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Journal of the Senate of South Carolina,
Being the Sessions of 1863:

Electronic Edition.

South Carolina. General Assembly. Senate


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First edition, 2000
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Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
2000.

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Source Description:
(title page) Journal of the Senate of South Carolina, Being the Sessions of 1863
184 p.
COLUMBIA, S. C.
CHARLES P. PELHAM, STATE PRINTER.
1863.

Call number 1960 Conf. 1863 (Rare Book Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)


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Illustration


JOURNAL
OF THE
SENATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
BEING THE
SESSIONS OF 1863.

COLUMBIA, S. C.
CHARLES P. PELHAM, STATE PRINTER.
1863.


Page 4


JOURNAL
OF THE
Senate of the State of South Carolina,
AT THE
CALLED SESSION OF SEPTEMBER, 1863.


Page 5

JOURNAL
OF THE
SENATE OF THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA.

AT THE CALLED SESSION OF SEPTEMBER, 1863.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 1863.

        Pursuant to the Proclamation of his Excellency the Governor, the Members of the Senate assembled in the Senate Chamber, at Columbia, at 7 o'clock, P. M., of this 21st day of September, A. D. 1863.

        The Hon. W. D. PORTER, one of the Senators from St. Philip's and St. Michael's, and President of the Senate, took the chair, and the roll having been called by the Clerk, the following Senators answered to their names:

        The PRESIDENT announced that a quorum of Senators was not present; and at half past 8 o'clock, P. M., on motion of Mr. WILSON, the Senate adjourned.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1863.

        The Members of the Senate assembled in the Senate Chamber at 12, M.

        The PRESIDENT took the chair. Prayer by Rev. Mr. Kennedy.

        On the roll having been called, the following Senators were ascertained to be present:

        The PRESIDENT announced that a quorum was present.

        The Clerk read the following Proclamation:

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
CHARLESTON, September 15, 1863.

By his Excellency M. L. BONHAM, Governor of the State aforesaid.

        By vritue of the power vested in me under the Constitution of this State, I invite the two branches of the Legislature to assemble in their respective Halls, at Columbia, on Monday, the twenty-first day of September, instant, at 7 o'clock, P. M.

        Given under my hand and seal of the State, at Charleston, the 14th day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three.

M. L. BONHAM.

W. R. HUNTT, Secretary of State.


        The PRESIDENT announced that in consequence of the death of the Senators from Edgefield and St. Helena, and the acceptance by the Senator from Laurens of a disqualifying office, he had issued writs of election to fill the vacancies in these Election Districts respectively. Whereupon the following Senators elect appeared, their credentials were read, the oaths were administered, and they took their seats:

        Mr. MOSES moved that a message be sent to the House of Representatives, informing that House that the Senate had met, and a quorum was present and ready to proceed with business; and that a Committee be appointed to wait on his Excellency the Governor with the like information, and that the Senate was ready to receive any communication he might be pleased to make.


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        The motions were respectively adopted. The message was delivered orally by the Clerk to the House of Representatives, and Messrs. MOSES, MANNING and LESESNE were appointed the Committee to wait on the Governor.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 21, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate that in obedience to the proclamation of his Excellency the Governor, the House has assembled, a quorum is present, and is now ready to proceed to business.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Committee very soon after reported that they had performed the duty assigned to them, and his Excellency the Governor had informed the Committee that he would communicate with the Senate forthwith.

        The following Message was then announced and read to the Senate:

MESSAGE No. 1

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, September 21, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        The day for your annual meeting is so near at hand, that I should not have convoked you again in extra session, but for what I deem a pressing emergency, admitting of no delay. The progress of the war for the last few months has not been favorable to our arms. The brilliant repulse of the enemy's ironclad fleet on the 7th of April last, in Charleston harbor, has been succeeded by the fall of Vicksburg and Port Hudson; our retirement from Pennsylvania, Maryland and Tennessee, and also by our evacuation of Morris' Island, but not without a stubborn resistance by the brave garrisons of Wagner and Gregg, under a fire from naval and land batteries, such as no works have ever before withstood. Fort Sumter still holds out with an infantry garrison which has recently achieved a brilliant success. Her noble ruins afford the best proofs of the indomitable courage of the officers and men of the First South Carolina Artillery. Our malignant foe is now erecting on Morris' Island powerful batteries of Parrott guns, and repairing his damaged fleet, preparatory to another and more determined attack upon our harbor outposts, whilst his land forces are being increased with the hope, possibly, of carrying Charleston in a combined attack by land and sea. The call of the President for five thousand troops


Page 9

for six months' service within the State, beginning the first of August last, has been promptly responded to, with the exception of five companies, now in process of organization. This requisition and the enforcement of the Conscription Act to forty-five, embracing almost the entire population between the ages of forty and fifty, so impair the efficiency of our militia organization, that I find it impracticable to obtain readily a force adequate to such emergencies as seem likely now soon to be upon us. To meet those emergencies I have endeavored, under your late Act and the Act of 1841, to raise a volunteer force of one mounted regiment, two companies of cavalry, and one battery of artillery, for service wherever in the State they may be needed. This force has not been so promptly raised as the occasion requires, and I have therefore felt it my duty to again convene your bodies, and to recommend to you that you devise such plan as in your wisdom may seem expedient, for furnishing for immediate service a military force of at least two regiments of infantry, one of which should be mounted, and a proportionate force of cavalry and artillery. Also, that the law be so amended as to place in some military organization, for the defence of the State, every able-bodied citizen between the ages of sixteen and sixty, not in Confederate service or otherwise legally exempted. The immediate danger to be apprehended arises from raiding parties of the enemy, who may dash suddenly into the State from Tennessee, through upper Georgia, or the passes of the mountains of North and South Carolina. Should the enemy in large force attempt invasion from these sections, the Confederate Government will, no doubt, afford adequate protection. But to repel raids and to protect our firesides, the State herself should make preparation. The persons to compose the organizations should be the able-bodied citizens between sixteen and sixty years of age, not in Confederate service, or otherwise legally exempted; and in this class should be embraced all persons who have procured exemptions by furnishing substitutes. No one should be relieved from the duty of defending his home because of having furnished a substitute for the war for Confederate service. Aliens who have declared their purpose to become citizens, as also such as are domiciled amongst us, enjoying the protection of our laws, should be included. I recommend, also, that the class of those whose service is limited to the district or regiment in which they reside, be reduced to the lowest practicable point consistent with the safe policy of the State. I call your attention to the report of the Adjutant and Inspector General upon this subject, herewith transmitted.

        In connection with the subject of exemptions, I call your attention to my correspondence with the Commandant of Conscripts for South Carolina, Major C. D. Melton, who is the successor of Colonel John S. Preston, with


Page 10

whom previous to your last extra session, I had a correspondence, a copy of which was then transmitted to you. Another copy, as also a copy of that with Maj. Melton is now transmitted. This subject calls for legislation so as to reconcile as far as possible the difference between the laws of the two Governments. It is an important question, involving the jurisdiction of the two governments, and needs to be delicately handled. I am satisfied our true policy is as far as is compatible with the constitutional rights of the State, to conform to the law of Congress on this subject I have not felt at liberty to make any distinction between the classes exempted by our law when the cases have been made, but have claimed exemption of all alike. The action of the Executive Council, on the same subject, and the action of your two Houses, at your last session, (the House approving and the Senate by its silence acquiescing in my action), made it proper that I should reply to Maj Melton, as I had done to Col. Preston.

        Additional legislation is needed to enable the Executive, through civil or military authority, or both, more effectually to aid the Confederate Government in arresting deserters from the army. In most cases the absentees have probably not left their commands with the intent to desert their colors; but the result of their absence is the same, so far as the good of the service and protection of the country is concerned. I have endeavored, so far as I was authorized, to afford assistance, but the law is inadequate to such efficient aid as is needed. Many construe your late act on this subject to mean that the Sheriffs are not to render aid to the Enrolling Officer till resistance has been made. In all such cases the deserter, of course, makes his escape. Such law as you may think proper to pass should embrace deserters from State service, and should also punish aiding and abetting deserters in escaping from the army, and in resisting or avoiding arrest.

        I invite your attention to the operation of the system of impressment adopted by the Confederate Government. I am informed that in some sections, where the people have little more than is absolutely necessary for their own use, it is apprehended that destitution will be brought about by its unequal operation. Coming as you do from every section of the State, you are doubtless better informed upon this subject than myself, and better prepared to adopt a judicious policy than I am now to suggest it. I have called the attention of the Confederate Government to the subject, and suggested to them the probability that the collection of the tax in kind, which operates more equally on all, would obviate the necessity for the impressment of provisions.

        The system adopted for furnishing labor for coast defences has failed to accomplish its purpose. Large numbers have availed themselves of the


Page 11

provision of the law, and paid the fine of one dollar and fifty cents instead of furnishing the labor; and others, with the hope of impunity, have neither furnished the labor or paid the fine. With the money collected by the agent, he has been unable to hire any labor. I recommend an amendment of the Acts on this subject, so as to abolish the fine, and so as to authorize the Governor, through the Commissioners of Roads, (who, in the main are true to their trusts,) to impress the labor requisite to enable him to respond to the calls of the Commanding General, giving credit for all labor previously furnished, and that the time of service be extended to two months. The free negroes should be included. I doubt not that there has been cause for the complaint heretofore made as to the treatment and detention of the negroes, but it is believed that through the instrumentality of the energetic State Agent, (whose report is herewith transmitted,) many of the evils have been remedied.

M. L. BONHAM.


        Mr. HARRISON offered the following resolutions, which were considered and agreed to, and the reference was made accordingly; two hundred and fifty copies of the Message was also ordered to be printed:

        Resolved, That so much of the Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor as relates to the organization of troops, the militia, the subject of exemptions, the arrest of deserters, and furnishing labor for coast defences, with the papers connected therewith, be referred to the Committee on Military.

        Resolved, That so much as relates to the subject of impressmens be referred to the Committee on Confederate Relations.

        Mr. WILSON offered the following resolution, which was considered and agreed to, and the Committee instructed accordingly:

        Resolved, That it be referred to the Committee on the Military to inquire into the expediency of abolishing all exemptions from military duty for State defence, and that the Committee be authorized to report by Bill or otherwise.

        The PRESIDENT announced the following additions to the Committees:

        Mr. POPE to the Committee on College, Education and Religion, and the Legislative Library.

        Mr. BACON, to the Committee on the Military and Pensions, and on Printing.


Page 12

        Mr. JONES, to the Committee on the Military and Pensions, and on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        At 1, P. M., the Senate went into Executive Session, and so remained until 15 minutes after 1, P. M., when the doors were opened and the regular session was resumed.

        The following remarks and resolutions were offered by Mr. Pope:

        MR. PRESIDENT: The business of the morning hour being over, I ask the melancholy privilege of announcing officially to the Senate the death of Edmund Rhett, the late Senator from St Helena. He expired on the 15th day of February last, at the village of Spartanburg, in this State, where on removing from the coast he had taken a refuge for his family. Could his wishes have been consulted, he doubtless would have preferred to die where he was born, among the people with whom he had lived, and in the Parish which, in public and private life, he had served both faithfully and well.

        Mr. Rhett was known to this body as a useful and indefatigable member; but to that community he was known as the benevolent and enterprising citizen. His experience in political affairs was not large; many years ago he had served for a single term in the House of Representatives, and he had just completed his first term in the Senate and entered upon the duties of a second, when the hand of death was laid upon him, and his voice hushed forever in the silence of the grave. He was generally well informed in the political history of the country, and the members of this body well remember the active part he took in the deliberations of the session of 1862, and although somewhat enfeebled by disease, no one could then have anticipated that sudden announcement which carried bereavement to the hearts of his family and friends, and in a moment, as it were, cut short his career of usefulness forever. How impressive the lesson! How solemn the warning! "Man cometh up, and is cut down like a flower; he fleeth as it were a shadow and never continueth in one stay." But, sir, the duties of life are more than life, and judged by this standard, Mr. Rhett had filled up the measure of his life with acts of usefulness, if he had failed to crown it with deeds of honor. In all of the relations of life he had taken his full share, and with more or less distinction he had borne his full part. It is no common praise to be able to say truthfully of any man, at the end of his life, that in these various relations, he was distinguished in many--he was respectable in all. As a politician, he was ardently Southern in his sentiments, and from impulse and conviction belonged to the strictest school of States' Rights; he seemed to long for the time when the South should declare her independence of a Government which he believed was alien to our


Page 13

true interests and inimical to our just rights; and he desired to witness an entire separation from a people who were ignorant of our social systems and unfriendly to our domestic peace. He lived, sir, to see the beginning of the conflict, and he fell a sacrifice to the zeal which actuated him in promoting this great end. The same warmth of temperament which characterized him in politics he carried into his professional life. He was always earnest, often vehement, in conducting his causes. At Westminster Hall, at the Inns of Court, Mr. Rhett would not have been placed in the front rank of his profession; perhaps no amount of application on his part could have made him a consummate jurist, like Petigru, or fitted him for a great Equity Judge, like Chancellor Harper. But, as a lawyer, he was nevertheless very successful. His information was liberal; and his great earnestness, coupled with the fact that he made the cause of his client his own, and pursued it with vehement energy, secured him success at the Bar. Owing to a slight impediment of utterance, which sometimes embarrassed his delivery, he could not be said to be eloquent of speech, and yet in spite of those disadvantages, he frequently spoke with effect, and on occasions when deeply interested, I have heard him rise to a high pitch of nervous eloquence.

        He enjoyed a reputation for scholarship which, in a new country like ours, is a distinction that can be said properly to belong to but few men. He very probably had not the extensive learning of Grimke, nor the classical attainments of Legare, but he nevertheless possessed scholarly tastes, and these he doubtless improved beyond most of his cotemporaries at the bar. His written style was chaste, and he kept up his acquaintance with the best standard authors. He took a lively interest in the education of the young of both sexes, and devoted much of his leisure to this laudable object. And this reflection naturally draws us from his public to his private life, and leads us to that inner circle of friends, where the domestic virtues outshine all popular applause, whose home is the centre of attraction, and the affection of the parent and friend outweighs all public distinctions. My relations with the deceased Senator, while cordial, were never intimate; but there are those who can speak of his disinterested friendship and his self-sacrificing devotion to those whom Providence had placed under his protecting care. There are those who know and can tell how the stern, often abrupt and somewhat unpopular manners of the man of business became yielding, confiding and gentle in the home circle, and around the domestic fireside. Within this circle we may not, with propriety, penetrate. Let us draw the curtain, and feel a sympathy for a bereavement that we cannot heal, and for a sorrow that we cannot reach.


Page 14

        Mr. President, in the performance of the painful duty which has devolved upon me, I have dealt in no unmeaning panegyric. As a public man, as a lawyer, as a man of letters, as a man of business, as a man of benevolence, Mr. Rhett had many equals, and may have had many superiors; but, sir, throughout a somewhat extensive acquaintance, I have yet to meet his equal as a man of energy. In heat or in cold, by night or by day, his overwhelming energy seemed never to flag for a single instant. He never was known to say that he had enough to do. I have been engaged with him day after day in the same cause, and when my own energies were exhausted, he appeared still fresh and as ready as ever to proceed. He had, therefore, a ready hand for the business of everybody around him. He appeared to be a part and parcel of almost everybody's affairs; and when, sir, in the providence of God the people of St. Helena shall again be permitted to return in peace to their own homes, and they begin to recall the past, and look around for absent ones, there will be no name more frequenly called, without an answer; and no form will be more generally missed from its accustomed place than the manly form of Edmund Rhett.

        I beg, Mr. President, to offer the following resolutions:

        Resolved unanimously, That the Senate has heard, with emotions of profound regret, of the death of the Hon. EDMUND RHETT, late a member of this body.

        Resolved unanimously, That in his death we have been deprived of a useful member, the State has lost a patriotic son, and the community in which he lived a benevolent and enterprising citizen.

        Resolved unanimously, That the Senate, in expressing a sense of this public loss can but sympathise with the greater loss of his bereaved family; and, in token of our respect, that a copy of these resolutions be forwarded, by the Clerk of the Senate, to the widow of the deceased member.

        The following remarks and resolutions were offered by Mr. BACON:

        It has fallen to my lot, sir, to announce to this body the death of the Hon. Arthur Simkins, of Edgefield District. I feel confidently assured I shall fall far short of the undertaking. It may be best that this lot should have fallen upon me, as no man knew him longer, no man knew him better, and no one could more fully appreciate his open and manly course as a gentleman and friend.

        From his boyhood up to the day of his death, which occurred on the 29th of April, 1863, of apoplexy, we lived firm and devoted friends, and for many years were neighbors. After having finished his collegiate education, he studied the profession of law and was admitted to the practice. The


Page 15

dull monotonies of the practice did not give scope to his cheerful and buoyant spirit. He left the bar soon after his admission, and devoted his attention to farming and politics.

        Death, under any circumstances, brings with it calamities. It drapes the home of the deceased in mourning. In the death of Arthur Simkins his family has lost a kind, a feeling, a loving and devoted husband and brother. The State has been deprived of his services at a juncture in our affairs which demands our every effort. The social circle has lost its great chief. He has left us but to mourn his loss. The vacuum thus created can never be filled. No more are we to hear his cheering voice around the festive board. No more to hear his councils in our frequent meetings. Time alone can obliterate the deep impression of respect and esteem upon the hearts of all who were familiarly acquainted with Arthur Simkins. Time must bring to its assistance that powerful agent "Death," before Arthur Simkins can ever be forgotten. For many long years to come, the tear of sorrow will moisten the cheeks of very many of his ardent friends whom he has left behind.

        As he lived, honored and respected, so he died. May his spirit, which has so often cheered the drooping spirits of friends while living, abide forever in that peaceful mansion prepared for all who hold out faithful to the end.

        Whereas, The death of the Hon. ARTHUR SIMKINS, formerly a member of this body, has been announced,

        Resolved unanimously, That we deeply deplore the loss of one so fully calculated to discharge the duties of a Senator.

        Resolved unanimously, That the State has lost a bright star from its political firmament, and this body has been deprived of the counsels of one quick in perception and strong in intellect.

        Resolved nanimously, That we truly sympathize with the family of the deceased, as a testimonial of our respect and esteem.

        Resolved, That a copy of these proceedings be sent to his family.

        The resolutions offered by Mr. POPE and Mr. BACON were considered and agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. BACON, it was ordered that, as an additional mark of respect for the deceased Senators, the Senate should now adjourn. The motion was agreed to, and the Senate adjourned at half past 1, P. M.


Page 16

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 23, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Leland.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Leave of absence, after this day, was granted to the Senator from St. Thomas' and St. Dennis', on account of illness in his family.

        On motion of Mr. E. G. PALMER, the Senate adjourned at half-past 12, P. M.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Boyd.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. LESESNE submitted the report of the Committee on Confederate Relations on so much of the Governor's Message as relates to the system of impressment adopted by the Confederate Government; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        Mr. HARRISON, from the Committee on the Military and Pensions, reported the following Bills:

        A Bill to prevent desertion from Confederate or State military service and evasion of conscription.

        A Bill to organize a Brigade of troops.

        The Bills respectively received the first reading, and were ordered for a second reading to-morrow, and to be printed.

        Mr. MAZYCK offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That the General Assembly will adjourn sine die on Friday, the 25th day of September, instant.

        Mr. HOPE moved to amend by inserting Saturday, 26th instant; which was lost.

        On the question of agreeing to the resolution, the yeas and nays were ordered, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are

        Messrs. Bull, Ellis, Hart, Jones, Mazyck, McAliley, McKewn, and Ware.

        Those who voted in the negative, are

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Arthur, Barker, Beaty, Blakeney, Boykin, Harrison, Hope, Houser, W. D. Johnson, W. R. Johnson, Keitt, Lesesne, Manning, Maxwell, McCaw, J. W. Miller, Moses, Murray, Oswald, S. W. Palmer, Pope, Sessions, Wilson and Wortham.

        In the affirmative, 8.

        In the negative, 25.

        The resolution was therefore not agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. BOYKIN, the Senate adjourned at 10 minutes past 2 P. M.


Page 18

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 25, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Martin.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Leave of absence for the remainder of the session was granted to the Senator from Newberry on account of severe sickness.

        Mr. McCAW offered certain resolutions in relation to the defence of Fort Sumter; which were ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate

        A Bill to provide for the election of Members of Congress of the Confederate States of America from this State.

        The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Privileges and Elections, and was ordered to be printed.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The Report of the Committee on Confederate Relations on so much of the Governor's Message as relates to the system of impressment adopted by the Confederate Government; which was agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        A Bill to prevent desertion from Confederate or State military service and evasion of conscription received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.

        A Bill to organize a brigade of State troops being before the Senate on the second reading,

        Mr. MAZYOK moved to amend by striking out the following words, commencing in fourth line and ending in sixth line, of third section, viz: ("including persons who have furnished substitutes in Confederate service, who are hereby declared liable to service under the provisions of this Act.")

        Mr. WILSON moved that the amendment do lie on the table, which question was ordered to be decided by yeas and nays, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Appleby, Arthur, Bacon, Barker, Beaty, Blakeney, Boykin, Boyle, Ellis, Hammond, Harrison, Hart, Hope, Houser, W. D. Johnson, W. R. Johnson, Keitt, Lesesne, Maxwell, McAliley, McKewn, J. W. Miller, Moses, Murray, Oswald, E. G. Palmer, S. W. Palmer, Pope, Roberds, Ware, Wilson and Wortham.


Page 19

        Those who voted in the negative, are

        Messrs. Fickling, Jones, Mazyck and McCaw.

        In the affirmative, 33.

        In the negative 4.

        The motion therefore prevailed.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, the sixth section of the Bill was stricken out, which is as follows:

        "SEC. 6. That the exemptions provided for by this Act, and by an Act, entitled 'An Act for the better organization of the militia and for other purposes,' passed 6th day of February, 1863, are hereby declared not to apply to conscription for Confederate service, but only to ordinary militia duty and to State service."

        The Bill was further amended as follows, on motion of the following Senators:

        By Mr. MOSES: providing for local organizations of mounted infantry, of not less than thirty nor more than eighty of those not liable to conscription.

        By Mr. HARRISON: appropriating $500,000, if so much be necessary, for carrying the Bill into effect.

        The Bill received the second reading, was agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives.

        The General Orders were disposed of.

        Mr. WILSON gave notice that to-morrow, or on some subsequent day, he will introduce "a Bill authorizing the Boards of Relief to impress, at Government prices, provisions for soldiers' families."

        Mr. HARRISON offered the following resolution, which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Resolved, That the twenty-sixth rule of the Senate be suspended, so far as relates to "a Bill to organize a brigade of troops," so as to allow amendments on third reading.

        Leave of absence, after this day, was granted to the Senators from Darlington, Lancaster and Chester, on account of sickness.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, the Senate adjourned at a quarter to 3, P. M.


Page 20

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Kennedy.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        A resolution suspending the 26th Rule of the Senate, so far as refers to "a Bill to organize a brigade of troops," was agreed to.

        Resolutions of thanks in relation to the defence of Fort Sumter were amended by striking out the second resolution, and inserting, in lieu thereof, on motion of Mr. WILSON, the following:

        Resolved, THat the thanks of the State are also tendered to Major STEPHEN ELLIOTT, Jr., and the officers and men of his command, for their gallant and meritorious conduct in repulsing the enemy in their late assault on Fort Sumter.

        The resolutions were further amended in accordance with this resolution, and were agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        At a quarter to 1, P. M., the Senate, on motion of Mr. WILSON, suspended business until 5, P. M.


        RECESS.


        At 5, P. M., the PRESIDENT took the chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to amend an Act to organize and supply negro labor for coast defence, in compliance with requisitions of the Confederate States," and to authorize the Governor to proceed to furnish negro labor under said Act

        The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions, and was ordered to be printed.

