there are now at Saltville, Virginia, awaiting shipment to Georgia, as much as 40,000 bushels of salt, the product of the furnaces erected and worked under the contract made by Hon. John W. Lewis, under direction of the Governor, and by the Planters' Salt Company, and the Georgia Salt Company, and that the manufacture of salt for supply in Georgia is daily progressing at that place. The Governor has set apart a train to be sent from the Western and Atlantic R. Road to Saltville, to transport the salt to Georgia and carry needful supplies for their furnaces. As the rate of daily manufacture is large, say 1500 bushels per day, further arrangements so soon as practicable, will probably be found necessary. We are informed that some negotiations are pending with intermediate R. Roads, on the subject of transportation. Without proposing to act disrespectfully to the committee on salt supply, we unanimously recommend the following resolution:

        Resolved, That we approve the action of the Governor, in relation to sending a special train, with a good engine and cars to Saltville, for the transportation of salt, made under the contract of Hon. John W. Lewis and the Planters' Salt Manufacturing Company, and Georgia Salt Company for supply to Georgia, and of taking needful supplies to the furnaces making the same. He is further authorized and requested to make all such contracts and arrangements with R. R. companies, as he may deem proper to facilitate transportation and to procure and send such other engine, and train or trains, as he may deem the exigencies of the work demand, having due regard to other calls for transportation.

CARS OF THE WESTERN AND ATLANTIC RAIL ROAD ON OTHER
ROADS.

        Your committee are informed that in doing transportation


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rendered indispensable by necessary requirements of the Confederate service, more than 100 cars have been taken off the road which are not yet returned. It is highly important that they be again placed in possession of the road if practicable. We learn too, that the Governor has permitted a train to be used for the military service and benefit of the citizens along the route on the Brunswick and Gulf R. Road: Therefore we unanimously recommend the following:

        Resolved, That the action of the Governor and general Superintendent of the Western and Atlantic R. Road, in permitting the cars of the road to leave it for the benefit of the Confederate service, is hereby approved as patriotic and right, but, it being highly important that the same should be returned if practicable, we request the Governor to send out a special agent to find said cars, wherever they may be scattered on the several roads of the Confederacy, unless used then in service of Georgia, and to bring them, or so much and such parts thereof as may be advantageous to Georgia, with power to sell or otherwise dispose of such as cannot be brought back.

        Resolved, That the action of the Governor and Superintendent of the W. and A. R. R. in permitting an engine and cars to be used on the Brunswick and Gulf R. R., for the benefit of citizens along the line and convenience of military authorities, is hereby approved; and the Governor is hereby requested, under any arrangement with the officers of the road, satisfactory to himself, to permit the train to remain so long as, in his judgment, it may continue to subserve the public good and aid in the common defense.

ESTABLISHMENTS TO REPAIR AND AID IN FURTHER SUPPLYING
ROLLING STOCK.

        The committee learn with pleasure that there are several establishments now in operation in Georgia, and others projected for this necessary object. Without proposing any invidious distinctions, we mention the establishment of Messrs. Laughborough & Timmons at Augusta, for the manufacture and repair of car wheels, axles, &c., and an enterprise projected by Mr. McNeill, and other citizens to provide supplies for R. R. companies, to be located at Macon or Atlanta, or some other convenient place. We unanimously recommend the following:

        Resolved, That the Governor is hereby requested in the management of the W. and Atlantic R. R. to furnish to the works of Messrs. Laughborough & Timmons, and such other works as are erected or may hereafter be erected to furnish R. R. supplies, such special facilities of transportation for coal, iron and other supplies as may be in his power, and consistent with other demands on the road.


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REGULATIONS OF CERTAIN RAIL ROADS AS TO CONTRACTS LIMITING
THEIR LIABILITIES AS COMMON CARRIERS.

        Your committee are of the opinion that it is unwise, unless in cases of extreme and unusually great risk beyond the power of prudent management to control, for R. Road companies to propose and make any contract limiting their well understood liability as common carriers. They notice with pain that this has been done by several R. Road companies in Georgia, and by the Western and Atlantic R. Road. The committee recommend the passage of the bill herewith submitted, as well as the bill referred to the committee touching this important subject. It is due to several members of the committee, to state that the passage of this bill is not unanimously recommended.

WM. M. BROWN, Chairman.


        A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the transportation of provisions on the several Railroads in this State, and to punish officers and agents who may violate the provisions of this act; read the first time.

        On motion the Secretary of the Senate was required to disregard the order requiring him to transmit forthwith to the House, a bill to amend the laws of this State in relation to the selection of jurors in civil and criminal cases.

        Mr. Jackson moved to reconsider so much of the Journals of to-day as relates to the passage of the above bill.

        The President decided said motion out of order. The rule prescribing that the Journals of one day could only be reconsidered on the day succeeding.

        An appeal was taken from this decision. The chair was sustained.

        The following bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to authorize John A. C. Anderson a minor of eighteen years to administer on the estate of John A. G. Anderson late of Cobb county, deceased.

        A bill to extend the charter of the Washington Fire Company of the city of Savannah.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to authorize David Dixon and Henry Rogers, Executors of the estate of John Dickson, late of Hancock county, deceased, to sell the real estate of said deceased known as the homestead tract, and to invest the proceeds of such sale.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to define the qualifications of voters at the


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elections to be held in the city of Columbus for Mayor and Aldermen, and other officers in said city, whose election is given to the people by law, and to provide for the registry all persons entitled to vote for city officers in said city.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to amend the 981st and 1040th Sections of the Code of Georgia, and to suspend during the war sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993 of said Code.

        A bill to amend an act to incorporate the Cassville Female College located in the town of Cassville, Georgia, and to incorporate the Cherokee Baptist College located at the same place, and to confer on the Commissioners of Cassville the power to grant license to retail ardent spirits, and for other purposes, and to prevent the forfeiture of the charters of said Colleges, and for other purposes.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Campbell and Fayette.

        A bill to authorize the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State to appoint trustees in certain cases therein mentioned, and for other purposes.

        A bill to authorize the auditing and payment of claims against the State of Georgia in favor of persons who have heretofore furnished guns to the troops of said State, by the authority of the State, and which have not been returned to said persons.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Miller and Early.

        The following House bill was read the first time:

        A bill to enable the Coroners of this State to hold inquests in certain cases with juries consisting of six men.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to a resolution of the House respecting the adjourned and extra sessions, and the order of business laid on the table for the present.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to House resolutions to rescind the resolutions of 25th November, 1862, authorizing the seizure of factories, tanneries, &c.

        On motion this resolution was concurred in.

        Mr. James Hilliard offered the following resolution:

        Whereas, a diversity of opinion exists among the Justices of the Inferior Courts of the several counties of this State, as to the distribution of the fund for support of indigent families of soldiers, and, whereas, manifest injustice has been done in certain instances by excluding altogether from the benefits of the munificence of the State all families unless they are utterly penniless and beggared:


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        Resolved by the General Assembly of Georgia, That the Inferior Courts of the several counties in this State, in disbursing the funds appropriated under the act December 13th, 1862, shall not confine their distributions only to such families as are utterly penniless, but shall in their discretion assist all indigent and needy families under the operations of the above named act.

        On motion the Senate adjourned to 9½ o'clock, A. M. Monday next.

MONDAY, APRIL 13TH, 1863.
9½ O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by Rev. Mr. Quillian.

        Mr. Harris moved to reconsider so much of the Journals of Saturday as relates to the indefinite postponement of a bill for the relief of widows of deceased soldiers.

        This motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Alexander moved to reconsider so much of the Journals of Saturday as relates to the concurrence in a House resolution rescinding the resolution of Nov. 25th, 1862, authorizing the seizure of tanneries and factories, &c., &c.

        The motion to reconsider prevailed.

        On motion, the rules were suspended, and the Senate took up the reconsidered bill for the relief of the widows of deceased soldiers.

        Mr. Jackson moved a substitute to the first section.

        Pending this, Mr. Mosely moved to refer this bill to a special committee of three.

        The motion prevailed, and the President appointed as said committee, Messrs. Mosely, Harris and Jackson.

        On motion, the Senate took up the reconsidered resolution touching the rescinding of the resolution of Nov. 25th, 1862, relating to the seizure of factories, tanneries, &c.

        Mr. J. R. Brown moved to lay the resolution on the table. The motion prevailed.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following resolution of the Senate, to-wit:

        A resolution relative to raising the pay of private soldiers and non-commissioned officers in the Confederate army.

        An act for the relief of the Cherokee Insurance and Banking Company.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:


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        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Ordinary of Harris county to grant letters of administration with the will annexed on the estate of William R. Blackman, late of Harris county, deceased, to Maria and Sanford Blackman.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the third clause of the seven hundred and thirty-ninth section of the Code of Georgia.

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the guarantee by the State of Georgia of the bonds of the Confederate States of America, so far as to guarantee her proportionate share of the sum of two hundred millions of dollars.

        A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of Turner Brown, of Bibb county, and John A. Jones, of Polk county.

        A bill to be entitled an act to grant the use of certain grounds in the Macon reserve to the Macon & Brunswick Railroad Company and the Milledgeville Railroad Company, for depot purposes, with the consent of the city of Macon.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the oath of taxpayers of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes.

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Governor to refund to parties or corporations any sums of money which may have been expended in obstructing navigable streams in this State against the incursions of the enemy.

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Griffin Fire and Marine Insurance Company, of Griffin, Georgia.

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the times and places of holding the Supreme Court of this State, and for other purposes.

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Stonewall Insurance Company, and for other purposes.

        The House of Representatives have concurred in the Senate amendments to the following bills of the House of Representatives, to-wit:

        A bill for the relief of Andrew Hamilton, of the county of Whitfield.

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act, passed on November 28th, 1861, entitled an act to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes.

        A bill to alter and amend the second section of an act entitled an act to define the liabilities of the several Railroad companies of this State for injury to or destruction of live stock killed or injured, or for destruction of or injury or damage to property other than live stock, by the running of cars, engines, locomotives, or other machinery upon


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any Railroad of this State, approved February 20th, 1854.

        The House of Representatives have also adopted a substitute for the Senate bill to be entitled an act to provide for the perfecting of titles to land when parties die and leave bonds out for titles; in which they respectfully ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives have adopted the following resolution, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate, to-wit:

        A resolution in relation to furnishing spun yarn to the families of indigent soldiers.

        And have also passed the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to legalize returns to Floyd Superior and Inferior Courts at the spring term thereof, 1863, and for other purposes.

        The House of Representatives refuse to concur in the action of the Senate discharging the joint committee appointed at the last session to examine into and report upon the Quartermaster and Commissary Departments of the State of Georgia.

        Mr. Seward, chairman of the Judiciary Committee, made the following report:

        The committee have had under consideration the following bill, to wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal and amend a part of section 4220 of the Code of Georgia. Report the same back, and recommend it do not pass.

        Mr. Brown, chairman of the Committee on Salt Supply, made the following report:

REPORT OF THE JOINT COMMITTEE ON SALT SUPPLY.

        The joint committee on salt supply, to whom was referred the Governor's message touching the manufacture of salt and its transportation to Georgia, having considered the subject, report that they are informed that on the first of April instant, there was as much as 40,000 bushels of salt at Saltville, Virginia, made for supply of Georgians and awaiting transportation. The daily manufacture at that place for consumption in this State is large, say about 1500 bushels, so that it may be reasonably expected, if successful transportation arrangements are accomplished, that we will get for consumption in Georgia from that source, during the approaching season, as much as 275,000 bushels.

        Upon the best information your committee can gather, and careful estimates based thereon, the people of Georgia,


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before this war, consumed as much as 700,000 bushels per annum. It will therefore, be perceived, that, even taking into consideration the salt that may be made at Saltville, by other companies and individuals not making under sanction of the State government, for special supply at cost prices in Georgia, but which may be brought to Georgia for sale, what we may reasonably expect to get from Virginia will fall considerably short of reaching an amount sufficient for supply. It will do much good towards regulating the market and relieving the people, but it ought not to be relied upon to meet all the necessities of our people. This amount ought to be increased

        If reliable arrangements for transportation could be made, your committee would recommend an increase of the salt manufacture at Saltville. We take pleasure in bearing testimony to the fidelity with which we are informed Messrs. Stuart, Buchanan & Co., have observed and performed the obligations of their previous contracts made with the State, through her agent Hon. John W. Lewis, and the companies working under sanction of the State. It may be found that these gentlemen will consent to increase the quantity of water they are already obligated to furnish under the contracts above referred to, and provided transportation facilities were sufficiently reliable, we would recommend that that course be adopted. We hope that these gentlemen will continue to deserve the confidence of the people and render the salt wells which, under Providence, have fallen into their possession, of the greatest good to the greatest number of the citizens of the Southern Confederacy. Thus they can best serve the country and advance the success of our common cause. While we recommend that his Excellency, under the authority of the law passed at the last session of this General Assembly, shall keep a watchful eye to our interests in Virginia, and feel confident that he will, we are nevertheless convinced that a resort to the sea-coast should not be neglected or delayed.

        After due consideration of all the facts we have been able to collect, we are glad to feel thoroughly satisfied that we are right in stating that, in our opinion, coast operations, though involving some risk are practicable. Many companies and individuals from middle and southern Georgia, have, during the last season, tried making salt both on the Atlantic and the Gulf coast; and they have tried it successfully. While it might be difficult for large operations to be conducted at any one point, yet experience demonstrates that even as many as two or more counties may co-operate successfully for their own home supply. Individuals too may enter upon the work without organization, for it requires but little capital. It requires labor, energy, enterprise, such as we feel confident Georgians will exercise.


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At first it was found that there were many difficulties in making salt advantageously from the water of the ocean. But experience in the management of the works, the proper application of heat and the adoption of wells has resulted in greatly improving the yield of the works that have been erected. We therefore most earnestly recommend our people to turn their attention, without delay to the coast. This policy energetically and wisely pursued, will greatly promote the public weal; and, success crowing all the works now in progress and which patriotic enterprise shall put into operation, our beloved State will be saved from want on account of scarcity of salt.

        The scarcity of kettles of proper sizes may be found materially to interfere with the success of these enterprises. It is deemed proper therefore for us to suggest that there are foundries that may be relied upon to cast kettles in most, if not all the cities in Georgia, and also at the iron works in northern Georgia; one great difficulty will be to obtain the necessary metal, out of which to make the kettles. This difficulty should be met if possible without calling upon the Confederate Government for iron supply, so as to allow furnaces and foundries under government contracts to furnish metals to facilitate the accomplishment of the object suggested. Should the people in any section of Georgia enter upon the work of mining iron, it would be an important step not only as subsidiary to the matter in hand, but also as materially affecting the general interests of the State. We are glad to know it is practicable to make iron and that the people in several of the counties of the State are embarking on this work for their own supply. This example we respectfully suggest for the emulation of all Georgians. But in the event of failure thus to get the supply of iron in time, we do not doubt but that the Confederate Government, upon proper application would permit the use of so much of the iron contracted for by its officers as would be needful to be used in making kettles.

Senate Com.

WM. M. BROWN,

D. N. SMITH,

House Com.

B. H. BIGHAM,

RICH'D. S. NEAL,

R. J. COCHRAN,


        Resolution authorizing the Governor to modify the contract with M. S. Temple & Co. for the manufacture of salt, at Saltville, Virginia.

        The committee concur with the report of the Committee on Transportation, so far as the same refers to the transportation of salt, and in addition thereto, recommend the following:


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        1st. Resolved, That the Governor is hereby requested, in the management of the Western & Atlantic Railroad, to give every encouragement in his power to salt making on the coast, by all special facilities for transportation consistent with other demands on the road, either by sending special trains, or cars, as exigencies may require, or by giving, in the regular operations of the road, reasonable preference to shipments directly needful to the making of salt on the coast and its transportation to the interior, and also by giving encouragement to efforts that may be made by citizens to obtain iron and kettles for that purpose.

        Resolved, 2ndly, That we request and authorize the Governor to modify the contract made by Hon. John W. Lewis, as agent of Georgia, with M. S. Temple & Co., for the manufacture of salt at Saltville, provided, in such agreement as he may make for increase of the compensation of said M. S. Temple & Co., he shall not exceed the payment of two dollars per bushel of 50 lbs, to said contractors, such increased pay not to continue longer than until a treaty of peace between the Confederate States and the United States of America; this compensation to embrace all salt made and delivered since the first day of January, A. D., 1863; and provided further, that the Governor bind said M. S. Temple & Co., in suitable stipulations, to regularly make and deliver to the State the full complement of five hundred bushels per day, and providing for payments in currency; provided, that the Governor shall not absolutely guarantee transportation either of supplies or of salt; and provided further, that upon the happening of any future event materially affecting the work, the Governor is hereby authorized to make with said contractors such arrangements as will secure, in his discretion, either that they will promptly deliver the works to another agent, to be conducted for the State, or that they will go on and make and deliver salt promptly and punctually, and without loss to them.

        Resolved, 3d, That the Governor is hereby requested to pay to the agent of Georgia at Saltville, for receiving and forwarding salt, such remuneration for his services as may be found just, after full examination into his duties, and the pay he is now receiving, not to exceed $2,500 per year.

        Which was taken up, read, adopted, and one hundred copies ordered printed for the use of the Senate.

        The rules being suspended, Mr. Mitchell introduced a bill to be entitled an act to relieve Mrs. M. A. F. Snead, formerly Mrs. M. A. F. Graham, from the pains and penalties of bigamy, which bill was read the first time.

        Mr. Hansell reported a bill to authorize and empower the Mayor and Council of every city and town in this State to purchase lands inside or outside of their corporate limits,


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for cemeteries and other public uses of said corporations, which bill was read the first time.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to be entitled an act to compel the planting of provision crops in this State during the present existing war with the abolitionists.

        On motion, the bill was laid on the table for the balance of the session.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to extend the charter of the Washington Fire Company of the city of Savannah.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to repeal and amend a part of section 4220 of the Code of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and lost.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize John A. C. Anderson, a minor of eighteen years, to administer on the estate of John A. G. Anderson, late of Cobb county, deceased, &c.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following bills were severally taken up and read the second time, to-wit:

        A bill to revive and declare of force the militia laws of this State prior to the first of January, 1863.

        Also, a bill to incorporate the Georgia Agricultural Implement and Lumber Manufacturing Company.

        The bill was referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole the following House bill:

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Miller and Early.

        The bill was laid on the table for the present.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The message from the House of Representatives asking concurrence in a House amendment to a Senate bill to provide for the perfecting of titles to land when parties die and leave bonds out for titles.

        The bill was referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--


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        The House bill to authorize the auditing and payment of claims against the State of Georgia in favor of persons who have heretofore furnished guns to the troops of said State by the authority of the State, and which have not been returned to said persons.

        Mr. Mitchell moved to amend the first section by adding,

        And provided further, that in all cases where the gun or guns may have been delivered to the agent or officer, and a receipt given for the same, specifying the price agreed upon, the same shall be evidence of the value of the gun or guns, and where no price is specified in the receipt, the affidavit of the party of the value thereof, shall be sufficient; provided further that the party shall swear that the gun has not been returned to him or his agent.

        The amendment was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Griffin, the word "interest," wherever it occurs in the bill, was stricken out.

        On motion of Mr. Jackson, the words "Comptroller General" were stricken out wherever they occur in the bill and the words "Adjutant General" inserted in lien thereof.

        Mr. J. R. Brown moved to amend by inserting in the caption and body of the bill words which will extend the provisions of the bill so as to make it applicable to those also who furnished guns to the Confederate authorities, which motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Lewis moved to amend by adding an additional section, to-wit:

        And be it further enacted, That in case the party named in this act be dead, the representative of his estate, or some other party who can do so, be authorized to make said affidavit, which when made shall have the same force and effect as if made by the deceased were he then living.

        The motion was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The rules being suspended, Mr. Seward introduced the following resolutions, which were read:

        Resolved by the General Assembly, That we approve of the principle of taxation recommended and set forth by R. M. T. Hunter, chairman of the Committee on Finance in the Senate of the Confederate States; that while we recognize it as a system of extraordinary taxation, we are equally sensible of the fact that the war that we are now engaged in is of the greatest magnitude. A tax upon products in kind and upon income and certain species of property is the most convenient mode of taxation, and will be less felt than a direct tax in value. It will avoid large issues of Treasury notes; it will lessen the volume of circulation; it will furnish a just scale of prices, because the value fixed upon


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products which are collected as taxes, affords a fair price to the producer. The products in kind will furnish the largest proportion of supplies for the army. It will check speculation in provision and prevent them from forcing the Government to pay five fold prices for what it purchases. It will restore confidence and credit and enable the Government to fund its debts and retire the circulation, until its volume is reduced to an amount only commensurate with the commercial wants and business of the country. We invoke the patriotism of the people to a faithful adherence to this system of taxation, when adopted. We must bear the burdens if we intend to be free.

        Mr. Gordon reported the following resolutions:

        Whereas, In the judgment of this General Assembly, the traffic of private citizens with foreign countries is one of the prime causes of the depreciation of the Confederate currency, and the consequent high prices of the necessaries of life;

        And whereas, In the opinion of this General Assembly, the largest portion of the cotton exported and of the goods imported inure directly or indirectly to the benefit of the abolitionists of New England;

        And whereas, This tribute to Yankee greed is abhorrent to the mind of every true patriot, sustains the trade of our detested foes, and demoralizes our citizens; therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of Georgia. That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be, and they are hereby requested to secure the passage of such a law as shall prevent "the running of the blockade," either by land or by water, during the existence of the present war, by any person whatsoever, except under the direct control and for the exclusive benefit of the Government of the Confederate States.

        Mr. Mitchell introduced the following resolutions:

        Whereas, It is the deliberate opinion of this General Assembly, that the running of Lincoln's blockade by our merchant vessels has resulted substantially in more benefits to the Lincoln Government than to the Confederacy, and in which benefit the English people have largely participated, particularly in the traffic in the article of cotton; and that the illicit trade is demoralizing to our people who are engaged in it; it being a fact well understood that few vessels are captured by the blockading fleet other than such as contain cargoes contraband of war; be it therefore

        Resolved, That a stop as far as possible ought to be put to this illicit traffic with the enemy, other than for articles contraband of war, and not only with the enemy, but with all foreign nations, as long as they refuse to recognize us an independent nation.


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        2d. That the Congress of the Confederate States be requested to take the subject into their serious and deliberate consideration, and if they concur with this General Assembly, that they be respectfully requested to adopt such measures, or pass such laws as in their judgment may be best calculated to arrest this growing evil.

        3d. That his Excellency the Governor be requested to forward copies of this preamble and these resolutions to the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives of the Confederate States, with a request that the same be laid before their respective bodies.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The House bill to change the line between the counties of Campbell and Fayette.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The House bill to amend an act to incorporate the Cassville Female College, to incorporate the Cherokee Baptist College, and to confer on the commissioners of the town of Cassville the power to grant the power to retail ardent spirits, and for other purposes; and to prevent the forfeiture of the charter of said colleges, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The House bill to authorize the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State to appoint trustees in certain cases therein mentioned, and for other purposes.

        The bill was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The House bill to amend the 981st and 1040th sections of the Code of Georgia, and to suspend during the war sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993 of said Code.

        The bill was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

        On motion, the rules were suspended, and the resolutions offered by Mr. Gordon were taken up read and adopted.

        The Senate then took up the following bills, which were read the first time, to-wit:

        A bill to authorize the Ordinary of Harris county to grant letters of administration with the will annexed on the estate of William R. Blackman, late of Harris county, deceased, to Maria and Sanford Blackman. Also,

        A bill to authorize the guarantee by the State of Georgia


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of the bonds of the Confederate States of America, so far as to guarantee her proportionate share of the sum of two hundred millions of dollars. Also,

        A bill for the relief of Turner Brown, of Bibb county, and John A. Jones, of Polk county. Also,

        A bill to grant the use of certain grounds in the Macon reserve to the Macon & Brunswick Railroad Company and the Milledgeville Railroad Company, for depot purposes, with the consent of the city of Macon.

        The Senate took up on its second reading the bill to enable the Coroners of this State to hold inquests in certain cases with juries consisting of six men.

        The Senate then took up resolutions of the House relative to the impressment of laborers to work on the defenses of Savannah.

        On motion, the Senate adopted a substitute for the Senate resolutions relative to the impressment of laborers for the defenses of Savannah, and, on motion, the said substitute was read and adopted.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3½ o'clock, P. M.

3½ O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        Mr. Dyer, Chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following acts and resolution, to-wit:

        An act to raise the fees of Jailors in this State.

        An act to compensate managers of elections in Warren, Chattooga and Greene counties, and for other purposes.

        An act to authorize F. W. C. Cook, James D. Pittard, R. Nickerson, and their associates, to open and keep open the North Oconee river, and to navigate the same.

        An act for the relief of Andrew Hamilton of the county of Whitfield.

        An act to change the line between the counties of Harris and Talbot.

        An act to alter and amend the second section of an act entitled an act to define the liabilities of the several Railroad Companies of this State for injuries to or destruction of live stock.

        An act to amend an act passed on November 28th, 1861, entitled an aet to fix the salaries and compensation of certain officers mentioned therein, and for other purposes.

        An act to add lot of land No. 46 in the 30th District of, originally Lee now Schley county to the county of Sumter.


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        An act to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Association of the city of Columbus.

        Also, a resolution to, compensate the Hon. David Irwin for superintending the publication of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following act of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to legalize returns to Floyd Superior and Inferior Courts at the spring terms thereof, 1863, and for other purposes.

        The Senate took up the following bills, which were read the first time:

        A bill to change the times and places of holding the Supreme Court of this State, and for other purposes.

        Also, a bill to incorporate the Stonewall Insurance Company, and for other purposes.

        Pending this order, the President announced that he had upon his table a communication in writing.

        On motion, it was read, and was as follows:

To the Honorable the President and Members of the Senate:

        In testimony of respect and esteem for the dignity and wisdom of your honorable body, these bouquets are humbly presented with the compliments of

MRS. R. H. HOWELL,

MISS SUE EDWARDS.


        On motion of Mr. Hansell, a committee of three was appointed to make a fitting response on the part of the Senate.

        The committee are Messrs. Hansell, Gordon and Wm. M. Brown.

        On motion, all unmarried gentlemen of the Senate were added to said committee, and are President Billups, Messrs. Smith, Kendall and Jamison.

        The Senate then took up the message of the House in relation to its resolution in relation to furnishing spun yarn to the families of indigent soldiers.

        The resolutions were taken up and read.

        The Senate then adjourned to 9½ o'clock, A. M., to-morrow.

TUESDAY, APRIL 14TH, 1863.
9½ O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment and was opened with prayer by the Reverend Mr. Mosely.


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        On motion, leave of absence from Thursday next, was granted to Mr. Thomas Hilliard.

        On motion, Mr. James Hilliard was excused on account of sickness.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the several laws of force in this State, in relation to issuing grants on Head rights, so as to extend the time for granting the same until the 25th Dec. 1863, and to allow purchasers in possession of lands surveyed and returned to the Surveyor General's office, to grant the same, and for other purposes.

        A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of Nathan Singletary and William Mims of the county of Schley.

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act to punish all owners of slaves and Guardians of free persons of color, and said slaves and free persons of color in the counties of Warren and Taliaferro for said owners and Guardians allowing said slaves and free persons of color to live alone and to permit the same, assented to on the 22d Dec. 1857.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate the following acts, to-wit:

        An act to define the qualifications of voters at the elections to be held in the city of Columbus for Mayor and Aldermen and other officers in said city, and for other purposes.

        Also an act to authorize David Dickson and Henry Rogers, executors of the estate of John Dickson, late of Hancock county, deceased, to sell the real estate of said deceased, known as the homestead tract and to invest the proceeds of such sale.

        Mr. Mitchell, chairman of the Committee on the Manufacture of Cotton Cards, submitted the following report:

        Your committee have investigated the matters submitted to them and beg leave to report, and ask that a joint committee be raised to whom the Governor's communication heretofore made to the Senate on the subject, with the accompanying documents be referred, and that your committee be discharged from the further consideration of said subject, and your committee beg leave to submit the following resolution:

        Resolved, That a joint committee of three from the Senate and five from the House be appointed for the purpose of investigating all matters and things in relation to the Card


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Manufactory, to whom the Governor's communication and accompanying documents be referred, and that said committee have power to examine witnesses on oath and to send for persons and papers.

        Mr. Mitchell, Senator from the 41st District, also reported a memorial from Messrs. Divine, Jones and Lee, touching the subject matter of said report, which was read.

        Mr. Mitchell moved the adoption of the report.

        Mr. Seward moved to lay the whole matter--the report and the memorial on the table for the balance of the session.

        On this motion, the yeas and nays were demanded.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Beasley, Benson, Boyd, James R. Brown, Dyer, Fletcher, Gaston, Gibson, Gordon, Griffin, Harris, Thomas Hilliard, Jackson, Killen, Lewis, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake, Simmons, Smith, Stephens, Swearingen, Ware, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Wm. M. Brown, Hill, Jamison, McRae, Mitchell, Vason.

        Yeas 25, nays 6. So the motion to lay on the table prevailed.

        Mr. Seward, chairman of the Judicary Committee made the following report, having had the following bills under consideration, the committee report as follows, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State, to appoint trustees in certain cases therein mentioned, and for other purposes, report the same back with recommendation it do not pass. Also,

        A bill to provide for executing titles to lands in certain cases, report the same back with recommendation it do not pass. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the 2041 section of the Code of Georgia, and report the same with an amendment and recommend that the same do pass.

        On motion, the rule was suspended and the Senate took up the report of the Judiciary Committee on the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to authorize the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State to appoint trustees in certain cases therein mentioned, and for other purposes.

        The report of the committee was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and lost.

        Also, a bill to provide for the perfecting of titles to land where parties die and leave bonds out for titles.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and lost.

        Also, a bill to amend the 2041st section of the Code of Georgia.


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        The Judiciary Committee to whom this bill was referred reported as a substitute in the nature of an amendment the following, to-wit:

        A bill to compel common carriers to give a preference to consumers in the shipment of certain articles.

        Mr. Beasley call for the previous question upon the bill under consideration.

        The call for the previous question being sustained, the main question was ordered to be put.

        The main question was will the Senate agree to the report of the Committee on the Judiciary?

        The report was disagreed to.

        The Senate took up the original bill to-wit:

        A bill to amend the 2041st section of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Vason moved to amend by inserting after the words undried fruit, the words, or other like articles of a perishable nature and liable to waste. This amendment was agreed to.

        Mr. Vason moved to amend by adding an additional section, to-wit:

        Be it further enacted, That it shall not be lawful for any Express Company in this State to refuse to receive or carry any article of property usually carried by such company, which may be tendered to the agent for that purpose, shall not charge for compensation a greater amount than one hundred per centum on the price usually charged by the Rail Roads over which such article has been transported, and for any violation of this law or any failure to comply with their contracts, such company shall be liable to be sued in any county in this State in which any agent of such company may do business, for double the amount of the value of such articles tendered or entrusted to it, which shall stand for trial at the first term of such Court; Provided such Express Company may shew for a refusal to receive any article that Rail Road transportation could not be procured.

        The amendment was agreed to.

        Mr. Hansell, chairman of the special committee to tender the thanks of the Senate for the presentation of boquets, made the following report:

Senate Chamber of Georgia,
Milledgeville, 15th April, 1863.

        LADIES.--We are charged with the very agreeable duty of acknowledging in behalf of the Senate, the reception of your flattering Note and exquisitely beautiful boquets.

        Permit us then to convey to you our high appreciation of these most acceptable gifts, and the assurance of our grateful thanks. Engaged in the sterner duties of legislation, which in this crisis of our beloved country so absorb our


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thoughts, it is a delightful relief to be thus summoned back for a time from these labors to the atmosphere of lovely woman by these fit emblems of her own spotless purity and irresistible charms.

        With sentiments of the highest esteem, we have the honor to remain gratefully your friends,

ANDREW D. HANSELL,
Chm'n.

GEORGE A. GORDON,

WILLIAM M. BROWN,

S. G. JAMISON,

O. N. SMITH,

J. B. KENDALL.

Mrs. R. H. HOWELL,
Miss SUE EDWARDS,
Milledgeville, Ga.

        On motion, the report was taken up, adopted and ordered to be communicated by the Secretary.

        Senate resumed the consideration of the bill, &c, when

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment and took up the unfinished business of the morning which was a bill to amend the 4021st section of the Code of Georgia.

        Mr. Mitchell moved to recommit the bill, which was rejected.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills which I am directed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act supplemental to an act assented to on the 13th day of December, 1862, to provide for raising a revenue for the political year 1863, and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and to make certain special appropriations and for other purposes therein mentioned.

        A bill to be entitled an act to make an additional appropriation to the fund for the support of pauper patients in the State Lunatic Asylum for the year 1863, and further to appropriate a sum of money for the special and express purpose alone of providing the means to enable the authorities of the institution to purchase, during the fall or winter seasons, when favorable opportunities present, supplies of provisions and clothing for the ensuing year.

        The House of Representatives have also instructed me to


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inform the Senate, that they have unanimously concurred in the Senate resolution expressive of confidence in the President of the Confederate States, and have directed me to transmit the same forthwith to the Senate.

        They have also concurred in the Senate amendment to the following House bill which I am directed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize Francis C. David, of the county of Harris in this State, to practice medicine and to charge and collect for the same.

        The House of Representatives has taken the following action on the amendments of the Senate to the bill of the House to be entitled an act to authorize the auditing and payment of claims against the State of Georgia, in favor of persons who have heretofore furnished guns to the troops of the State, and which have not been returned to said persons, and I am instructed to transmit said action to the Senate, to-wit:

        The House refuses to concur in the first and second amendments to said bill and they respectfully ask the Senate to recede from the same.

        The House concurs in the third, fourth, fifth, and sixth amendments to said bill.

        The House of Representatives refuse to concur in the substitute of the Senate for the resolutions of the House of Representatives, "in relation to the impressment of laborers to work on the defenses of Savannah," and they respectfully ask the Senate to recede from the same.

        The Senate resumed the consideration of the regular order and upon the question shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded and were yeas 17, nays 15.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Benson, Wm. M. Brown, James R. Brown, Gaston, Jackson, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Simmons, Smith, Stephens, Vason, Ware, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Anthony, Dyer, Echols, Gibson, Gordon, Griffin, Hansell, Harris, Hill, Thomas Hilliard, Killen, Lewis, Seward, Shewmake, Swearingen.

        Yeas 17 nays 15. So the bill was passed.

        The Senate then proceeded to the reading of House bills, and the following were read the first time:

        A bill supplemental to an act assented to on the 13th day of December, 1862, to provide for raising a revenue for the political year 1863, and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and to make certain


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special appropriations and for other purposes therein mentioned. Also,

        A bill to make an additional appropriation to the fund for the support of pauper patients in the State Lunatic Asylum for the year 1863, and further to appropriate a sum of money for the special and express purpose alone of providing the means to enable the authorities of the institution to purchase during the fall, &c., provisions for the ensuing year. Also,

        A bill to repeal the act to punish all owners of slaves and guardians of free persons of color, &c., in the counties of Warren and Taliaferro, for said owners and guardians allowing said slaves and free persons of color to live alone, &c. Also,

        A bill to amend the several laws of force in this State relative to issuing Head right grants, so as to extend the time for granting the same until the 25th December, 1863, and for other purposes, &c. Also,

        A bill for the relief of Nathan Singletary and William Mims, of the county of Schley. Also,

        A bill for the relief of all incorporated cities and towns in this State. Also,

        A bill to grant to the city of Columbus the North, South and East commons of said city, and to authorize the Mayor and Council to survey and sell the same on such terms as they may prescribe and to apply the proceeds of said sale to the redemption of its bonds and interest thereon. Also,

        A bill to fix the compensation of members to the next General Assembly.

        The message of the House was taken up on the bill to authorize the auditing and payment of claims for guns, &c., furnished to the State troops, &c., in which the House refused to concur in Senate amendments.

        On motion, the Senate adhered to its amendments.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled and act to fix the compensation of members of the next General Assembly, and I am directed to transmit the same forthwith to the Senate.

        The Senate took up the message from the House of Representatives refusing to concur in the Senate resolutions relative to the impressment of laborers for the defenses of Savannah.

        The Senate adhered to its original action.

        Senate then took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to revive and declare of force the militia laws of this State prior to the first of January, 1863.


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        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate then took up the following Senate bills which were severally read the second time:

        A bill to authorize and empower the Mayor and Council of every city and town in this State to purchase lands inside or outside of their corporate limits for cemeteries and other public uses of said corporations. Also,

        A bill to relieve Mrs. M. A. F. Graham from the pains and penalties of bigamy, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Hansell from the Committee on the Judiciary made the following report from said committee.

        I am instructed by the Judiciary Committee to report back to the Senate the accompanying bill to add an additional section to the eighth division of the Penal Code, further defining the offense of conspiracy and prescribing a penalty for such offense, with the recommendation that it do not pass, and further to report the accompanying bill to the Senate for its action without recommending its passage or rejection.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill to add an additional section to the eighth division of the Penal Code further defining the offense of conspiracy and prescribing a penalty for said offense.

        The bill reported by Mr. Hansell of the Judiciary Committee, to-wit:

        A bill to add an additional section to the eighth division of the Penal Code of this State was offered as a substitute in the nature of an amendment.

        The amendment was adopted.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed and ordered to be transmitted forthwith to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following acts, to-wit:

        An act to amend an act to incorporate the Cassville Female College located in the town of Cassville, Georgia, and to incorporate the Cherokee Baptist College, located at the same place and confer on the Commissioners of Cassville the power to grant license to retail spirits, &c. Also,

        An act to alter and change the line between the counties of Campbell and Fayette, &c.

        Mr. Dyer, Chairman, of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President the following resolution of the Senate, to-wit:

        Resolution expressive of confidence in the President of the Confederate States.


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        Mr. Mosely from the special committee to whom the bill was referred reported back the bill for the relief of widows of deceased soldiers with an amendment and recommend that it do pass.

        The bill was taken up.

        Mr. Jackson moved as a substitute for the amendment reported by the special committee the following which was agreed to:

        That the justices of the Inferior Courts of the several counties of this State may grant relief to such indigent family or persons whenever in their judgment such support ought in justice to be granted out of the funds in their hands for the support of indigent families of soldiers.

        Mr. Seward moved to amend by adding an additional section:

        And be it further enacted, That where any widow or family shall remove from the county where she or they resided at the time of the passage of the act of which this is amendatory, they shall be entitled to the same benefits under said act as if they had not removed, and shall receive their proportion of the fund from the county from whence they removed.

        The amendment was received.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed and ordered to be transmitted forthwith to the House of Representatives.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to grant to the corporation of the city of Columbus the North, South and East commons of said city and to authorize the Mayor and Council of said city, to have said commons surveyed into lots, and to sell the same on such terms and conditions as may be prescribed by said Mayor and Council and to apply the proceeds arising from the sale of the same, to the payment of the bonds and interest, issued by said corporation in aid of the several Railroads in which said corporation has subscribed for stock. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of all incorporated cities and towns in this State, and I am instructed to transmit the same forthwith to Senate.

        The Senate then took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The House bill to enable the Coroners of this State to hold inquests in certain cases with juries consisting of six men.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.