        On motion of Mr. McCAW, the Senate adjourned at ten minutes past 5, P. M.


Page 21

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Shand.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of Saturday.

        Mr. MOSES offered a resolution requiring the Secretary of State to make search for the minutes of the Governor and Council in 1860 and 1861, which was agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill to prevent desertion from Confederate or State military service and evasion of conscription.

        The Bill having been amended in the House of Representatives on the second reading, it was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        Hon. B. W. LAWTON, Senator from Barnwell, appeared in his place in the Senate Chamber.

        Leave of absence was granted to the Senator from St. Stephen's after to-day.

        And, also, to the Senator from Prince William's, for the remainder of the session, on account of important public duties.

        And, also, to the Senator from Sumter, from and after to-day, in consequence of a pressing call requiring his presence in Charleston.

        The following message was communicated to the Senate, and on motion of Mr. MOSES, the message and correspondence were referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions, and were ordered to be entered on the Journal of the Senate:

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, September 28, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        I herewith transmit to you a United States flag, received from General Beauregard, by the hands of Captain Miles, of the Charleston Battalion, with a letter from General Beauregard, committing it through me to the custody of the State, and my reply thereto; and also the photographs of the ruins of Fort Sumter referred to in his letter.

M. L. BONHAM


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HEADQUARTERS,

DEPARTMENT OF SOUTH CAROLINA, GA. AND FLA.,
CHARLESTON, S. C., September 22, 1863.

        SIR: During the night of the 8th instant, thirty or more of the enemy's launches, containing about 800 men, attacked Fort Sumter, defended by the Charleston Battalion, under Major Blake--Major Elliott being in command of the Post. Preparations had been made for such an event; and, at a concerted signal, all the Batteries bearing on the work, assisted by the gunboat "Chicora," properly located, opened on the exterior of the Fort; fire-balls and hand-grenades were thrown out by the garrison, which behaved with coolness and gallantry. In less than half an hour the enemy was decisively repulsed; leaving in our hands one hundred and twenty-five prisoners (thirteen officers included), five launches, and five colors. His additional loss in killed, wounded and drowned, must have been large. Fortunately we had no casualties.

        Among the colors taken was an old garrison flag, weather-worn, stained and tattered, which was reported by some of the prisoners to be the one that had been lowered to us when Fort Sumter was surrendered by the United States on the 13th April, 1861.

        The appearance of this flag, and the circumstances under which it was found, satisfy me that really it is the same one that Maj. Anderson was permitted to remove, and which our adversary hoped to replace above the shattered walls of that Fortress, as a dramatic surcease to his humiliation. With the sanction of the War Department, I have the honor to present it, through your Excellency, to the State of South Carolina, as the fitting custodian of a flag that was designed to mark and make memorable the discomfiture of your people, in the face of your wives, children and servants.

        I also send you herewith a set of photographs of Fort Sumter, showing its condition at the time of the assault.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

G. T. BEAUREGARD,
General Commanding.

To his Excellency M. L. BONHAM, Governor of South Carolina.


STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,

HEADQUARTERS, COLUMBIA, September 26, 1863.

        SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt, through Capt. Miles, of the Charleston Battalion, of the flag captured on the 8th inst. from the enemy at Fort Sumter by the garrison; the photographs of Fort Sumter, and your letter accompanying them.


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        I shall take pleasure in at once placing them at the disposal of the Legislature now in session.

        It will constitute one of the most interesting incidents of the war, that the flag which the enemy lowered to our arms on the 13th April, 1861, at Fort Sumter, should be surrendered on the 8th September, 1863, at the same place, and to the same troops, under the same commander, at a moment when the invaders hoped to raise it in triumph on the ruins of that Fort.

        Let me take this occasion to express to you, and, through you, to the officers and men under your command, the high gratification with which the State has witnessed their gallant defence of Charleston harbor during a vigorously prosecuted siege now approaching the close of its third month.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. L. BONHAM.


        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following resolutions, which were concurred in, and were returned to the House of Representatives:

        Resolved, That the presiding officers of each branch of this General Assembly do issue to the Members thereof pay bills for their mileage, and per diem for their attendance on the present session.

        Resolved, That the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives be authorized to issue to the Librarian, a pay-bill for the same per diem as is allowed by law to a Member of the General Assembly, and to the Clerks of the Solicitors sixty dollars, for the services of said Librarian and Clerks during the present session.

        Resolved, That the presiding officers of each branch of this General Assembly do issue to the Clerks of their Houses, respectively, a pay-bill for the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars, and that the Reading Clerks, Assistant Clerks, the Messengers and the Doorkeepers of the two Houses be paid each the sum of one hundred and twenty-five dollars, the same to be compensation for the services of each of said officers and their assistants during the present extra session, and that the Bank of the State of South Carolina be authorized to pay the same.

        The House of Representatives returned, with its concurrence, the report of the Committee on Confederate Relations on so much of the Governor's Message as relates to the system of impressment adopted by the Confederate Government.

        On motion of Mr. McKEWN, the Senate, at 15 minutes to 1, P. M., suspended business until 4, P. M.


Page 24


        RECESS.


        At 4, P. M., the PRESIDENT took the chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        Mr. HARRISON submitted the report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on amendments by the House of Representatives to a Bill to prevent desertion from Confederate or State military service and evasion of conscription, recommending concurrence in the amendments by the House of Representatives. The Bill received the third reading, was agreed to, the title was changed to "An Act," and it was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the report of same Committee, on

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to amend an Act to organize and supply negro labor for coast defence, in compliance with requisitions of the Government of the Confederate States," and to authorize and direct the Governor to proceed to furnish negro labor under said Act.

        The Bill received the second reading, was agreed to, and ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the following communication, which was read, and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary:

To the Honorable the President and Members of the Senate:

        I beg leave respectfully to report to your honorable body that it is impracticable to obtain journal paper for the Senate. The kind heretofore used is larger than foolscap, and, unless I was otherwise instructed, I would not wish to have irregularity in the size of the journals. To obtain your instructions, and place on record an explanation, if the journal should not be written, is the object of this communication. I would respectfully state that since the present system of printing the journals was adopted, I have never, in a single instance, known the manuscript journal referred to.

Very respectfully,

WM. E. MARTIN, C.S.


        On motion of Mr. HARRISON, the Senate, at 10 minutes to 5, suspended business until half-past 7, P. M.

NIGHT SESSION.

        At half-past 7, the PRESIDENT took the chair, and the Senate proceeded to business.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate a resolution in relation to the flag captured at Fort Sumter, which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.


Page 25

        Mr. J. W. MILLER, a member of the Committee on Privileges and Elections, stated that but two members of that Committee were present. He therefore asked that the Committee be discharged from the further consideration of a Bill from the House of Representatives to provide for the election of members of the Congress of the Confederate States of America.

        The Committee was accordingly discharged; and on motion of Mr. GARLINGTON, the Bill was referred to a Committee of the whole, to sit immediately. The Senate therefore, resolved itself into a Committee of the whole, Mr. GARLINGTON, Senator from Newberry, in the chair, and after some time spent therein, the Committee rose, and the PRESIDENT resumed the chair.

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the report of the Committee, recommending that the Bill do pass, and the Bill received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, the Senate adjourned at 9, P. M.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Yates.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops; the title of which had been altered to "a Bill to provide for Volunteer Companies of Mounted Infantry, and for other purposes."

        The Bill having been amended, by the House of Representatives, in certain particulars, the amendments were referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to amend an Act to organize and supply negro labor for coast defence, in compliance with requisitions of the Government of the Confederate States," and to authorize and direct the Governor to proceed to furnish negro labor under said Act.

        The Bill received the third reading, and it was


Page 26

        Resolved, That the Bill do pass; that the title thereof be changed; that it be called "An Act;" that it be returned to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER offered a resolution authorizing the Clerks of the two Houses to purchase stationery; which was agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. E. G. PALMER, the Senate, at a quarter past 1, P. M., suspended business until 5, P. M.


        RECESS.


        At 5, P. M., the PRESIDENT took the Chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the 2d resolution by striking out "these resolutions," and insert "foregoing resolution."

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on amendments to a Senate Bill by the House of Representatives to a Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops. The Committee recommend that the amendments of the House be rejected, and that certain amendments recommended by the Committee be substituted, and that the title of the Bill, as it went from the Senate, be restored.

        The report of the Committee was agreed to, and the Bill was amended accordingly, and received the third reading; the Bill was passed, the title was changed to "An Act," and it was sent to the House of Representatives


Page 27

        Leave of absence from and after this day, was granted to the Senator from Union, on account of indisposition.

        On motion of Mr. WILSON, the Senate, at 10 minutes to 6, P. M., suspended business until half-past 8, P. M.

NIGHT SESSION.

        At half-past 8, the PRESIDENT took the Chair, and the Senate proceeded to business.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, it was ordered that when the Senate adjourns, it shall stand adjourned to meet to-morrow, at 9 A. M.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, the Senate adjourned at fifteen minutes past 10, P. M.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1863.

        The Senate met at 9, A. M. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Leland.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 29, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully asks leave to amend a Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops, by adding the following Sections:

        That such persons and employees in each paper mill and newspaper or printing establishments and iron manufactories, as the Adjutant and Inspector General, with the approval of the Governor, may see fit to exempt from time to time from military service, be exempted.

        That the Fire Departments of Charleston and Columbia, being a part of the State police, and as such, are hereby exempted from the Conscript Act of the Confederate States: Provided, That the exemption herein declared, shall not extend save to the officers of the Department, and forty members of each of the fire companies of the said cities: Provided, also, That this exemption shall be forfeited by change of residence of any of these parties from their respective cities, or by absence from the same without leave of the Mayors thereof.


Page 28

        That the present Deputy Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions for Kershaw District be exempted from service, under this Act, until the return of the Clerk, now held as a prisoner in the hands of the enemy.

        That to the end that every available man may be put into the field, no State Department, civil or military, shall employ, or keep employed, any clerks or agents, unless holding commissions from the State, under the age of forty-five years. And that immediately after the passage of this Act, the Governor shall give notice to the different Departments, to report to the Confederate States Enrolling Officers the names of all agents and employees under the age of forty-five; and that the places of such persons so discharged, shall be filled only by disabled soldiers, or persons over the age of forty-five years.

        And further to amend, by inserting on the 7th line of the second Section, after the word "substitute," the word "either;" and in the same Section, on the 8th line, after the word "in," "State or;" and after the word "service" in the 8th line, the following words, "between the ages of eighteen and forty-five years."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate returned a message refusing leave, to which the House of Representatives returned the following reply:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 30, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully insists upon its amendments to a Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops, as indicated in Message No. 2 from the House; and asks a Committee of Conference, and, on the part of the House, appoints Messrs. Yeadon, J. H. Williams, Brabham, Trenholm, Dawkins, Duryea and Cook.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate returned a message insisting on refusing leave, and assenting to the appointment of a Committee of Conference, and informing the House of Representatives that Messrs. GARLINGTON, ARTHUR, HARRISON, WILSON and HOPE had been appointed the Committee of Conference on the part of the Senate.


Page 29

        Mr. GARLINGTON, from the Committee of Conference, submitted the following report:

        The Committee of Conference of the two Houses, in relation to their disagreement respecting certain amendments to the Senate Bill, entitled "A Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops," respectfully report:

        That, after a fair and full conference, they have agreed to recommend, and do recommend, that the House adhere to the first amendment, and recede from all the others.

A. C. GARLINGTON,
Chairman of Senate Committee.
RICHARD YEADON,
Chairman of House Committee.


        The report was considered and agreed to. Immediately thereafter the following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 30, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate that this House agrees to the report of the Committee of Conference, on a Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops; and, pursuant thereto, this House respectfully recedes from asking leave of the Senate to make the amendments referred to in the message from the House, with the exception of the following section:

        "That such persons and employees in each paper mill and newspaper or printing establishment and iron manufactories, as the Adjutant and Inspector General, with the approval of the Governor, may see fit to exempt from time to time from military service, be exempted."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate returned a message informing the House that the Senate had likewise agreed to the report of the Committee of Conference, and granting leave to the House of Representatives to make the proposed amendment.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,

        A resolution to authorize the Confederate Government to raise certain troops; which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, and the resolutions were amended pursuant to the leave granted, and were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives:


Page 30

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 30, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully concurs in striking out, from the resolution respecting pay of soldiers in Confederate service, the word these, and inserting the foregoing.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on resolutions from the House of Representatives, relative to the flag captured at Fort Sumter, recommending concurrence; and the resolutions were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the following report:

        The Committee on the Military and Pensions, to whom was referred a resolution from the House of Representatives, authorizing the Confederate Government to raise certain troops, ask leave to report:

        That they have considered the same, and recommend that the Senate concur in the resolution, with the following amendment, viz: after the word "Government," in the first line of the resolution, insert "with the consent of the Governor."

Respectfully submitted,

A. C. GARLINGTON,
Chairman of Committee.


        The report was agreed to, and pursuant thereto a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the resolution accordingly.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        An Act to organize a Brigade of Troops; and it was committed to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        On motion of Mr. E. G. PALMER, the Senate, at 5 minutes to 2, P. M., suspended business until half-past 3, P. M.


        RECESS.


        At half-past 3, P. M., the PRESIDENT took the chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:


Page 31

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 30, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully concurs in the amendment of the Senate, to the resolution of the House authorizing the Confederate Government to raise certain troops, by inserting after the word "Government" in the first line, "with the consent of the Governor."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The resolution was amended accordingly, and was concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. GARLINGTON stated that it was the view of the Committee on the Military and Pensions that their report on "A Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops," included a recommendation of the change of the title of the Bill also to "A Bill to provide for Volunteer Companies of Mounted Infantry, and for other purposes;" but that, owing to some misunderstanding, the title has not been so changed. He therefore moved to reconsider the reference of the Act to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, and the same was ordered.

        Mr. GARLINGTON then moved that a message be sent to the House of Representatives asking leave of that House to change the title of the Act to "An Act to provide for Volunteer Companies of Mounted Infantry, and for other purposes."

        To this the House of Representatives returned the following reply:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 30, 1863.

Mr. President, and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully concurs with the Senate to change the title of a "Bill to organize a Brigade of Troops" to "An Act to provide for volunteer companies of mounted infantry, and for other purposes."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The title was changed accordingly and the Act was committed to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. WARE, from that Committee, reported that the Acts which had been passed at the present session of the General Assembly, had been duly engrossed, and were ready for ratification; and the Senator moved that an invitation be sent to the House of Representatives to attend forthwith in the Senate Chamber for the ratification of the Acts, and the same was ordered.


Page 32

        Mr. HOPE offered the following resolution, which was considered and agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        Resolved, That the General Assembly will adjourn sine die on this day, at 5 P. M.

        The following message was received from his Excellency the Governor:

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, September 30, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        I herewith transmit a copy of a letter from Mr. William Gregg, President of the Graniteville Company, making a most potriotic offer.

        I recommend that an appropriation be made for the purchase, weekly, of the number of yards of cloth named, to be distributed through the Soldiers' Boards of Relief at cost and charges, giving preference to the most needy.

M. L. BONHAM.


KALMIA, September 21, 1863.

To his Excellency Governor Bonham:

        MY DEAR SIR:--Owing to the scarcity of goods, together with the inflated currency, Domestic Cloths have gone up to a point which renders it difficult for the poor to obtain that which is absolutely necessary.

        Our sales are attended by a highly respectable class of merchants from all the States this side of the Mississippi to Virginia, and prices have run up to $2 26 a yard for 4.4 Sheetings and Drills--a price which places them beyond the reach of many of our people; and although we feel much disposed to do something towards relieving the needy, it will be impossible for us to make the distribution. I therefore propose to sell to the State of South Carolina ten thousand yards a week, at Government prices, which are now $1 10 per yard--less than half the market value. Our contract with the Government is on a sliding scale, which is altered periodically, as the costs of material and labor may change, but whatever that may be, it shall govern the cost to the State.

I am, very truly, yours,

WILLIAM GREGG,
President Graniteville Company.


        Mr. HARRISON offered the following resolution, which was considered and agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:


Page 33

        Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be authorized and requested to make such arrangements with Mr. Gregg, for the purchase of Domestic Cloths, to be distributed through the different Boards of Relief for families of soldiers, as, in his judgment, may be deemed proper; and that the President of the Bank of the State be requested to advance the money therefor.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate, with concurrence, a resolution for adjournment of the General Assembly, this day, at 5, P. M.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate a resolution providing for the exemption of the Fire Departments of Charleston and Columbia from the Conscript Act of the Confederate States, which, on motion of Mr. HARRISON, was referred to the Committee on Military and Pensions.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, September 30, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully asks leave of the Senate to amend a resolution, authorizing his Excellency the Governor to purchase cloth for the Soldiers' Board of Relief, by striking out "Mr. Gregg," and inserting "William Gregg, President of the Graniteville Manufacturing Company."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate returned a message granting leave, and immediately thereafter the resolutions were returned by the House of Representatives, amended accordingly and concurred in.

        At 5, P. M., the Speaker and members of the House of Representatives, attended by the officers of the House, entered the Senate Chamber, when the following Acts were duly ratified, in the presence of the members of both branches of the General Assembly:

        On motion of Mr. HARRISON, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, delivered orally by the Clerk, informing the House that the Senate had disposed of the business before it, and was then ready to adjourn the present session of the General Assembly.

        The House of Representatives sent a similar message to the Senate, delivered in a similar manner.

        Pursuant to previous order, Mr. HOPE moving therefor,

        The PRESIDENT announced the Senate adjourned sine die.


        NOTE.--The Chair will be taken at 7, P. M., by the President of the Senate, on the 4th Monday in November next.



Page 35

Illustration


JOURNAL
OF THE
Senate of the State of South Carolina,
FOR
THE ANNUAL SESSION OF 1863.


Page 37

JOURNAL
OF THE
SENATE OF THE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA.

AT THE REGULAR SESSION OF NOVEMBER, 1863.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1863.

        The General Assembly of the State of South Carolina, begun and holden at the Capitol, in Columbia, in the State of South Carolina, on this day, the fourth Monday in November, the day fixed by the Constitution for the meeting of the General Assembly--

        The Members of the Senate assembled in the Senate Chamber at 7 o'clock, P. M.

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, one of the Senators from the Election District of St. Philip's and St. Michael's, and President of the Senate, took the Chair, and the roll having been called, the following Senators answered to their names, viz:

        A quorum was present, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the last day of the last Session, September 30, 1863.

        The following communication was laid before the Senate:

NOVEMBER 22, 1863.

To the HON. W. D. PORTER, Columbia, S. C.:

        MY DEAR SIR: I am sorry to be so troublesome to the Senate, or to be too exacting, but I have suffered very much by the evils growing out of the war, and can never recover from the consequences. I therefore humbly ask the indulgence of the Senate to accept of an approved substitute in my stead. I am deeply affected by the kindness so long bestowed upon me, but I hope a kind Providence will reward and bless in his own way and time.

With great respect,
Your friend,

J. D. GAILLARD.


        On motion of Mr. MOSES, leave was granted pursuant to the request of the writer.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, delivered orally by the Clerk, informing that House that the Senate had met, a quorum being present, and was ready to proceed with business. Immediately thereafter a similar message was received from the House of Representatives, delivered in a similar manner.


Page 39

        Mr. McCAW moved that a Committee be appointed to wait on his Excellency the Governor, and inform him that the Senate had met, a quorum being present, and was ready to receive any communication he might be pleased to make. Messrs. McCAW, BACON and KEITT were appointed the Committee.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, the Senate adjourned at a quarter to 8, P. M

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 24, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Palmer.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. HOPE offered the following resolutions, which were agreed to, and the Committee was instructed accordingly:

        Whereas, The severe restrictions by statute of the State, upon the privilege of distilling spirituous liquors from grain, has had the effect of reducing the quantity to such an amount that a sufficiency cannot be obtained, even for necessary medical purposes by the practitioners of the healing art; and whereas, This scarcity of supply has attracted the attention of the active trader, watchful of his personal interests, and disposed him to secure as much of the existing article as possible, and to sell it at enormous prices; and whereas, This condition of things permits those only in the army and out of it, to obtain a sufficiency to meet the demands of the constitution and the requirements of a cultivated taste, whilst the masses have to make the sacrifice; Therefore,

        Resolved, That it be referred to the Committee on the Judiciary to enquire into the expediency of repealing the present law, and on the propriety and necessity of passing another Act, more fully to meet the demands of the public, and that they have leave to report by Bill or otherwise.

        Mr. MAZYCK presented the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for St. James', Santee; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.


Page 40

        Mr. MOSES presented the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Sumter District; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. HOUSER presented the petition of Elizabeth Myers, Ellen Myers, and Catharine Myers, praying that the title of the State to the escheated estate of John H. Roy, an illegitimate, may be vested in them; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. BLAKENEY gave notice, that he will, on Thursday next, introduce a Bill to amend the Charter of the Cheraw and Darlington Railroad Company.

        Returns of Commissioners of Free Schools were presented by the following Senators:

        Mr. OSWALD presented the petition of the Trustees of Walterboro' Male Academy for renewal of their Charter; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Also the report of the Soldiers' Relief Board for St. Bartholomew's Parish, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. McCAW presented the report of the Acting Commissioners and Architect of the New State House, 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the New State House, and was ordered to be printed.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER submitted the Presentment of the Grand Jury of Fairfield District for Fall Term; which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        Mr. MOSES presented the Report of the Secretary of State on a resolution to make search for the Journal and Minutes of the Executive Council, appointed by the Governor under the Resolution of the Convention, passed in December, 1860.

        Mr. MOSES then offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That the book containing the Journal and Minutes of the Executive Council, "appointed by the Governor under the Resolution of the Convention, passed at their sitting in December, 1860," be deposited in


Page 41

the office of the Secretary of State, to be kept and preserved under the care of that officer.

        The resolution was agreed to, and ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        Mr. GARLINGTON was excused from serving on the Committee on the Judiciary in consequence of the pressing duties of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, and Mr. FICKLING was appointed in his place.

        At half-past 12, P. M., Message No. 1, of his Excellency the Governor, was communicated to the Senate and was read, and on motion of Mr. McCAW, was made the Special Order of the Day for to-morrow, at 1 o'clock, and two hundred copies were ordered to be printed.

MESSAGE No. 1.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Columbia, November 23, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        Since your last annual meeting, the enemy has obtained possession of Port Hudson, Vicksburg, Chattanooga and Morris Island, not, however, without paying dearly for his possessions; and a second time have our troops evacuated Pennsylvania and Maryland, though not defeated. There is in this no cause for despondency. He is this day relatively weaker than he was before these events, his armies being widely separated, and further from their bases of supplies, whilst the Confederacy is relatively stronger, our armies possessing the facilities for more rapid concentration by interior lines, and being nearer their bases of supplies. The great battle of Chickamauga, in which some of Carolina's noblest sons have fallen, has illustrated the truth of this proposition. Beyond the points obtained, he has made no real progress towards the accomplishment of his purpose--the subjugation of the South. Our harvests have been bountiful, our country healthy, and our people have been rendered, if possible, more united and resolved by the vandalism of our foes. The siege of Charleston, now far advanced into its fifth month, conducted with a power and range of metal and destructiveness of projectiles, hitherto unknown in warfare, and a malignity that respects neither sex, age, or condition, has shown to our enemies that they will probably never place their unhallowed feet upon the soil of that brave old city; but, if they do, it will be only they have reduced it to a heap of ruins. Sumter, held with a gallantry and a tenacity which will immortalize its noble defenders, is now in ruins, but is yet a giant in its powers of resistance. To the west of the Mississippi, our troops have gained important advantages. In Tennessee, the enemy's forces are besieged


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in Chattanooga and driven from Knoxville, and the army of the Potomac stands ready to give him another Fredericksburg reception. It behooves us, however, not to relax our efforts. Untiring energy and perseverance are essential to success. A bitter and wily foe watches our every movement, prepared to take every advantage. Our people have counted the cost, and have determined upon independence or annihilation; it is ours to leave nothing undone to secure the object of this revolution. Never was the remark more applicable, that the price of liberty is eternal vigilance. The State Legislatures have no unimportant part to play in this great drama. They can aid the Confederate Government, by assisting in clothing the troops, in repelling the raids of our enemies, and in feeding the families of our soldiers in arms. In all measures which you, in your wisdom, may adopt, looking to the successful issue of this great struggle, you may, gentlemen, rely upon my hearty coöperation.