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        The Senate took up House resolutions relative to furnishing spun yarns to the families of indigent soldiers.

        The resolution was concurred in.

        The Senate then took up the following House bills which were severally read the second time:

        A bill to authorize the Ordinary of Harris county to grant letters of administration with the will annexed on the estate of William R. Blackman, late of said county, deceased, to Maria and Sanford Blackman. Also,

        A bill to amend the oath of tax payers of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes. Also,

        A bill to guarantee by the State of Georgia the bonds of the Confederate States of America so far as to guarantee her proportionate share of the sum of two hundred millions of dollars. Also,

        A bill to amend the third clause of the seven hundred and thirty-ninth section of the Code of Georgia. Also,

        A bill to grant the use of certain grounds in the Macon reserve to the Macon and Brunswick Railroad Company and the Milledgeville Railroad Company for Depot purposes with the consent of the city of Macon. Also,

        A bill to incorporate the Griffin Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Griffin. Also,

        A bill to change the time and places of holding the Supreme Court of this State and for other purposes. Also,

        A bill to incorporate the Stonewall Insurance Company, and for other purposes. Also,

        A bill to authorize the Governor to refund to parties or corporations any sums of money which may have been expended in obstructing navigable streams in this State against the incursions of the enemy. Also,

        A bill for the relief of Turner Brown, of Bibb county, and John A. Davis, of Polk county.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 9 o'clock, A. M. tomorrow.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15th, 1863.
9 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Echols.

        On motion leave of absence was granted to Mr. Hill, also to Mr. Dyer after Saturday next.

        Mr. Seward moved to reconsider so much of the Journals of yesterday as relates to the passage of a bill to amend


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2041 section of the Code of Georgia limiting the liability of common carriers.

        The motion to reconsider prevailed.

        Mr. Gordon moved to take up the reconsidered bill.

        This motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Gordon moved to refer said bill to a special committee of five.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The committee appointed were Messrs. Gordon, Pinckard, Lewis, Jackson and Vason.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to authorize and empower the Mayor and Council of every city and town in this State to purchase land inside or outside of their corporate limits for cemeteries, and other public uses of said corporations.

        The report was agreed to, the bill read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to relieve Mrs. M. A. Snead formerly Mrs. M. A. Graham from the pains and penalties of Bigamy.

        Mr. James R. Brown moved to amend said bill by striking out so much as makes her marriage with Snead legal.

        The report, as amended, was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to grant the use of certain grounds in the Macon Reserve to the Macon and Brunswick Railroad Company and the Milledgeville Railroad Company for depot purposes, with the consent of the city of Macon.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to authorize the guarantee by the State of Georgia of the Bonds of the Confederates States of America, so far as to guarantee her proportionate share of the sum of $200,000,000.

        Mr. Hansell moved to postpone this bill indefinitely.

        Upon the question of agreeing to this motion the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 24, nays 10.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Beasley, Benson, Jas. R. Brown, Echols, Gaston, Gordon, Griffin, Hansell, Harris, Hill, James Hilliard, Thos. Hilliard, Jamison, Killen, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Seward, Simmons, Smith, Stephens, Swearingen, Ware, Wright.


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        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Boyd, Wm. M. Brown, Dyer, Furlow, Gibson, Mosely, Pinckard, Shewmake, Vason.

        Yeas 24, nays 10. So the motion was agreed to.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to authorize the Governor to refund to parties or corporations any sum of money which may have been expended in obstructing navigable streams in this State against the incursions of the enemy.

        On motion of Mr. Pinckard this bill was indefinitely postponed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for the relief of Turner Brown of Bibb county and John A. Jones of Polk county.

        On motion this bill was laid on the table for the present.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize an increase of the pay of Public Printer.

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Georgia Savings Bank of the city of Macon, by a constitutional majority, by a vote of ayes 68, nays 19.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the charter of the city of Macon, and to authorize the Mayor and Council to grade the streets, assess damages, and tax for the same, and to give control and regulations of the side walks, pavements, streets, street-crossings and alleys of said city.

        A bill to be entitled an act to levy and collect a tax on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State, arising from the sale of goods, wares and merchandize, groceries and provisions, also on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies engaged in the manufacture and sale of cotton and woolen goods, in the tanning and sale of leather, and in the manufacture and sale of any articles made thereof, and in the distillation and sale of spirituous liquors from grain of any kind or from any other article, and to appropriate the same when collected for the support of indigent widows and orphans of deceased soldiers, and for other purposes therein named.

        The House of Representatives has also adopted the resolution of the Senate fixing the time for adjournment, with an amendment, in which they respectfully ask the concurrence of the Senate, and I am directed to transmit the same to the Senate forthwith.


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        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Stonewall Insurance Company, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to authorize the Ordinary of Harris county to grant letters of administration with the will annexed on the estate of William R. Blackman, late of Harris county, deceased, to Maria and Sanford Blackman.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        On motion the Senate took up the message of the House relating to House amendment of Senate resolution relating to an adjournment, sine die.

        The amendment of the House was concurred in.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend the oath of Tax payers of this State for the year 1863.

        Mr. Seward moved to refer this bill to the committee on Finance.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Furlow offered the following resolution, which on motion was taken up and referred to the committee on Finance:

        Whereas, great difficulty is likely to arise between Tax Receivers and holders of Cotton as to its value on the 1st day of April, by reason of the fact that said article rose from 20 cents to 35 and 40 cents per pound about the 1st April, remained at that price but a few days and then receded to 20 or 25 cents per pound, thereby rendering the value on the 1st day of April very indefinite:

        Be it therefore resolved, That the Finance Committee take this matter into consideration and report some remedy at an early day.

        The rule being suspended Mr. Hansell offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Georgia, That the resolution of the General Assembly, passed on the 10th day of December, 1862, providing for the re-assembling of the General Assembly on the fourth Wednesday in April, 1863, be and the same is hereby rescinded.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President: The House of Representatives have adopted the report and resolutions therein contained of the


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Committee on Transportation, and I am directed to inform the Senate of the same.

        Mr. Killen, chairman of the Military Committee, made the following report:

        The Military Committee having had under consideration, "a bill to be entitled an act to amend the 981st and 1040th Sections of the Code of Georgia, and to suspend during the war Sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993 of said Code", report the same back with the recommendation that it be laid on the table for the balance of the session, inasmuch as the Senate have passed "a bill to be entitled an act to revive and declare of force the militia laws of this State prior to the first of January, 1863," covering the provisions of the bill under consideration.

        The following bill from the House was taken up and read the second time:

        A bill to grant to the corporation of the city of Columbus the North, South and East commons of said city, and to authorize the Mayor and Council of said city to have the said commons surveyed into lots and to sell the same upon such terms and conditions as may be prescribed by the said Mayor and Council, and to apply the proceeds arising from the sale of the same, to the bonds and interest issued by the said corporation in aid of the several Railroads in which said corporation has subscribed for stock.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to amend the 981st and 1040th Sections of the Code of Georgia, and to suspend during the war sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993 of said Code.

        The Military Committee to whom this bill had been referred reported adversely to its passage; the report was agreed to and the bill was lost.

        The rule being suspended the following House bill was read the first time:

        A bill to levy and collect a tax on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State arising from the sale of goods, wares and merchandize, groceries and provisions, also, on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies engaged in the manufacture and sale of cotton and woolen goods, in the tanning and sale of leather, and in the manufacture and sale of any articles made thereof, and in the distillation and sale of spirituous liquors from grain of any kind, or from any other article, and to appropriate the same, when collected, to the support of indigent widows and orphans of deceased soldiers, and other persons therein named.

        On motion one hundred copies of this bill were ordered to be printed.


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        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to amend the third clause of the seven hundred and thirty-ninth section of the Code of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Georgia Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Griffin, Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the times and places of holding the Supreme Court of this State, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the 3d time and passed.

        The Senate took up and adopted resolution respecting the turning over to the Printer the Journals of the Senate of the last two days of the last session.

        Senate resolutions relating to the running of the Blockade taken up and indefinitely postponed.

        Senate resolutions of instructions to Inferior Courts touching disposal of appropriations for indigent soldiers families.

        This resolution was read and adopted.

        The resolutions respecting taxation was taken up, and on motion laid on the table for the present.

        The resolutions respecting the impressment of labor, was taken up and indefinitely postponed.

        The resolution relating to Railroad Transportation was read and adopted, and the President appointed on the committee, Messrs. Brown, Pinckard and Lewis.

        Resolutions relating to the currency were taken up and indefinitely postponed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to punish the refusal of Confederate Notes or attempts to depreciate the same.

        On motion the bill was indefinitely postponed.

        The resolution relative to unfinished business of last session was taken up.

        This resolution was indefinitely postponed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to regulate the fining of defaulting jurors and the manner of collecting the same.

        The report was amended and as amended agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.


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        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill for the relief of certain citizens of the county of Floyd, &c.

        On motion this bill was indefinitely postponed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President: The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, which I am directed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act making it penal to trespass upon lands in this State.

        A bill to be entitled an act amendatory of the laws relating to suits against the Railroad Companies in this State.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Gordon offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted:

        Whereas, the Library of the late A. A. Smets of Chatham county, is about to be sold by the executors of the will of said deceased; and, whereas, it would be a public loss to the State of Georgia to permit said library to be disposed of outside of the limits of this State; and, whereas, notwithstanding the offers made both in Europe and America, for the purchase of this valuable library the executors and surviving relatives of the deceased, would prefer to see it in possession of the State of Georgia:

        Resolved, That the Governor be and he is hereby requested to confer with the executors of said estate in reference to the purchase of said Library for the State, and report to the next General Assembly the nature and extent of said Library and the terms on which it can be purchased.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned till 3½ o'clock, P. M.

3½ O'CLOCK, P. M.

        Senate met according to adjournment.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, which I am directed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act for the relief of the Sheriff of Chatham county.

        A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the bringing suits against the several Banks of this State.

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the time of holding the Inferior Court for county purposes of Washington


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county, Ga., from the first Tuesday to the first Wednesday in each month.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to punish all owners of slaves and guardians of free persons of color and said slaves and free persons of color in the counties of Warren and Talliaferro for said owners and guardians allowing said slaves and free persons of color to live alone and to permit the same, assented to the 22d Dec. 1857.

        A bill to make an additional appropriation to the fund for the support of the pauper patients in the State Lunatic Asylum for the year 1863, and further to appropriate a sum of money for the special and express purpose alone, for furnishing the means to enable the authorities of the institution to purchase, during the fall or winter seasons, when favorable opportunities present, supplies of provisions and clothing for the ensuing year.

        A bill for the relief of all incorporated cities and towns in this State.

        A bill supplemental to an act assented to on the 13th day of December, 1862, to provide for raising a revenue for the political year 1863, and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and to make certain special appropriations, and for other purposes therein mentioned.

        A bill for the relief of Nathan Singletary and William Mims of the county of Schley.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the several laws of force in this State, in relation to issuing grants on Head rights, so as to extend the time for granting the same until the 25th Dec. 1863, and to allow purchasers in possession of lands surveyed and returned to the Surveyor General's office, to grant the same, and for other purposes.

        A bill to fix the compensation of the members of the next General Assembly.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the first time:

        A bill to change the time of holding the Inferior Courts, for county purposes, of Washington county, Ga., from the first Tuesday to the first Wednesday in each month.

        A bill making it penal to trespass upon land in this State.

        A bill to amend the charter of the city of Macon and to authorize the Mayor and Council to grade the streets, assess damages and tax for the same, and to give control and regulations of the sidewalks, pavements, streets, street-crossings and alleys in said city.

        A bill to authorize the increase of the pay of the Public Printer.


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        A bill to provide for bringing suits against the several Banks of this State.

        A bill to incorporate the Georgia Savings Bank of the city of Macon.

        A bill for the relief of the Sheriff of Chatham county.

        A bill amendatory of the laws relating to suits against Railroad Companies in this State.

        The rule being suspended, the Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for relief of Turner Brown, of Bibb county, and John A. Jones, of Polk county.

        Several amendments were offered to this bill which together with the bill were laid on the table for the present.

        The rule being suspended, the Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the line between the counties of Miller and Early.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate the following act and resolution, to-wit:

        An act to enable the Coroners of this State to hold inquests in certain cases with juries consisting of six men.

        Also, a resolution in relation to furnishing spun yarn to the families of indigent soldiers.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following resolution of the Senate, to-wit:

        A report of the joint committee and the resolutions therein contained.

        Mr. Swearengen offered the following resolution which was on motion taken up, read and adopted:

        Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives, That his Excellency the Governor be, and he is hereby directed when the Laws and Journals of this extra session as well as the regular session shall have been printed, to cause to be forwarded to each member of the Senate and House of Representatives, also to the Secretary of the Senate and Clerk of the House of Representatives.

        On motion leave of absence was granted to Mr. Killen after Friday night next.

        On motion the Senate adjourned till 9 o'clock, A. M., to-morrow.


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THURSDAY, APRIL 16, 1863.
9½ O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Hawkins.

        Mr. Lewis moved to reconsider so much of the journals of yesterday as relates to the indefinite postponement of the bill to authorize the Governor to refund to parties or corporations any sum of money which may have been expended in obstructing navigable streams in this State against the incursions of the enemy.

        This motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Jackson moved to reconsider so much of the journals of yesterday as relates to the passage of a joint resolution to adjourn the General Assembly sine die at 12 o'clock M. Saturday next.

        This motion was not agreed to.

        Mr. Seward moved to reconsider so much of the journals of yesterday as relates to the passage of the bill to change the times and places of holding the Supreme Courts of this State.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The rule being suspended, the Senate took up as the re-report of the committee of the whole--

        Reconsidered House bill to change the times and places of holding the Supreme Courts of this State.

        Mr. Hansell offered an amendment in the nature of a substitute with the same caption.

        Mr. Gordon to amend the amendment by striking out the words "twelve months."

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time, and passed.

        The special committee to whom was referred a bill to be entitled an act to amend the two thousand and forty-first section of the Code of Georgia, limiting the liability of common carriers, have had the same under consideration and have instructed me to report a substitute herewith submitted with the unanimous recommendation that said substitute do pass.

Signed.

GEO. A. GORDON, Chm'n.


        On motion, the substitute was received in lieu of the original bill.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Committee on Finance to whom was referred a bill to be entitled an act to amend the oath of tax payers of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes, and a resolution


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on a subject germain to said bill, report that they have duly considered said bill and resolution and are sensibly impressed with the difficulties presented by any system of taxation that has ever been or can ever be framed by the legislative department of the government and are confident of the truth of the assertion that no system can be devised that will not operate unequally on supposed cases; your committee are however satisfied that the advalorem principle of taxation as adopted in the Code of Georgia, as a general rule, is the most nearly equal and just that can be devised; but owing to the fluctuation in the value of the present currency of the country, and the difference between that value and specie, they consider the amendments to the Code for the year 1863, proposed by the bill under consideration necessary and proper so far as they go. But as the existing laws require all the property held by the tax payer on the first April, to be given in to the Receiver any time between the 1st April and 1st July, and do not specify the time to which such valuation shall have reference, they propose the first of April as the time, thereby avoiding the difficulty presented by the fluctuation in value that may arise during the space of three months.

        As to the difficulty presented by the resolution referred to them in consequence of the sudden rise and fall of cotton about the 1st of April, and the consequent uncertainty that will exist in the minds of the tax payers on this subject, they propose an amendment to the bill to fix the specific valuation on cotton to twenty-five cents per lb. They therefore recommend that the bill do pass with the following amendments to-wit:

        1st. Instead of the words in the bill "and that it is not worth," &c., insert "and that was not worth on the 1st April of this year" &c.

        2d. Instead of the words in the bill "and the value you have affixed to it is a just and true valuation in Confederate Treasury notes," insert "and the value you have affixed to it is a just and true valuation on the 1st April of this year in Confederate Treasury notes."

        3rd. Amend by adding the following section:

        Sec. Be it further enacted, That said oath so far as valuation is concerned shall not apply to cotton subject by existing laws to taxation, but twenty-five cents per lb shall be the fixed value of such cotton for the present year.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        The bill in the foregoing report specified.

        Mr. Seward moved an amendment in the nature of a substitute to the report, to-wit:

        An act to prescribe the mode and manner of equalizing


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the value of certain taxable property and to collect the taxes upon such valuation.

        This amendment was not agreed to.

        Mr. Jackson offered the following amendment which was agreed to:

        And be it further enacted, That all persons holding notes or indebtedness on any individual or incorporation shall give in the same on its value in Confederate notes.

        On motion of Mr. Hausell, this bill was recommitted to the committee of the whole.

        Mr. Dyer offered the following amendment which was agreed to:

        And be it further enacted, that if any of the tax payers of this State shall have made a return of their property to the Receiver and Collector, previous to the passage of the act that it shall be the duty of said Collector and Receiver to require of such tax payers that they make another return to him upon the valuation as provided for in this bill.

        Mr. Pinckard moved to amend by striking out the amendment proposed by the Finance Committee fixing the valuation of cotton.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to.

        Upon the question, shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 21, nays 12.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Boyd, Wm. M. Brown, J. R. Brown, Dyer, Furlow, Gaston, Gibson, Hansell, Harris, James Hilliard, Jackson, Killen, Lewis, Mitchell, Pinckard, Shewmake, Simmons, Stephens, Vason.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Anthony, Benson, Echols, Gordon, Griffin, McRae, Mosely, Seward, Smith, Swearingen, Ware, Wright.

        Yeas 21, nays 12. So the bill was passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, which I am instructed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Baker and Calhoun.

        A bill to be entitled an act amendatory of an act to prevent the spread of small pox in this State assented to December, 1862.

        A bill to be entitled an act to facilitate suits against Express companies in this State.


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        A bill to be entitled an act to provide for the suppression of domestic insurrection within the limits of the State of Georgia, and in the enforcement of the laws by establishing a State guard throughout the State and to abrogate all commissions heretofore granted to militia officers in this State.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to fix the rates of toll for grinding grain in the counties of Gwinnett, Cherokee and Forsyth.

        The House has also concurred in the amendment of the Senate to the bill of the House to be entitled an act to change the times and places of holding the Supreme Court of this State, and for other purposes.

        The following message has been received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills which I am instructed to transmit forthwith to the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill entitled an act to incorporate the Southern Iron and Coal Mining Company.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the 4317th section of the Code of Georgia.

        The House of Representatives has receded from its disagreement to the first and second amendments of the Senate to the bill of the House entitled an act to authorize the auditing and payment of claims against the State of Georgia in favor of persons who have heretofore furnished guns to the troops of said State by the authority of the State and which have not been returned to said persons.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to extend the limits of the city of Macon and the jurisdiction of the Mayor and Council of said city over said extension. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to empower Elizabeth Lowther, a widow, to appoint Jesse J. Jordon and James R. Stewart, of the State of Alabama, her executors. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal the one hundred and seventy-eight section of the Code of Georgia, and to revive and put in force, the laws of this State prescribing the manner of electing a Messenger and Doorkeeper for the Senate


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and House of Representatives, prior to the adoption of the Code. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Randolph and Calhoun, so as to embrace in Randolph county certain lots therein mentioned. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Evangelical Lutheran synod of Georgia. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act to authorize the Clerks of the Superior and Inferior Courts of the county of Ware to keep their offices at their residences, if within eight miles of the Court-house, and to exempt Justices of the Inferior Court from all other public duties during their continuance in office, approved March 3d, 1856. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Coffee and Clinch, and between the counties of Irwin and Wilcox. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Bank in the city of Atlanta. Also,

        The following resolution to-wit:

        A resolution directing his Excellency the Governor to have 2,000 copies of the sermons of Rev. Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer, delivered on Fast day the 27th, 1863, published for distribution, also have adopted the report of the joint committee on Transportation.

        The House insists upon its resolution which was a substitute for the resolutions of the Senate in relation to impressment of laborers for the defenses of Savannah.