        The supplying of slave labor for coast defences has proved perplexing. Our energetic State Agent, whose report is herewith transmitted, has done all in his power to enforce your Acts on this subject. But the system has not furnished all the labor which the pressing emergencies at Charleston required. The Confederate General felt the necessity of impressing, in September last, additional labor to secure the safety of the city. This action, I did not, under the circumstances, hesitate to approve. It would seem that no system imposing penalties, is likely to secure equality and success. The patriotic send their slaves; other will pay, if the fine is not too heavy, or take the chances of escape through the Courts. Much complaint is made of the mismanagement and treatment of the negroes; of their detention in violation of the contract and the law, and that so many citizens furnish no labor at all. The first complaint, I am sorry to believe, there is foundation for; but the remedy for the evil is difficult, and must necessarily rest with the Confederate authorities. The second, I have been given to understand, arises from the inability of the State authorities to replace the labor at the end of the month. The third is the result of a radical defect in the system itself. If labor is still to be furnished, and I have no intimation that it will not be needed, (so long as the coast is invaded, and there is need of it, it ought to be furnished,) the plan which will secure the greatest equality, in my judgment, is to authorize the Governor or State Agent, or the Confederate General commanding the department, if it is preferred, to impress through the Commissioners of Roads, for two months' service, the equal proportion of every slaveholder, owning more than one road hand. My acquaintance, for some years past, with the organization of these Boards, leads me to believe that they would fairly and impartially discharge the duty, and furnish the labor promptly.


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An extension of the time of service is recommended, to lessen the expenses of transportation, and because every change requires a new organization, which takes, I learn, the better part of the first week. Besides, it is not the time the hands are kept, of which planters complain, if they are advertised of it; it is their detention, contrary to the understanding and their previous arrangements.

        Owing to the disorganization of the State militia, by the enforcement of the Conscript Acts of Congress up to the age of forty five, it will require much time to reorganize it, so as to make it at all effective. Upon this subject, I ask your attention to the Report of the Adjutant and Inspector General. In the present condition of things, a permanent force, taken by volunteering or draft, proportionally from each military division of the State, would be much more effective. The militia, for protection against raids, cannot be brought so promptly into the field; would not be so effective; and suddenly called out by regiments, would take the entire agricultural white labor of the particular regiments from home, perhaps at harvest, perhaps at seed-time. On this subject, I beg leave to embody an extract from the recent message of the patriotic Executive of Georgia.

        Speaking of his two regiments of State troops, their protecting the rear of General Bragg's army since he has been near Chattanooga, and their importance in time of war, he says: "Had the State not been able to protect his rear, the General must have sent part of his own army to do that duty, which would have weakened his force, and made his success more doubtful. * * * * In case of a raid into this State, this force would be of great service in the protection of public and private property, and in repelling the aggressors. No State in the Confederacy should be without such a force during the continuance of the war, as emergencies must frequently arise which make it indispensably necessary that the State have at her command a force sufficient to suppress slave insurrections, repel incursions of the enemy, or meet other sudden exigencies. I notice that the Governor of South Carolina has lately convened the Legislature, and recommended the organization of a similar force in that gallant State."

        The cost of such a body of troops may be objected to. If two regiments are two much, let one be raised, to be put in the field when needed, and wholly or partially furloughed when not needed. This is no time to count the cost of maintaining a small force to protect the State against raids, our women and children from insult, our hearth-stones from desecration. With but two companies of mounted troops. (the Combahee Rangers were disbanded in July last,) I was enabled with one, Rogers' company, to guard, in part, the eastern coast of the State, and with the other, Boykin's, materially to assist the Confederate Government in arresting deserters, which


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delicate duty has been most satisfactorily performed. I have also been enabled recently, at the request of Governor Vance, to send one company, Captain Boykin's, into North Carolina, where it has rendered most efficient services, as will be seen by reference to the report of the Captain, and General Vance's order returning them to their own State, copies of which are herewith transmitted. His command engaged and repulsed a force larger than his own, Captain Boykin having two men wounded, one probably mortally.

        I herewith transmit a copy of the able and satisfactory Report of Major Niernsee, State Engineer, upon the obstruction of the Santee, and a battery at Taber's Point, St. Matthew's Parish, Orangeburg District, together with a letter from General Beauregard in relation thereto.

        Accompanying this Message, is a report of the Commissary General, showing the progress made in suppressing undue distillation in the State, and explaining the inability of the State to furnish, as yet, whiskey for medicinal purposes. Your law prohibiting undue distillation, has contributed largely toward keeping down the price of breadstuffs, particularly Indian corn. If the Confederate Government would receive its tithe, and postpone impressments for the present, (holders will not destroy the supplies, nor can they conceal them,) I believe the breadstuffs in the country are amply sufficient for the people and the army.

        The question of conflict between the State and Confederate Exemption Acts has been submitted to the courts, and I am just informed that the decision of the Circuit Court is, "that neither the Ordinance nor the Act amendatory of it, contemplated exemption from any service besides militia service in the State, and so neither is in conflict with the Conscription laws." As I said in my message of September last, I think it is our true policy to amend our exemption laws, so as to make them conform as nearly as practicable to those of the Confederate Government. This may be done without yielding the right of the State to exempt such portion of her population as she may choose, and when she may choose, for police and other purposes. If the Confederate Government will put into the field the most of the able-bodied men between eighteen and forty-five, now occupied as Quartermasters and Commissaries, Purchasing Agents, Enrolling Officers and Impressing Agents, and in other similar positions, the great mass of whose places can be as well, in many, and in some instances better, filled by disabled soldiers, and the State Governments will conform their's to the Confederate Exemption Acts, the Confederate Government can command a force that will drive beyond our borders all the armies the Abolition Government can congregate for the further prosecution of this unholy war. Your attention is invited to the views of the Adjutant and Inspector General upon this and other subjects referred to, in his report accompanying this Message.


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        I also ask your attention to the following exemption clause in our own law: "The officers, and as many employees of each Railroad Company as the President or Superintendent may certify to be necessary to the efficient conduct of its business. Provided, That it is also certified that the duty of said employees cannot be discharged by slaves." I do not know that these officers have abused this trust. Such power should not be lodged with any one who is not directly connected with the administration of the Government. The final decision should be left with the Executive or the Adjutant General.

        The permission of substitutions is suited to a war in which a small proportion of the arms-bearing population is required for the field--not to a war which may sooner or later require every man, without reference to age, to shoulder his musket; and especially is it unsuited to a conscription system which purports to take all able-bodied men between given ages. You have wisely declared those having substitutes in Confederate service still liable to State service. The time, I suggest, has arrived, when all laws, whether State or Confederate, allowing substitution, should be repealed. They operate in favor of a class, than whom none have a deeper interest in the success of the cause.

        The State owes no higher obligation growing out of this war than to protect every soldier's family against want; and to effect this, it is the duty of the Legislature to increase the appropriation to be distributed by the Soldiers' Boards of Relief to any amount requisite; and if necessary, to raise the taxes for that purpose. And these taxes should, at this time, be levied upon incomes.

        Of the fund appropriated for the military defence of the State, less than one-half has been expended. The six months' State troops having gone into Confederate service, and the exigencies, though threatening, not having required the calling out of the militia, the expenditures have been far less than was anticipated. I have directed the Auditor to obtain estimates from all the departments for the next year, which I will send in as soon as completed.

        Upon this, the Quartermaster General's Department, and other subjects reported upon, I call your attention to the full and satisfactory report of the State Auditor. The arduous duties of this officer have been faithfully and ably performed. Under, as I think, a mistaken view, much of his salary has been expended for what I can scarcely suppose it was the expectation of the Legislature it would be. Such an officer at this time is indispensable, but his labors are too great for one person. One assistant, and for a short period two, have been found necessary for the accomplishment of the work. I recommend that an assistant be allowed, with a competent salary.


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        To the reports of the Auditor and the Commissary General, I refer you, for information as to what has been done in procuring and distributing wool and cotton cards, and the procurement of card-making machines. It is much to be regretted that these articles could not have been sooner procured. But I have no reason to doubt that the agents employed to procure them, accomplished all that was practicable. Learning from General James Jones, Quartermaster General, to whose superintendence I have committed the card-making machines, that one machinist can manage ten with ease, I ordered one to be made here (not yet completed), and have purchased nine others, obtained from abroad, six of which have just arrived. The number of wool and cotton cards received will relieve much the wants of soldier's families, and other needy families; and the card-making machines, I trust, will enable me before a great while to materially reduce the price. The mode of distributing them, according to representation, is not, under existing circumstances, just. It would be far more so, to distribute them according to the actual wants of all the Districts, to be determined by the present population.

        I transmit herewith copies of communications from some eminently practical citizens, upon the subject of Government ships for procuring such machinery and supplies as the State may need for her own use, or that of her soldiers in Confederate service. The Confederate Government cannot at all times, so promptly as they may wish, furnish such things as the army may need; and by adopting one or both of the schemes suggested, the State will be in a condition to procure for herself, or furnish to the troops, such articles at much less cost than now.

        The Confederate Government has expressed a willingness to take off the hands of the State, the Saltpetre Plantation, and her interest in the lead mine, at cost and charges; but not the State Works. I did not deem it advisable to transfer the least important and expensive part of the public works, retaining the others. The working of the lead mine, I recommend to be abandoned, as it cannot, according to the report of Dr. LeConte, herewith communicated, be made profitable. The Saltpetre Plantation, it is believed, can be made to pay well, and is a very interesting experiment. The advantages of the State Works do not appear to be, so far, commensurate with the expenditures. It is believed, however, that they will in future be profitable, if the expenses of procuring coal and coke, and transporting iron, do not prevent it. It is a grave question for your consideration, in the present state of the country, whether it would not be better now, to change the locality of the works, placing them at Columbia, on the canal, or near the iron mines, at some place where the machinery may be run by water. And here I recommend to your consideration the question of how


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far it may not be desirable for the State to do something towards establishing more direct communication with the Deep River coal mines. If these difficulties could be overcome, the information I have received on a recent visit to the Works, from the intelligent Superintendent and the heads of the different departments, satisfies me they will be profitable. It is a matter of great importance to the State to have it, in future, in her own power to manufacture the implements of war which she may need.

        In accordance with your resolution, I contracted for the manufacture of one thousand Morse's carbines. A part of them have been completed, and I regard them the best cavalry weapon in use. The compensation to Col. Morse has not been determined upon, and I recommend this matter to your consideration, as something more than the mere value of the article manufactured, it may be thought proper to allow.

        Five of George's Revolving Cannon have been constructed, under your resolution, and inspected and approved by the Ordnance officer of the State, whose report, together with reports furnished by General Hampton and Captain Thomas, as to the utility of the arm, are herewith communicated. The remaining two will be completed by Captain George at an early day. In order to have them fully tested, I sent one to General Beauregard, and another I delivered to General Hampton, to be carried to Virginia, where it can be tested in the field. He proposed to replace it with another, which he has ordered to be constructed. Two others I have within the last few days, sent to General Beauregard, at his request, he thinking them useful at Charleston. The fifth is at the Arsenal for the inspection of the military committees. I refer you, for further information on these subjects, to the report of the Ordnance officer, herewith communicated.

        I attended, in July last, the annual examination of the Deaf and Dumb, at the Cedar Springs Asylum. I commend this Institution to the fostering care of the State. No one who has not attended the examinations can form any adequate estimate of the happiness imparted to the unfortunate pupils of the school by their education.

        The Citadel and Arsenal Academies are in a flourishing condition, and at this juncture, are the most suitable institutions for training the youths of our State. I commend them earnestly to your care and encouragement.

        I transmit copies of a communication from Hon. James A. Seddon, Secretary of War, acknowledging the receipt of your resolution of September, in reference to impressments. There have certainly been many irregularities, on the part of government officials, in the execution of the law; but it is hoped the orders of the War Department, recently published, may prevent them in future.

        In compliance with the resolutions of your Houses, at your last session, upon the subject of furloughs to the six months' troops, for the purpose of


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gathering their crops and sowing grain, and also as to placing troops near the passes of the mountains, I communicated both with the Secretary of War, and the Commanding General of this department. Their replies are herewith transmitted. Subsequently, upon representations from Asheville, and also from the citizens of Greenville, that the danger of a raid through Asheville into the upper Districts of this State was imminent, the Commanding General sent to the mountains one regiment of State troops and a battery of light artillery.

        In accordance with your resolution, I accepted the offer of Mr. William Gregg, President of the Graniteville Manufacturing Company, to deliver to the State, for distribution through the different Boards of Relief for families of soldiers, ten thousand yards of Graniteville cloths per week. I notified him of my acceptance of his proposition, and have received several thousand yards, and have directed the distribution according to your resolution. Since that time, I have received from Mr. Gregg a proposition to change the terms of his offer, but did not feel warranted in acceding to it. I transmit copies of his letter, and of my reply.

        I earnestly recommend an increase of the salaries of all public officers whose salaries are not limited by the Constitution. The high price of provisions and rents, renders it utterly impossible for them to support themselves with their present salaries, especially those whose duties require them to live in Columbia. I enclose herewith copies of a communication addressed to me upon the subject.

        I transmit also a copy of a communication from Hon. Marshall McCue, which he desires should reach you through me, upon the subject of clothing for our army, together with a pamphlet containing his speech in the House of Delegates, and much valuable statistical information.

        I transmit also copies of a memorial and letters of Mr. B. J. Sage, upon the subject of a Volunteer Navy, under the Act of Congress. I recommend this subject to the most favorable consideration of the Legislature. The recent action of the British and French Governments renders it more than ever desirable that the States themselves should take some steps towards furnishing what has been so long needed to bring the war to a speedy and successful termination.

        In accordance with your resolutions of January 24, 1863, I established the Richmond Agency for the assistance of South Carolina soldiers. I appointed Colonel E. P. Jones, of Greenville, agent, and authorized him to employ two assistants, requiring him to make periodical returns. I have every reason to be satisfied with the manner in which he has performed his duties, and have every assurance that the agency has contributed greatly to the comfort and relief of our soldiers, with an inconsiderable outlay of money. Copies of his annual report are herewith submitted.


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        I transmit also a communication from a Committee of the House of Delegates of Virginia, upon the all-important question of the currency. It is gratifying to know that in your bodies are to be found some of the ablest financiers of the country, and I trust that their combined wisdom may suggest some means of improving its condition.

        I herewith communicate copies of certain resolutions of the North Carolina Legislature upon the subject of loyalty, enclosed me by the Governor of that State, to be laid before your bodies.

        I transmit also the first battle flag of the 13th South Carolina Volunteers, with the correspondence between Lieutenant Colonel Brockman, commanding, and myself. It was the first flag borne by the regiment under the lead of its gallant Colonel, Edwards, who gave up his life in defence of that flag and his country's honor. It should be preserved as one of the proud memorials of the gallantry of Carolina's sons.

        I recommend an amendment of the sixth section of "The Act to enable citizens of the State who are engaged in military service to exercise the rights of suffrage," ratified on the 6th day of February, 1863, so as to require the polls to be opened in the army on a day so long previous to the day fixed for the election, as to secure ample time for the transmission of the result to the District Managers before the day for declaring the election.

        The office of Paymaster General should be abolished, and the duties assigned to the Quartermaster General's department. The duties of these two departments are consolidated in the Confederate Government, and it is found to work well.

        All joint resolutions should be engrossed and filed in the Secretary of State's office, and be published with the Acts. They are so disposed of under the Federal as well as the Confederate Governments, and I incline to think, some of the State Governments. Having the force of law, they should be as accessible to the public as the Acts of Assembly themselves. Moreover, as they often impose duties upon the Executive, it is important that he should have ready access to them immediately upon the adjournment of the Legislature.

        I enclose a joint resolution of the Legislature of Georgia, just received, setting apart the 10th day of December next, as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, and requesting the Congress of the Confederate States, the Legislatures of the different States, the army and navy, and all the people, to unite with them in its observance. I recommend the adoption of a resolution of concurrence, with a request to all the good citizens of this State, to unite in the observance of that day.

        Upon your deliberations, I invoke the blessings of the Almighty.

M. L. BONHAM.



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        Mr. HAMMOND offered the following preamble and resolution, which were agreed to:

        Whereas, it is apparent, from the present aspect of affairs, that much suffering will inevitably ensue from the spirit of speculation and inordinate thirst for gain that is spreading everywhere throughout our struggling country; and, whereas, the prime necessaries of life are now progressing to such high prices that it will soon be impossible for the community to procure livelihood, and in order to prevent this threatened suffering and want by our brave countrymen, and to guard against the subjugation that our cruel and ruthless enemy seems determined to bring upon us:

        Resolved, That the President of the Senate appoint a Committee of Five to coöperate with a similar Committee to be appointed by the House, in devising some scheme that will protect the families of soldiers, the non-producers, and the poor generally, against the sufferings and ills with which they are threatened on account of a depreciated currency and the consequent high prices of the prime necessaries of life.

        Messrs. HAMMOND, ARTHUR, LAWTON, JONES, and WARE were appointed the Committee on the part of the Senate, and a message was sent to the House of Representatives asking the appointment of a similar Committee.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        A Bill to provide for the election of Members of the House of Representatives in the Congress of the Confederate States of America, was, on motion of Mr. WILSON, ordered to lie on the table.

        The Reports of the Committee of Ways and Means of the House of Representatives,

        On the petition of Charles J. Lesesne, to be refunded a tax twice paid;

        On the petition of W. W. Tyler, to be refunded an excess of war tax;

        On the petition of Josiah S. Tennent, to be relieved from a double tax execution;

        On Message No. 3, of his Excellency the Governor; were referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        On motion of Mr. WILSON, the Senate adjourned at fifteen minutes past one, P. M.


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WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 25, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Breaker.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. MOSES offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That it be referred to the Committee on the Military to inquire into the expediency of such change in the organization and arrangement of the State Military Academy as will permit annually a larger number of Pay and Beneficiary Cadets than is now permitted by the regulations of the said Institute, and that the Committee have leave to report by Bill or otherwise.

        The resolution was agreed to, and the Committee was instructed accordingly.

        Mr. OSWALD presented the Return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for St. Bartholomew's Parish, 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. WARE presented the following Report:

        The Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices, beg leave to report the following offices vacant, viz:


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        On motion of Mr. ARTHUR, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, proposing to that House to go into a ballot for Solicitor of the Southern Circuit to-morrow, at 1, P. M; and, on motion of Mr. WILSON, a message was further ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives, proposing to go into a ballot for Master and Commissioners in Equity immediately thereafter.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the Petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Columbia, for an increase of the Transient Poor Fund for that city; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Also, the account of W. W. Purse, for work done in the Senate Chamber; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        Also, the report of the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Columbia, on the expenditure of the Transient Poor Fund for that city; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER gave notice, that to-morrow, he will ask leave to introduce

        A Bill to repeal all Acts to organize and furnish labor for coast defence.

        Mr. JONES presented the account of Dr. W. H. Henry for a post mortem examination; which was referred to the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts.

        Mr. FURMAN presented the account of Dr. John H. Boatwright, for post mortem examination, praying compensation for the same; which was referred to the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts.

        Mr. HOPE presented the Report of the Board of Relief of Lexington District for 1863; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. BLAKENEY presented two reports from the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Chesterfield; which were referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        On motion of Mr. E. G. PALMER, a Special Committee of six Senators, one from each Congressional District, was ordered to be raised, to which Committee shall be referred all reports from the Soldiers' Boards of Relief. Messrs. E. G. PALMER, THOS, THOMSON, H. D. LESESNE, B. W. LAWTON, J. W. MILLER, and W. D. JOHNSON, were appointed the Committee. The Committee on Finance and Banks was then discharged from the further consideration of the reports on that subject, and they were referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the Report of the Commissioners of the Institution for the Education of the Deaf, Dumb and Blind; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion, and three hundred copies were ordered to be printed.


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        Mr. MAZYCK presented the Return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for St. James', Santee, for 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the petition of the Board of Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston; which was referred to the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the Annual Report of the Comptroller General; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, November 25, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully concurs in your preamble and resolution, respecting the "spirit of speculation and thirst for inordinate gain that is spreading everywhere throughout our struggling country," and has appointed Messrs. J. M. DeSaussure, B. F. Perry, T. N. Dawkins, G. A. Trenholm, R. A. Fair, B. T. Watts and J. J. Brabham, a Committee to meet the Committee of your House upon that subject.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, November 25, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House concurs in your proposition to go into an election to-morrow, at 1 o'clock, for Solicitor of the Southern Circuit, and immediately thereafter for Master in Equity for Charleston District, and Commissioners in Equity for Edgefield, Greenville, Kershaw, Sumter, Williamsburg, Fairfield and York Districts.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        At 1, P. M., the Senate proceeded to the Special Order for this hour, the reference of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor.

        The reading was dispensed with, and Mr. McCAW offered the following resolution, which was immediately considered, and agreed to, and the several subjects of the Message were referred accordingly:

        Resolved, That Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor, be referred as follows:

        1. So much as relates to the supply of slave labor for coast defence.


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        2. So much as relates to the State militia; to the employment of two mounted companies; to the Report of Major Niernsee; to the conflict between the State and Confederate Exemption Acts; to the exemption of railroad employees; to the subject of substitutes; to the fund for military defence; to the sale of the State Works, nitre plantation and lead mine; to the construction of Morse's carbine; to George's revolving cannon; the Richmond agency; to the battle-flag of the 13th South Carolina Volunteers; to the office of Paymaster; to the six months' troops; to the communication of the Hon. Marshall McCue, and to the State Military Academies; to the Military Committee.

        3. So much as relates to the suppression of undue distillation; to the subject of wool and cotton cards; to the subject of Government ships for procuring machinery and supplies; and to the memorial and letter of B. J. Sage; to the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts.

        4. So much as relates to the relief of soldiers' families, and the communication of William Gregg; to the Special Committee to whom has been referred the reports of the Soldiers' Boards.

        5. So much as relates to the State Auditor; and to the communication of the House of Delegates of Virginia; to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        6. So much as relates to the Deep River coal mines, to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        7. So much as relates to the Cedar Springs Asylum, to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        8. So much as relates to the subject of impressment; and also to the resolutions of the North Carolina Legislature; to the Committee on Confederate Relations.

        9. So much as relates to the increase of salaries, to the Committee on Vacant Offices.

        10. So much as relates to enabling citizens engaged in military service to exercise the right of suffrage, to the Committee on Privileges and Elections.

        11. So much as relates to the Joint Resolutions, to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        12. And that with relation to so much as relates to a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, the following resolution be adopted, viz:

        Resolved, That Thursday, the 10th day of December next, be set apart as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, and that his Excellency the Governor be requested to issue a proclamation to that effect, and inviting the clergy and people of this State to unite in divine services appropriate


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to such an occasion, and in asking of Almighty God deliverance from the malevolence of our enemy. That a Committee of Three be appointed by the President of the Senate to make arrangements for the performance of appropriate services before the General Assembly, and that a message be sent to the House, asking its concurrence in this resolution, and the appointment of a similar Committee.

        In pursuance to the resolution relative to a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, Messrs. McCAW, BOYKIN and OSWALD were appointed the Committee on the part of the Senate, and a message was sent to the House of Representatives asking the appointment of a similar Committee.

        Mr. MOSES moved that the documents accompanying the Governor's Message be read.