        The Senate took up the message from the House relating to refusal of the House to concur in Senate amendment of resolution relating to the impressment of laborers for the defense of Savannah.

        The Senate adhered and called for a committee of conference, whereupon the President appointed Messrs. Gordon, Hansell and Furlow.

        On motion, leave of absence was granted to the Senators from the 9th and 24th districts after Friday night next.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to fix the compensation of members of the next General Assembly.

        Mr. Gibson moved to amend by striking out six dollars and inserting in lieu thereof eight dollars. This motion was not agreed to.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:


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        A bill to be entitled an act to provide for taking testimony in certain cases. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the line between the counties of Pickens and Gilmer, and for other purposes. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to allow administrators, executors, guardians and trustees twelve months in which to invest trust funds. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize J. M. Broadfield, administrator de bonis non on the estate of Isaac Boring, deceased, late of Putnam county, to sell at private sale, a house and lot in the town of Eatonton, belonging to said estate. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Dade County Iron Manufacturing and Coal Company, approved Feb. 7, 1854. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to constitute Abner Roan Zachry the heir of Josias Boswell, of Putnam county. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to legalize certain processes, commissions, &c., returnable to the Feb. term 1863, of Walton Superior Court. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the time of holding the January term of the Court of Ordinary of Brooks county.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for the relief of Nathan Singletary and William Mims, of the county of Schley.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        An act to amend the several laws of force in this State, in relation to issuing grants on Head Rights, so as to extend the time for granting the same until the 25th December, 1863, and to allow purchasers in possession of lands surveyed and returned to the Surveyor General's office, to grant the same, and for other purposes.

        On motion this bill was referred to the Judiciary Committee.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill supplemental to act assented to on the 13th day of December, 1862, to provide for raising a revenue for the political year eighteen hundred and sixty-three and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and to make certain special appropriations, and for other purposes therein named.

        On motion this bill was taken up by sections.


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        Sections first and second were taken up and severally agreed to.

        Third section being taken up, Mr. Gibson moved to amend so as to allow the President of the Senate and Speaker of the House of Representatives each ten dollars per day instead of six dollars; also to allow members of the General Assembly six instead of five dollars per day; also to allow five instead of four dollars for mileage.

        The third section as amended was agreed to.

        The 4th section being taken up, Mr. Vason offered the following amendment which was agreed to:

        The sum of six dollars per day be appropriated to pay the Clerk of the Military and Judiciary Committees of the Senate for as many days as he has served said Committees, and that the Auditing Committee of the Senate shall not be authorized to audit said Clerk's account for any greater number of days than shall be certified to by the Chairman of said Military and Judiciary Committees.

        The fourth section as amended was agreed to.

        The 5th section being taken up, Mr. Jackson moved to amend the same so as to allow the Door-Keeper and Messenger of the Senate each seven dollars per day instead of six dollars.

        This amendment was agreed to.

        The sixth, seventh and eighth sections were taken up and severally agreed to.

        The 9th section being taken up, Mr. Lewis offered the following amendment, which was agreed to: "which sum shall be distributed in the following manner, to-wit: the sum of one hundred and twenty-four dollars to the Hon. Robert Hester, the sum of thirty dollars to the Hon. A. J. Hansell, the sum of sixty-two dollars to the Hon. Samuel Sheats; the sum of thirty-six dollars and twenty cents to the Hon. A. T. Burke; the sum of nine dollars and eighty cents to the Hon. M. A. Candler; the sum of thirty-nine dollars to the Hon. George A. Black; the sum of forty-seven dollars to the Hon. John M. Jackson; the sum of forty-two dollars to the Hon. M. W. Lewis, and the sum of one hundred and forty dollars to L. Carrington, Esq., which said several sums shall be paid by the Treasurer to each of said persons respectively on his receipting the Treasurer for the same. The 9th section as amended was agreed to.

        Mr. Hansell offered the following additional section as an amendment which was agreed to:

        Be it further enacted, That the sum of eight hundred dollars be and is hereby appropriated to pay Capt. George W. Lee, of the county of Fulton, to reimburse him the amount paid out by him for subsistence of his volunteer company in the absence of a commissary.

        Mr. ---- offered the following additional section as an


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amendment: Whereas by resolution of the Senate passed on the 13th day of Nov. 1861, the Secretary of the Senate was authorized to appoint an assistant journalizing Clerk, and thereupon the Secretary proceeded immediately to carry out such resolution by the appointment of a compentent person who discharged his duties from thence to the close of the session, and whereas the compensation of the Secretary and his employees had always before been passed upon by the auditing committee, and whereas near the close of said session of 1861, after the labors of the assistant had been performed, the old rule of allowing compensation was abandoned and a per diem allowed the Secretary instead, which per diem made no allowance for the pay of such assistant:

        Be it therefore enacted, That the sum of two hundred dollars be and the same is hereby appropriated as compensation for the services of the assistant journalizing Clerk of the Senate for the session of 1861.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to increase and fix the compensation of the employees of the Penitentiary of this State during the present war between the United States and the Confederate States.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        A bill to be entitled an act to alter and amend an act to incorporate the town of Hawkinsville in the county of Pulaski, and to appoint commissioners for the same, and to confer certain powers upon said commissioners, also to incorporate the town of Grooverville, Brooks county, and for other purposes.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to release and fully discharge Archibald G. Wimpy, of the county of Lumpkin, as co-executor, from the further execution of the last will and testament of Benjamin M. Smith, late of said county, deceased


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        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act passed Dec. 8th, 1860, which allows compensation to managers of elections in the county of Emanual.

        The Senate then took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for the relief of all incorporated cities and towns in this State.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to repeal an act entitled an act to punish all owners of slaves and guardians of free persons of color and said slaves and free persons of color in the counties of Warren and Taliaferro, for said owners and guardians allowing said slaves and free persons of color to live alone, and to permit the same, assented to on the 22d Dec. 1857.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to grant to the corporation of the city of Columbus the North, South and East commons of said city, and to authorize the Mayor and Council of said city to have the said commons surveyed into lots and to sell the same upon such terms and conditions as may be prescribed by said Mayor and Council and to apply the proceeds arising from, the sale of the same to the payment of bonds and interest issued by said corporation in aid of the several Railroads in which said corporation has subscribed for stock.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to make an additional appropriation to the fund for the support of pauper patients in the State Lunatic Asylum for the year 1863, and further to appropriate a sum of money for the special and express purpose alone of providing the means to enable the authorities of the institution to purchase during the fall or winter seasons, when favorable opportunities present, supplies of provisions and clothing for the ensuing year.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to levy and collect a tax on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State, arising from the sale of goods, wares and merchandize, groceries and provisions, also the net income or profits of all persons


Page 163

and corporate bodies engaged in the manufacture and sale of cotton and woolen goods, in the tanning and sale of leather, and in the manufacture and sale of any articles made thereof, and in the distillation and sale of spirituous liquors from grain of any kind or from any other article, and to appropriate the same when collected for the support of indigent widows and orphans of deceased soldiers and other persons therein named.

        A bill making it penal to trespass upon land in this State.

        A bill amendatory of the laws relating to suits against Railroad Companies in this State.

        A bill for the relief of the Sheriff of Chatham county.

        A bill to change the time of holding the Inferior Courts (for county purposes) of Washington county, Ga., from the first Tuesday to the first Wednesday in each month.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for the relief of Turner Brown, of Bibb county, and John A. Jones, of Polk county.

        Mr. Seward offered an amendment in the nature of a substitute, to-wit: a bill to provide for the payment of expenses incurred under an act to prevent the spread of small pox in this State, assented to Dec. 11th, 1862, and to repeal said act.

        Pending the consideration of this report, on motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The following House bills was taken up and read the second time:

        A bill to authorize an increase of the pay of the Public Printer.

        A bill to amend the charter of the city of Macon and to authorize the Mayor and Council to grade the streets, assess damages and tax for the same, and to give control and regulations of the side walks, pavements, streets, street-crossings and alleys in said city.

        A bill to incorporate the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Georgia.

        A bill to provide for bringing suits against the several banks in this State.

        A bill to incorporate the Savings bank of the city of Macon.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:


Page 164

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to empower the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess a tax on brokers.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following acts of the House to-wit:

        An act to change the line between the counties of Miller and Early.

        An act to grant the use of certain grounds in the Macon reserve, to the Macon and Brunswick Railroad Company, and the Milledgeville Railroad Company for depot purposes, with the consent of the city of Macon.

        An act to authorize the Ordinary of Harris county to grant letters of administration with the will annexed on the estate of William K. Blackman, late of said county, deceased, to Maria and Sanford Blackman, without the necessity of their giving bond and security.

        An act to incorporate the Stone Wall Insurance Company, and for other purposes.

        An act to amend the third clause of the (739) seven hundred and thirty-ninth section of the Code of Georgia.

        An act to authorize the auditing and payment of claims against the State of Georgia in favor of persons who have furnished guns to the troops of said State or of the Confederate States, by authority of the State, and which have not been returned to said persons.

        An act to change the times and places of holding the Supreme Court of this State, and for other purposes.

        An act to incorporate the Griffin Fire and Marine Insurance Company of Griffin, Ga.

        The following bills House bills were taken up and severally read the first time:

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to authorize the Clerks of the Superior Courts and Inferior Courts of the county of Ware to keep their offices at their residence if within eight miles of the Court-house and exempt the Justices of the Inferior Court from all other public duties during their continuance in office, approved March 3d, 1856.

        A bill to empower Elizabeth Lowther, a widow of Jones county, to appoint Jesse J. Jordan and James R. Stewart, of the State of Alabama, her executors.

        A bill to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Bank in the city of Atlanta.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Coffee and Clinch, and between the counties of Irwin and Wilcox.

        A bill to repeal the one hundred and seventy-eighth section of the Code of Georgia, and to revive and put in force


Page 165

the laws of this State, prescribing the manner of electing a Messenger and Doorkeeper for the Senate and House of Representatives prior to the adoption of the Code.

        A bill to provide for the suppression of domestic insurrection within the limits of the State of Georgia, and in the enforcement of the laws by establishing a State guard throughout the State and to abrogate all commissions heretofore granted to militia officers in this State.

        A bill to fix the rates of toll for grinding grain in the counties of Gwinnett, Cherokee and Forsyth.

        A bill to change the time of holding the January term of the Court of Ordinary of Brooks county.

        A bill to incorporate the Southern Iron and Coal Mining Company.

        A bill to release and fully discharge Archibald G. Wimpy, of the county of Lumpkin, as co-executor from the further execution of the last will and testament of Benjamin M. Smith, late of said county, deceased.

        A bill to increase and fix the compensation of the employees of the Penitentiary of this State, during the present war between the United States and Confederate States.

        A bill to alter and amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the town of Hawkinsville in the county of Pulaski, to appoint commissioners for the same and to confer certain powers upon said commissioners, also to incorporate the town of Grooverville, Brooks county, and for other purposes.

        A bill to empower the Mayor and Council of Atlanta to assess a tax on brokers.

        A bill to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        A bill to legalize certain processes, commissions, &c., returnable to February term 1863, Walton Superior Court.

        A bill to extend the limits of the city of Macon and the jurisdiction of the Mayor and Council of said city over said extension.

        A bill to provide for taking testimony in certain cases therein mentioned.

        A bill to authorize J. M. Broadfield, administrator de bonis non on the estate of Isaac Boring, deceased, late of Putnam county, to sell at private sale a house and lot in the town of Eatonton, belonging to said estate.

        A bill to change the lines between the counties of Pickens and Gilmer, and for other purposes.

        A bill to constitute Abner Roan Zachry the heir of Josias Boswell, of the county of Putnam.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Baker and Calhoun.

        A bill to amend the 4317th section of the Code of Georgia.


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        A bill to facilitate suits against Express Companies in this State.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Randolph and Calhoun, so as to embrace in the county of Randolph lots of land Nos. 210, 211, 246 and 247 of the fifth district of originally Lee.

        A bill amendatory of an act entitled an act to prevent the spread of small pox in this State, assented to Dec. 1862.

        A bill to allow administrators, executors, guardians and trustees, twelve months to invest trust funds.

        A bill to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Dade County Iron Manufacturing and Coal Company.

        A bill to repeal an act passed December 8th, 1860, which allows compensation to managers of elections in the county of Emanuel.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to amend the several laws of force in this State in relation to issuing grants to Head-rights, so as to extend the time for granting the same until 25th Dec. 1863, and to allow purchasers in possession of lands surveyed and returned to the Surveyor General's office to grant the same and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate resumed the consideration of the unfinished business of the last adjournment to-wit:

        A bill for the relief of Turner Brown, of Bibb county, and John A. Jones, of Polk county.

        The amendment offered by Mr. Seward was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following House resolution was taken up, read and concurred in, to-wit:

        A resolution directing his Excellency the Governor to have two thousand copies each of the sermons delivered at the Capitol on Fast day Friday the 27th day of March, 1863, by the Rev. Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer, published for distribution.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Furlow offered the following resolution which was taken up, read, adopted and ordered to be transmitted forthwith, to-wit:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of Georgia, That the Superintendent of the Western and Atlantic Railroad, be and he is hereby directed to suspend all further issue of change bills as are authorized by the act, assented to Dec. 17th, 1861, and if in the opinion of the said Superintendent and his Excellency the Governor a further issue is necessary, said issue shall be so altered as to promise to redeem the same in


Page 167

current or Confederate notes and not in Bank notes as now required by law.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to encourage and regulate the business of mining Iron, Coal, Copper, Gold and other useful metals and minerals in Georgia; also the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the transportation of provisions on the several Railroads in this State, and to punish officers and agents who may violate the provisions of this Act.

        The following House bill was taken up and read the first time:

        A bill to encourage and regulate the mining of Iron, Coal, Copper, Gold and other useful metals and minerals in Georgia.

        The following Message was received from his Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--I am directed by the Governor, to deliver to the Senate a communication in writing, nominating a person as Judge of the Superior Courts in the Coweta Judicial District in this State.

        On motion, the foregoing message from his Excellency was taken up and the Senate resolved itself into secret session.

        The Senate having returned to open session, on motion, adjourned to 8 o'clock, P. M.

8 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        On motion, leave of absence from to-night's session was granted to Mr. James Hilliard.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills, of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to compensate the citizens of this State for certain slaves who have died or been seriously injured or disabled, under certain circumstances, with certain amendments thereto, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the amount of compensation the members of the


Page 168

General Assembly shall receive for their services and for other purposes therein mentioned, passed over the executive veto Nov. 30th, 1861, and for other purposes, with an amendment in which they respectfully ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the 4708th section of the Code of Georgia. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to change the time of holding the Superior Courts of Baker county. Also,

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate and confer certain powers and privileges upon the Citizens' Fire Company of Augusta called and known as No. 8.

        The roll being called there being no quorum present, on motion the Senate adjourned to 8½ o'clock, A. M. to-morrow.

FRIDAY, APRIL 17TH, 1863,
8½ O'CLOCK, A.M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment, and was opened with prayer by the Rev. Mr. Mosely.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to amend the charter of the city of Macon, and to authorize the Mayor and Council to grade the streets, assess damages and tax for the same, and to give control and regulations of the sidewalks, pavements, streets, street crossings and alleys in said city.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to increase the pay of the Public Printer.

        Mr. Mitchell moved to postpone this bill indefinitely. This motion was agreed to.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have concurred in the amendment of the Senate to the following bills of the House, to-wit:

        A bill entitled an act for the relief of Turner Brown, of Bibb county, and John A. Jones, of Polk county.

        A bill to authorize the Governor to refund to parties or corporations any sum or sums of money which may have been expended in obstructing navigable streams in this State against incursions of the enemy.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the oath of tax-payers


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of this State for the year 1863, and for other purposes.

        The House of Representatives accepts the proposition of the Senate for a committee of conference on the resolutions in relation to impressment of laborers for the defense of Savannah, and have appointed as such committee on part of the House, Messrs. Trammell, Moore of Thomas, Dever, Monk and Lee.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Georgia Savings Bank of the city of Macon.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed on a call of the yeas and nays by the constitutional majority.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to provide for bringing suits against the several Banks of this State.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill for the relief of the Sheriff of Chatham county.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following act of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to regulate the transportation of provisions on the several railroads in this State, and to punish officers and agents who may violate the provisions of this act.

        Also, the following acts of the House of Representatives, to-wit:

        An act to make an additional appropriation to the funds for the support of pauper patients in the State Lunatic Asylum, for the year 1863.

        An act for the relief of Nathan Singletary and William Mims, of the county of Schley.

        An act to fix the compensation of members of the next General Assembly.

        An act for the relief of all incorporated towns and cities in this State.

        An act to grant to the corporation of the city of Columbus the north, south and east commons of said city, and to authorize the Mayor and Council of said city to have said commons surveyed.

        An act to repeal an act to punish all owners of slaves and


Page 170

guardians of free persons of color, in the counties of Warren and Talliaferro, for allowing said slaves and free persons of color to live alone, and to permit the same, assented to 22d December, 1857.

        Also, the following acts of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to amend section 4708 of the Code of Georgia.

        An act to change the time of holding the Superior Courts of Baker county.

        An act to incorporate and confer certain powers and privileges upon the Citizen Fire Company of Augusta, called and known as No. 8.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the time of holding the Inferior Court (for county purposes) of Washington county, Geo., from the first Tuesday to the first Wednesday in each month.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill amendatory of the laws relating to suits against Railroad companies in this State.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the consolidation of the stock of the Savannah, Albany & Gulf Railroad Company, and the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad Company, and for other purposes, with an amendment, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate; and I am instructed to transmit the same to the Senate forthwith.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the passage by the House, with amendments, of Senate bill to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the amount of compensation the members and officers of the General Assembly shall receive, &c.

        House amendment--"Except that part which fixes the pay of the Secretary of the Senate and Clerk of the House of Representatives which shall be and remain in full force."

        On motion, the Senate disagreed to House amendment--"Provided that this act shall not be so construed as to affect the per diem pay and mileage of the present General Assembly."

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the passage by the House, with an amendment, of Senate bill to authorize the consolidation of the stocks of the Savannah,


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Albany & Gulf Railroad Company and the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad Company, and for other purposes.

        On motion, the House amendment was concurred in.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the passage by the House, with amendments, of Senate bill to compensate the citizens of this State for certain slaves who have died or been seriously injured or disabled under certain circumstances.

        On motion, the Senate disagreed to House amendments of said bill.

        The following message was received from his Excellency the Governor, by Mr. Waters, his Secretary, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--The Governor has approved and signed the following acts, to-wit:

        An act to incorporate the Atlanta & Roswell Railroad Company.

        An act to incorporate the Blanceville Slate Mining Company of the county of Polk, and for other purposes.

        Also, a resolution relative to raising the pay of private soldiers and non-commissioned officers in the Confederate army, and also in the State service.

        A resolution expressive of confidence in the President of the Confederate States.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to levy and collect a tax on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State arising from the sale of goods, wares and merchandise, groceries and provisions; also, on the net income or profits of all persons or corporate bodies engaged in the manufacture and sale of cotton and woolen goods, in the tanning and sale of leather, and in the manufacture and sale of any article made thereof, and in the distillation and sale of spirituous liquors from grain of any kind, or from any other article, and to appropriate the same when collected for the support of indigent widows and orphans of deceased soldiers and other persons therein named.

        On motion this bill was taken up by sections.

        1st section being taken up, Mr. Mitchell offered the following amendment, which was not agreed to:

        Insert after the word "provisions" in the fourth line, "live stock, and all banks, railroad and insurance companies, and all brokers and money lenders, and all other companies and corporations doing business for profit and gain."

        Mr. Gibson moved to postpone this bill indefinitely. This motion was not agreed to.

        The first section was agreed to.