        Mr. MAZYCK moved, as a substitute therefor, that they be referred to the several Committees, with the Governor's Message referring to them, and that the Committees have such of them printed as they may deem advisable. The substitute was adopted, and the order was made accordingly.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, the Senate adjourned at 20 minutes past 1, P. M.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Martin.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. BLAKENEY presented the Return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Chesterfield District, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.


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        Mr. MOSES presented the petition of the Chief Justice and other members of the Court of Appeals, praying for relief touching the Library of the Court of Appeals; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. BARKER presented the Return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for the Parish of St. John's, Berkeley, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. KEITT presented the Report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Orange Parish; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. BACON presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Edgefield District, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the report of the Regents of the Lunatic Asylum; which was referred to the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts, and 400 copies were ordered to be printed.

        Mr. McALILEY presented the memorial of the President and Directors of the Shelby and Broad River Railroad, praying for aid of the State in its construction; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. BOYLE presented the Return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for St. Paul's Parish, for 1861, 1862 and 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. HOPE presented the report of the Special Joint Committee, appointed to examine the condition of the Branch of the Bank of the State at Columbia; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        Mr. McKEWN presented the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for St. James', Goose Creek; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. WILSON presented the return of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Prince George's, Winyaw, for 1863; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. LESESNE offered the following resolution, which was agreed to:

        Whereas, there is reason to believe that the outstanding circulation of the Banks of the Confederate States has nearly all passed into the hands of the enemy, and is held as a debt due to them by said institutions, and therefore clearly a subject for sequestration by the terms of the Act of Congress,

        Resolved, That it be referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks to consider and report whether it is practicable to cause the outstanding circulation of the Banks of this State to be brought under the operation of the Sequestration Act, with liberty to report a Bill for carrying out the purpose of this resolution.


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        Mr. MAZYCK offered the following resolution, which was considered, and agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        Resolved, That this General Assembly will adjourn sine die on Saturday, 5th day of December ensuing.

        Pursuant to notice, and with leave of the Senate, Mr. E. G. PALMER introduced

        A Bill to repeal all Acts to organize and furnish labor for coast defence.

        The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The following messages were received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, November 25, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully informs your body, that A. G. Baskin has been appointed to discharge the duties of Reading Clerk for the present Session.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, November 25, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House concurs in your resolution, setting apart Thursday, the 10th day of December next, as a day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, and that his Excellency the Governor be requested to issue a proclamation to that effect, and inviting the clergy and people of this State to unite in divine services, appropriate to such an occasion, and in asking of Almighty God deliverance from the malevolence of our enemies.

        Messrs. Wilmot G. DeSaussure, Jones and Boyce have been appointed a Committee on the part of this House to meet the Committee of the Senate.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.



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        A message from the House of Representatives in relation to the last subject, with a similar recommendation to the Senate to that sent to the House of Representatives by the Senate, was received, and ordered to lie on the table.

        At 1, P. M., the Senate, pursuant to previous orders, joined the House of Representatives in a ballot for Solicitor of the Southern Circuit. Messrs. APPLEBY and ARTHUR were appointed the Committee on the part of the Senate, to count the ballots.

        Immediately thereafter, the Senate joined the House of Representatives in a ballot for Master in Equity for Charleston District, and Commissioners in Equity for the Districts of Edgefield, Greenville, Kershaw, Sumter, Williamsburg, Fairfield, and York. Messrs. BACON and BARKER were appointed the Committee on the part of the Senate, to count the ballots.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Pringle.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        And they were declared by the PRESIDENT duly elected accordingly.

        The Committee further reported that for Commissioner in Equity for York and Greenville Districts, neither of the candidates had received a majority of ballots, and there was consequently no election.

        On motion of Mr. BACON, a message was sent to the House of Representatives proposing to that House to go into a ballot at half-past 12, P. M., this day; and the House having concurred, the Senate, at the hour named, joined the House in the ballot. Messrs. BLAKENEY and BOYKIN were appointed the Committee, on the part of the Senate, to count the ballots.

        Pursuant to notice, and with leave of the Senate, Mr. BLAKENEY introduced

        A Bill to alter and amend the Charter of the Cheraw and Darlington Railroad Company. The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the petition of the Charleston Importing and Exporting Company, praying for an Act of Incorporation; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the petition of the Vestry and Wardens of Trinity Church of Columbia for a charter; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. LESESNE gave notice that he will ask leave, to-morrow, to introduce

        A Bill to incorporate the Charleston Importing and Exporting Company.

        Mr. HAMMOND presented a petition from certain persons for the reappointment of John H. McMurray, as Commissioner of the Relief Board for soldiers' families in Lancaster District; which was referred to the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices;

        Also, the petition of sundry soldiers' families of Lancaster District, for the re-appointment of John Gardner as a member of the Relief Board; which was referred to the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the Report of the City Treasurer of Charleston, showing the expenditures for the poor for the fiscal year ending in September, 1863; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. HARRISON presented the Report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Anderson District; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. MANNING presented the Report of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Clarendon District, 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.


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        Mr. WARE presented the Report of the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices, reporting the office of Comptroller General vacant after the 1st of March next; and, on his motion, a message was sent to the House of Representatives proposing to go into a ballot therefor to-morrow, at 1, P. M.

        The Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts was discharged from the further consideration of so much of the Governor's Message as refers to the distillation of spirituous liquors, and the same was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The Report of the Special Joint Committee to examine the Branch of the Bank of the State of South Carolina being before the Senate, Mr. MOSES offered the following resolution, which was considered and agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        Resolved, That the Report of the Special Joint Committee on the part of Senate, appointed to examine the Branch of the Bank of the State of South Carolina at Columbia, be received and filed, and be printed with the Acts and Resolutions of the General Assembly.

        On motion of Mr. MURRAY, the Senate adjourned at twenty minutes past 1, P. M.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Gaillard.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the report of the Committee of Inspection of the principal Bank of the State of South Carolina, in Charleston; which was ordered for consideration on Monday, and to be printed.


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        Mr. McALILEY gave notice that he will, on Monday next, ask leave to introduce

        A Bill to continue in force the laws heretofore enacted in relation to the cultivation of cotton.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the first annual report of the Central Association for the relief of South Carolina soldiers; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks and ordered to be printed.

        The Committee on the Judiciary was discharged from the further consideration of the resolution in relation to distilling from grain, and it was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        Mr. BLAKENEY, from the Committee appointed on the part of the Senate to count the ballots for Commissioner in Equity for the Districts of Greenville and York, reported the following elections to have been made:

        J. P. Moore, for Greenville District;
W. B. Metts, for York District.

        And they were declared by the PRESIDENT duly elected.

        Mr. MAXWELL presented the Report of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Pickens District; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, November 28, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House concurs in your proposition to go into a ballot for Comptroller General to-day, at 1 o'clock.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. GARLINGTON presented the returns of Commissioners of Free Schools for Newberry District; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. WARE presented the Report of the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, on a Bill to amend the charter of the town of Abbeville, recommending that the Bill do not pass; which was ordered for consideration on Monday next.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the petition of Jesse E. Dent, Sheriff of Richland District, for an increase of the allowance for feeding prisoners confined in jail; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives and concurred in, and a message returned accordingly:


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HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, November 28, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House adopted the following resolution:

        That the report of the Auditor on claims for negroes lost in the public service be referred to the Committee on Claims, and that a message be sent to the Senate, asking leave for the Committee on Claims and Grievances of that body, to act with the Committee on Claims of this House, as a Joint Committee on that report.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. LESESNE offered the following resolution, which was agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        Resolved, That the sum of fifty dollars be paid to the Messenger of the Senate for extra services in the performance of which he is engaged.

        Mr. WILSON presented the report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures, and the Mechanic Arts, on the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston; which was ordered for consideration on Monday.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the report of the Solicitor of the Western Circuit on District Officers and Offices; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. FICKLING, from the Committee on Privileges and Elections, to which had been referred certain portions of the Governor's Message relating thereto, reported

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to enable citizens of the State who are engaged in military service to exercise the rights of suffrage.

        The Bill received the first reading, and was ordered for consideration on Monday.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the annual report of the President and Directors of the Bank of the State of South Carolina; which was referred to the Committee en Finance and Banks, and ordered to be printed; also,

        The Schedule of Free School returns for the Parishes of St. Philip's and St. Michael's, for 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. HARRISON presented the Memorial of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Anderson District; which was referred to the Special Committee on that subject; and also,

        A resolution requiring the Clerk of each branch of the Legislature to furnish to the Governor certified copies of all resolutions which pass their


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respective Houses, as soon as they have been passed; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        At 1, P. M., the Senate, pursuant to messages interchanged, joined the House of Representatives in a ballot for Comptroller General. Messrs. BOYLE and FICKLING were appointed the Committee on the part of the Senate to count the ballots.

        At twenty minutes past 1, P. M., the Senate, on motion of Mr. ARTHUR, adjourned.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Walker.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of Saturday.

        Mr. FICKLING, from the Committee appointed on the part of the Senate to count the ballots for Comptroller General, reported that James A. Black had received the majority of the votes cast. He was therefore declared by the PRESIDENT duly elected.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate a resolution requesting information from his Excellency the Governor relative to the distillation of spirituous liquors.

        On motion of Mr. HOPE, it was considered immediately, and was concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The following notices were given of Bills which the Senators would ask leave to introduce to-morrow, viz:

        By Mr. LAWTON, a Bill to amend an Act, entitled an Act to Suppress the Distillation of Spirituous Liquors in this State.

        By Mr. LESESNE, a Bill to incorporate the Consolidated Steamship Company of Charleston.

        And also, a Bill to incorporate the Chicora Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina.


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        By Mr. ARTHUR, a Bill to amend and extend the charter of the Columbia and Hamburg Railroad Company.

        Mr. THOMSON presented the Return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Abbeville; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        The Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices was discharged from the further consideration of a memorial of public officers for increase of salaries; and it was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. F. W. MILLER presented the Return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Spartanburg District for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the petition of the Consolidated Steamship Company of Charleston, praying for an Act of Incorporation; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Also, the petition of H. L. Pinckney, trustee of Mrs. Anna G. Elliott, for renewal of a certificate of State stock; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Pursuant to notice, and with leave of the Senate, Mr. McALILEY introduced

        A Bill to continue in force the laws heretofore enacted in relation to the cultivation of cotton. The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements, and ordered to be printed.

        Mr. LAWTON presented the petition of the Trustees of the Aiken Public School, asking an appropriation; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. WARE, from the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, reported

        A Bill to incorporate the Charleston Importing and Exporting Company. The Bill received the first reading, and was ordered for a second reading to-morrow.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the following resolution, which was considered and agreed to, and the Committee was instructed accordingly.

        Resolved, That it be referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions to inquire and report what persons or classes of persons should be exempted from Confederate conscription, as necessary for the internal government and police of this State, and that said Committee be authorized to report by Bill or otherwise.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the petition of H. L. Pinckney, Tax Collector of the Parishes of St. Philip's and St. Michael's, to be refunded money


Page 65

paid for the printing of public books and papers; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances;

        And also the memorial of citizens of Charleston, praying the incorporation of the Chicora Steamship Company; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. GARLINGTON, from the Committee on the Military and Pensions, to which had been referred certain portions of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor, reported

        A Bill to declare and amend the Exemption law of this State, and for other purposes. The Bill received the first reading, and was ordered for a second reading to morrow, and to be printed.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The Report of the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, on a Bill to amend the charter of the town of Abbeville, was agreed to, and the Bill was consequently rejected.

        The Report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts, on the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston, was passed over.

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to enable the citizens of the State who are engaged in military service to exercise the right of suffrage," received the second reading, and was agreed to.

        The report of the Committee of Investigation of the Bank of the State of South Carolina, was ordered to be received, filed, and printed with the Reports and Resolutions.

        The General Orders were disposed of; and, on motion of Mr. MURRAY, the Senate adjourned at one o'clock, P. M.


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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1863.

        Senate met at 12 M. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Howe.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Appeared in their places in the Senate Chamber.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following Bills:

        A Bill to authorize the Clerk of the Court for Marlboro' District to draw Juries for the next term of the Court during the vacation;

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to increase the fees of Sheriffs for dieting persons confined in jail;

        A Bill explanatory of an Act for the better organization of the militia, and for other purposes.

        The Bills received the first reading, and the two first were referred to the Committee on the Judiciary, and the last to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate, for concurrence,

        The Report of the Committee on Claims,

        On the account of W. W. Purse, for work done in the House of Representatives;

        On the account of Dr. R. W. Moye, for attending prisoners in jail; which were referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances; and also,

        The reports of the Medical Committee of the House of Representatives,

        On two accounts of Dr. A. W. Kennedy, for attending prisoners in jail; which were referred to the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts; and also,

        The report of the Committee on the Military, on Message No. 1, so far as it relates to the flag of the 13th Regiment, S. C. V.; which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions; and also,

        The reports of the Committee of Ways and Means,

        On the petition of Edward Noble, to be refunded a double tax;

        On the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston, praying State aid; which were referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.


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        The House of Representatives also returned to the Senate a resolution providing for printing the report of the Special Joint Committee to examine the Branch Bank at Columbia with the Reports and Resolutions of the General Assembly, in which it had concurred.

        Mr. MAXWELL presented the report of the Committee to examine the Branch of the Bank of the State at Abbeville; which was ordered to be received, filed and printed with the Reports and Resolutions.

        Mr. FICKLING presented the report of the Board of Relief for soldiers families for St. Luke's Parish, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. THOMPSON presented the Annual Report of the Board of Visitors of the South Carolina Military Academy, for 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The following Returns of the Commissioners of Free Schools, for the year 1863, were presented by the following Senators, and were referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion:

        Mr. LESESNE gave notice, that he will ask leave, to-morrow, to introduce a Bill to amend the charter of the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Factory.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the petition of Charles Logan, praying compensation for a slave lost whilst in the employment of the State, on the obstructions in the Santee River; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the petition of the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Factory, praying for an amendment of their charter; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. WILSON presented the return of the Commissioners of the Poor for Georgetown District, of the fund for the relief of the transient poor; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. HOPE offered a preamble and resolution in relation to the Tax in Kind, which were ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        Mr. BOYKIN presented the report of the Special Joint Committee to examine the Branch of the Bank of the State at Camden; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        Mr. THOMSON, from the Committee on the Military and Pensions, presented a Bill to alter and amend certain sections of the Acts recently passed to organize and supply negro labor for coast defence. The Bill received the first reading, and was ordered for a second reading to-morrow.


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        Pursuant to notice, and with the leave of the Senate, Mr. ARTHUR presented a Bill to amend and renew the charter of the Columbia and Hamburg Railroad Company, and to produce conformity in the charters granted to said Company by the States of Georgia and South Carolina. The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, and to be printed.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the petition of the Trustees of the Roper Hospital, asking a continuance of the State appropriation; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Pursuant to notice, and with the leave of the Senate, Mr. LAWTON presented a Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to suppress the distillation of spirituous liquors in this State. The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements, and to be printed.

        Leave of absence, from and after this day, was granted to the Senator from Marion District.

        Mr. WARE presented the petition of Theo. D. Wagner, James H. Taylor, and James Montgomery, praying that they and their associates may be incorporated by the name of the Batesville Manufacturing Company; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts; and also,

        The Report of the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts upon

        A Bill to alter and amend the Charter of the Cheraw and Darlington Railroad Company; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        A Bill to incorporate the Charleston Importing and Exporting Company, received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.

        The Report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts, on the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston, was passed over.

        A Bill to declare and amend the Exemption Law of this State, and for other purposes, received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives, having been first amended, on motion of Mr. GARLINGTON, by striking out, in the tenth and eleventh lines of the second section, the following words, to wit: "All regularly licensed practising physicians over the age of forty years,"


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        The General Orders were disposed of

        At twenty minutes past 2 o'clock. Message No. 2 of his Excellency the Governor was communicated to the Senate, and on motion of Mr. HARRISON, was made the Special Order of the Day for to-morrow, at 1 o'clock, P. M.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, the Senate adjourned at twenty minutes past 2 o'clock, P. M.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12 M. Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Boyd.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the report of the Solicitor of the Western Circuit on District Offices; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the following reports of the Attorney General:

        On Bernard E. Bee, debtor to the Ludlam School Fund; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Lducation and Religion; and,

        On District Offices and Officers of Charleston District; which were referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. HAMMOND presented the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief of Lancaster District; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. WORTHAM presented the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief of All Saints' Parish; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. WORTHAM presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for All Saints' Parish, for 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. GARLINGTON gave notice that, to-morrow, he will ask leave to introduce


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        A Bill to re-enact an Act, entitled An Act to extend relief to debtors, and to prevent the sacrifice of property at public sale.

        Mr. WARE, from the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, reported the following Bills:

        A Bill to incorporate the Chicora Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina;

        A Bill to amend the charter of the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Factory;

        A Bill to incorporate the Consolidated Steamship Company of Charleston. The Bills received the first reading, and were ordered for a second reading to-morrow.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the following reports of the Committee on the Judiciary:

        On a resolution, requiring the Clerks of the two Houses to furnish the Governor with copies of Resolutions;

        On the petion of the Chief Justice and other members of the Court of Appeals, praying relief touching the Library of the Court of Appeals;

        On a Bill to authorize the Clerk of the Court for Marlboro' District to draw Juries for the next term of the Court during vacation.

        On the petition of Jesse E. Dent, Sheriff of Richland District, for an increase of allowance for feeding prisoners; and,

        On a Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to increase the fees of Sheriffs for dieting persons confined in jail; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Mr. FURMAN submitted the report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts.

        On the account of Dr. John H. Boatwright, for a post mortem examination.

        Mr. BARKER submitted the report of the same Committee on the report of the Medical Committee of the House of Representatives,

        On the account of Dr. A. W. Kennedy, for attending prisoners in jail.


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        Mr. LAWTON presented the report of the same Committee

        On the account of Dr. W. H. Henry, for a post mortem examination.

        The reports were ordered for consideration to-morrow, and the Senate granted leave to Mr. JONES to withdraw the account of Dr. W. H. Henry.

        Mr. WILSON submitted the report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts, on the report of the Committee of Ways and Means of the House of Representatives,

        On the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston, praying State aid.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the report of the Commission on the report of the Commissioner of the Code; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures, and the Mechanic Arts, on the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston, recommending an appropriation of $7,000, was agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        The resolution in relation to the Tax in Kind being before the Senate for consideration, Mr. MAZYCK moved the following as a substitute:

        Whereas, it is apparent that the Confederate Tax in Kind is causing the waste of provisions, and producing general dissatisfaction among the tax payers; therefore,

        Resolved, by this General Assembly, That our Senators and Representatives in Congress be requested to endeavor to procure such an amendment of the Act imposing taxes as to substitute a money tax for the Tax in Kind, and that the Governor be requested to transmit a copy hereof to each member of our delegation in Congress.

        On motion of Mr. POPE, the resolution and substitute were referred to the Committee on Confederate Relations.

        The report of the Special Joint Committee to examine the Branch of the Bank of the State at Camden, was ordered to be received and filed, and printed with the Reports and Resolutions.

        A Bill to alter and amend the charter of the Cheraw and Darlington Railroad Company, received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.


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SPECIAL ORDER FOR 1 O'CLOCK, P. M.

        At 1 o'clock, P. M., the Senate proceeded to the Special Order for this hour, the following Message (No. 2,) from his Excellency the Governor:

MESSAGE No. 2.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, November 30, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        The wisdom of your legislation restricting the cultivation of cotton to one acre to the full hand, has been abundantly proved by experience. It is worthy of your consideration whether, in passing again upon this subject, it is not advisable, in view of the limited territory of the Confederacy for the cultivation of grain, to still further reduce the quantity for the next year. I recommend that the one acre be not exceeded, convinced by my knowledge of the present condition of things that no more cotton should be raised than is absolutely necessary for the wants of the country.

        I call your attention to the necessity of making a further provision for payment for the card-making machines, imported under your resolution. The advanced rates of exchange have greatly increased the cost of these machines.

        I transmit copies of a communication from Major J. R. Niernsee, upon the subject of the limited compensation he receives for his services. I recommend it to your most favorable consideration. The present high prices of provisions and rents lead me again to recommend an increase of the salaries of all public officers whose duties require them to reside in Columbia, and whose salaries are not limited by the Constitution.

        I transmit copies of an interesting communication from Col. Allan Macfarlan, President of the Cheraw and Coal Fields Railroad Company, to which I ask your attention. Whatever the State can properly do towards securing promptly a supply of coal for her public works, I suggest should be done without delay. She is a stockholder in that Company. If the end desired can be accomplished by it, I recommend that she increase her subscription sufficiently to effect it.

        In this connection, I call your attention to the proposed connection of the Spartanburg and Union Railroad with the Charlotte and Shelby Road--the link known as the Shelby and Broad River Railroad--by which a continuous line of railroad will be completed between the iron works in this State and Greensboro', N. C., near which are other coal fields.


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        I submit to your consideration the propriety of prohibiting the further existence and operation of express companies in this State. Their use is of very questionable policy at any time; but at a time like this, when every man capable of bearing arms should be in the field, if not absolutely necessary in some other pursuit, the companies should be abandoned, and some system adopted by which the railroad and other transportation companies should be required to perform the duties now performed by the express companies. This subject has arrested the attention of many intelligent and practical men, and I transmit copies of the outlines of a plan submitted to me for effecting this object, which I recommend to your consideration.

        I recommend the passage of a resolution requiring the Clerks of your respective Houses to furnish to the Executive, immediately upon its passage, a certified copy of any resolution which may devolve upon him the performance of duties. Otherwise, it will be readily perceived it may be some days before a resolution requiring his immediate action will reach him. I learn that a resolution is now of force, directing the Clerks to furnish copies of such resolutions as the Executive may call for. The Journals of the last day of your session, during which day it frequently happens that important resolutions are passed, do not appear until the volume containing the Reports and Resolutions has been published by the printer. Hence it will be seen that the Governor, unless casually, has no means of knowing what resolutions have passed on that day, except by sending to inspect the manuscript Journal in the printer's hands, or by examining the original papers; nor can the public have ready access to them, although they have the force of law. I therefore again recommend that all joint resolutions be engrossed and filed with the Acts of Assembly in the office of the Secretary of State, and be printed with the Acts.

        I transmit copies of a communication forwarded to me by General Beauregard in relation to slaves impressed and contributed under the laws of the State for labor on the coast, and much other valuable information on that subject, which I recommend to your consideration.

        Your resolution authorizing me to appoint one Cadet from each Congressional District, was not adopted early enough to enable me to place last winter in the Arsenal Academy one from each District. Of those appointed, only one is in the Academy receiving the benefit of your resolution. The appropriation was, however, made for the six, but the appropriation for one only has been drawn. Supposing your intention to be that the full number of six for each year should be appointed for four years, I have appointed for the next year eleven. It will be necessary, therefore, that the appropriation for the present year should be placed to the credit of the Board of Visitors for the next year. In the present condition of the country, there can


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be no better school for the instruction of our young men, and I recommend an increase of the number to be educated at the two Academies, and the requisite increase of your annual appropriation.

M. L. BONHAM.


        Mr. HARRISON offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That Message No. 2 of his Excellency the Governor be referred as follows, viz:

        1. So much as relates to the cultivation of cotton, the coal fields, and railroad connections therewith, to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        2. So much as relates to the machines for manufacturing cotton cards, to the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts.

        3. So much as relates to the communication of Maj. Niernsee, his compensation, and the propriety of increasing the salaries of public officers, to the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices.

        4. So much as relates to prohibiting the further existence and operation of express companies, to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        5. So much as relates to joint resolutions of the General Assembly, to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        6. So much as relates to the communication of Gen. Beauregard in regard to negro labor, and so much as relates to the admission of Cadets into the State Military Academies, to the Committee on Military and Pensions.