        2d section being taken up, Mr. Lewis offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:


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        After the word "to-wit" strike out and insert--

        When the profits for the year preceding the return shall amount to twenty per cent. on the capital or credit invested, a tax of fifty per cent. on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall exceed twenty per cent. and amount to thirty per cent. or under, one dollar and fifty cents on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall exceed thirty per cent. and amount to forty per cent. or under, two dollars on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall exceed forty per cent. and amount to fifty per cent. or under, two dollars and fifty cents on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall exceed fifty per cent. and amount to sixty per cent. or under, three dollars on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall exceed sixty per cent. and amount to seventy-five per cent. or under, three dollars and fifty cents on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall exceed seventy per cent. and amount to eighty per cent. or under, four dollars on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall exceed eighty per cent. and amount to ninety per cent. or under, four dollars and fifty cents on every one hundred dollars.

        When they shall ninety per cent. and amount to one hundred per cent. or under, five dollars on every one hundred dollars, and so on ad infinitum.

        The second section as amended was agreed to.

        The third section was agreed to.

        4th section being taken up, Mr. Lewis offered the following amendments, which were agreed to:

        Insert in the third line above $100,000 in figures, after the word "sales," the words "if he, she or they keep such books."

        Also, strike the word "of" immediately before $100,000 in figures, and insert "one thousand per cent. on."

        Mr. James R. Brown offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Insert after the word 'accordingly' where it first occurs after $100,000 in figures, "and the said assessors shall have power to compel such citizen or tax-payer to appear before them and to give testimony in said investigation."

        Mr. Hansell offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Provided that in case of corporations, if the President or other officer managing the same, shall file an affidavit with the assessors, that they cannot remove their books


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from their place of business without inconvenience and loss, then said assessors shall investigate the said books at the place of business of said corporation.

        The fourth section as amended was agreed to.

        The fifth section was agreed to.

        6th section being taken up, Mr. Furlow offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Strike, out wherever it occurs, the words "grain and provisions," and insert in lieu thereof the words "agricultural productions."

        Mr. James R. Brown offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Add "provided said manufactured articles do not exceed in value the sum of two thousand dollars per annum."

        The sixth section as amended was agreed to.

        7th section being taken up, the following amendment was agreed to:

        Insert between the words "the" and "Treasury" where it first occurs, the word "State."

        Mr. Hansell offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Strike out all after the words "each year" where it first occurs down to the word "provided."

        Mr. James R. Brown offered the following amendment, which was agreed to:

        Strike out the words "tax act" at the close of the section, and insert "appropriation act passed by the General Assembly at its last session."

        The 8th section was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Vason, this bill was recommitted to the committee of the whole.

        Mr. James R. Brown offered the following amendment which was agreed to:

        Amend first section by striking out after "1863" the words "and annually thereafter."

        Amendments changing the caption had been agreed to, but by amendment the caption as it originally stood was restored.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The rule being suspended, Mr. Gordon offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted:

        Resolved, That the Secretary of the Senate be instructed to request the House of Representatives to return a local bill to be entitled an act for the relief of the Sheriff of


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Chatham county, which was passed this morning in the temporary absence of the Senator representing the interest to be affected, and which was intended to be amended at the request of the parties concerned.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have concurred in the resolution of the Senate to rescind the resolution of the General Assembly passed on the 10th day of December, 1862, providing for the re-assembling of the General Assembly on the fourth Wednesday in April, 1863.

        The House has also adopted a substitute for the bill of the Senate entitled an act to change sections 2488 and 2490 of the Code of Georgia, and for other purposes, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have adopted the report and resolutions of the joint committee on salt supply.

        The House of Representatives have also passed the following bills of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate an insurance company in the city of Augusta to be called the Commercial Insurance Company.

        Also, a bill to be entitled an act to legalize and make valid certain acts of Notaries Public in this State.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have adopted and passed a substitute for a bill of the Senate to be entitled an act to amend the laws of this State in relation to the selection of Jurors in civil and criminal cases.

        Also, have passed the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to confirm to the Confederate States of America the occupancy and use of certain lands in the county of Richmond in this State, heretofore held by the late United States of America, and to assent to and confirm the purchase of other lands in said county, and to grant to the said Confederate States of America exclusive jurisdiction over the same.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following act of the Senate, to-wit:

        An aet to authorize the consolidation of the stocks of the Savannah, Albany & Gulf Railroad Company and the Atlantic & Gulf Railroad Company, and for other purposes.


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        An act to confirm to the Confederate States of America the occupancy and use of certain lands in the county of Richmond in this State, heretofore held by the late United States of America; to assent to and confirm the purchase of other lands in said county, and to grant to the said Confederate States of America exclusive jurisdiction over the same.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have disagreed to the following amendments of the Senate to the bill of the House to be entitled an act supplemental to an act assented to 13th day of December, 1862, to provide for raising a revenue for the political year 1863, and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and to make certain special appropriations, and for other purposes therein mentioned, to-wit: amendments Nos. 1, 2, 3, 5, 7 and 8.

        The House has concurred in amendment No. 4, with an amendment thereto, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        The House has also concurred in amendment No. 9 to said bill.

        The following message from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have concurred in the resolution of the Senate requesting the House to return to the Senate a local bill to be entitled an act for the relief of the Sheriff of Chatham county.

        On motion, the foregoing message was taken up. The said bill was amended and passed.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the passing by the House of Senate bill changing sections 2488 and 2490 of the Code of Georgia, and with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.

        On motion, the amendment of the House was concurred in.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill making it penal to trespass upon land in this State.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to legalize certain processes, commissions, &c., returnable to February term, 1863, Walton Superior Court.

        A bill to extend the limits of the city of Macon, and the


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jurisdiction of the Mayor and Council of said city of Macon over said extension.

        A bill to fix the rates of toll for grinding grain in the counties of Gwinnett, Cherokee and Forsyth.

        A bill to be entitled an act to provide for taking testimony in certain cases therein mentioned.

        A bill to encourage and regulate the mining of iron, coal, copper, gold and other useful metals and minerals in Georgia.

        A bill to authorize J. M. Broadfield, administrator de bonis non on the estate of Isaac Boring, deceased, late of Putnam county, to sell a house and lot in the town of Eatonton, belonging to said estate.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Pickens and Gilmer, and for other purposes.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Randolph and Calhoun, so as to embrace in the county of Randolph lots of land Nos. 210, 211, 246 and 247 in the 5th district of originally Lee.

        A bill to repeal the 178th section of the Code of Georgia, and to revive and put in force the laws of this State prescribing the manner of electing a Doorkeeper and Messenger for the House of Representatives prior to the adoption of the Code.

        A bill to incorporate the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Georgia.

        A bill to repeal an act entitled an act to authorize the Clerks of the Superior and Inferior Courts of the county of Ware to keep their offices at their residences, if within eight miles of the court house, and exempt the Justices of the Inferior Court from all other public duties during their continuance in office, approved March 3, 1856.

        A bill to empower Elizabeth Lowther, a widow, of Jones county, to appoint Jesse J. Jordan and James R. Stewart, of the State of Alabama, her executors.

        A bill to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Bank in the city of Atlanta.

        A bill to constitute Abner Roan Zachry the heir of Josias Boswell, of Putnam.

        A bill to provide for the suppression of domestic insurrection within the limits of the State of Georgia, and in the enforcement of the laws by establishing a State guard throughout the State, and to abrogate all commissions heretofore granted to militia officers in this State.

        A bill to allow administrators, executors, guardians and trustees twelve months to invest trust funds.

        A bill to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Dade County Iron Manufacturing and Coal Company.

        A bill to repeal an act passed December 8th, 1860, which


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allows compensation to managers of elections in the county of Emanuel.

        A bill amendatory of an act entitled an act to prevent the spread of small pox in this State, assented to December, 1862.

        A bill to empower the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess a tax on brokers.

        A bill to alter and amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the town of Hawkinsville in the county of Pulaski, to appoint commissioners for the same, and to confer certain powers upon said commissioners; also, to incorporate the town of Grooverville, Brooks county, and for other purposes.

        A bill to change the lines between the counties of Coffee and Clinch and between the counties of Irwin and Wilcox.

        A bill to change the time of holding the January term of the Court of Ordinary of Brooks county.

        A bill to regulate the admisslon of testimony in certain cases.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the passage by the House of Senate bill to incorporate the Georgia Savings Bank of the city of Macon, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.

        Upon the question of concurring in said amendment, the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 21; nays 8.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, Benson, W. M. Brown, Echols, Furlow, Gaston, Gibson, Hansell, Harris, Kendall, Killen, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake, Simmons, Stephens.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Boyd, J. R. Brown, Dyer, James Hilliard, Swearingen, Vason, Ware, Wright.

        Yeas 21; nays 8. So the amendment was concurred in by the constitutional majority of yeas 21, nays 8.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 3 o'clock, P. M.

3 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The following House bills were taken up and severally read the second time:

        A bill to increase and fix the compensation of the employees of the Penitentiary of this State during the present war between the United States and Confederate States.


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        A bill to incorporate the Southern Iron and Coal Mining Company.

        A bill to facilitate suits against Express Companies in this State.

        A bill to change the line between the counties of Baker and Calhoun.

        A bill to release and fully discharge Archibald G. Wimpey, of the county of Lumpkin, as co-executor, from the further execution of the last will and testament of Benjamin M. Smetts, late of said county.

        A bill to amend the 4317th section of the Code of Georgia.

        The Senate took up the message from the House relating to the refusal of the House to concur in any of the Senate amendments except one to House bill to provide for the raising revenue for the political year 1863, and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and to make certain special appropriations, and for other purposes therein mentioned.

        On motion, the Senate insisted on all its amendments, and on motion its action was ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        Mr. Seward's resolution relating to revenue, taxation, &c., was taken up, read and adopted, and ordered to be transmitted forthwith.

        The Senate took up the resolution against the indorsement of Confederate debts by the several States, &c.

        These resolutions were laid on the table for the present.

        The Senate took up House resolution relating to an adjournment sine die.

        On motion, this resolution was concurred in, with an amendment.

        Mr. Jackson moved to go into executive session.

        Upon agreeing to this motion, the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 16; nays 16.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Benson, Boyd, Wm. M. Brown, James R. Brown, Echols, Gordon, Griffin, Hansell, Harris, James Hilliard, Jackson, Killen, McRae, Seward, Simmons, Stephens, Wright.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Anthony, Beasley, Dyer, Furlow, Gaston, Gibson, Kendall, Lewis, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Shewmake, Swearingen, Vason, Ware.

        Yeas 16; nays 16. There being a tie, the President voted in the affirmative, and the motion prevailed to go into executive session.


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        The Senate having returned to open session,

        Mr. Dyer, Chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following acts, to-wit:

        An act to authorize the Governor to refund to parties or corporations any sum or sums of money which may have been expended in obstructing navigable streams in this State against incursions of the enemy.

        An act to change the time of holding the Inferior Court (for county purposes) of Washington county, Ga., from the first Tuesday to the first Wednesday in each month.

        An act amendatory of the laws relating to suits against railroad companies in this State.

        An act to amend the several laws of force in this State, in relation to issuing grants on Head Rights, so as to extend the time for granting the same until the 25th December, 1863, and to allow purchasers in possession of lands surveyed and returned to the Surveyor General's office, to grant the same, and for other purposes.

        An act to amend the charter of the city of Macon, and to authorize the Mayor and Council to grade the streets, assess damages and tax for the same, and to give control and regulations of the side walks, pavements, streets, street crossings and alleys in said city.

        An act to amend the oath of tax-payers for the year 1863, and for other purposes.

        An act to provide for bringing suits against the several banks of this State.

        An act to provide for the payment of expenses incurred under an act to prevent the spread of small pox in this State, assented to Dec. 11th, 1862, and to repeal said act.

        An act making it penal to trespass upon lands in this State.

        An act to incorporate the Georgia Savings Bank of the city of Macon.

        Also, a resolution directing his Excellency the Governor to have two thousand copies each of the sermons delivered at the capital on Fast Day, Friday the 27th day of March, 1863, by the Revs. Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer, published for distribution.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives insist upon their amendments to the bill of the Senate entitled an act to compensate the citizens of this State for certain slaves who have died or been seriously injured under certain circumstances.

        The House also insists upon their amendment to the bill


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of the Senate entitled an act to repeal an act entitled an act to fix the amount of compensation the officers and members of the General Assembly shall receive, and for other purposes.

        The House also insists upon its disagreement to the amendments of the Senate to the bill of the House entitled an act supplemental to an act assented to on the 13th day of December, 1862, to provide for raising a revenue for the political year eighteen hundred and sixty-three and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and for other purposes; and ask for a committee of conference on the two last mentioned bills, and have appointed as such committee on the part of the House, Messrs. Love, Cochran of Glynn, and Reese.

        The House also insists upon its amendment to the fourth amendment of the Senate to said bill.

        The House has concurred in the amendments of the Senate to the bill of the House entitled an act for the relief of the Sheriff of Chatham county.

        The foregoing message from the House being taken up, the Senate adhered to its action, and appointed on the committee asked for, Messrs. Lewis, Gibson, Mosely.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to disagreement on the subject of the impressment of negroes for the defense of Savannah, and asking a committee of conference.

        The President appointed on said committee on the part of the Senate, Messrs. Gordon, Hansell and Furlow.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned till 8 o'clock, P. M.

8 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        The committee of conference to whom was referred the disagreement of the houses on the subject of the impressment of negroes for the defense of Savannah, have had the same under consideration, and unanimously recommend the following as a substitute for both resolutions:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of Georgia, That the Governor be, and he is hereby instructed to fill the requisition of the Confederate General at Savannah for 1500 negroes, for 90 days, in terms of the resolution of Nov. 14, 1862, and the resolution amendatory thereof; provided, that said impressment shall be made from such portions of the State as are under the military jurisdiction of General Beauregard; provided further, that the General shall, as far as


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practicable, impress first such negroes as are engaged in other than agricultural pursuits, and as far as practicable from such counties as have not heretofore furnished their full quota; provided further, that when collected by the Governor, the said negroes shall be turned over to the agents of the Confederate States, so soon as the impressment law of Congress shall be in full operation in this State; provided also, that so soon as the requisition herein provided for shall have been filled, the resolution of the General Assembly, approved Nov. 14, 1862, authorizing the impressment of negroes shall be and are hereby declared to be repealed.

Respectfully submitted.

(Signed)
GEORGE A. GORDON,
Ch'n Senate Committee.

L. N. TRAMMELL,
Ch'n House Committee.


        Upon the question of agreeing to this report, the yeas and nays were recorded, and were yeas 14; nays 13.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Beasley, James R. Brown, Furlow, Gordon, Hansell, Jackson, Killen, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Simmons.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Anthony, Benson, Wm. M. Brown, Dyer, Echols, Gibson, Harris, James Hilliard, Shewmake, Swearingen, Vason' Ware, Wright.

        Yeas 14; nays 13. So the report was agreed to.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an an act to incorporate the Augusta Fire and Marine Insurance Company.

        The House has also taken the following action upon the amendments of the Senate to the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to levy and collect a tax on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State, arising from the sale of goods, wares and merchandize, groceries and provisions, also on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies engaged in the manufacture and sale of cotton and woolen goods, in the tanning and sale of leather, and in the manufacture and sale of any articles made thereof, and in the distillation and sale of spirituous liquors from grain of any kind


Page 182

or from any other article, and to appropriate the same when collected for the support of indigent widows and orphans of deceased soldiers, and for other purposes therein named.

        The House concurs in the 1st and 2d amendments. The House disagrees to the 3d and 5th amendments, and respectfully asks the Senate to recede therefrom; and concurs in all other amendments to said bill.

        The House has also passed the following bill of the Senate, with an amendment, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal the 1376th section of the Code of Georgia.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. Pressdent:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an an act to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Augusta Fire Company, and to grant them certain exemptions.

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize, executors, administrators, trustees and guardians to receive Confederate Treasury notes and State notes, and interest bearing Confederate notes in payment of claims due, or to be due such estates as they may represent.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following acts which originated in the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to legalize and make valid certain acts of Notaries public in this State.

        An act to incorporate an insurance company in the city of Augusta to be called the Commercial Insurance Company of Augusta.

        An act amendatory of the 2488th and 2490th sections of the Code of Georgia.

        Also, a resolution authorizing the Governor to modify the contract with M. S. Temple & Co., for the manufacture of salt at Saltville, Va.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to House amendment to Senate bill to repeal the 1376th section of the Code of Georgia.

        On motion, said amendment was concurred in.

        The committee of conference to whom was referred the bill in reference to the compensation of officers and members of the General Assembly, and the general appropriation bill for this extraordinary session, report, that they recommend the passage of the former bill with the amendment of the House, which excepts the Secretary of the


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Senate and Clerk of the House from its provisions, and rejecting the House amendment, which excludes from the operation of the bill the per diem pay and mileage of the members of this General Assembly.

        They recommend the passage of the appropriation bill with all the amendments of the Senate, and the amendment placed upon it by the House, in reference to paying for stationery, lights, fuel, &c.

M. W. LEWIS,
Ch'n of Senate Com.

P. E. LOVE,
Ch'n of House Com.


        On motion the report was taken up and agreed to.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the refusal of the House to concur in Senate amendments to House bill to be entitled an act to levy and collect a tax on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State, arising from the sale of goods, wares and merchandise, groceries and provisions; also, on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies engaged in the manufacture and sale of cotton and woolen goods, in the tanning and sale of leather, and in the manufacture and sale of any article made thereof; and in the distillation and sale of spirituous liquors from grain of any kind, or from any other article, and to appropriate the same, when collected, for the support of indigent widows and orphans of deceased soldiers, and other persons therein named.

        Mr. Pinckard moved that the Senate recede from its amendments.

        Mr. Pinckard withdrew this motion, and moved to adhere.

        This motion was agreed to.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to House amendment of Senate bill to compensate the citizens of this State for certain slaves who have died or been seriously injured or disabled under certain circumstances.

        On motion, this bill was made the special order for tomorrow, 9 o'clock, A. M.

        On motion, the Senate adjourned to 8 o'clock, A. M., to-morrow.

SATURDAY, APRIL 18TH, 1863.
8 O'CLOCK, A. M.

        The Senate met according to adjournment.

        Mr. James R. Brown moved to reconsider so much of


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the Journals of yesterday as relates to the rejection of the bill to increase the pay of the Public Printer.

        This motion was agreed to.

        On motion this bill was taken up, read the third time and passed.

        Mr. Dyer, Chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President the following acts of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to carry into effect paragraph four of the second section of the fourth Article of the Constitution of this State.

        An act to incorporate the Augusta Fire and Marine Insurance Company.

        Also the following act of the House, viz:

        An act for the relief of the Sheriff and Clerks of the Superior and Inferior Courts of Chatham county.

        An act of the Senate to authorize Executors, Administrators, Trustees and Guardians to receive Confederate Treasury Notes and State Treasury Notes, and interest-bearing Confederate Notes in payment of claims due, or to be due, such estates as they may represent.

        An act to repeal the 1376 section of the Code of Georgia.

        An act to incorporate the Confederate Express Company.

        An act to incorporate the town of Smithville, in the county of Lee, in this State.

        An act to authorize Austin W. Berry of Hancock county, to prepare and vend drugs and medicines, &c.

        An act for the relief of Louiza S. White, Executrix, and John T. White, Executor, of the last will and testament of Wm. M. White, late of Troup county, deceased.

        An act to amend an act to incorporate the Augusta Fire Company, and to grant them certain exemption, approved December 29, 1845.

        An act to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        An act to prevent monopolies and speculation in renting or leasing of salt lands and waters on the coast of Georgia, &c.