        The resolution was considered and agreed to, and the Message was referred accordingly.

        The General Orders were resumed.

        A Bill to alter and amend certain sections of the Acts recently passed to organize and supply negro labor for coast defence, was ordered to be placed in the General Orders of the Day, for to-morrow.

        The General Orders were disposed of.

        The Committee on the Judiciary was discharged from the further consideration of the petition of Elizabeth Myers, Ellen Myers and Catharine Myers, relative to property liable to escheat, and the Senate granted leave to Mr. HOUSER to withdraw the petition.

        Mr. APPLEBY presented the petition of the Upper Board of Commissioners of Roads for St. George's, Dorchester, asking the discontinuance of a road for the present; which was referred to the Committee on Roads and Buildings.

        Returns of Commissioners of Free Schools, for 1863, were presented by Mr. SESSIONS, for Kingston; and


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        Mr. McKEWN, for St. James', Goose Creek; and they were referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the report of the Board of Commissioners for the relief of soldiers' families for Richland District, for 1863; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. WARE submitted the following report:

        The Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices ask leave to report,

        That there is one seat vacant in the Law Court, and one seat vacant in the Chancery Court.

        On motion of Mr. BLAKENEY, the Senate adjourned at twenty minutes past 1 o'clock, P. M.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 3, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Porter.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The Senate, on motion of Mr. MOSES, went into
SECRET SESSION,
And so remained for a few minutes, when it was terminated, and the usual session was resumed.

        Mr. McCAW submitted the following report, which was considered and agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        The Special Committee to whom it was referred to make arrangements for appropriate services on Thursday, the 10th, report that they have invited the Rev. B. M. Palmer to perform such services, and that he has accepted the invitation. The Committee recommend that both branches of


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the General Assembly should suspend their business upon that day, and that the services be performed in the Hall of the House of Representatives, at 11 o'clock, A. M.

        Reports of the Soldiers' Boards of Relief were presented

        By Mr. MAXWELL, for Pickens; and

        Mr. J. W. MILLER, for Spartanburg; and they were referred to the Special Committee on that subject.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate

        The report of the Solicitor of the Middle Circuit, on the condition of the offices in his Circuit; and

        The report of the Solicitor of the Northern Circuit on the same subject; and they were referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. BOYLE presented the petition of P. J. Messervy and L. J. Messervy, for the increase of tolls of Rantowle's and Wallace's Bridges; which was referred to the Committee on Roads and Buildings.

        Mr. BEATY presented the petition of P. Sartor, for payment of a slave who died in the service of the State; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances; and also,

        The petition of Jesse Briggs, with a similar prayer; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the petition of Jacob Geiger, assignee of Jas. Young, praying for the use of a portion of the water of the Columbia Canal, near his mill; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        PAPERS FROM THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following message, which was concurred in, and a message was returned accordingly:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 2, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully informs the Senate that the Rev. Dr. Palmer will perform services in the Hall of the House of Representatives on Thursday, the 10th inst., and request that the Senate do attend said service on that day, at 11 o'clock.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate a resolution for the appointment of proxies to represent the State in the meetings of the Cheraw and Darlington Railroad Company; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks; and also,


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        A Bill to consolidate the offices of the General Staff; which received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the report of the Comptroller General on Contingent Accounts against the lower division of the Treasury; which was referred to the Committee on Accounts and Vacant offices.

        Pursuant to notice, and with leave of the Senate, Mr. GARLINGTON introduced

        A Bill to continue in force an Act, entitled An Act to extend relief to debtors, and to prevent the sacrifice of property at public sales, and also the Act amendatory thereof. The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        At half-past 12, P. M., the following message was received from his Excellency the Governor:

MESSAGE NO. 3.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, December 2, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        In answer to your resolution of the first instant, requesting me "to lay before your bodies any and all the information I may have in reference to the distillation of spirituous liquors for medicinal purposes in this State, authorized by the Act of April 10, 1863," I have to say,

        The Act referred to contains the following clause:

        "That his Excellency the Governor, on being satisfactorily assured that an increased quantity of spirituous liquors, which cannot be otherwise procured, is absolutely necessary for medicinal purposes in this State, shall have power to have manufactured, at some central and convenient location, by skilled and responsible agents, at fixed salaries, to be appointed by himself, such quantity of alcohol or pure spirits as shall be deemed requisite for the purposes aforesaid, and to make such rules and regulations for the distribution of the same, wherever needed throughout the State, as shall be most convenient and effectual to meet the public exigency, and at the same time secure its application, as far as is practicable, exclusively to medicinal purposes."

        Soon after the passage of the Act, I directed the Commissary General to advertise for skilled and responsible agents to undertake to manufacture pure spirits for medicinal purposes, at or near Columbia. I received but one proposition, and that was at the price of five dollars per gallon, and asking for a contract for fifty thousand gallons. I did not feel at liberty to


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make the appointment, supposing that I should possibly be able to make better terms.

        Dr. J. J. Chisolm, Medical Purveyor of the Confederate States, applied to me for leave to manufacture ten thousand gallons for the Government, and upon his obtaining the consent of the Confederate authorities to manufacture what I should need for the State for medicinal purposes, I authorized him to proceed, as my agent, to manufacture twenty-five thousand gallons, ten thousand of which he was to have for the medicinal wants of the army in South Carolina. This amount of twenty-five thousand gallons, I purposed to increase according to the wants of the State, and to sell at cost and charges, which Dr. Chisolm at that time thought would not exceed two dollars, and will not, since the rise in the price of corn, exceed two dollars and a half per gallon. He informs me that he has been much delayed by the failure on the part of the contractors to complete his machinery; but he has at last been enabled to commence the manufacture, and proposes to commence delivering to the Commissary General for distribution on Saturday next, as will be seen by his letter herewith transmitted.

        I have appointed agents for the sale in various sections of the State, who have given their bonds placing them under obligations with heavy penalties, to comply with the law against selling the spirits for other than medicinal purposes.

        I am not prepared to say that the spirituous liquors for medicinal purposes, in the language of the Act, "cannot be otherwise procured." But it can only be procured now, at such an enormous price, that I have felt the spirit of the Act would be complied with by my having manufactured at least the quantity above named, and more if wanted for medicinal purposes.

        The provisions of the law for suppressing distillation, I must think, have been very beneficial to the country. The agents I have employed have, in most of the Districts to which they have gone, it is believed, pretty much suppressed it. At this time, when so much labor is abstracted from the production of breadstuffs, and it is so important to save all grain as food for man and beast, I cannot but think these laws are wise. I have no doubt now, of the ability of the agent to supply soon all that will be wanted for medicinal purposes, and I recommend to you to allow the laws to stand as they are.

        I transmit copies of a communication from Major Hammond, Quartermaster of McGowan's brigade, upon the subject of clothing for the troops, which I submit for your consideration.

        An offer has just been made to sell to me, for the use of our soldiers in the field, some forty-five hundred pairs of shoes, an article now much needed by our armies. I recommend that I be authorized at once to make the


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purchase, and turn them over to the Central Association for distribution among the most destitute in Virginia and Tennessee.

        As I stated in my first Message at this session, I now transmit to you estimates of expenditures for the various public works, and the Departments connected with these Headquarters. The estimate of the Quartermaster General for outfit for a single company of infantry is based upon the supposition that they will be furnished with all things enumerated in the army regulations. This is impracticable at this time, and somewhat diminishes the cost of outfit. I recommend an appropriation to cover all contingencies.

M. L. BONHAM.


        Mr. HARRISON offered the following resolution, which was agreed to, and the Message was referred accordingly:

        Resolved, That Message No. 3 of his Excellency the Governor be referred as follows, viz:

        1. So much as relates to the distillation of spirituous liquors for "medicinal purposes," to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        2. So much as relates to the communication of Maj. Hammond, in reference to clothing for troops; also so much as relates to the purchase of shoes for the troops, and estimates for military expenditures, to the Commitee on the Military and Pensions.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on a Bill from the House of Representatives, explanatory of "an Act for the better organization of the Militia, and for other purposes," was agreed to, and the Bill was consequently ordered to lie on the table.

        The report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts, on the account of Dr. W. A. Henry, for a post mortem examination, was ordered to lie on the table.


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        The following were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives:

        The report of the Committee of Ways and Means, of the House of Representatives, on the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston, praying State aid.

        The report of the Medical Committee of the House of Representatives, on the account of Dr. A. W. Kennedy, for attending prisoners in jail; and

        The report of the Committee on the Military of the House of Representatives, in relation to the flag of the 13th Regiment, S. C. V.

        The following Bills received the second reading, were agreed to, and were sent to the House of Representatives:

        A Bill to incorporate the Chicora Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina;

        A Bill to amend the Charter of the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Factory; and

        A Bill to incorporate the Consolidated Steamship Company of Charleston.

        The following Bills received the second reading, were agreed to, and returned to the House of Representatives:

        A Bill to authorize the Clerk of the Court for Marlboro' District to draw Juries for the next term of the Court during vacation; and

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to increase the fees of Sheriffs for dieting persons confined in jail.

        The following were agreed to, and were sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        The report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts, on the account of Dr. John H. Boatwright, for a post mortem examination;

        The report of the Committee on the Judiciary, on the petition of the Chief Justice and other members of the Court of Appeals, praying for relief touching the Library of the Court of Appeals;

        A resolution requiring the Clerks of the two Houses to furnish the Governor with copies of resolutions; and

        The report of the Commission on the report of the Commissioner on the Code.

        Mr. FICKLING offered the following resolutions, which were considered and agreed to, and were sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:


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        Resolved, That the Commission to whom the reports of the Commissioner of the Code were referred at the last session of the General Assembly be continued, to sit during the recess, and to report to the next General Assembly.

        Resolved, That each member of the Commission be allowed his necessary expenses while in actual session, and mileage from home to the place of meeting or meetings, and returning, to be paid by the Bank of the State, and placed to the charge of the State.

        Resolved, That the report of the Commission be printed with the Acts and Resolutions of the General Assembly.

        A Bill to alter and amend certain sections of the Acts recently passed to organize and supply negro labor for coast defence, was, on motion of Mr. THOMSON, placed in the General Orders of the Day for to-morrow.

        The General Orders were disposed of.

        The Special Committee in relation to the relief of soldiers' families was discharged from the further consideration of the several subjects referred to it, and they were referred to the Special Joint Committee on the part of the Senate on the same subject.

        On motion of Mr. WARE, the Senate adjourned at twenty minutes to two o'clock, P. M.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 4, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Mouzon.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following Preamble and Resolutions:


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        Whereas, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, is entitled to the gratitude of the people, and the commendation of every enlightened patriot, for his unselfish patriotism, and untiring devotion to the interests of the whole country; therefore be it

        Resolved, By the Senate and House of Representatives of the State of South Carolina in General Assembly met, that the State of South Carolina, fully appreciating the trials and onerous duties devolving upon the Chief Magistrate of the Confederate States, and his self-denying sacrifices, tenders to him the assurance of unabated confidence.

        Resolved further, That they maintain an unalterable determination to sustain him in his efforts to conquer an honorable peace, and maintain the liberties of the people.

        Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be requested to transmit to the President a copy of the foregoing preamble and resolutions.

        The preamble and resolutions were ordered for immediate consideration.

        Mr. FICKLING moved that a message be sent to the House of Representatives, proposing to amend the first resolution, by adding at the end of the same, the following words, "in his patriotism and devotion to his country;" and the same was ordered. The remaining resolutions and the preamble were then agreed to.

        Mr. BEATY presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Union District, 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. W. D. JOHNSON presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Marlboro' District, for 1863; which was referred to the same Committee; and also,

        The petition of C. W. Dudley, Secretary and Treasurer of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Marlboro' District, praying an appropriation in aid of the fund provided for the current year, for the support of soldiers' families in that District; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. McKEWN presented the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief of St. George's, Dorchester, for 1863; which was referred to the same Committee.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER submitted the report of the Committee on Finance and Banks, on the petition of the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Columbia, for an increase of the Transient Poor Fund for that District; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Mr. POPE submitted the following resolutions, which were considered and agreed to, and the Committee was instructed accordingly:


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        Resolved, That is be referred to the Committee on the Judiciary to inquire into the expediency of an Act, entitled "An Act to extend relief to debtors, and to prevent the sacrifice of property at public sale," ratified the twenty first day December, 1861; and also an Act to continue the same in force, ratified the sixth day of February 1863; and to report as to the policy of permitting said Acts to expire by their own limitation.

        Resolved. That the whole question be left open to the Committee, and, if it be deemed expedient to continue in force some such Act or Acts hat the Committee report such modifications and amendments as may be d emed necessary; making, in addition to the exception against common carriers now of force, such other exceptions as will not unnecessarily hamper the administration of public justice in this State on questions arising under express or implied contracts; and that the Committee have leave to report by Bill or otherwise.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The report of the Special Joint Committee on the subject of relief of soldiers' families on motion of Mr. HAMMOND, was recommitted.

        The reports of the Committee on Claims and Grievances,

        On the petition of Charles Logan, praying compensation for a slave lost whilst working for the State;

        On the account of W. W. Purse, for work done in the Senate Chamber.;

        On the petition of H. L. Pinckney, trustee of Mrs. Anna G. Elliott, for a renewal of a certificate of State Stock;

        On the account of W. W. Purse, for work done in the House of Representatives; were agreed to, and were sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence

        The unfavorable report of the Committee on Finance and Banks on the return of the Commissioners of the Poor for Georgetown District of the fund for the relief of the transient poor, was agreed to

        The following were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives:

        The report of the Committee of Ways and Means, of the House of Representatives, on the petition of Josiah S. Tennent, to be relieved from a double tax execution;

        The report of the same Committee on Message No. 3 of his Excellency the Governor;

        The report of the same Committee on the petition of W. W. Tyler, praying to be refunded an excess of war tax;


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        The report of the same Committee on the petition of Charles A. Lesesne, to be refunded a tax twice paid;

        The report of the same Committee on the petition of Edward Noble, to be refunded a double tax.

        The reports of the Committee on Finance and Banks,

        On the report of the City Treasurer of Charleston, showing the expenditures for the poor of the current year;

        On the petition of the Trustees of the Roper Hospital, asking a continuance of the State appropriation; were agreed to, and were sent to the House on Representatives for concurrence

        The report of the same Committee on the mem rial of certain public officers, for an increase of salaries, was agreed to, and the petition was rejected.

        The report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts, on the report of the Medical Committee of the House of Representatives, on the account of Dr. A. W. Kennedy, for a post mortem examination, was passed over.

        A Bill to alter and amend certain sections of the Acts recently passed to organize and supply negro labor for coast defence was recommitted, on motion of Mr MAZYCK, to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The General Orders were suspended, and the following Message was received from his Excellency the Governor:

MESSAGE No. 4.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
COLUMBIA, S. C., Dec. 4, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        In compliance with the request of the Board of Trustees of the South Carolina College, at their annual session, recently held, I now "communicate to the Legislature the action of the Board in relation to the suspension of the College exercises."

M. L. BONHAM.


        The suspension of the College exercises seems to be a matter of necessity. The Confederate authorities have taken possession, for war purposes, of all the Colleges, and there are no apartments for the students.

        If it were otherwise, there could be no Senior Class, and but few members of a Junior Class Past experience shows they would be within the limits of the conscription age. There could be no graduating class; and no diplomas could with propriety be conferred, because the curriculum of


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studies could not be carried out, the Presidency of the College being vacant, as well as two Professorships; and there is no proposition to fill them.

        If the exercises are suspended, the Professors will be without employment; yet to disband the present corps of faithful and able Professors is, for obvious reasons, unadvisable. To prevent the burthen of their salaries from pressing upon the State Treasury, it is proposed to call upon the Confederate Government to pay a reasonable rent for the use of the College buildings, and out of the proceeds to pay the salaries of the Professors.

        The Committee recommend that application be made by the President of the Board to the Confederate Government, or the proper officer thereof, to pay for use of the College buildings, within the campus, a rent of $12,500 per annum, from June 1862, at which time they took possession; and for the use of the College Hall outside of the campus, from the period (August 25th) when they took possession, at the rate of $2500 per annum.

        These rents are far below what could be obtained for the use of the buildings during the war, if they were let at a public bidding.

        The Committee recommend that the offices of steward or bursar, and marshall, be discontinued during the suspension of the college exercises, and that the buildings occupied by these officers be surrendered to the Executive Committee; that the same be let by them upon such terms as they may deem expedient, but only during the suspension of the College exercises. And that the rents be applied, if necessary, towards the payment of the Professors' salaries, and otherwise towards such debts as may be due by the Trustees.

        The Committee recommend that all the College Buildings and premises within and without the campus, be let out during the suspension of the College exercises, by the Executive Committee, upon reasonable terms; but that there be excepted from the library building, the laboratory, and the apparatus and mineral rooms, the halls of the Euphradian and Clariosophic Societies, the premises of the Professors, now occupied by them, the buildings and premises appropriated by the Confederate Government, and the house and premises lately occupied by Professor Barnwell, which the Committee recommend may be permitted to continue in the possession of the mother and sisters of the late Professor Barnwell, until the further order of the Board, without charge.

        On motion of Mr. HARRISON, the Message and accompanying documents were referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        The General Orders were resumed, and the Senate proceeded to the second reading of


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        A Bill to continue in force the laws heretofore enacted in relation to the cultivation of cotton.

        Mr. MAZYCK moved that the following words be added at the end of the Bill: "Provided, that the said Acts shall be so amended, that it shall be lawful to plant three acres of cotton for each hand, instead of one acre."

        This question was ordered to be decided by yeas and nays, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are:

        Messrs. Barker, Bull, Furman, Hope, Mazyck, McKewn, Pope, and Wilson.

        Those who voted in the negative are:

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Arthur, Bacon, Beaty, Blakeney, Boykin, Boyle, Ellis, Fickling, Garlington, Hammond, Harrison, Hart, Houser, W. D. Johnson, Jones, Keitt, Manning, Maxwell, McAliley, McCaw, E. H. Miller, J. W. Miller, Oswald, E. G. Palmer, S. W. Palmer, Roberds, Sessions, Thomson, Ware.

        In the affirmative, 8.

        In the negative, 30.

        The amendment was therefore not agreed to.

        Mr. HOPE proposed the following amendment:

        Provided, That the classification of the hands made in the Acts referred to, be so altered that all hands between the ages of twelve and sixty be considered full hands.

        On motion of Mr. McALILEY, the amendment was ordered to lie on the table. The second reading was concluded, and the Bill was agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 4, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully refuses to concur with the Senate amendment to the resolution complimentary to the President, by adding after the words "unabated confidence," at the end of the first resolution, the words, "in his patriotism and devotion to the country."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        While the message was under consideration, the Senate, on motion of Mr. MAZYCK, adjourned at ten minutes to three o'clock, P. M.


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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 5, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Breaker.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The Senate proceeded to consider the subject before it at the hour of adjournment yesterday--a message from the House of Representatives relative to complimentary resolutions to the President of the Confederate States.

        On motion of Mr. POPE, the subject was made the Special Order of the Day for Tuesday next, at 12½ o'clock, P. M.

        The Bills received the third reading in the Senate, and it was resolved that they do pass, that the titles thereof be changed, that they be called Acts, and it was ordered that they be returned to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the report of W. B. Johnston, Recording Agent of soldiers' deaths for the State; which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The PRESIDENT laid before the Senate the annual private report of the indebtedness of the Officers and Directors of the Bank of the State and its Branches; which was ordered to lie on the Clerk's desk for the inspection of Senators.

        Mr. BLAKENEY presented the petition of Jacob Wessel, to be paid for damages sustained by the revocation of his license to distil spirituous


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liquors; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances;

        And the petition of Jacob Wessel, to be allowed to manufacture vinegar from corn; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        Mr. ELLIS presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Prince William's Parish, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. BARKER presented the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for St. John's, Berkeley, for 1863; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER introduced the following resolution:

        Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be requested, in the future distribution of salt, cotton cloth, and cotton and woolen cards, to adopt hereafter, as the basis of distribution, the number of families supported by each Board of Commissioners for the relief of soldiers' families in each District and Parish, and not in the ratio of representation, as hitherto adopted.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER submitteed the report of the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements,

        On so much of the Governor's Message No. 1 as relates to the establishment of communications with the Deep River Coal Mines on Deep River, and

        On a letter from Col. Allan Macfarlan, on the same subject; all of which were ordered for consideration on Monday next, and the report in relation to the Military Academy was ordered to be printed.


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        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The report of the Committee on Finance and Banks, on the memorial of the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Columbia, for an increase of the Transient Poor Fund for that city, was agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        The unfavorable report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts, on the report of the Medical Committee of the House of Representatives, on the account of Dr. A. W. Kennedy, was agreed to, and the account was rejected.

        The General Orders were disposed of.

        Mr. BACON offered the following resolution, which was agreed to, and the Committee was instructed accordingly.

        Whereas, there is an entire failure of the Militia system to meet the ends (as regards patroling) for which it was intended; and whereas, the condition of the country requires the strict performance of the patrol laws,

        Resolved, That it be referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions to inquire and report as to the expediency of establishing a Military Board in each District in this State, whose duty it shall be to enforce the patrol laws of this State.

        On motion of Mr. HAMMOND, the Senate adjourned at 1, P. M.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 7, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Yates.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of Saturday.

        Mr. BOYLE submitted the report of the Board of Soldiers Relief for St. Paul's; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. HART presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Darlington District, for 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.


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        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 5, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully informs the Senate that it has appointed M. P. O'Connor, J. L. Reed, Thos. Oliver, Wm. Fort, Moses Hendricks and J. T. Lowry, as a Committee, on the part of the House, to nominate suitable persons for President and Directors of the Bank of the State, and respectfully requests the appointment of a similar Committee on the part of the Senate.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate concurred, and the following gentlemen were appointed the Committee: Messrs. Hope, Sessions, McKewn, Oswald and J. W. Miller, and a message was returned accordingly.


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        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following papers, in which it had concurred:

        The report of the Committee on the Judiciary, on the petition of the Chief Justice and other members of the Court of Appeals, praying for relief touching the library of the Court of Appeals.

        Resolutions in relation to correspondence on the Code.

        Report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts, on the petition of the Trustees of the Marine School of Charleston.

        The House of Representative also sent, for concurrence,

        Resolution for the appointment of D. Ravenel and S. Furman, proxies to represent the State stock in the Charleston and Savannah Railroad Company; and

        Resolution for the appointment of D. Ravenel and Allan Macfarlan proxies to represent the State stock in the North-Eastern Railroad Company; and they were concurred in, and ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate, for concurrence,

        Report of the Committee on Claims, on the account of the Clarendon Banner, for printing; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances;

        Resolution in relation to the distribution of cotton and woolen cards; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements;

        Report of the Committee of Ways and Means, on so much of Message No. 1 of the Governor, as relates to the Deep River mines, and of so much of Message No. 3 as relates to the communication of Col. Macfarlan; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks;

        Report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum, on the report of the Regents of the Lunatic Asylum; which was referred to the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts.

        Report of the Committee of Ways and Means, on the report of the Mayor and Aldermen of Columbia, on the expenditure of the transient poor fund; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Report of the Committee on Education, on resolution to inquire into the free school fund; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Reports of the Medical Committee,

        On the accounts of Dr. S. Chatham Brown, for post mortem examinations;

        On the accounts of Dr. James S. Brockinton, for a post mortem examination; which were referred to the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts.


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        The following reports of the Committee on Claims:

        On the petition of Jesse R. Smith, administrator of Elizabeth Smith, for arrears of pension to be paid over to him;

        On the account of Jas. E. Peterson, jailor of Newberry District;

        On the account of Davis & Crews, for public printing; which were referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        Report of the Abbeville Delegation, on the annual report of the trustees and treasurer of the estate of Dr. John De La Howe; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following resolution:

        Resolved, That this General Assembly adjourn sine die, on Thursday, the 17th December, inst., at five o'clock, P. M.