        An act to provide for and prescribe the mode of ordering elections for Militia officers in this State, and to repeal so much of the Code of Georgia, as is in conflict with this act.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk, to-wit:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representative have passed the following bills of the Senate to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize Austin W. Berry of Hancock county, to prepare and vend drugs and medicines,


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and do all other matters and things pertaining to said branch of business, also as a regular liscensed druggist.

        A bill to be entitled an act to regulate the admission of testimony in certain cases therein specified.

        Also a bill to be entitled an act for the relief of Louisa S. White, Executrix, and John T. White, Executor of the last will and testament of Wm. M. White, late of Troup county, deceased.

        Also a bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the town of Smithville, alias Renwick, in the county of Lee, in this State.

        Also a bill to be entitled an act to prevent monopolies and speculation in renting or leasing of salt lands and water on the coast of Georgia, and for other purposes.

        Also a bill to be entitled an act to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Company No. 1, of Savannah, with an amendment in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        Also a bill to be entitled an act to amend the four thousand five hundred and ninety-second section (4592) of the Code of Georgia.

        A bill to incorporate the Confederate Express Company.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have receded from it disagreement to the amendment of the Senate to the bill of the House of Representatives entitled

        An act to levy and collect a tax on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State arising from the sale of goods, wares and merchandize, groceries and provisions, also, on the net income or profits of all persons and corporate bodies engaged in the manufacture and sale of cotton and woolen goods, in the tanning and sale of leather, and in the manufacture and sale of any articles made thereof, and in the distillation and sale of spirituous liquors from grain of any kind, or from any other article, and to appropriate the same, when collected, to the support of indigent widows and orphans of deceased soldiers, and other persons therein named.

        The House of Representatives has laid upon the table the report of the conference committee on the amendments to the General Appropriation bill, and also upon the bill to fix the compensation of certain officers, &c., and ask for another committee of conference on the same, and have appointed as such committee on part of the House, Messrs. Lawson, Black and Gibson.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Carrington:


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        Mr. President: The House of Representatives have passed the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to add an additional section to the 8th Division of the Penal Code.

        The House of Representatives have also adopted resolutions and report of special committee relative to the Code of Georgia, in which they respectfully ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        The Senate took up the message of the House touching House amendment to Senate bill to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Company, No. 1, of Savannah.

        On motion the Senate refused to concur in said amendment.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to amendment by the House of Senate bill to compensate the citizens of this State for certain slaves, &c.

        On motion this bill was indefinitely postponed, by a vote of yeas 13, nays 12.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Anthony, Boyd, Furlow, Gibson, Griffin, Harris, James Hilliard, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Simmons, Vason, Ware.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Beasley, James R. Brown, Dyer, Echols, Gaston, Hansell, Kendall, Lewis, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the refusal of the House to agree to the reports of the conference committees of yesterday and asking the appointment of another committee.

        The Senate adhered and appointed on said committee Messrs. Hansell and Harris.

        Mr. Lewis offered the following resolution, which was taken up, read and adopted:

        Resolved, That a committee of three be appointed for the purpose of bringing up the unfinished business.

        The President appointed on said committee Messrs. Boyd, Jas. R. Brown and Anthony.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to repeal an act entitled an act to authorize the Clerks of the Superior and Inferior Courts of the county of Ware to keep their offices at their residences, if within eight miles of the Court House, and exempt the Justices of the Inferior Court from all other public duties during their continuance in office, approved March 3, 1856.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:


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        Mr. President:--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to repeal sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993 of the Code of Georgia.

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess and collect a tax on the proceeds of sales made by commission merchants in said city.

        A bill to be entitled an act to amend the 4592 section of the Code of Georgia.

        A bill to be entitled an act to make uniform the laws of this State for the collection of cost, and for other purposes.

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate a Warehouse Insurance and Deposit Company in the city of Americus.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President: The House of Representatives have passed the following bills of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to relieve certain soldiers who now are or may hereafter be in the military service of the Confederate States or of the State of Georgia from the payment of taxes.

        A bill to be entitled an act to define the liability of common carriers in certain cases.

        The House has also adopted a resolution to discharge a joint special committee on offices of Quartermaster and Commissary Generals, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        A bill to release and fully discharge Archibald G. Wimpey of the county of Lumpkin as co-executor, from the further execution of the last will and testament of Benjamin M. Smett late of said county, deceased.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to extend the limits of the city of Macon and the jurisdiction of the Mayor and Council of said city of Macon over said extension.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the 3d time and passed.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following acts of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to amend the four thousand five hundred and ninety-second section of the Code of Georgia.

        An act to add an additional section to the 8th Division of the Penal Code of this State.


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        An act to make penal the passage, &c., of currency of the United States, or either of them, &c.

        Also, a resolution to rescind the resolution of the General Assembly taking a recess and providing for the re-assembling of the same.

        Also, an act of the House, to-wit: to authorize an increase of the pay of the Public Printer.

        An act to extend the limits of the city of Macon and the jurisdiction of the Mayor and Council of said city of Macon over said extension.

        The following message has been received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to authorize and empower the Mayor and Council of every city and town of this State to purchase land outside of their corporate limits for cemeteries and other public uses of said corporations.

        A bill to be entitled an act for the benefit of deceased soldiers' wives, with amendments, in which they ask the concurrence of the Senate.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The committee of conference on the amendment of the Senate to the appropriation bill concerning the pay of members and officers of the General Assembly, have had the same under consideration, and beg leave to report that they recommend that the Senate do recede from said amendment.

Signed.

ANDREW J. HANSELL,
Ch'n. Senate Com.

T. G. LAWSON,
Ch'n. House Com.


        The people of this State have with pride and gratitude witnessed the unavailing efforts of our enemy to invade our soil by means of his iron clad fleet. And whereas, the heroic garrison at Fort McAlister, on Georgia soil, was the first to demonstrate the failure of iron clad gunboats against the determination of a brave people struggling for the protection of their homes; and whereas it is befitting that a free and grateful people should recognize and commend the heroic action of her brave defenders, in resisting the assaults of a ruthless invader:

        Be it therefore resolved by the General Assembly of Georgia, That the thanks of the people of Georgia are hereby extended to the heroic garrison of Fort McAlister for the gallant and successful defense of a land Battery from the assaults


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of the boasted invulnerability of the iron fleet of our enemy; that they did demonstrate to the world, that the "will to be free gives the necessary power to accomplish it," and that under the protection of a just God, we need fear no demonstration of power or numbers of a foe, seeking our subjugation.

        Resolved, That the determined bravery and resolute courage of the late Major John B. Gallie, the first commander of that post, have written his name upon a lustrous page of Georgia's history, and his sublime death in that same engagement, has left a bright example of heroism to which every Georgia will always point with pride and admiration.

        Resolved, That Capt. Geo. W. Anderson, Jr., who succeeded Major Gallie in command of that post, for the cool courage and successful defense of Fort McAlister, and the noble band under the wise orders of this youthful Commander, deserve the kind remembrance and grateful feelings of the people of this State.

        Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be requested to transmit copies of these resolutions to the surviving family of Major Gallie, to Capt. Anderson and through him to the officers and men constituting the garrison of Fort McAlister, at the time of its severe assaults by the abolitionists.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have agreed to the report of the Committee of Conference on the amendments of the Senate to the general appropriation bill, and the bill to fix the compensation of certain officers, &c.

        The House of Representatives have also passed the following bill of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate an insurance company in the town of Fort Gaines, to be called the Chattahoochee Insurance Company.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to provide for the suppression of domestic insurrection within the limits of the State of Georgia, and in the enforcement of the laws by establishing a State guard throughout the State and to abrogate all commissions heretofore granted to militia officers in this State.

        Mr. Thomas Hilliard called the previous question. This call was sustained. The main question was put.

        The report was agreed to.

        Upon the question shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded and were yeas 14 nays 10.

        Those who voted in the affirmative are Messrs.

        Anthony, Beasley, Dyer, Furlow, Gibson, Hansell, Harris, James Hilliard, Lewis, Mitchell, Mosely, Shewmake, Simmons, Vason.


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        Those who voted in the negative are Messrs.

        Alexander, Boyd, James R. Brown, Echols, Gordon, Griffin, Kendall McRae, Seward.

        Yeas 14, nays 10.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the town of Fort Gaines in the county of Clay, to define its jurisdictional limits and for other purposes therein mentioned.

        A bill to be entitled an act to define the liability of the Western and Atlantic Railroad for injuries done to persons and property, and to extend the provisions of the act entitled an act to define the liability of the several Railroad Companies in this State for injury to persons or property, to prescribe in what counties they may be sued and served with process, approved March 5th, 1856.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to legalize certain processes, commissions, &c., returnable to February term 1863, Walton Superior Court.

        The report was agreed to, the bill read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to allow administrators, executors, guardians and trustees twelve months to invest trust funds.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Southern Iron and Coal Mining Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to empower Elizabeth Lowther, a widow of Jones county, to appoint Jesse J. Jordan and James R. Stewart of the State of Alabama, her executors.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the line between the counties of Randolph and Calhoun, so as to embrace in the county of Randolph lots of land Nos. 210, 211, 246 and 247 in the 5th district of originally Lee.


Page 191

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to increase and fix the compensation of the employees of the Penitentiary of this State during the present war between the United States and the Confederate States.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time, and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the lines between the counties of Coffee and Clinch and between the counties of Irwin and Wilcox.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to empower the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess a tax on brokers.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives have passed the following bills of the Senate, to-wit:

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Chestatee River and Town Creek Gold Mining Company.

        A bill to be entitled an act to incorporate the Augusta and Dahlonega Mining Company.

        A bill to be entitled an act to declare the liability of the Western and Atlantic Rail Road for damages in running locomotives, cars and other machinery to regulate the mode of bringing suits therefor and to declare all suits brought against said Railroad since the adoption of the Code legal and valid.

        A bill to be entitled an act to relieve Mrs. M. A. F. Snead formerly Mrs. M. A. F. Graham from the pains and penalties of bigamy, and for other purposes.

        Mr. Pinckard offered the following resolution, which on motion, was taken up, read and laid on the table for the present:

        Resolved by the General Assembly, That the resolution by which the two Houses have agreed to adjourn at 12 o'clock this day, be repealed and that the General Assembly will adjourn sine die this day at 9 o'clock, P. M.

        Mr. Seward offered the following resolutions:

        Resolved, That we tender our thanks to the Hon. John Billups, President of the Senate, for the able and impartial


Page 192

manner in which he has discharged his duties as presiding officer of this body.

        Resolved, That in taking leave of him we offer our best wishes for his future happiness and prosperity, and will retain in our memory the fond recollection of his urbane and amiable deportment towards this body.

        On motion, these resolutions were taken up and unanimously adopted with a rising vote.

        Mr. Mosely offered the following resolution, which on motion, was taken up, read and adopted.

        Resolved, That the thanks of the Senate be tendered to Jas. M. Mobley, Esq., and his assistant Clerks for the faithful discharge of their duty and their courtesy to the Senate, and on taking leave of them our best wishes attend them for time and eternity.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to repeal the one hundred and seventy eighth section of the Code of Georgia, and to revive and put in force the laws of this State prescribing the manner of electing a Messenger and Doorkeeper for the Senate and House of Representatives prior to the adoption of the Code.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to alter and amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the town of Hawkinsville in the county of Pulaski, to appoint commissioners for the same, and to confer certain powers upon said commissioners, also to incorporate the town of Grooverville, Brooks county, and for other purposes.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to encourage and regulate the mining of Iron, Coal, Copper, Gold and other useful metals and minerals in Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the line between the counties of Pickens and Gilmer, &c.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--


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        House bill to amend an act entitled an act to incorporate the Dade County Iron Manufacturing and Coal Company.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        Mr. Dyer chairman of the committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President the following acts of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to repeal an act to fix the amount of compensation of the members and officers of the General Assembly, &c., passed over the Executive veto, November 30th, 1861, and for other purposes.

        An act to repeal sections 986, 987, 988, 989, 990, 992 and 993 of the Code of Georgia.

        An act to authorize and empower the Mayor and Council of every city and town of this State to purchase lands outside of their corporate limits for cemeteries and other public uses of said corporation.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President.--The House of Representatives insists upon its amendment to a bill of the Senate to be entitled an act to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Company No. 1, of Savannah, and respectfully ask the Senate to recede from the same. The House of Representatives have also adopted a resolution appointing a joint committee to wait on His Excellency the Governor, &c.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill amendatory of an act entitled an act to prevent the spread of small pox in the State of Georgia, assented to Dec. 1862.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to be entitled an act to change the time of holding the January term of the Court of Ordinary of Brooks county.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to authorize J. M. Broadfield, administrator (de bonis non) on the estate of Issac Boring, deceased, late of Putnam county, to sell at private sale a house and lot in the town of Eatonton.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.


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        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to change the line between the counties of Baker and Calhoun.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to amend the 4317th section of the Code of Georgia.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to constitute Abner Roan Zachry heir of Josias Boswell, of the county of Putnam.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to fix the rates of toll for grinding grain in the counties of Gwinnett, Cherokee and Forsyth.

        Mr. J. R. Brown moved to amend by striking out the words "one twelfth" and inserting "one tenth."

        The amendment was agreed to.

        The report as amended was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to repeal an act passed Dec. 8, 1860, which allows compensation to managers of elections in the county of Emanuel.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to provide for taking testimony in certain cases therein mentioned.

        The report was agreed to, the bill was read the third time and passed.

        Mr. Dyer chairman of the Committee on Enrollment reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President the following acts of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to incorporate the Chestatee River and Town Creek Gold Mining Company.

        An act to authorize the Mayor and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess and collect a tax on the proceeds of sales made by commission merchants in said city.


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        An act to amend the four thousand five hundred and ninety-second section of the Code of Georgia.

        An act to make uniform the laws of this State for the collection of costs and for other purposes.

        An act to be entitled an act to relieve certain soldiers who now are or may hereafter be in the military service of the Confederate States or of the State of Georgia, from the payment of taxes.

        An act to define the liability of common carriers in certain cases.

        An act to incorporate the town of Fort Gaines in the county of Clay, to define its jurisdictional limits, and for other purposes therein mentioned.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to the House insisting upon its amendment to Senate bill to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Company No. 1, of Savannah.

        On motion, the Senate adhered to its refusal to concur in said amendments.

        The Senate took up as the report of the committee of the whole--

        House bill to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Bank in the city of Atlanta.

        The report was agreed to.

        Upon the question shall this bill pass? the yeas and nays were recorded and were yeas 20 nays 6.

        Those who voted in the affirmative were Messrs.

        Alexander, Anthony, Beasley, Benson, Echols, Furlow, Gibson, Gordon, Griffin, Hansell, Harris, Lewis, McRae, Mitchell, Mosely, Pinckard, Seward, Shewmake, Simmons, Swearingen.

        Those who voted in the negative were Messrs.

        Boyd, J. R. Brown, Dyer, Gaston, James Hilliard, Ware.

        Yeas 20 nays 6. The reconsidered bill passed.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President the following act of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to charter and incorporate a bank in the city of Augusta by the name and style of the Traders' and Importers' Bank.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:--The House has passed the bill of the Senate to incorporate a bank in the city of Augusta by the name and style of the Traders' and Importers' Bank, by a constitutional vote, yeas 83, nays 18.


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        The Senate took up the message of the House relating to House resolution to discharge a joint special committee on offices of Quartermaster and Commissary Generasl.

        On motion, the resolution was concurred in.

        The Senate took up the message of the House in relation to resolutions and report of the special committee relative to the Code of Georgia.

        On motion, this resolution was concurred in.

        The Senate took up the message of the House relative to resolution to appoint a joint committee to wait on his Excellency the Governor, &c.

        The committee on the part of the Senate were Messrs. Mitchell, Mosely and Lewis.

        The committee retired, and having returned, reported that they had discharged the duty imposed; that the Governor had no further communication to make, and concurred in the resolution to adjourn.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following act of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to incorporate the Augusta and Dahlonega Mining Company.

        Mr. Dyer, Chairman, of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President the following acts of the Senate, to-wit:

        An act to relieve Mrs. M. A. F. Snead, formerly Mrs. M. A. F. Graham, from the pains and penalties of bigamy, and for other purposes.

        An act to incorporate a Warehouse, Insurance and Deposit Company in the city of Americus.

        An act to define the liability of the Western & Atlantic Railroad for injuries done to persons and property, and define the liabilities of the several railroads in this State, &c.

        An act to define the liability of Western & Atlantic Railroad for damages in running locomotives, cars, and other machinery, &c.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Carrington, their Clerk:

        Mr. President:-- The House of Representatives have unanimously adopted a resolution prolonging this session till 12½, P. M.

        The House insists upon its amendment to the bill of the Senate entitled an act to extend the charter of the Oglethorpe Fire Company, No. 1, of Savannah.

        The House has concurred in the following resolutions of the Senate:

        A resolution in relation to the purchase of the library of A. A. Smets, of Savannah.


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        A resolution directing the Governor to furnish the members of the General Assembly, &c., with copies of laws and journals.

        A resolution to turn over journal of last day of last session to State Printer.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as ready for the signature of the President, the following resolution of the Senate:

        A resolution relative to the purchase of the library of A. A. Smets, late of Chatham county.

        A bill to incorporate the Chattahoochee Insurance Company of Fort Gaines.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following act of the House, to-wit:

        An act to provide for the suppression of domestic insurrection within the limits of the State of Georgia.

        Also, the following acts of the House of Representatives:

        An act to levy and collect a tax on the net profits of all persons and corporate bodies in this State, &c.

        An act to change the lines between the counties of Coffee and Clinch, and between the counties of Irwin and Wilcox.

        An act to allow administrators, executors, guardians and trustees twelve months to invest trust funds.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate, the following resolution of the House, to-wit:

        A resolution instructing the Adjutant and Inspector General to prepare a system of military laws for the State of Georgia.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House and ready for the signature of the President, of the Senate, the following act of the House, to-wit:

        An act to increase and fix the compensation of the employees of the Penitentiary of this State during the present war.

        Also, a resolution against the running of the blockade.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and ready for the signature of the President, the following Senate resolutions, to-wit:


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        A resolution directing the Governor to furnish the members of the General Assembly and Secretary and Clerk with copies of the laws and journals.

        A resolution to turn over journals of last session to State Printer.

        A resolution of instructions to Inferior Courts, touching disposals of appropriations for indigent soldiers' families.

        A bill for the relief of Nathan Singletary and William Mims of the county of Schley.

        A bill for the relief of the Sheriff of Chatham county.

        A bill to alter and amend an act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers and manufacturers of spirituous liquors in this State, approved Nov. 22, 1862.

        A bill to change the county line between the counties of Randolph and Calhoun, so as to embrace in the county of Randolph lots Nos. 210, 211, 246 and 247 in the 5th district of originally Lee.

        A bill to empower the Major and Council of the city of Atlanta to assess a tax on brokers.

        A bill to repeal an act passed December 8th, 1860, which allows compensation to managers of elections in the county of Emanuel.

        A bill to allow administrators, executors, guardians and trustees twelve months to invest trust funds.

        A bill to legalize certain processes, commissions, &c., returnable to February term, 1863, Walton Superior Court.

        A bill to facilitate suits against Express Companies in this State.

        A bill to empower Elizabeth Lowther, a widow, of Jones county, to appoint Jesse J. Jordan and James R. Stewart, of the State of Alabama, her executors.

        Mr. Dyer, chairman of the Committee on Enrollment, reported as duly enrolled and signed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and ready for the signature of the President of the Senate,the following acts of the House, to-wit:

        An act, assented to December 13th, 1862, to provide for raising a revenue for the political year 1863, and to appropriate money for the support of the Government during said year, and to make certain special appropriations, and for other purposes.

        An act to provide for taking testimony in certain cases therein mentioned.

        An act to incorporate the Mechanics' Savings Bank in the city of Atlanta.

        An act to constitute Abner Roan Zachry the heir of Josias Boswell, of the county of Putnam.

        An act to change the line between the counties of Baker and Calhoun.


Page 199

        An act to incorporate the Evangelical Lutheran Synod of Georgia.

        An act to amend the 4317th section of the Code of Georgia.

        An act to encourage and regulate the mining of iron, coal, copper, gold and other useful metals and minerals in Georgia.

        An act to repeal an act passed December 8, 1860, which, allows compensation to managers of elections in the county of Emanuel.

        An act to empower Elizabeth Lowther, a widow of Jones county, to appoint Jesse J. Jordan and James R. Stewart, of the State of Alabama, her executors.

        An act to incorporate the town of Hawkinsville in the county of Pulaski, to appoint commissioners for the some, and to confer certain powers, &c.

        An act to authorize J. M. Broadfield, administrator de non on the estate of Isaac Boring, deceased, late of Putnam county, to sell at private sale a house and lot in the town of Eatonton, belonging to said estate.

        An act to fix the rates of toll for grinding grain in the counties of Gwinnett, Cherokee and Forsyth.

        An act to legalize certain processes, commissions, &c., returnable to February term 1863, Walton Superior Court.

        The Senate took up and concurred in the message of the House relating to extending the time of the session one-half hour.

        According to previous resolution, the Senate adjournment sine die.


Page 201

    INDEX TO CALLED SESSION.

    • A.

      • ABSENCE.

        • Leave granted to--

        • Mr. Boyd, 99
        • Mr. Dyer, 145
        • Mr. Echols, 89
        • Mr. Furlow, 117
        • Mr. Gaston, 69
        • Mr. Gibson, 35 96
        • Mr. Gordon, 85
        • Mr. Harris, 35 78
        • Mr. Hill, 145
        • Mr. James Hilliard, 167
        • Mr. Thos. Hilliard, 137
        • Mr. Jamison, 117
        • Mr. Kendall, 35
        • Mr. Killen, 153
        • Mr. Lane, 96
        • Mr. Lewis, 78
        • Mr. Shewmake, 89
        • Mr. Smith, 78
        • Mr. Stafford, 69
        • Mr. Vason, 117
        • Messenger of the Senate, 116
        • Senators from the 9th and 24th Dists., 158
        • Absent at Roll call, 3 94
        • Adjournment, 4 30 31 35 38 41 44 47 62 64 66 69 72 75 78 81 85 86 89 94 96 99 100 105 107 110 117 125 135 136 145 151 153 163 167 168 177 180 183
        • Resolution relative to, 98 106 148 154 199
        • Resolution relative to, adjournment sine die, 178 191
        • Senate adjourned sine die, 199
      • ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR GENERAL.

      • Res. relative to office of, 88 117
      • Message of Gov. relative to, 107 112
      • To prepare, a system of militia laws, 119
      • ADMR'S. EXECUTORS, GUARDIANS, &c.

      • Authorize to receive Confederate and State Treasury Notes, 38 41 45
      • Provide for the proper admr. of estate of L. L. Trawick, 41 61 70
      • Louisa S. White, Ex'rx. and J. T. White, Exr., 45 69 73
      • David Dickson and Henry Rogers, Exrs. 107 113 123

Page 202

      • John A. C. Anderson, Admr. 116 123 131
      • Admr. on estate W. R. Blackman, 134 145 148
      • Empower Mrs. E. Lowther to appoint Exrs. 164 176 190
      • Archibald G. Wimpey, Ex'r. 165 178 187
      • J. M. Broadfield, 165 176 193
      • Allow 12 months to invest trust frunds, 165 176 190
      • AGRICULTURE.

      • See "Cotton" and "Provisions."
      • APPROPRIATIONS.

      • Dr. B. M. Palmer, 40
      • Hon. David Irwin, 88 99 111
      • For support of Government, 141 152 159 178 182 188
      • Lunatic Asylum, 142 152 162
      • ARMS

      • Furnished for State defense, 107 124 132 142
      • ASSOCIATIONS.

      • Incorporate Mechanics' Savings Association of Columbus, 71 106 116
      • ASYLUMS.

      • LUNATIC.
        • Appropriate money for, 142 152 162
    • B.

    • BANKS AND BANKING.
      • Relief Cherokee Insurance and Banking Co. 71 99 106
      • Incor. Traders' and Importers' Bank, 79 98 104
      • Amend act to grant relief to the Banks and people, 115
      • Bill to provide for bringing suits against, 152 163 169
      • Incor. Georgia Savings Bank, 153 163 169 177
      • Incor. Mechanics' Savings Bank of Atlanta, 164 176 195
      • Relieve Mrs. M. A. F. Graham from the pains and penalties of, 130 143 146
      • BLOCKADE.

      • Res. relative to running the, 133
      • BONDS OF CONFEDERATE STATES.

      • See "Indorsement."
      • BROKERS.

      • Assess tax on, in Atlanta, 165 177 191

Page 203

      • C.

        • CHANGE BILLS.

        • Legalize signing of certain, issued by W. & A. R. R., 61 71 77
        • Bill to relieve W. J. Anderson from penalties of issuing, 106 118
        • Suspend issuing of, by W. & A. R. R., 166
        • CHURCHES--RIGHTS OF THE

        • Gov's. message on, 11
        • CIRCUITS--JUDICIAL.

        • Judge of the Pataula, 32 34
        • Solicitors General pro tem, 64 69 75 93
        • Judge of Coweta, 167
        • CITIES AND TOWNS.

        • Incor. Smithville alias Renwick, 45 69 75
        • Tax on Commission Merchants in Atlanta, 69 76 82
        • Define the qualification of voters at elections in Columbus, 71 106 123
        • Incor. Fort Gaines, 79 98 104
        • Authorize Mayor and Council of, buy lands outside of limits for cemeteries, &c., 130 143 146
        • Bill for relief of all incorporated, 142 152 162
        • Authorize city Council of Columbus to sell commons, &c., 142 149 162
        • Amend charter of Macon, 152 163 168
        • Amend act incorporating Hawkinsville, 165 177 192
        • Incorporate Grooversville, 165 177 192
        • Extend limits of Macon, &c., 165 175 187
        • Tax on Brokers in Atlanta, 165 177 191
        • CODE.

        • Gov's message on, 9
        • Change 2488th section, 30 34 36 175
        • Amend 4708th section, 34 37 40
        • Repeal 1376 and 4496 articles, 36 41 46
        • Repeal 1376th section, 38 41 46 62 68 182
        • Amend 4592d Section, 64 67 70 75 76 86
        • Repeal 986, 987, 988, 990 sections of, 66 70 73 106 134 149
        • Repeal relative to election of militia officers, 45 69 73
        • Amend a part of 4220th Sec., 79 96 97 127 131
        • Pay Hon. David Irwin for superintending publication of 88 99 111
        • Amend 2041st sec. 106 111 138 139 140 141 146 154
        • Amend 981 and 1040 sections, &c., 106 124 134 149
        • Amend 739th section, 145 150
        • Repeal 178th section, 164 176 192
        • Amend 4317th section, 165 178 194
        • Res. relative to, 196

Page 204

        • COLLEGES.

        • Cassville Female College, 115 124 134
        • Cherokee Baptist College, 115 124 134
        • COMMITTEES.

        • To wait on Governor, 4 196
        • On Transportation, 29
        • On Indorsement of Confederate Bonds, 29
        • On planting cotton, 29 42 96
        • On distillation, 29
        • On Small Pox, 29
        • On Military Affairs, 29
        • On making arrangements for fast day, 29
        • On res. relative to surplus of corn, peas, &c., 29
        • House Committees, 31
        • On supplies, 29 35 76 80
        • To wait on Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer, 37
        • Special on the impressment of negroes, 47 63 95 103 180
        • Georgia's interest in the Cotton Card Manufactory, 61
        • To procure services of Clergymen to open daily sessions with prayer, 64
        • On bill to regulate the payment of interest, 73
        • Committee on Enrollment, 74
        • Special committee on bill for relief of widows of deceased soldiers, 125
        • To respond to Mrs. Howell and Miss Edwards, 136 139
        • On bill to amend 2041st sec. of Code, 146
        • On Res. rel. to impressment of laborers, 158 180
        • On bill for relief of Sheriff of Chatham county, 180
        • To bring up unfinished business. 186
        • COMMON CARRIERS.

        • Amend Code relative to, 106 111 138 139 140 141 154
        • Report of committee on, 123
        • COMMUNICATION.

        • From Mrs. Howell and Miss Sue Edwards, 136
        • From Bryan Tyson, 32
        • CONFEDERATE DEBT.

        • See "Debt--Confederate."
        • CORONERS.

        • Hold inquests with juries of six men, 124 135 144
        • COTTON CARDS.

        • Res. relative to, 32 61
        • Message from Gov. relative to, 46 61
        • Committee on, 61
        • Report of committee, 137
        • COTTON PLANTING.

        • Committee on Planting Cotton, 29 96

Page 205

        • Bill to prevent and punish the planting over a certain quantity of land in cotton or tobacco, 42 48 66 73 74 78 89
        • Report of majority of committee on, 42
        • Res. to appoint a committee on cotton bill, 79 96
        • COTTON.

        • Res. relative to price of cotton for taxation, 148
        • COUNTY LINES.

          • To change between--

          • Madison and Hart, 41 61 70
          • Harris and Talbot, 71 99 113
          • Miller and Early, 107 124 131 153
          • Campbell and Fayette, 115 124 134
          • Coffee and Clinch, 164 177 191
          • Irwin and Wilcox, 164 177 191
          • Pickens and Gilmer, 165 176 192
          • Baker and Calhoun, 165 178 194
          • Randolph and Calhoun, 166 176 190
        • COURTESIES.

        • Drs. Pierce and Palmer and Brig. Gen. Doles invited to seats on floor, 35
        • COURTS.

          • SUPREME,

          • Change time and places of holding, 136 145 150 154
          • SUPERIOR,

          • Returns to Floyd Sup'r. Court spring term, 1863, 30 34 36
          • Change time of holding in Baker, 34 37 40
          • Prescribe the mode of selecting jurors in Chatham, for the trial of criminal cases, 61 71 77
          • Authorize to assign and set off dower, &c., 71 77 93
          • Judges to appoint Trustees in certain cases, 107 124 134 138
          • Clerks of in Ware county, 164 176 186
          • Of Walton county, 165 175 190
          • INFERIOR.

          • Returns to Floyd, spring term 1863, 30 34 36
          • Of Ware co.--Assess tax to build C. H., 38 41 48 64
          • Change the time of holding in Washington, 152 163 170
          • Clerks of, in Ware county, 164 176 186
          • ORDINARY.

          • Change time of holding January term of Brooks county, 165 177 193
        • CURRENCY.

        • Resolutions relative to, 38 150

Page 206

        • Bill to prevent and punish the circulation of foreign paper, 63 70 75
        • To punish the refusal of Confederate notes, &c., 63 70 75 82 150
      • D.

        • DEBT--CONFEDERATE.

        • Gov's message on State indorsement, 12
        • Committee on, 29
        • Alabama and Florida resolutions, &c., 23
        • Resolutions relative to, 33 52 60 180 178
        • Report of Committee on, 48 94
        • Bill to guarantee Georgia's proportion, 69 82 86 97 98 99 101 103 108 134 145 146
        • Gov's message on Texas resolutions, 83
        • See "Indorsement."
        • DEFENSE.

        • Gov's message rel. to impressment of negroes, 10
        • Res. rel. to negroes at work on defenses at Savannah, 35 37 135 142
        • DISTILLATION.

        • Gov's message on, 7
        • Committee on, 29
        • Prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain in the manufacture of spirituous liquors, 72 76 86 88 89 100 101
        • DOCKAGE, WHARFAGE AND STORAGE.

        • Establish rates of; in Savannah, 35 41 45
        • DOMESTIC INSURRECTION.

        • Bill to provide for the suppression of, &c. 165 176 189
        • DOOR-KEEPER.

        • Repeal Code relative to election of, 164 176 192
        • DRUGS AND MEDICINE.

        • Authorize A. W. Berry to prepare and vend, 99 106 107 110 116 117
      • E.

        • EDUCATION.

        • Teachers of common schools, 76 87 95
        • Amend act incorporating Cassville Female College, 115 124 134

Page 207

        • ELECTIONS.

        • Repeal Code rel. to election of militia officers, &c., 45 69 73
        • Define the qualification of voters in Columbus, 71 106 123
        • Repeal act to compensate managers of, in Chattooga, 72 99 113
        • Repeal Code rel. to election of Doorkeeper and Messenger, 164
        • Managers of, in Emanuel, 166 176 194
        • ENDORSEMENT.

        • See "Indorsement."
        • ESTATES.

        • Of L. L. Trawick, 41 61 70
        • Of Wm. M. White, 45 69 73
        • Of John Dickson, 107 113 123
        • Of John A. G. Anderson, 116 123 131
        • Of W. R. Blackman, 134 145 148
        • Of Benj. M. Smith, 165 178 187
        • Of Isaac Boring, 165 176 193
        • EXECUTORS.

        • See "Administrators, &c."
        • EXPRESS COMPANIES.

        • Confederate Express--to incorporate, 65 70 75 82
        • Facilitate suits against, 166 178
      • F.

        • FACTORIES, TANNERIES, &c.

        • Rescind res. rel. to seizing, 124 125
        • FAST DAY.

        • Res. relative to, 29
        • Committee to procure copies of sermons delivered on, 37
        • Compensate Dr. B. M. Palmer for religious service on, 40
        • Res. to have sermons printed, 166
        • FEES.

        • Raise, of Jailors, 71 99 113
        • FIRE COMPANIES.

        • Citizens Fire Co. No. 8, of Augusta, 34 37 40
        • Augusta Fire Co.--amend act, 34 37 39
        • Oglethorpe No. 1 of Savannah, 66 70 76 186
        • Washington Fire Co. of Savannah--extend charter, 113 123 131 195
        • FREE PERSONS OF COLOR.

        • In Warren and Talliaferro, 142 152 162

Page 208

      • G.

        • GENERAL ASSEMBLY.

        • Proclamation of Gov. convening, 3
        • Compensation of officers and members, 32 37 39 182 188
        • Fix compensation of members of next, 142 152 158 170
        • GOVERNOR.

        • Committee to wait on, 4 196
        • Message from, to the General Assembly, 5
        • Message and accompanying documents ordered printed, 30
        • Message from, 32 87 171
        • Nominating a person to fill the office of Judge of Pataula circuit, 32 34
        • Relative to cotton cards, 46
        • Texas resolutions, 82 83
        • Raising pay of privates and non-commissioned officers, 90
        • Office of Adj. & Insp. General, 107 112
        • Nominating a person for Judge of Coweta circuit, 167
        • GRAHAM, MRS. M. A. F.

        • Relieve, from the pains and penalties of bigamy, 130 143 146
        • GRAIN.

        • Prevent the unnecessary consumption of, in manufacture of spirituous liquors, 72 76 86 88 89 100 101
        • Prescribe the rates of toll for grinding, in Gwinnett, Cherokee and Forsyth, 165 176 194
        • GUARDIANS.

        • See "Administrators, &c."
        • GUNS.

        • Claims of persons who have furnished guns by authority of the State, 107 124 132 142
      • H.

        • HEAD RIGHT GRANTS.

        • Amend laws rel. to issuing, 142 152 159 166
        • HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

        • Message from, 4 31 36 39 40 44 60 62 66 72 82 87 92 94 96 97 102 103 110 111 117 125 137 142 144 147 148 151 156 157 158 161 163 167 168 170 174 175 179 181 182 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 193 195 196

Page 209

        • HOWELL, MRS. & MISS EDWARDS.

        • Communication from, 136
        • Response of Senate to, 139
      • I.

        • IMPRESSMENT.

        • Gov's message on impressment of negroes, 10
        • Special committee on impressment of negroes, 47 63 102
        • Slaves at work on defenses at Savannah, 35 37 135 142
        • Resolution relative to, 95 102 150 158 180
        • INCOME TAX.

        • Bill to levy and collect, 149 162 171 183
        • INCORPORATIONS.

          • Associations,

          • Mechanics' Savings Association of Columbus, 71 106 116
          • Banks--

          • Traders' & Importers' Bank, 79 98 104
          • Savings Bank of Macon, 153 163 169 177
          • Mechanics' Savings Bank of Atlanta, 164 176 195
          • Cities and Towns--

          • Smithville alias Renwick, 45 69 75
          • Fort Gaines, 79 98 104
          • Grooverville, Brooks county, 165 177 192
          • Express Company--

          • Confederate Express Co., 65 70 75 82
          • Fire Companies--

          • Citizens Fire Co. of Augusta, No. 8, 34 37 40
          • Augusta Fire Co.--amend act, 34 37 39
          • Oglethorpe, No. 1, of Savannah, extend charter, 66 70 76 186 195
          • Insurance Companies--

          • Augusta Fire & Marine Ins. Co., 34 37 40
          • Commercial Ins. Co. of Augusta, 34 37 40
          • Georgia Home Insurance Co., 41 61 70
          • Chattahoochee Ins. Co., 79 87 96
          • Stonewall Insurance Co., 136 145 148
          • Griffin Fire and Marine Ins. Co., 145 150
          • Mining and Manufacturing Co.'s--

          • Blanceville Slate Mining Co., 42 48 68
          • Augusta and Dahlonega Mining, Co., 89 98 105
          • Chestatee River and Town Creek Gold Mining Co., 89 98 105
          • Confederate Coal Mining Co., 89 98 105
          • Ga. Agricultural Implement & Lumber Manufacturing Co., 117 131

Page 210

          • Southern Iron and Coal Mining Co., 165 178 190
          • Dade co. Iron Manufacturing and Coal Co., 166 176 193
          • Miscellaneous Incorporations--

          • Warehouse, Insurance and Deposit Co. in Americus and LaGrange, 75 87 93
          • Ga. Locomotive & Tool Works, 79 97 106
          • Evangelical Lutheran Synod, 163 176 188
          • Railroad Companies--

          • Atlanta & Roswell R. R. Co., 45 69 73
        • INDORSEMENT OF CONFEDERATE DEBT.

        • Gov's message on State, 12
        • Letter of Gov. Shorter to Gov. Brown, 23
        • Alabama resolutions, 23
        • Letter of Gov. Milton to Gov. Brown, 24
        • Florida resolutions, 24
        • Letter of Gov. Pettus to Gov. Brown, 25
        • Mississippi act, 26
        • Letter of Gov. Bonham to Gov. Brown, 27
        • Act of South Carolina, 27
        • Committee on, 29
        • Resolution rel. to, 33 52 60 79 108 178
        • Report of the majority of the committee on, 48 67 94
        • Report of the minority of the committee on, 52 67 94
        • Bill to guarantee Ga.'s proportionate share of $500,000,000, 68 82 86 97 98 99 101 103 108
        • Gov.'s message on Texas resolutions, 83
        • Georgia's proportion of $200,000,000, 134 145 146
        • INFERIOR COURTS.

        • See "Courts--Inferior."
        • INSURANCE COMPANIES.

        • Augusta Fire and Marine Insurance Co., 34 37 40
        • Commercial Insurance Company of Augusta, 34 37 40
        • Georgia Home Insurance Co., 41 61 70
        • Relief of Cherokee Insurance and Banking Co., 71 99 106
        • Incor. Chattahoochee Insurance Co., 79 87 96
        • Incor. Stonewall Insurance Co., 136 145 148
        • Griffin Fire and Marine Ins. Co., 145 150
        • INTEREST.

        • Bill to regulate the payment of, 35 67 68 73

Page 211

        • INTERNAL TRANSPORTATION.

        • See "Railroads."
        • INQUESTS.

        • Coroners to hold with juries of six men, 124 135 144
        • INVASION,

        • Bill to aid in repelling, &c., 165 176 189
      • J.