        On motion of Mr. HAMMOND, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the resolution, by striking out Thursday, 17th, and inserting Tuesday, 15th.

        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate the following Bills, which received the first reading, and was referred and disposed of as follows, viz:

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to charter the Shelby and Broad River Railroad Company;"

        A Bill to incorporate the Batesville Manufacturing Company;

        A Bill to incorporate the Foot Point Land Company; and

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to incorporate the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Factory;" all of which were referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        A Bill to continue in force an Act, entitled "An Act to extend relief to debtors, and to prevent the sacrifice of property at public sale;" which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        A Bill to extend an Act, entitled "An Act to continue in force an Act entitled 'An Act to authorize certain Building and Loan Associations to suspend the call for monthly instalments during the present war,'" which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        The Senate granted leave of absence to Mr. MAZYCK from and after Wednesday next.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the report of the Commissioners for building marine battery; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        The following message from his Excellency the Governor was communicated to the Senate:


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MESSAGE NO. 5.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, COLUMBIA, December 5, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        I transmit herewith copies of a communication of December 4, from Major J. R. Niernsee, State Engineer, correcting a misapprehension in my message of 30th November, 1863, of his communication to me of November 24, transmitted to your bodies. It appears that his first communication had in view my submitting to your bodies the question of allowing him the pay of Major of Engineers, according to army regulations. I recommend that the allowance be made. The skill and energy of this officer in the discharge of his duties are too well known to need any commendation from me.

        I also transmit copies of the report of General W. G. DeSaussure, to whom was committed the settlement with the Confederate Government of certain claims of this State.

M. L. BONHAM.


        On motion of Mr. GARLINGTON, so much as refers to the communication of Major Niernsee, was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions; and so much as refers to General DeSaussure's settlement of accounts with the Confederate Government, was referred to the Committee on Confederate Relations.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The following were agreed to, and were sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        The report of the Committee on Military and Pensions, on so much of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor, as relates to the Military Academy; also, the report of the Board of Visitors, and on a resolution inquiring as to the expediency of increasing the number of Cadets;

        The report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances, on so much of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor, as relates to the Richmond Agency;

        A resolution in relation to the distribution of salt, cotton cloth, and cotton and wool cards.

        The report of the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements, on so much of the Governor's Message No. 1 as relates to the establishment


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of communications with the Deep River Coal Mines on Deep River, and on a letter from Col. Allan Macfarlan on the same subject, was agreed to.

        The General Orders were disposed of; and,

        On motion of Mr. HARRISON, the Senate adjourned at half-past 1, P. M.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 8, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Ambler.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. OSWALD submitted the report of the Solicitor of the Southern Circuit; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. MANNING submitted the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Clarendon District; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. SESSIONS presented the return of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Kingston Parish, for 1863; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. ROBERDS presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for St. Peter's Parish, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. HOUSER submitted the report of the Commissioners of Free Schools for St. Matthew's Parish, for the year 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. ELLIS submitted the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Prince William's Parish; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. HOPE submitted the report of the Committee on Roads and Buildings on the petition of L. J. Messervy, to increase the tolls of Rantowl's and Wallace's Bridges; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Mr. WILSON, from the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts, reported

        A Bill to procure supplies and furnish the implements of agricultural and manufacturing industry for the soldiers and people of the State, by a union of the State with the Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow, and the Bill and report to be printed.


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        Mr. HAMMOND submitted the report of the Joint Committee for the relief of soldiers' families; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the reports of the Committee on the Military and Pensions,

        On the report of the Central Association for the relief of South Carolina soldiers; and on the report and resolution from the House of Representatives on the same subject; which were ordered for consideration to-morrow;

        On so much of Message No. 1 as relates to defences on the Senate; and on the report and resolutions of the House of Representatives on the same subject; which were ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Mr. WILSON offered the following resolutions, which were made the special order for to-morrow, at half-past one o'clock, P. M.:

        Resolved, 1. That in the opinion of this General Assembly the subject of the naturalization of foreigners is one of vital importance to the future safety and well-being of the Confederate States of America.

        2. That any uniform system of making citizens of foreigners is unsafe and unwise, and is calculated to produce mischievous consequences in its operation.

        3. That no person not now a citizen of the Confederate States, or in its service, ought hereafter to be invested with the right of suffrage, except for meritorious services rendered, or for special cause, and that the application in such cases should be to the Congress of the Confederate States, which should alone have authority to grant citizenship by special Act.

        4. That a copy of these resolutions be transmitted to our Senators and Representatives in Congress, with instructions to lay them before their respective bodies.

        Mr. HOPE presented the report of the Joint Committee of both Houses to nominate President and Directors of the Bank of the State of South Carolina, nominating.

        For President--Charles M. Furman.

        For Directors--C. V. Chamberlain, Thomas Ryan, J. H. Steinmyer, W. W. Smith, and J. L. Nowell.

        The report was ordered to be printed, and to lie on the table.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the reports of the Committee on Claims and Grievances, on the report of the Committee on Claims of the House of Representatives, recommending concurrence in the following:

        On the account of G. E. Elford, for public printing;

        On the account of the Edgefield Advertiser, for public printing;

        On the account of E. R. Stokes, for binding House Journal;


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        On the account of the Lancaster Ledger, for public printing;

        On the account of E. R. Stokes, for record Book for Secretary of State;

        On the account of Davis & Crews, for public printing;

        On the account of Jas. E. Peterson, Jailer of Newberry District, for blankets furnished prisoners;

        On account of the Clarendon Banner for public printing; and they were all ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Mr. THOMSON submitted the report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions on so much of Message No. 1 of the Governor as relates to the supply of slave labor for coast defence; also on the report of the State Agent; and a Bill to repeal all Acts to organize and furnish labor for coast defence; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER, from the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements, reported

        A Bill to grant to Jacob Geiger, his heirs and assigns, the right to use a portion of the water of the Columbia Canal; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate the following reports and resolutions, which were disposed of as follows:

        A resolution to allow the Doorkeeper of the House extra pay; which was concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives; and

        The reports of the Committee on the Military,

        On the Annual Report of the Board of Visitors of the Military Academy;

        On the petition of George W. Morse for compensation for the use by the State of his patent of the breech-loading cannon;

        On so much of the Governor's Message No. 4, as relates to the purchase of shoes; all of which were referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate the following Bills, which received the first reading, and were referred as follows:

        A Bill to incorporate certain religious and charitable societies, and to renew and amend the charters of others heretofore granted;

        A Bill to amend the charter of the Edisto and Ashley Canal Company; which were referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.


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        A Bill to vest the right and title of the State in the real and personal estate of Noah Etheridge in his mother and brother; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate

        An Act to incorporate the Charleston Importing and Exporting Company, and it was committed to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate the following Bills, which had been twice read in the Senate and twice in the House of Representatives, viz:

        The Bills received the third reading, and it was resolved that the Bills do pass, that the titles thereof be changed, that they be called Acts. Ordered, that they be sent to the House of Representatives.

        At half past 12, P. M., the Senate proceeded to the special order for this hour, certain resolutions complimentary to the President of the Confederate States; the question being on the message from the House of Representatives refusing leave to the Senate to amend the first resolution, by adding at the end thereof the following words, to wit: "in his patriotism and devotion to his country." After consideration, the Senate refused to return a message, insisting on asking leave to make the proposed amendment.

        On the question of concurring in the first resolution, the yeas and nays were ordered, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Arthur, Beaty, Blakeney, Boykin, Boyle, Garlington, Hammond, Harrison, Hart, Hope, Houser, W. D. Johnson, Lawton, Lesesne, Maxwell, McCaw, J. W. Miller, E. G. Palmer, S. W. Palmer, Pope, Roberds, Sessions, Thomson, and Wilson.

        Those who voted in the negative, are

        Messrs. Bacon, Barker, Bull, Ellis, Fickling, Furman, Manning, Mazyck, E. H. Miller, Murray, and Oswald.

        In the affirmative, 25.

        In the negative, 11.

        The resolution was therefore concurred in.

        The remaining resolutions and preamble were then concurred in, and were returned to the House of Representatives.


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        The special order for 1 o'clock, P. M., being an order for a secret session, was discharged, and the order for the same was made for to-morrow, at 1 o'clock, P.M.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill to declare and amend the Exemption Law of this State, and for other purposes. This Bill, having been amended by the House of Representatives on the second reading, was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 8, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully refuses leave to amend the resolution to adjourn, by striking out "Thursday, the 17th," and inserting "Tuesday, the 15th."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate refused to insist on asking leave, and the resolution for the adjournment of the General Assembly on Thursday, 17th inst., at five o'clock, P. M., was concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. MAZYCK, the Senate adjourned at 3 o'clock, P. M.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 9, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Woodrow.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. MOSES, who was absent yesterday when the vote was taken on concurring in the first resolution, from the House of Representatives, complimentary to the President of the Confederate States, was permitted by the Senate to record the vote he would have given if he had been present, and on the Senator's name being called, he voted in favor of concurring in the resolution.

        Mr. McCAW offered the following resolution, which was agreed to, and ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence, and


Page 102

was immediately returned from the House of Representatives with its concurrence:

        Whereas, it has been ascertained that the Hall of the House of Representatives is believed to be insufficient for the accommodation of the public on the occasion of the services recommended as suitable to the day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer; therefore,

        Resolved, That said services be held in the Washington Street Methodist Church, at the hour before designated, instead of the Representative Chamber.

        Mr. HARRISON presented the petition of the "South Carolina Annual Conference" of the Methodist Protestant Church, and Missionary Society connected therewith, praying an Act of incorporation; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate a resolution in relation to the power of the Governor as Commander-in-Chief of the militia; which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the abstract of the number of transient poor relieved by the City Council of Charleston during the year ending August 31, 1863; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        The Special Order for 1 o'clock, P. M.--an order for a secret session--was discharged, and was postponed to Friday next, at 1 o'clock, P. M.

        The Senate proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        On motion of Mr. HAMMOND, the report of the Special Joint Committee on the subject of relief of soldiers' families, was recommitted.

        The favorable report of the Committee on the College, Education and Religion, on the petition of the Trustees of the Aiken Public School, asking an appropriation, was agreed to, and the petition was rejected.

        The favorable report of the Committee on the College, Education and Religion, on the report of the Commissioners of the Deaf, Dumb and Blind, was agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, a Bill from the House of Representatives to consolidate the offices of the General Staff, was recommitted.

        The Senate, at half-past 1, P. M., proceeded to the Special Order for this hour--resolutions relative to naturalization.

        Mr. MOSES moved that the resolutions do lie on the table, which was ordered to be decided by yeas and nays, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Barker, Beaty, Blakeney, W. D. Johnson, Lesesne, McAliley, Moses, Murray, Oswald, E. G. Palmer, S. W. Palmer, Roberds, Thomson and Ware.

        Those who voted in the negative, are

        Messrs. Appleby, Arthur, Boykin, Bull, Ellis, Fickling, Furman, Garlington, Hammond, Harrison, Hope, Houser, Jones, Lawton, Manning, McCaw, E. H. Miller, J. W. Miller, Sessions, and Wilson.


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        In the affirmative, 15.

        In the negative, 20.

        The motion was, therefore, lost.

        The question recurring on agreeing to the resolutions, the first was agreed to.

        Mr. LESESNE offered the following amendment:

        Strike out the second, third and fourth resolutions, and insert the following in lieu thereof:

        2. That the existing laws for the naturalization of foreigners ought to be repealed.

        3. That in such new uniform laws as the Congress of the Confederate States may establish for the naturalization of aliens, in pursuance of the Constitution, the preliminary term of residence in the State of which any alien may become a naturalized citizen, ought to be greatly prolonged, and stringent regulations ought to be provided for preventing fraudulent and surreptitious practices in procuring the naturalization of persons not legally entitled thereto.

        On motion of Mr. LESESNE, the Special Order was then discharged, and the resolutions and amendment were made the Special Order for Friday next, at half-past 1 o'clock, P. M., and to be printed.

        The Report of the Committee on Confederate Relations, on a resolution in relation to the Tax in Kind, was agreed to, and the resolution and amendment were ordered to lie on the table.

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to suppress the distillation of spirituous liquors in this State," received the second reading, was agreed to, and ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.

        The General Orders were suspended, and, on motion of Mr. LESESNE, it was

        Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns, it shall stand adjourned to meet to-morrow, at half-past 10 o'clock, A. M.

        Mr. WARE submitted the reports of the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts,

        On a Bill, from the House of Representatives, to amend an Act, entitled An Act to charter the Shelby and Broad River Railroad;

        On a Bill, from the House of Representatives, to incorporate the Southern Importing and Exporting Company;


Page 106

        On a Bill to amend and renew the charter of the Columbia and Hamburg Railroad Company, and to produce uniformity in the charters granted to said Company by the States of Georgia and South Carolina;

        On a Bill to amend the charter of the Edisto and Ashley Canal Company; all of which were ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        The following message was communicated to the Senate; and, on motion of Mr HARRISON, was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements:

MESSAGE No. 6.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        I transmit copies of a communication of this date from Dr. Chisolm upon the subject of a supply of spirits for medicinal purposes. I had hoped he would be able at an early day to meet the wants of the country, but it seems he is not sanguine of doing so. The demands are growing daily more numerous and the prices higher. It is proper to send you this information at once, that you may have time to take such action as you may deem advisable.

        I have before informed your bodies that only one firm has offered to manufacture the article for me at or near Columbia, and that at the price of five dollars per gallon.

M. L. BONHAM.

CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA,
MEDICAL PURVEYOR'S OFFICE,
COLUMBIA, S. C., December 9, 1863.

To His Excellency Governor M. L. BONHAM:

        DEAR SIR: I have just been asked by Colonel R. Caldwell, Commissary General, whether I am at present able to supply the State with the amount of whiskey and alcohol required for immediate issue. I informed him that, owing to delay in obtaining material, and the difficulty in having work done, that the distillery is far from being completed, and that if the transportation of the railroads continue in its present doubtful condition, it will be some time before the State supply can be furnished. I would


Page 107

respectfully recommend that the Legislature take some steps to supply the immediate and pressing wants of the people.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. J. CHISOLM,
Surgeon and Medical Purveyor.


        On motion of Mr. WARE, the Senate adjourned at 3 o'clock, P. M.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 10, 1863.

        The Senate met at half-past 10, A. M., pursuant to adjournment.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. McCAW offered the following resolution:

        Resolved, That a Committee of three be appointed to wait on his Excellency the Governor, and invite him to join the Senate in attendance on the religious services ordered by the Legislature.

        The resolution was agreed to, and Messrs. McCaw, Oswald and Boykin were appointed the Committee.

        Mr. McCAW very soon after reported that the Committee had waited upon his Excellency the Governor, and that he had accepted the invitation.

        The Senate granted leave of absence to the Senator from St. Andrew's from and after to-morrow, on account of important business.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, it was

        Ordered, That the Senate be adjourned after the conclusion of the religious services.

        On motion of Mr. McCAW, Chairman of the Committee of Arrangements, the Senate then joined the procession for the purpose of attending the religious services.


Page 108

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 11, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Townsend.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following Acts:

        An Act to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to increase the fees of Sheriffs for dieting persons confined in jail;"

        An Act to authorize the Clerk of the Court for Marlborough District to draw Juries for the next term of the Court during vacation;

        An Act to amend the charter of the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Factory;

        An Act to incorporate the Chicora Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina;

        An Act to incorporate the Consolidated Steamship Company of Charleston;

        All of which were referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. McCAW offered the following resolutions, which were considered and agreed to, and were ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives:

        Resolved, That the thanks of this General Assembly be tendered to the Rev. B. M. Palmer, D. D., for his able and appropriate discourse and prayer delivered before them on the day of fasting, humiliation and prayer, and that he be respectfully requested to furnish the Committee of Arrangements with a copy of the same for publication.

        Resolved, That his Excellency the Governor be respectfully requested to give as general circulation as possible in the Confederacy and in Europe to the eloquent discourse of the Rev. Dr. Palmer, which so fully sets forth the character of our struggle, and the sacred duties it imposes upon us.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, and was ordered to lie on the table:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 10, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House has appointed Messrs. Wilmot G. DeSaussure, Evans, and Oliver as a Committee on the part of the House to wait upon his Excellency the Governor, and invite him to proceed with the two Houses to the


Page 109

Washington street Methodist Church, to attend the religious services ordered by the Legislature, and respectfully ask that the Senate do appoint a similar Committee.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. HARRISON presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Anderson District for the year 1863; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Mr. JOHNSON presented the return of the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Marion District; which was referred to the Special Committee.

        Leave of absence was granted to the Senator from St. John's, Berkeley, on and after to-morrow.


Page 111

        The Senate then proceeded to the
GENERAL ORDERS OF THE DAY.

        The unfavorable report of the Committee on Roads and Buildings,

        On the petition of P. Messervy and L. J. Messervy, to increase the toll of Rantowle's and Wallace's bridges, was agreed to, and the petition was rejected.

        A Bill to procure supplies and furnish the implements of agricultural and manufacturing industry for the soldiers and people of this State, by a union of the State with the Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina, was, on motion of Mr. MOSES, ordered to be placed in the General Orders of the Day for to-morrow.

        The reports of the Committee on the Military, of the House of Representatives,

        On the report of the Central Association for the relief of South Carolina soldiers; and on the report and resolution from the House on the same subject; and

        On so much of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor as relates to defences on the Santee, and on report and resolutions from the House on the same subject, were concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The General Orders of the Day were suspended, and the Senate proceeded to the

        The Senate resumed the


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        The Senate resumed the

        At ten minutes past 3, P. M., the General Orders were suspended, and, on motion of Mr. BOYKIN, the Senate adjourned.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 12, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Rude.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.


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        Leave of absence was granted to the Senator from Prince William's Parish from to-day, on account of sickness in his family.

        The Senate proceeded to the

        Mr. MOSES then offered the following resolution, which was considered and agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        Resolved, That the report of the Trustees in relation to the South Carolina College be approved, except so much as relates to the renting out of the premises occupied by the Steward or Bursar, and Marshal, and the Senate recommend that said officers be permitted to occupy their respective premises free of rent until otherwise directed by the General Assembly.

        The unfavorable report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum and Medical Accounts, on the report of the Medical Committee of the House of Representatives, on the account of Dr. James S. Brockington, for a post mortem examination, was agreed to, and the report was consequently rejected.

        On motion of Mr. ARTHUR, the Senate suspended the General Orders, and took from the table the reports of the Committee on Claims and Grievances, and they were agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        On the account of the Edgefield Advertiser, for public printing;

        On the account of E. R. Stokes, for binding House Journal;

        On the account of the Lancaster Ledger, for public printing;

        On the account of E. R. Stokes, for Record Book for Secretary of State;

        On the account of Davis & Crews, for public printing;

        On the account of James E. Peterson, jailor for Newberry District, for blankets furnished prisoners;

        On the account of the Clarendon Banner, for public printing.

        Messages were sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the following reports in the following manner:

        The report of the Committee on Claims on the account of E. J. Elford, by striking out E. J. Elmore and inserting G. E. Elford.

        The report of the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum, of the House of Representatives, on the reports of the Regents of the Lunatic Asylum, by striking out in the second resolution, third line, the word "public," and inserting "probable." Also in the third resolution, third line, by striking out the words "hereafter," and also the words "per annum," for the purpose of inserting "for the present year, 1864."


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        The report of the Medical Committee, of the House of Representatives, on the accounts of Dr. S. Chatham Brown, for post mortem examinations, so that the petitioner be paid but $40--$20 for a post mortem examination on the body of a German, and $20 for a post mortem examination on the body of Katharine Lawler.

        The report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on the Governor's Message No. 1, on mounted men, lead mine, nitre plantation, State Works, Morse's carbine and George's revolving cannon, by substituting the following for the first resolution recommended by the Committee, viz:

        1. That his Excellency the Governor is hereby authorized to turn over to the Confederate Government, the saltpetre plantation and the lead mine, and if that Government should decline to take the lead mine, that the Governor shall abandon the further working of it, and dispose of the State's interest therein in any manner he may deem best.

        The remaining resolutions of the Committee were concurred in.

        The General Orders were suspended.

        Mr. WARE submitted the report of the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices, on the Comptroller General's Report on contingent accounts of the Lower Division of the Treasury. The report was ordered to lie on the table for the inspection of Senators.

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on Message No. 4, of his Excellency the Governor, relating to the purchase of shoes, and on the House report on the same subject.

        The Senate resumed the

        The General Orders were again suspended.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following Bills:

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to incorporate the Carolina Cotton and Woolen Factory;"

        A Bill to incorporate the Chicora Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina; and

        A Bill to continue in force an Act, entitled "An Act to extend relief to debtors, and to prevent the sacrifice of property at public sales."

        The two first, on motion of Mr. WARE, were ordered to lie on the table.

        The third received the third reading, and it was

        Resolved, That the Bill do pass, that the title thereof be changed, and that it be called "An Act."

        Ordered, That it be returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,

        Report of the Medical Committee on the resolution in relation to examining and testing the whiskey now being distilled by the agent employed by the Governor; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        A resolution on the subject of the Mints, was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. JONES presented the return of the Commissioners of Free Schools for Laurens District, for 1863; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the account of Evans & Cogswell, for stationery for the General Assembly; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        The General Orders were again resumed.

        The following Bills received their second reading, were agreed to, and were ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to charter the Shelby and Broad River Railroad.

        A Bill to incorporate the Southern Importing and Exporting Company.

        A Bill to amend the charter of the Edisto and Ashley Canal Company.

        A Bill to combine the offices of the Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions and Register of Mesne Conveyance.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:


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HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 12, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully grants leave to the Senate to amend the report of the House Committee on Claims on account of E. T. Elford, for public printing, by striking out E. T. Elmore, and inserting "G. E. Elford."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The report was then amended, pursuant to leave granted, and was concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 12, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully asks leave of the Senate to amend the resolution in relation to the publication of the discourse of the Rev. Dr. Palmer, by adding at the end of the first resolution, "and that five thousand copies be printed."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate concurred, and returned a message accordingly.

        A Bill, entitled a Bill to extend an Act, entitled An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled "An Act in reference to the suspension of specie payments by the Banks of this State, and for other purposes," to the first day of January, in the year of our Lord 1864, being before the Senate on the second reading, Mr. MOSES offered the following amendment, to constitute the second section of the Bill.

        SEC. 2. The provisions of this Act shall not be held to apply to any Bank, which, during the operation of the Act, shall declare or pay a dividend to its Stockholders in gold or silver coin.

        On the question of agreeing to this amendment, the yeas and nays were ordered to be taken, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are

        Messrs. Bacon, Bonneau, Boyle, Hope, Jones, McCaw, McKewn, E. H. Miller, J. W. Miller, Moses, Oswald, E. G. Palmer, S. W. Palmer, Roberds, Sessions, Thomson, Ware.

        Those who voted in the negative, are

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Arthur, Fickling, Garlington, Harrison, W. D. Johnson, Lawton, Maxwell, McAliley, Wortham.

        In the affimative, 17.


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        In the negative, 10.

        The amendment was therefore agreed to, and the Bill received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        At 15 minutes past 3, P. M., on motion of Mr. McCAW, the Senate adjourned.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 14, 1863.

        The Senate met at 12, M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Kennedy.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of Saturday.

        The following messages were received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 12, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully grants leave to amend the report of the House Committee on the Lunatic Asylum, by striking out, in the second resolution, and third line, the word public, and inserting "probable." And also, in the third resolution, to strike out the word hereafter, and the words per annum, and inserting "for the year 1864."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 12, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully grants leave to the Senate to amend the report of the House Committee on Military on Governor's Message No. 1, on mounted men, nitre plantation, State Works, &c., by striking out all after the word "resolved," in the first resolution, and inserting the following: "That his Excellency the Governor is hereby authorized to turn over to the Confederate Government, the saltpetre plantation and the lead mine, and if that


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Government should decline to take the lead mine, that the Governor shall abandon the working of it, and dispose of the State's interest therein in any manner he may deem best."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The reports were amended pursuant to leave granted, and were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, and a message was returned insisting on asking leave to make the proposed amendments:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 12, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully refuses to grant leave to the Senate to amend the report of the House Medical Committee on the account of Dr. S. C. Brown, for post mortem examinations, by striking out one hundred dollars, and inserting "forty dollars;" that is to say, twenty dollars for post mortem examination on the body of a German, and twenty dollars for a post mortem examination on the body of Katharine Lawler.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate, with its concurrence, resolutions relative to the discourse and prayer of Rev. Dr. Palmer, on the day of fasting, humiliation and prayer.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate, for concurrence,

        The report of the Committee on Confederate Relations on Message No. 2 of his Excellency the Governor, at the extra session in September; and also "a Bill to define the law in relation to slaves and free persons of color taken in arms against the State;" which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary; also,

        The report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions on sundry resolutions from the House of Representatives; and also on resolutions from the Senate in relation to troops at the City of Charleston; which was referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions; also,

        A Bill to procure supplies and furnish the implements of agricultural and manufacturing industry for the soldiers and people of the State, by a union of the State with the Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina; which received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts, and to be printed.


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        The Senate resumed the


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        The following were concurred in, and were returned to the House of Representatives, viz:

        Reports of the Committee of Ways and Means,

        On the report of the Trustees of Roper Hospital;

        On the petition of John Rains, to be refunded a double tax;

        On the petition of H. L. Pinckney, Trustee of Mrs. Anna G. Elliott, for a new certificate of stock;

        On the petition of John W. Harrington, Administrator of J. H. Irby, to be refunded a tax twice paid;

        On the report of the City Treasurer of Charleston, showing expenditure of transient poor fund;

        On the petition of Allen Franklin, to be refunded a double tax;

        On so much of the Message No. 1 of the Governor as relates to Deep River mines, and on so much of Message No. 3 as relates to the communication of Col. Macfarlan;

        On a resolution, from the House of Representatives, to appoint proxies to represent the stock owned by the State in the Cheraw and Darlington Railroad Company.

        The unfavorable report of the Committee of Ways and Means, on a resolution, from the House of Representatives, as to the payment of taxes on certain stocks, was agreed to, and the resolution was rejected.

        The following Bills received their second reading, were agreed to, and were ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives:

        A Bill, entitled a Bill to extend an Act, entitled "An Act to continue in force an Act, entitled 'An Act to authorize certain Building and Loan Associations to suspend the call for monthly instalments during the present year;' "

        The report of the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, on a Bill to incorporate certain Religious and Charitable Societies, and to renew and amend the charters of others; and

        A Bill to alter the law in relation to the election of District officers.

        A Bill to consolidate the offices of the General Staff received the second reading, the title was changed so as to read, A Bill to amend the law in relation to the General Staff; and the Bill was agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives.

        The Senate, at half-past 1 o'clock, P. M., proceeded to the Special Order for that hour, viz: Resolutions, and amendments thereto, on the subject of naturalization.

        On motion of Mr. LESESNE, the Special Order was discharged, and the same subject was made the Special Order for to-morrow, at half-past 1 o'clock, P. M.

        The Senate resumed the


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        The Senate proceeded to the second reading of a Bill, from the House of Representatives, to make provision for the support of the families of soldiers from this State in the Confederate and State service.

        The following recommendation of the Committee was disagreed to by the Senate: Eighth line, first section, after State, to insert these words: "Except those of the Graniteville Manufacturing Company, so long as it continues its donation of five thousand yards of cloth per week to the State." The second amendment recommended by the Committee was agreed to, to wit: thirteenth line of second section, after the words "portion of the State," the following: "Provided, no person shall be required to deliver their produce at a distance exceeding eight miles from the place of production."

        Mr. McALILEY offered the following amendment, as a substitute for the first section:

        That a tax in kind, of two per cent, shall be paid by the producer, on the gross amount of all rice, corn and wheat, raised and grown in this State, during the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. Also, a tax of one hundred cents per hundred dollars, on factorage, employments, faculties and professions, including the profession of dentistry, (except clergymen, schoolmasters and schoolmistresses.) and on every hundred dollars on the amount of commissions received by vendue masters and commission merchants; forty cents per hundred dollars upon the capital stock paid in on the first of October, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, of all banks which, for their present charters, have not paid a bonus to the State--to be paid by the respective banks--and on the capital stock of all incorporated gas-light companies, to be paid by the respective companies; one and a half per centum on all premiums taken in this State by incorporated insurance companies, and by the agencies in this State acting in behalf of insurance companies and underwriters without the limits of this State; twenty-two cents on every hundred dollars of the amount of sales of goods, wares and merchandize, embracing all articles for sale, barter or exchange, and including all the manufactured products of this State, except cotton and woolen goods in the hands of the producer, hereinafter taxed in kind (the agricultural products of this State, and the unmanufactured products of any of the Confederate States excepted,) which any person shall have made, from the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, to the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four, either on his, her or


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their capital, on borrowed capital, or on account of any person or persons, as agent, attorney, or consignee; ninety cents upon every hundred dollars of the amount of sales of goods, wares and merchandize whatever, which any transient person, not resident in this State, shall make in any house, stall or public place, whether the said sale be made by sample or otherwise; one-tenth of one per cent. on all moneys loaned, moneys at interest, on hand, or on deposit on the first day of January, and on all moneys invested in the stocks or bonds of any individual, State or corporation, at the time last aforesaid, other than bonds or stocks of this State, or of the Confederate States, and other than the stocks of the banks, and of such railroad companies as have not heretofore declared any dividend; one dollar and fifty cents for every hundred dollars of gross receipts of all commercial agencies within the limits of this State. Also, a tax in kind of five per cent upon the gross products during the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, of all cotton and woolen manufactures, including cotton yarns and salt, within this State, which said tax shall be collected and paid in the manner hereinafter prescribed.

        Mr. ARTHUR moved an amendment to strike out "and salt," in forty-third line and insert, "and upon all salt made," and the same was agreed to.

        Mr. McALILEY then moved to insert after salt, "bar iron and nails," which was agreed to.

        And, on motion of Mr. McCAW, "hollow ware" was inserted after "nails."

        Mr. HARRISON moved to insert "molasses and sorghum syrup," which was not agreed to.

        Mr. GARLINGTON moved the following: "all molasses and sorghum syrup manufactured therein for sale or barter," which was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. ARTHUR, the twenty-first line was amended by inserting after goods, the words, "and other articles," and the twenty-second line was amended after the word producer, the words "and manufacturer."

        On motion of Mr. HOPE, the following words were stricken out of the end of the second section, to wit: "And the said Tax in Kind of grain shall be collected by weight, according to the standard weight of said grains."

        When the reading of the second section of the Bill had been concluded, the reading was suspended, and the Senate, on motion of Mr. McALILEY, at fifteen minutes past 3. P. M., suspended business until 7, P. M.


Page 125


        RECESS.


        At 7 o'clock, P. M., the PRESIDENT resumed the chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        Leave of absence was granted to the Senator from Anderson after to-day, and to the Senator from York on and after to-morrow, and to the Senator from Kingston on and after Wednesday next.

        The Senate resumed the second reading of

        A Bill to make provision for the support of the families of soldiers from this State in the Confederate and State service.

        On motion of Mr. ARTHUR, the following was introduced as the 4th Section of the Bill:

        SEC. 4. That the Tax Collector in each District and Parish of this State is hereby authorized and required to collect the money tax hereinbefore provided for, at such times and places as the general State tax is received and collected. And he shall keep a separate book, in which the names of all tax-payers, in money, under this Act, shall be entered, on what the tax is paid, and the amounts of said tax, and in every other respect conform to the law as it now exists; and said Tax Collectors are hereby vested with the same power for collecting the tax hereby assessed, as in the collection of the general State tax, and shall receive like compensation for his services, as is now provided by law for the same: Which said tax shall be paid into the Treasury of this State in the same manner as the general tax is paid, and placed to the account of the fund for the benefit of soldiers' families.

        Mr. McALILEY moved to amend the third line of 7th Section, by striking out $600,000, to insert $300,000, and the same was ordered.

        Mr. ARTHUR moved that the whole proviso be stricken out, and the same was ordered.

        M. FICKLING moved to strike out all after the enacting clause, for the purpose of inserting the following:

        1. That the sum of one million eight hundred thousand dollars, if so much be necessary, be, and the same is hereby, appropriated, to be distributed, in proportion to the number of persons to be relieved, amongst the several Boards of Relief of this State, as is prescribed in the Act ratified the eighteenth day of December, in the year one thousand eight hundred and sixty-two, entitled "An Act to make appropriations in aid of the families of soldiers, and to repeal an Act, entitled 'An Act to afford aid to the families of soldiers,' " and the said Boards shall conform to the provisions of the


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said Act, and be subject to its directions in every particular, except as herein provided.

        2. That the Boards of Relief shall in no case give money that shall purchase and distribute necessary supplies to the families of soldiers.

        At this stage the reading of the Bill was suspended, on motion of Mr. McALILEY, and the Senate gave the first reading to

        A Bill to raise supplies for the year commencing in October, 1863; and it was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks, and was ordered to be printed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, was concurred in, and a message was returned accordingly:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 14, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully invites the Senate to unite in a ballot for President and Directors of the Bank of the State to-morrow, at one o'clock.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate the following message:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 14, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House insists on refusing to grant leave to the Senate to amend the report of the House Committee, on the account of Dr. S. C. Brown, for post mortem examination, by striking out one hundred dollars, and inserting forty dollars; that is to say twenty dollars for a post mortem examination on the body of a German, and twenty dollars for a post mortem examination on the body of Kath. Lawler.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate returned a message insisting on asking leave to amend the report. Messrs. Lawton, McKewn and Bonneau, were appointed a Committee of Conference, and a message was sent accordingly, asking the appointment of a similar Committee, to confer with the Committee of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following Bills.

        A Bill to extend an Act, entitled "An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled An Act in reference to the suspension of specie


Page 127

payments by the Banks of this State, and for other purposes, to the first day of January, in the year of our Lord 1864."

        On the third reading, the House of Representatives had striken out the following, which had been inserted by the Senate on the second reading:

        SEC. 2. The provisions of this Act shall not be held to apply to any Bank which, during the operation of the Act, shall declare or pay a dividend to its stockholders in gold or silver coin.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, insisting on restoring the section, and asking a Committee of Conference, and informing the House of Representatives, that Messrs. Moses, McAliley, and Lesesne, had been appointed such Committee, on the part of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives also returned to the Senate the following Bills, to wit:

        A Bill to incorporate the Southern Importing and Exporting Company;

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to charter the Shelby and Broad River Railroad;"

        A Bill to authorize the tax collectors of Beaufort District to pay over to the Soldiers' Board of Relief certain funds in their hands;

        A Bill to incorporate the Batesville Manufacturing Company;

        A Bill to combine the office of the Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas and General Sessions and Register of Mesne Conveyances for Georgetown District;

        A Bill to amend the charter of the Edisto and Ashley Canal Company.

        The Bills received their third reading, and it was resolved that they do pass; that the titles thereof be changed; that they be called Acts, and be returned to the House of Representatives.

        The Senate then resumed the consideration of the report of the Special Committee on a Bill, from the House of Representatives, to make provision for the support of the families of soldiers from this State in the Confederate and State service; and the question recurred on the amendment offered by the Senator from St. Luke's.

        Mr. GARLINGTON offered the following amendment to the amendment:

        SEC.--. That the said Boards of Relief be, and are hereby authorized and empowered to impress supplies for the use of soldiers' families whenever, after diligent effort, they are not otherwise able to procure the same at reasonable prices, to be fixed by said Boards for their respective Districts; and that no impressment shall be made, under this Act, upon the property of any person who shall prove to the satisfaction of the Board that the articles


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proposed to be impressed are necessary for the use and support of his or her own family or plantation.

        SEC.--That said Boards shall have power to appoint impressing agents to execute their warrants of impressment, and whenever any person resists, or threatens to resist, the execution of any warrant of impressment, the Board shall have the power to call to their aid the sheriff, who shall execute the same.

        Mr. McALILEY moved that the amendment and the amendment to the amendment do lie on the table; and the same was ordered.

        The question then recurred on the passage of the Bill, and the Bill having received the second reading, was agreed to, and was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The General Orders were suspended, and, on motion of Mr. JONES, it was

        Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns, it shall stand adjourned to meet to-morrow, at 11 o'clock.

        The Senate then resumed the

        The General Orders were disposed of.

        Mr. McKEWN presented the report of Dr. Henry R. Frost, Chairman of the Vestry of St. James', Goose Creek, on the Ludlam School Fund; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        On motion of Mr. McALILEY, the Senate adjourned at five minutes to 11, P. M.


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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1863.

        The Senate met at 11, A. M. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Shand.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The following messages were received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 15, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully concurs with the Senate in the appointment of a Committee of Conference, on the report of the House Medical Committee, on the account of Dr. S. C. Brown, and have appointed Messrs. Mobley, Boatwright and Bates as the Committee on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 15, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully concurs with the Senate in the appointment of a Committee of Conference upon restoring the Senate's amendment to "A Bill to extend an Act, entitled an Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled an Act in reference to the suspension of specie payments by the Banks of this State, and for other purposes," and have appointed Messrs. W. G. DeSaussure, W. S. Mullins and James Hemphill as the Committee on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,

        A Bill to make appropriations for the year commencing in October, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three. The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks, and to be printed; also,

        A Bill to make provision for the support of the families of soldiers from this State in the Confederate and State service. The Bill having been amended on the third reading in the House of Representatives, the amendments were referred to the Special Committee; also,

        A Bill to extend an Act, entitled, an Act to continue in force an Act, entitled an Act to authorize certain Building and Loan Associations to suspend


Page 130

the call for monthly installments during the present war. The Bill received the third reading, and it was

        Resolved, That the Bill do pass, that the title thereof be changed, and that it be called an Act.

        Ordered, That it be sent to the House of Representatives.

        Also, a Bill to refund to the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Marlboro' District money advanced by them. The Bill received the first reading, and was referred to the Special Committee; also,

        A resolution for the appointment of proxies in the Laurens Railroad Company; which was concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives; also

        Resolutions in regard to the sustenance and education of the children whose fathers have fallen in the service of their country; which were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate, with its concurrence,

        A resolution in relation to the action of the Trustees of the South Carolina College relative to that Institution; and

        A resolution granting extra compensation to the Door-Keeper of the Senate; and

        A resolution providing for extra pay to the Reading Clerk of the Senate.

        Mr. MOSES submitted, without reading, the report of the Committee on the Judiciary:

        On the report of the Committee on Confederate Relations, of the House of Representatives, on Message No. 2 of his Excellency the Governor, at the extra session in September, and on a Bill to define the law in relation to slaves and free persons of color taken in arms against the State; which was ordered to be considered in secret session at 1, P. M., this day.

        And also the following report, which was considered and agreed to:

        The Committee on the Judiciary, to whom was referred the communication of the Clerk of the Senate in relation to the paper on which the Journal is to be written, ask leave to report that they have considered the same, and recommend that the Clerk be instructed to write out the Journal on such paper as he may be able to procure, which may be nearest in quality and size to that heretofore used for the purpose.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the following reports of the Committee on the Judiciary,


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        On a resolution appointing Frederick A. Ford, Esq., a special magistrate for Barnwell and Edgefield Districts;

        On a Bill to continue in force an Act, entitled An Act to extend relief to debtors, and to prevent the sacrifice of property at public sales; and also the Act amendatory thereof, and on certain resolutions in reference to extending relief to debtors, &c. The resolution and the Bill were both ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        Mr. LESESNE submitted the report of the Committee on Confederate Relations, on the report of W. G. DeSaussure, relative to claims against the Confederate Government; which was ordered for consideration tomorrow.

        Mr. LESESNE offered a resolution in relation to the books in the office of the Secretary of State; which was agreed to, and ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER offered the following resolution, which was agreed to:

        Resolved, That the Hon. Edmund Ruffin, a distinguished Virginian, who has identified himself with the struggle in which we are engaged, from its commencement upon the soil of South Carolina, be invited to a seat in the Senate Chamber.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the report of the Committee on the Judiciary, on

        A Bill, from the House of Representatives, to provide additional remedies for the default of common carriers; which was ordered to be placed in the General Orders of this Day.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the following report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances,

        On the petition of H. L. Pinckney, to be refunded money paid for printing books for the office of Tax Collector; also,

        On the report of the Committee of Ways and Means, of the House of Representatives, on the same subject;

        On the report of the Committee on Claims, of the House of Representatives, on the account of E. R. Stokes, for binding Acts, Reports and Resolutions;

        On the account of Evans & Cogswell, for stationery furnished the General Assembly;

        On the report of the Committee on Claims, of the House of Representatives, on the petition of Jesse R. Smith, Administrator of Ely Smith, for arrears of pension.


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        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on the petition of George Morse, and the report of the House of Representatives on the same subject.

        Mr. HAMMOND submitted the report of the Special Joint Committee, on the Soldiers' Board of Relief, on District returns; all of these were ordered for consideration to-morrow, and the last to be printed.

        Mr. WILSON submitted the report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts,

        On a Bill, from the House of Representatives, to procure supplies and furnish the implements of agricultural and manufacturing industry for the soldiers and people of the State by a union of the State with the Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina; which was placed in the General Orders of this Day.

        Mr. McALILEY submitted the report of the Committee on Finance and Banks, on

        A Bill to raise supplies for the year commencing in October, A. D., 1863; and the report having been ordered for immediate consideration, the Bill received the second reading, was agreed to, and was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill to amend the law in relation to the General Staff. The House of Representatives, on the third reading, had restored the original text and Bill, which had been stricken out by the Senate on the second reading.

        The Senate, on motion of Mr. MANNING, sent a message to the House of Representatives, insisting on restoring the Senate amendments.

        The Senate further asked a Committee of Conference, informing the House of Representatives that Messrs. Manning, Arthur, and Oswald, had been appointed the Committee on the part of the Senate.

        The Senate proceeded to the

        A Bill in relation to the Southern Express Company, was ordered to lie on the table.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, the Senate proceeded to consider the report of the Committee on the Judiciary,

        On a Bill to provide additional remedies for the default of common carriers; the Bill having been amended, by striking out all after the enacting clause, and changing the title to the following: "A Bill in relation to the Southern Express Company, and for other purposes," received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives.


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        The Special Order for a secret session at 1 o'clock, P. M., was discharged, on motion of Mr. MOSES, and the same order was made for to-morrow, at 1 o'clock, P. M.

        The Senate resumed the General Orders of the Day, and proceeded to consider resolutions relating to exemption of overseers, &c.; and while so engaged, the following Message was communicated to the Senate:

MESSAGE No. 7.

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA,
EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT, Columbia, December 15, 1863.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        A communication from Col. D. B. Harris, Chief Engineer to General Beauregard, with General Beauregard's endorsements thereon, has been referred to me for information. It relates to the subject of labor for coast defences. Copies are herewith transmitted.

        With my annual Message I communicated to your bodies a letter from Hon James A. Seddon, Secretary of War, upon the subject of impressments, and expressed the hope that the orders of the War Department, then recently published, might prevent in the future, irregularities which had grown up under the impressment law. I regret to learn that those orders have not been, in all respects, complied with ; and find that complaints continue to be made. Circulars, purporting to be issued by "T. B. Trout, Major and Division Quartermaster," from Chesterville, S. C., (copies of which I communicate.) have been served upon various citizens; in which Major Trout makes the following announcement; "I desire to purchase all the produce in your possession;" and "any effort to remove or dispose of the same will be at your peril." Such a proceeding strikes


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me as so manifestly unwarranted and mischievous, that I have felt it my duty to communicate this information. Many sections of the State and many families in every section have been deprived, by the requirements of the service, of that labor which has heretofore supported them. These must be fed from the surplus products of the State, and if no one is allowed to part with his surplus, real suffering must be the result. I cannot regard such proceedings as consistent with the law. I therefore recommend the adoption of a resolution requesting our Senators and Representatives in Congress to urge upon the Government a prompt correction of the evils of the system; and if such proceedings are deemed compatible with the law, that they take steps to have it amended.

        I have just been informed that I may receive a proposition for the purchase of the "State Works," from a company of citizens of South Carolina. Having authorized me, by your resolution at the last regular session, to dispose of those works to the Confederate Government, (which Government has declined to purchase them,) it may be well to enlarge the terms of that resolution, so as to admit of their being disposed of to such a company.

        From the annual message of his Excellency Gov. Vance, just received, I learn that by the State steamer "Advance" large quantities of clothing, leather, shoes, and every description of army supplies, besides considerable freight for the Confederacy, have been brought safely into North Carolina; and that the proceeds of two thousand bales of cotton, equivalent, at the present rate of exchange, after paying all expenses thereon, to not less than four or five millions of dollars, are now deposited in Liverpool to the credit of that State. In view of my recommendations in a previous message, I have thought it advisable to communicate to you this interesting information.

M. L. BONHAM.


        Mr. McCAW offered the following resolutions:

        Resolved, That Message No. 7 of his Excellency the Governor be referred as follows:

        1. So much as relates to the communication of General Beauregard upon the subject of slave labor, to Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        2. So much as relates to the subject of impressment, to the Committee on Confederate Relations.


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        3. So much as relates to the State Works at Greenville, to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        4. So much as relates to the information derived through Governor Vance, to the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts.

        The resolutions were agreed to, and the Message was referred accordingly.

        At ten minutes past 3 o'clock, P. M., the Senate, on motion of Mr. POPE, suspended business until 7 o'clock, P. M.


        RECESS.


        At 7 o'clock, P. M., the PRESIDENT resumed the chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        Mr. McKEWN, from the Committee appointed to count the ballots for President and Directors of the Bank of the State of South Carolina, reported that the following persons had received a majority of ballots cast:

        And they were declared by the PRESIDENT duly elected accordingly.

        Mr. LAWTON submitted the following report:

        The Committee of Conference of the two Houses, to whom was referred the accounts of Dr. S. Chatham Brown for post mortem examinations, ask leave to report that they have considered the same, and recommend that he be paid the sum of fifty dollars, and the balance of his accounts be rejected.

        And a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the report accordingly.

        Mr. LESESNE presented the memorial of the Commissioners of Free Schools for the Parishes of St. Philip and St. Michael; which was referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion.

        The Senate then resumed the

        Resolutions in relation to overseers were before the Senate, as follows:

        Resolved, 1. That, in the opinion of this General Assembly, all persons who now are, by the laws of this State, exempt from militia duty, as overseers, the officers and men of the city guard of Charleston and Columbia, and forty men of each company of the Fire Department of Charleston and Columbia, should be exempted from conscription in the army of the Confederate States, as necessary to the internal police government of this State.

        2. That it is also the opinion of this General Assembly that the offices of Quartermaster, commissary, provost marshal, enrolling and impressing officers, express agents, and officers of the like kind, with their various deputies, clerks, agents and assistants, should be filled only with persons not liable to Confederate conscription, either by reason of age or otherwise, or by wounded or disabled soldiers, and that all able-bodied men within the conscript age, now filling any of said offices, should be forced, by the most stringent and rigid enactments, to take their respective places in the army of the Confederacy, now in the field.


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        3. That our Senators and Representatives in the Confederate Congress be earnestly requested to urge the passage of laws embodying the above principles, and that copies of these resolutions be forwarded to them by his Excellency the Governor.

        On the question of agreeing to the first resolution, the yeas and nays were ordered to be taken, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are:

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Arthur, Boykin, Fickling, Jones, Lawton, Lesesne, McKewn, Murray, Roberds, Thomson, and Wilson.