        • JAILORS.

        • Raise fees of, 71 99 113
        • JUDGES.

        • Message from Gov. nominating a person to fill the office of Judge in Pataula circuit, 32
        • To appoint trustees in certain cases, 107 124 134 138
        • See "Courts."
        • JURORS.

        • Manner of selecting, for criminal cases in Chatham, 61 71 77
        • Regulate the fining of defaulting, 69 76 82 150
        • Make uniform the compensation of grand and petit, 74 87 96 115
        • Amend laws rel. to selection of, in civil and criminal cases, 101 111 118 123
      • L.

        • LAND.

        • Titles to, when parties die and have bonds out for titles, 30 34 36 47 131 138
        • Authorize the issuance of a grant to certain lot of, in Brooks county, 41 61
        • Prevent monopoly or extortion in renting or leasing salt lands, 42 48 68
        • Lot No. 46 in 30th dist[.] originally Lee, 71 99 114
        • Confirm to Confederate Gov't certain, in Richmond, 79 97 106
        • Authorize cities and towns to buy lands outside of limits for cemeteries, &c., 130 143 146
        • Penal to trespass upon, 152 163 175
        • LAWS & JOURNALS.

        • Resolutions relative to, 34 42 153
        • LIQUORS.

        • See "Distillation."

Page 212

      • M.

        • MANUFACTURING & MINING CO.'S.

        • Incor. Blanceville Slate Mining Co., 42 48 68
        • Incor. Augusta & Dahlonega Mining Co., 89 98 105
        • Incor. Chestatee River and Town Creek Gold Mining Co., 89 98 105
        • Incor. Confederate Coal Mining Co., 89 98 105
        • Incor. Ga. Agricultural Implement and Lumber Manufacturing Co., 117 131
        • Incor. Southern Iron & Coal Mining Co., 165 178 190
        • Incor. Dade county Iron Manufacturing & Coal Co., 166 176 193
        • Regulate Mining of iron, coal, &c., 167 176 192
        • MASONIC.

        • Amend act incorporating Trustees of Masonic Hall, Milledgeville, 61 71 77
        • MEDICINE.

        • Authorize A. W. Berry to prepare and vend drugs and medicine, 99 106 110 116 177
        • Authorize F. C. David to practice, 107 116 117
        • Authorize G. W. Fackler to practice, 107 116 117
        • Authorize Rufus Barker to practice, 116 117
        • MEMORIAL.

        • From J. J. Flournoy, 32
        • MESSAGES.

        • From House--See "House of Representatives."
        • From Governor--See "Governor."
        • MESSENGER.

        • Repeal Code rel. to election of, 164 176 192
        • MILITARY.

        • Gov's message on military law, 11
        • Committee on, 29 117
        • Repeal Code rel. to election of militia officers, &c., 45 69 73
        • Relieve certain soldiers from taxation, &c., 87 98 105
        • Gov's message rel. to raising pay of soldiers, 90
        • Resolutions rel. to raising pay of soldiers, 92 118
        • Communication from Dr. Ridley relative to an improved fire arm, 101
        • Res. authorizing Gov. to furlough State troops, 107 116
        • Res. rel. to office of Adj. & Ins. Gen'l, 88 117
        • Message of Gov. rel. to office of Adj. & Ins. General, 107 112

Page 213

        • Revive the militia laws of force prior to 1st Jan, 1863, 119 131 142
        • Res. requiring Adjutant Gen. to prepare a system of militia laws, 119
        • Res. rel. to fund for support of indigent families of soldiers, 124
        • Bill for relief of widows of deceased soldiers, 85 98 118 125
        • Bill to provide for suppression of domestic insurrection, &c., 165 176 d89
        • Res. rel to defense of Fort McAlister, 188
        • MINING.

        • Regulate mining of iron, coal, &c. 167 176 192
      • N.

        • NAVIGATION.

        • Authorize J. W. C. Cook and others to navigate North Oconee, 71 99 114
        • NEGROES.

        • Gov's message rel. to impressment of, 10
        • Compensate citizens for, who have died in service of the State, 30 34 36 64 65 67 171 183 186
        • Res. rel. to, at work on defenses at Savannah, 35 37 135 142
        • Special committee on the impressment of, 47 63 95
        • Res. rel. to teaching, to read, &c., 67 88
        • Res. rel. to impressment of, 95 102 150 158 180
        • NOTARIES PUBLIC.

        • Make legal and valid certain acts of, 34 37 38
      • O.

        • OATH OF TAX PAYERS.

        • Amend, for 1863, 38 41 47 68 145 148 154
        • OBSTRUCTIONS.

        • Gov. to refund money to parties for obstructing navigable streams, 145 147 154
        • OFFICERS.

        • Gov's message on salaries of certain, 9
        • Bill to fix the on salaries of certain, 32 37 40 77 96 114
        • Bill to repeal act to fix compensation of members and officers of General Assembly, 32 37 39
        • ORDINARIES.

        • Make legal and valid the acts of the several Clerks of, 69 76 82

Page 214

        • ORDINARY.

        • Court of, in Brooks county, 165 177 193
      • P.

        • PENAL CODE.

        • Add an additional sec. to 8th Div., 101 111 143
        • PENITENTIARY.

        • Increase pay of employees, 165 177 191
        • PHYSICIANS.

        • Authorize F. C. David to practice medicine, 107 116 117
        • Authorize G. W. Fackler practice medicine, 107 116 117
        • Authorize Rufus Barker practice medicine, 116 117
        • PRESIDENT OF SENATE.

        • Res. of thanks to, 191
        • PROCLAMATION.

        • Of Gov. convening General Assembly, 3
        • PRINTER--STATE.

        • Res. to turn over last days' journal of regular session to, 101
        • Bill to increase the pay of, 152 163 168 183
        • PRINTING.

        • Res. rel. to journals of last session, 34
          • ORDERED BY SENATE--

          • Gov's. message and accompanying documents, 30
          • Report of committee on Cotton Planting, 44
          • Bill to compel the planting of a provision crop, 45
          • Majority and minority reports on State Indorsement of Confederate debt, 48
          • Bill to regulate the sale and exportation of corn, bacon, &c., 66
          • Gov's. message on Texas Resolutions and accompanying documents, 83
          • Amend act to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain by distillers, 88
          • Report of committee on bill to regulate transportation on Railroads, 88
          • Report of Committee on Salt Supply, 130
          • Income Tax bill, 149
          • Sermons of Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer, 166
        • PROVISIONS.

        • Gov's. message on transportation of, 8
        • Committee on supplies, 29 35 76 80
        • Resolution relative to a surplus of, 5 29
        • Regulate the transportation of, on Railroads, 30 34 88 103 123

Page 215

        • Bill to compel the planting of a provision crop, &c., 45 66
        • Bill to regulate the sale and exportation of 66 69 76 80 82
        • Res. relative to Railroads refusing to transport, 72
        • Report of Committee on Supplies, 88
        • Report of Committee on Transportation, 119
        • Res. relative to Corn Supply, 126
        • Res. relative to Salt Supply, 121 127 See "Transportation."
      • Q.

        • QUARTERMASTER AND COMMISSARY'S DEPT'S.

        • Report of committee, 103
        • Committee on, discharged, 116
        • QUORUM.

        • No quorum present, 94 168
      • R.

        • RAILROADS.

        • Regulate the transportation of provisions on, 30 34 88 105
        • Consolidate Sav. A. & G. R. R. and A. & G. R. R. Cos. 32 37 39 173
        • Incor. Atlanta and Roswell R. R. Co. 45 69 73
        • Amend charter of Brunswick and Albany R. R. Co. 61 71 76 88
        • Amend charter of Macon & Brunswick R. R. Co. 61 71
        • Define liability rel. to killing live stock, &c., 71 99 134
        • Res. rel. to refusing to transport provisions, 72
        • Report of Committee on Transportation, 119
        • Res. rel to supplying rolling stock for, 122
        • Liability as common carriers, 106 111 123
        • Use of Macon reserve to M. & B. R. R., Milledgeville R. R. Cos., 135 145 148
        • Suits against R. R. Cos., 153 163 170
        • Incor. Ga. Locomotive and Tool Works, 79 97 106
        • See Western and Atlantic R. R.
        • RECESS.

        • Resolution relative to, 30 31 35 36 37 148
        • RELIEF.

        • Certain citizens of Floyd county. 36 41 45 151
        • L. S. White, Exr'x. and J. T. White, Exr., 45 69 73
        • Andrew Hamilton, 71 99 114
        • Cherokee Insurance and Banking Co., 71 99 106
        • Mary E. Cannon and Mary A. Prince, 79 98 105 111
        • Widows of soldiers, 85 98 118 125 145
        • W. J. Anderson, 106 118

Page 216

        • Banks and people, 115
        • T. Brown and J. A. Jones, 135 145 147 153 163 166
        • Nathan Singletary and Wm. Mims, 142 152 159
        • All incorporated cities and towns, 142 152 162
        • Sheriff of Chatham county, 153 163 169 175 180
        • RESOLUTIONS.

        • That the Secretary inform House that the Senate has convened in accordance with Gov's. proclamation, 4
        • That a joint committee be appointed to wait on Gov. 4
        • That the President appoint a Doorkeeper and Messenger, 4
        • That a joint committee be appointed to report on the best means of reaching surplus corn, bacon, &c., 5
        • Alabama resolutions on indorsement of Confederate debt, 23
        • Florida resolutions on indorsement of Confederate debt, 24
        • To refer Gov's. message to appropriate committees, 29
        • Relative to observance of a Fast day, 29
        • Relative to surplus corn, peas, &c., 29 34
        • Relative to Rules of Senate, 30
        • Relative to Recess, 30 31 35 36 37 148
        • Relative to Manufacture of cotton cards, 32 61
        • Relative to Indorsement of Confederate debt, 33 52 60 79 108 178
        • Relative to Laws and Journals of last session, 34 42 153
        • Inviting Drs. Pierce and Palmer and Gen. Doles to seats on floor, 35
        • Negroes at work on defenses at Savannah, 35 37 135 142
        • Relative to sermons delivered by Drs. Pierce and Palmer, 37
        • Relative to the currency, 38 150
        • Compensate Dr. B. M. Palmer for religious services on Fast day, 40
        • On cotton planting, 43
        • Relative to impressment of negroes, 47 63 95 102 150 158 180
        • Instructing Tax Receivers and Collectors as to manner of receiving taxable property, 60 63
        • To appoint a committee to procure services of Clergymen to open sessions with prayer, 64
        • Relative to teaching negroes to read, &c., 67 88
        • Relative to Railroads refusing to transport provisions, &c., 72

Page 217

        • To appoint a committee on cotton bill, 79 96
        • Relative to supplies, 81
        • Relative to office of Adjutant and Inspector Gen. 88
        • Claim of Hon. David Irwin for superintending publication of Code, 88 99 111
        • Relative to raising pay of soldiers, &c., 92 118
        • Relative to adjournment, 98 106 148 154 178 191 199
        • That journal of last days' regular session be turned over to State Printer, 101 150
        • Authorizing Gov. to furlough State troops, 107 116
        • Expressing confidence in the President, &c., 118 143
        • Relative to Transportation, 120
        • Relative to Corn supply, 121
        • Relative to Salt supply, 121
        • Cars of W. and A. R. R. on other Roads, 122
        • Supplying rolling stock for Railroads, 122
        • Rescind resolutions of 25th Nov. 1862, 124 125
        • Relative to fund for support of indigent families, 124 150
        • To modify contract with M. S. Temple & Co., 129
        • Approving of the principle of taxation recommended by Hon. R. M. T. Hunter, 132 150 154 178
        • Relative to running the blockade, 133 150
        • Relative to furnishing spun yarn to families of indigent soldiers, 136 145
        • Relative to Cotton Card Manufactory, 137
        • Relative to Tax on cotton, 148
        • Relative to Library of A. A. Smets, 151
        • To have sermons of Bishop Pierce and Dr. Palmer printed, 166
        • Requesting the House Representative to return a certain bill, &c., 174
        • Rel. to Maj. Jno. B. Gallie, 188
        • Rel. to Capt. Geo. W. Anderson, &c., 189
        • Thanks to President of Senate, 191
        • Thanks to Secretary and assistant Clerks, 192
        • REVENUE.

        • To raise for 1863, 141 152 159 178
        • ROAD LAWS.

        • Repeal in Burke, 41 61 70
        • RIVERS.

        • Authorize J. W. C. Cook and others to navigate North Oconee, 71 99 114
        • Authorize Gov. to refund money to parties for obstructing, 145 147 154
      • ROLL CALL. 3 31 94
        • RULES OF SENATE.

        • Rules of session of 1862 adopted, 30

Page 218

      • S.

        • SALARIES.

        • Gov's. message on, 9
        • Bill to repeal act to fix, of certain officers, 32 37 40 77 96 114
        • Members and officers of Gen. Assembly, 32 37 39
        • SALT.

        • Prevent monopoly or extortion in renting or leasing salt lands or waters, 42 48 68
        • Incor. Blanceville Salt Mining Co.; 42 48
        • Report of committee on Salt Supply, 121 127
        • Res. relative to Salt Supply, 121
        • Res. to modify contract with M. S. Temple & Co., 129
        • SCHOOLS--COMMON.

        • Authorize teachers to advance in prices, 76 87 95
        • SECRETARY OF SENATE.

        • Res. of thanks to, 192
        • SHERIFF.

        • For relief of, of Chatham, 153 163 169 175 180
        • SHEEP RAISERS.

        • Bill to protect, &c., 34 37 38
        • SLAVES.

        • Gov's. message on the impressment of, 10
        • Compensate citizens for, who have died in service of State 30 34 36 64 65 67 171 183 186
        • Prevent from owning property with or without consent of owners, 34 37 38
        • Special committee on the impressment of, 47 63 95
        • Res. relative to teaching to read, &c., 67 88
        • Res. rel. to impressment of, 95 102 135 142 158 180
        • In Warren and Taliaferro, 142 152 162
        • SMALL POX.

        • Gov's. message on, 10
        • Committee on, 29
        • Prevent the spread of, in Oglethorpe county, 35 41 45
        • Amend act to prevent the spread of, 166 177 193
        • SMITH, MR.

        • From 20th Dist. appeared and took his seat, 35
        • SOLDIERS.

        • For relief of widows of deceased, 85 98 118 125 144
        • Relief from taxes, 87 98 105
        • Gov's. message rel. to raising pay of, 90
        • Res. rel. to raising pay of, 92 118
        • Res. rel. to fund for support of indigent families of, 124 150
        • Res. rel. to furnishing spun yarn to families of, 136 145

Page 219

        • SOLICITORS GENERAL.

        • Amend act authorizing the appointment of, pro tempore, 64 69 75 93
        • SPIRITUOUS LIQUORS.

        • Prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain in the manufacture of, 72 76 86 88 89 100 101
        • STAY LAW.

        • Repeal rel. to rent for houses and lands, 45 69 93 95 115
        • STATE TROOPS.

        • Res. rel. to furloughing, 107 116
        • STOCK.

        • Define liability of Railroads for killing, &c., 71 99 114
        • SUPPLIES.

        • See "Provisions."
      • T.

        • TAXES.

        • Relief of certain citizens of Floyd co., 36 41 45
        • Amend oath of Tax Payers for 1863, 38 41 47 68
        • Extra in Ware to build Court House, 38 41 48 64
        • Res. relative to the manner of valuing property, 60 63
        • Tax on Commission Merchants in Atlanta, 69 76 82
        • Relieve soldiers from the payment of, 87 98 105
        • Res. approving the principle of taxation recommended by R. M. T. Hunter, 132 150 178
        • Income Tax, 149 162 171 183
        • Tax on Brokers in Atlanta, 165 177 191
        • TAX RECEIVERS AND COLLECTORS.

        • Resolution instructing, as to the manner of receiving taxable property, 60 63
        • Resolution relative to value of cotton, 148
        • TAX PAYERS.

        • Amend oath of, for 1863, 38 41 47 68 145 148 154
        • TEACHERS OF COMMON SCHOOLS.

        • Increase the pay of, 76 87 95
        • TEMPLE, M. S. & CO.

        • Resolution to modify contract with for making salt, 129
        • TESTIMONY.

        • Regulate the admission of, in certain cases, 66 70 76 93 94 165 177
        • Provide for taking, in certain cases, 165 176 194

Page 220

        • TOBACCO.

        • See "Cotton Planting."
        • TOLL.

        • Prescribe the rates of, for grinding grain in Gwinnett, Cherokee and Forsyth, 165 176 194
        • TRANSPORTATION.

        • Governor's message on, 8
        • Committee on, 29 119 150
        • Regulate, of provisions on Railroads, 30 34 88 103 123
        • Resolution relative to, on Railroads, 72 150
        • Report of Committee on, 119
        • Resolutions, &c., on Corn supply, 120
        • Resolutions, &c., on Salt supply, 121
        • TREASURY NOTES.

        • Authorize Adm'rs., Ex'rs., &c., to receive, 38 41 45
        • To punish the refusal of Confederate, &c., 63 70 75 82 150
        • TRUSTEES.

        • Judges of Superior Courts may appoint, in certain cases, 107 124 134 138
        • See "Administrators, &c."
        • TRUST FUNDS.

        • Allow Administrators, Executors, &c., months to invest, 12 165 176 190
        • TYSON, BRYAN.

        • Communication from, 32
      • U.

        • UNFINISHED BUSINESS.

        • Resolution relative to, of last session, 31 35 36 37 150
        • Committee to bring up, 186
        • UNITED STATES' MONEY.

        • Bill to prevent the circulation of, 63 70 75
      • W.

        • WAREHOUSE, INSURANCE & DEPOSIT COS.

        • Incorporate in Americus and LaGrange, 75 87 93
        • WATER COURSES.

        • See "Rivers."
        • WESTERN & ATLANTIC R. R.

        • Legalize signing of certain change bills issued by, 61 71 77
        • Liability for injuries done to persons and property, &c., 79 98 111
        • Cars of, on other Roads, 121 122
        • Resolution requesting the Superintendent to suspend the issue of change bills, 166

Page 221

        • WIDOWS OF DECEASED SOLDIERS.

        • Bill for the relief of, 85 98 118 125 144
        • Tax for, 149 162 171 183
        • WOOL.

        • Encourage the growing of, &c., 34 37 38
      • Y.

        • YEAS AND NAYS.

        • On bill to repeal 1376 and 4496 Sections of the Code, 46 47
        • On motion to reconsider passage of bill to repeal 1376th Section of the Code, 62
        • On bill to compensate citizens of this State for slaves who have died in service, &c., 65 186
        • On bill to regulate the payment of interest in certain cases, 68
        • On bill to restrict the planting of Cotton and Tobacco, 74 78
        • On bill to amend charter of Brunswick and Albany Railroad Co. 76
        • On resolution relative to negro preaching, &c., 88
        • On bill to prevent the unnecessary consumption of grain in the manufacture of spirituous liquors--amend act, 100
        • On bill to incorporate Traders and Importers Bank, 104
        • On Indorsement of Confederate Debt, 109
        • On bill to amend act to fix salaries and compensation of certain officers, 115
        • On Report of Committee on Cotton Card Manufactory, 138
        • On bill to amend 4021st Section of the Code, 141
        • On bill to guarantee Georgia's proportion of $200,000,000 of Confederate Debt, 146
        • On bill to amend oath of Tax-payers, 156
        • On bill to incorporate Georgia Savings Bank of Macon, 177
        • On motion to go into Executive session, 178
        • On resolution relative to impressment of negroes, 181
        • On bill to provide for suppression of domestic insurrection, &c., 189
        • On bill to incorporate Mechanics Savings Bank of Atlanta, 195
      • Z.

        • ZACHRY, ABNER ROAN

        • Constitute, heir of Josias Boswell, 165 176 194