        Those who voted in the negative, are:

        Messrs. Appleby, Bacon, Beaty, Boyle, Garlington, Hammond, Hart, Hope, Houser, W. D. Johnson, Keitt, Maxwell, McAliley, E. H. Miller, J. W. Miller, Moses, Oswald, E. G. Palmer, S. W. Palmer, Pope and Sessions.

        In the affirmative, 12.

        In the negative, 21.

        The resolution was therefore rejected.

        The remaining resolutions were then agreed to, and were sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence, having been first amended by striking out the word "also" in the first line of the first resolution which passed, and adding "unanimously" after resolved, and striking out "these" in the last, and inserting "foregoing resolution."

        A Bill to procure supplies and furnish the implements of agricultural and manufacturing industry for the soldiers and people of the State, by a union of the State with the Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina, was, on motion of Mr. WILSON, ordered to lie on the table; and the report of the Committee on Commerce, Manufactures and the Mechanic Arts, on a Bill, from the House of Representatives, with the same title, was taken up, and the Bill was ordered for the second reading, and having been read, on the question of agreeing to the Bill, the yeas and nays were ordered to be taken, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are:

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Appleby, Arthur, Bacon, Beaty, Boykin, Boyle, Fickling, Garlington, Hammond, Hart, Hope, W. D. Johnson, Jones, Lawton, Lesesne, McCaw, McKewn, E. H. Miller, J. W. Miller, Murray, Oswald, E. G. Palmer, S. W. Palmer, Pope, Roberds, Sessions, Ware and Wilson.

        Those who voted in the negative, are:

        Messrs. Houser, Keitt, Maxwell, McAliley, Moses, and Thomson.


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        In the affirmative, 29.

        In the negative, 6.

        The Bill was therefore agreed to, and was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        A Bill to establish certain roads, bridges and ferries; and

        A Bill to grant the aid of the State to the Shelby and Broad River Railroad Company received the second reading, were agreed to, and were ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        The report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions on Message No. 4 of his Excellency the Governor, relating to the purchase of shoes, and on the House report on the same subject, was agreed to, and a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the House report by striking out, at the end of the resolution, the words, "to be paid for by them out of the appropriation made at the present session of this General Assembly," and inserting the words, "that the sum of one hundred and seventy-one thousand dollars be appropriated for that purpose."

        The General Orders were suspended.

        Mr. HAMMOND submitted the report of the Joint Committee of the Soldiers' Board of Relief on a Bill to refund to the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Marlboro' District; also,

        Report of the same Committee on the amendments made by the House of Representatives on the third reading to a Bill to make provision for the support of the families of soldiers from this State in the Confederate and State service; both of which were ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, it was

        Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns, it shall stand adjourned to meet to-morrow, at 11 o'clock, A. M.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, the Senate adjourned at ten minutes past 10 o'clock, P. M.


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1863.

        The Senate met at 11, A. M., pursuant to adjournment. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Martin.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill to reduce all Acts and clauses of Acts in relation to the supply of negro labor for the military defence of this State into one Act, and to alter and amend the same; which had been amended by the House of Representatives on the third reading, and the title had also been amended, so as to read, "A Bill to amend an Act in relation to the supply of labor for, the military defence of the State, passed in September, A. D., 1863." The House of Representatives, on the third reading, having made certain amendments, they were referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        Mr. THOMSON, soon after, submitted a report, recommending that the Senate concur in the amendments made by the House of Representatives. The report was ordered for immediate consideration, and was agreed to. The Bill received the third reading, was agreed to, the title was changed to an Act, and it was sent to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives also sent to the Senate,

        A Bill to incorporate certain religious and charitable societies, and to renew and amend the charters of others heretofore granted. On the third reading in the House of Representatives, the third section, in relation to Trinity Church, had been restored, which the Senate on the second reading had stricken out. The Senate sent a message to the House of Representatives insisting on striking out the section, and asking the appointment of a Committee of Conference, informing the House of Representatives that the Senate had appointed Messrs. Ware, Lesesne, and Boykin the Committee on the part of the Senate; and also,

        A Bill to continue in force the laws heretofore enacted in relation to the cultivation of cotton; the Bill received the third reading, and it was

        Resolved, That the Bill do pass; that the title thereof be changed; that it be called an Act.

        Ordered, that it be sent to the House of Representatives.


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        Also, a Bill to amend an Act, entitled "An Act to suppress the distillation of spirituous liquors in this State." The Bill having been amended on the third reading in the House of Representatives, the amendments were referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        Leave of absence, from and after to-day, was granted to the Senators from Darlington, Barnwell, and St. Philip's and St. Michael's--(Mr. LESESNE.)

        Mr. WARE submitted the report of the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices, on the report of the Committee on Accounts, of the House of Representatives, on the Comptroller General's report on contingent accounts against the Upper Division of the Treasury; and the House report was concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. WARE, the report of the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices, on the Comptroller General's report on contingent accounts against the Lower Division of the Treasury, was taken from the table, and was agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        The following reports were submitted:

        By Mr. GARLINGTON--The report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions, on the report of the Committee on the Military, of the House of Representatives, on sundry resolutions from the Senate in relation to troops at the city of Charleston;

        By Mr. ARTHUR--The report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances, on the report of the Committee on Claims, of the House of Representatives, on the report of the Auditor on losses of slaves in the public service.

        The reports having been ordered for immediate consideration, the reports of the Committees of the House of Representatives were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. LESESNE submitted the report of the Committee on Confederate Relations, on so much of Message No. 7 of his Excellency the Governor as relates to impressments by agents of the Confederate Government. The report was ordered for immediate consideration, and was agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives, and a message was returned granting leave:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully asks leave of the Senate to amend the resolution appended to the report of the Committee on Finance and Banks, on the petition of H. L. Pinckney, trustee of Mrs. Anna G. Elliott, for the renewal of a Certificate of State Stock, by inserting after the word "stock," the


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words "to be numbered 550 of the Fire Loan, and by the addition of the words "to be marked duplicate."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. ARTHUR presented the account of Theodore Stark, for incidental expenses for the State House; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        Mr. McKEWN offered the following resolution, which was considered and agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        Resolved, That the Treasurer of the Lower Division be authorized to pay to the members of the Legislature the amount of contingent accounts allowed for each District or Parish in said Division.

        Mr. ARTHUR presented the report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances,

        On the petition of Jacob Wessel, praying compensation for losses sustained by the revocation of his license to distil alcohol; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,

        The report of the Committee on Claims, on the second report of the Auditor of the State on claims for slaves lost in the public service; which was referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        Mr. FICKLING made a report from the Committee on Privileges and Elections, on the report of the Committee on Privileges and Elections of the House of Representatives, appointing managers of elections for the general elections; which was ordered to lie on the table for the inspection of Senators.

        Mr. POPE submitted the report of the Committee on the College, Education, and Religion,

        On the memorial of the Commissioners of Free Schools for the Parishes of St. Philip and St. Michael (recommending an appropriation of $5,000). The report was considered, and the resolution recommending the appropriation was disagreed to.

        Mr. ARTHUR made a report from the Committee on Claims and Grievances, on the report of the Committee on Claims, of the House of Representatives,

        On the second report of the State Auditor on losses of slaves in the public service. The report having been ordered for immediate consideration, the report of the Committee of the House of Representatives was concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.


Page 142

        The Senate proceeded to the

        The General Orders were suspended.

        Mr. ARTHUR made a report from the Committee on Claims and Grievances, on the account of Theodore Stark, Keeper of the State House, for contingent expenses against the State House; which was considered and agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        Mr. MANNING submitted the Free School Schedule for 1863; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow, and to be printed.

        Mr. POPE offered a resolution declaring that the resolution heretofore adopted by the General Assembly, in relation to the premises occupied by the Steward and Marshal of the South Carolina College, was not intended to take the premises out of the control of the Executive Committee of the Trustees; which resolution was considered and agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the following report:

        The Committee of Conference appointed to meet a similar Committee on the part of the House of Representatives, on "A Bill to extend an Act, entitled An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled An Act in reference to the suspension of specie payments by the Banks of this State, and for other purposes, to the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four," report,

        That they met the House Committee, and, after conference, were unable to agree; they therefore recommend that a message be sent to the House, proposing to that body the appointment of a Committee of Free Conference to meet a similar Committee from the Senate.

        A message was sent to the House of Representatives pursuant thereto; Messrs. Moses, Oswald and McAliley were appointed the Committee of Free Conference on the part of the Senate, and the House of Representatives was informed of the same accordingly.

        Mr. WILSON moved that the 32d Rule of the Senate be suspended for this session; which was ordered for consideration to-morrow.


Page 143

        At half-past 2 o'clock, P. M., the Senate went into
SECRET SESSION.

        And so remained until 3 o'clock, P. M., when the regular session was renewed.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following papers, in which it concurred:

        The report of the Commission on the report of the Commissioner of the Code;

        The petition of Charles Logan, praying compensation for a slave lost whilst working for the State;

        The account of W. W. Purse, for work done in the Senate Chamber;

        The report of the City Treasurer of Charleston, showing the expenditures for the poor of the current year;

        The petition of the Trustees of the Roper Hospital, asking a continuance of the State appropriation; also,

        The favorable report of the Committee on Finance and Banks,

        On the memorial of the Mayor and Aldermen of the city of Columbia, for an increase of the transient poor fund for that city; also,

        The report of the Committee on Military and Pensions,

        On so much of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor as relates to the Military Academy; also the report of the Board of Visitors, and on a resolution inquiring as to the expediency of increasing the number of Cadets; also,

        The report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances,

        On so much of Message No. 1, of his Excellency the Governor, as relates to the Richmond Agency; also,

        The resolution in relation to the distribution of salt, cotton cloth, and cotton and wool cards; also,

        The favorable report of the Committee on the College, Education and Religion,

        On the report of the Commissioners of the Deaf, Dumb and Blind.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate, for concurrence, the following reports of the Committee on Education:

        On Message No. 4 of his Excellency the Governor, and accompanying paper;

        On the report of the Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the South Carolina College;

        On the report of the Commissioners of the Cedar Spring Institution for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind;


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        On Bernard E. Bee's debt to the Ludlam School Fund; all of which were referred to the Committee on the College, Education and Religion; also,

        The report of the Special Committee,

        On a resolution in relation to a burial place for soldiers; which was referred to the Committee on Military and Pensions; also,

        The report of the York and Lancaster Delegation,

        On the report of John R. Patton, Indian Agent; which was referred to the Delegation from York and Lancaster; also,

        A resolution as to holding the Courts in this State; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary; also,

        The report of the Committee on the Judiciary,

        On the bill of Jacob Williman, Esq., in the matter of the Library of the Court of Appeals; which was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary; also,

        The following reports of the Committee on the Military and Pensions,

        On so much of Message No. 1 of the Governor, as relates to Major Hammond's communication;

        On so much of Message No. 6 of the Governor as relates to the communication of Major Niernsee;

        On the report of the agent to record names of deceased soldiers;

        On so much of Message No. 4 as relates to estimates for military expenditures; all of which were referred to the Committee on Military and Pensions.

        The following reports of the Committee of Ways and Means:

        On the report of the Comptroller General under resolution in relation to moneys collected in certain Parishes in aid of the families of soldiers;

        On the petition of T. R. Aldrich, Physician of Charleston jail, praying additional compensation;

        On the petition of Thomas Oliver, to be relieved from a war tax execution;

        On the report of the Commissioners for building Marine Battery;

        On so much of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor as relates to a continued appropriation for making cotton cards; all of which were referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        The following reports of the Committee on Claims,

        On the petition of John D. Bateman, praying compensation for damages sustained by the Act 10th April, 1863, revoking former license to distil spirituous liquors;

        On the report of the Treasurer of the Lower Division (under the Act of 1841), respecting the claim of Dr. John May, of Colleton District, for hire of property impressed for public service;


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        On the petition of Jacob Wessel, for compensation for a license to distil spirituous liquors revoked;

        On the petition of William R. Huntt, Secretary of State, for duties performed by him as Secretary of State, for which no compensation is fixed by law;

        On the account of Charles P. Pelham, for public printing;

        On the petition of W. B. Johnston, praying compensation for amount of expenses as Recording Agent for the State;

        On the petition of Isaac H. Means (ex Secretary of State), for duties performed by him during his term of Secretary of State, for whioh no compensation is fixed by law;

        On the accounts of A. S. Willington & Co;

        On the account of R. H. Greneker, for public printing;

        On the petition of R. W. Gibbes, praying compensation for printing; all of which were referred to the Committee on Claims and Grievances.

        At ten minutes past three o'clock, P. M., the Senate, on motion of Mr. MOSES, suspended business until half-past 7 o'clock, P. M.


        RECESS.


        At half-past 7 o'clock, P. M., the PRESIDENT resumed the chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.

        Mr. MOSES offered a resolution in relation to fines and penalties for default of slave labor. The resolution was considered and agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully asks for a Committee of Free Conference upon a Bill to extend an Act, entitled An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled An Act in reference to the suspension of specie payments by the Banks, &c., and do appoint W. G. DeSaussure, Mullins and Hemphill, as the Committee on the part of the House of Representatives.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate concurred, and returned a message, informing the House of Representatives that Messrs. Moses, McAliley and Oswald had been appointed the Committee.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,


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        The report of the Committee on the State House and Grounds, on the report of the Acting Commissioner and Architect of the New State House; which was referred to the Committee on the New State House; also,

        The report of the Committee of Ways and Means, on so much of the Message of his Excellency the Governor as relates to a communication on the subject of the finances of the Confederate States, received from a Committee of the House of Delegates of Virginia; which was referred to the Committee on Finance and Banks.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the report of the Committee of Free Conference,

        On a Bill to extend an Act, entitled An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled An Act in reference to the suspension of specie payments by the Banks of this State, and for other purposes, to the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four; which was placed in the General Orders for this day.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER presented the report of the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements,

        On a Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to suppress the distillation of spirituous liquors in this State; which was placed in the General Orders for this day.

        Mr. HAMMOND presented the report of the delegation from York and Lancaster, on the Indian Agency; which was placed in the General Orders for this day.

        The House of Representatives returned, with its concurrence, the report of the Committee on Finance and Banks,

        On the petition of H. L. Pinckney, trustee of Mrs. Anna G. Elliott, for a renewal of a certificate of State Stock.

        The Committee on Claims and Grievances was discharged from the further consideration of the report of the Committee on Claims of the House of Representatives,

        On the petition of Jacob Wessel, praying compensation for losses sustained by him by the revocation of a license to distil spirituous liquors.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the reports of the Committee on Claims and Grievances, on the reports of the Committee on Claims of the House of Representatives,

        On the account of C. P. Pelham, for public printing;

        On the petition of Wm. R. Huntt, Secretary of State, for duties performed by him in his office;

        On the petition of Isaac H. Means, Secretary of State, for services rendered in his office;

        On the account of A. S. Willington & Co, for public printing;

        On the account of R. H. Greneker, for public printing;


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        On the petition of R. W. Gibbes, for public printing;

        On the petition of W. B. Johnston, for expenses incurred by him as Recording Agent of the State;

        On the petition of John D. Bateman, for compensation for losses sustained by the revocation of his license to distil spirituous liquors;

        On the report of the Treasurer of the Lower Division, on the claim of Dr. John May, for property impressed for public use; all of which were placed in the General Orders for this day.

        The Committee on the Judiciary was discharged from the consideration of the following papers:

        A resolution appointing Frederick A. Ford, Esq., a Special Magistrate for Barnwell and Edgefield Districts; and the resolution was ordered to lie on the table.

        A Bill to continue in force an Act, entitled "An Act to extend relief to debtors, and to prevent the sacrifice of property at public sales;" and, also, the Act amendatory thereof, and on certain resolutions in reference to extending relief to debtors, &c.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the report of the Committee on Offices and Officers, to whom were referred sundry petitions for the appointment of District officers; which was referred to the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices.

        Mr. WILSON offered a resolution, requesting his Excellency the Governor to correspondent with the President of the Confederate States in relation to the quantity of freight to be carried for the Confederate States Government on the ships of the Importing and Exporting Company. The question of agreeing to this resolution was ordered to be decided by yeas and nays, and they are as follows:

        Those who voted in the affirmative, are:

        Hon. W. D. PORTER, President; Messrs. Appleby, Arthur, Bacon, Boykin, Boyle, Garlington, Hammond, Hope, W. D. Johnson, Jones, Lawton, McKewn, J. W. Miller, Murray, Oswald, E. G. Palmer, Roberds, Ware and Wilson.

        Those who voted in the negative, are:

        Messrs. Beaty, Houser, Keitt, Maxwell, McAliley, Moses and Thomson.

        In the affirmative, 20.

        In the negative, 7.

        In resolution was therefore agreed to, and was ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        A Bill to refund to the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Marlboro' District, received the second reading, was agreed to, and was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.


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        A Bill to authorize Jacob Wessel to manufacture vinegar by the distillation of corn and Sorghum seed, was, on motion of Mr. E. G. PALMER, postponed indefinitely.

        A Bill, from the House of Representatives, to make provision for the support of the families of soldiers from this State in Confederate and State service, being before the Senate on the second reading, a message was sent to the House of Representatives to the following effect, to wit:

        First line, sixth section, strike out six, and insert "three," before "hundred thousand dollars;" and, also, insisting on the Senate's amendment striking out the proviso in the last section as follows: "Provided, That the sum of three hundred thousand dollars of the said six hundred thousand dollars be raised by a tax," &c. The Senate also appointed a Committee of Conference, consisting of Messrs. Hammond, Arthur and McAliley, and requested that the House would appoint a similar Committee.

        Mr. MOSES made a report from the Committee on the Judiciary, on the report of the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives, on the bill of Jacob Williman in the matter of the Library of the Court of Appeals. The report was ordered for immediate consideration, and the House report was concurred in and returned.

        The following report was agreed to, and a message was sent to the House of Representatives, pursuant to its recommendations:

        The Committee on the Military and Pensions, to whom were referred certain amendments of the House of Representatives, to a Bill from the Senate, "to declare and amend the Exemption Laws of this State, and for other purposes," ask leave to report:

        That they have considered the same, and recommend that the Senate agree to the amendment of the House of Representatives, inserting in the sixth line of the second section, after the word "drills," the words "all persons belonging to the Boards of Relief of soldiers' families;" that the Senate do not agree to the amendment, striking out in the eleventh line of the same section, the words "over the age of forty years;" that the Senate agree to the amendment, striking out in the twelfth line of the same section, the words "has been," and inserting the word "was;" that the Senate agree to the amendment, striking out in the thirteenth line of the same section, the words "six months," and inserting the words, "at the commencement of the war;" that the Senate do not agree to the amendment in the thirteenth line of the same section, inserting the words "and those who were engaged as such at the commencement of the war," and the word "none" in same line. That the Senate agree to the amendment, inserting at the end of the sixteenth line of the same section, the words "all persons belonging to the Boards of Relief of Soldiers' Families, if over the age of


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forty-five years, or if exempted by reason of physical infirmity, from Confederate conscription," but not to agree to the insertion of the words "civil employment," in the same line. That the Senate do not agree to the amendment, inserting in the twenty-first line of same section, the words "or white persons over the age of forty-five years;" nor to the amendment in the twenty-eighth line of same section, striking out "ten," and inserting the word "twenty;" nor to the amendment, adding the words, "Provided, The said order shall be published for thirty days," at the end of the last line of the third section.

        A Committee of Conference was therefore appointed, consisting of Messrs. Garlington, W. D. Johnson and Keitt, and requesting the House of Representatives to appoint a similar Committee.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully grants leave to the Senate to amend a Bill to incorporate certain religious and charitable institutions, &c., by striking out the third section of said Bill.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Bill was amended, pursuant to the leave granted, and received the third reading, was passed, the title was changed to "An Act," and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The following messages were received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully concurs with the Senate in the matter of the account of Dr. S. C. Brown, and grants leave to amend the report by striking out the words "one hundred" and inserting "fifty."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully grants leave to the Senate to amend the report of the Committee on the Military on Governor's Message, No. 4, by striking out, at the end of the resolution, the words, "to be paid for by them out


Page 150

of the appropriation made at the present session," and inserting the words, "that the sum of one hundred and seventy-one thousand dollars be appropriated for that purpose."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The reports were amended, pursuant to leave granted, and were concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The following messages were received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully grants the Senate the Committee of Free Conference on a Bill to extend an Act, entitled An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled An Act for the suspension of specie payments by the Banks, and have appointed Messrs. DeSaussure, Mullins and Hemphill as the Committee on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully grants to the Senate the Committee of Conference asked for on the restoring the text and title to "A Bill to amend the law in relation to the General Staff," added by the Senate on the second reading, and have appointed Messrs. Hutson, Suber and Whaley as the Committee on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The resolutions, and amendments thereto, in relation to naturalization, on motion of Mr. McALILEY, were laid upon the table.

        The report of the Committee on the Military of the House of Representatives, on the petition of George W. Morse for compensation for the use of his breech-loading cannon, on motion of Mr. MOSES, was ordered to lie on the table.

        The following were agreed to, and were ordered to be sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence:

        Report of Special Joint Committee on the Soldiers' Board of Relief on District returns;


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        On the account of Evans and Cogswell, for stationery furnished the General Assembly;

        Report of the Committee on Confederate Relations on the report of W. G. DeSaussure, relative to claims against the Confederate Government.

        The following were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives:

        Report of the Committee of Ways and Means,

        On the petition of H. L. Pinckney, to be refunded money paid for printing books for the office of Tax Collector; and on the report of the Committee of Ways and Means, of the House of Representatives, on the same subject;

        On the report of the Committee on Claims of the House of Representatives, on the account of E. R. Stokes, for binding Acts, Reports and Resolutions; also,

        On the report of the Committee on Claims, of the House of Representatives, on the petition of Jesse R. Smith, administrator of Ely Smith, for arrears of pension; and

        The report of the delegation of York and Lancaster in the House of Representatives, in relation to the report of John R. Patton, Indian Agent.

        A Bill to amend an Act, entitled An Act to suppress the distillation of spirituous liquors in this State, received the third reading, was passed, the title was changed to "An Act," and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill to grant the aid of the State to the Broad River and Shelby Railroad Company.

        A message was sent to the House of Representatives, insisting on restoring the following amendments, to wit: First section, first line, after "and for the purpose of making such subscription, the Comptroller General be, and he is hereby, authorized," by adding, "to draw upon the Bank of the State of South Carolina for so much of the sinking fund as may be necessary." The Senate further asked for a Committee of Conference, informing the House of Representatives that the Senate had appointed Messrs. E. G. Palmer, McAliley, and Garlington, the Committee on the part of the Senate.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the unfavorable report of the Committee on the Judiciary,

        On a resolution from the House of Representatives, expressing the opinion that hereafter it will be expected that the Judges and Chancellors will hold their Courts as required by law in all cases ready for trial, or where


Page 152

there is no just ground for continuance. The report was agreed to, and the resolution was rejected.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the following report:

        The Committee of Conference, to whom were referred the matters of difference between the two Houses, in reference to a Bill to amend the law in relation to the General Staff, beg leave to report:

        That they have considered the matters referred, and recommend that the Bill proposed by the Senate, as a substitute for the House Bill, be adopted, with the following amendments, viz: To add to the first section of said Bill the following words, viz: "And the duties heretofore performed by the ordnance officer be hereafter performed by the Arsenal keepers of Charleston and Columbia, under the supervision of the Adjutant and Inspector General." Also, to strike out from the remainder of said Bill all that relates to the said Ordnance officer, or his pay or duties.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully agrees with the report of the Committee of Conference in reference to "a Bill to consolidate the officers of the staff." That the Bill of the Senate be adopted with the following amendments, viz: to the end of the first section, "and the duties heretofore performed by the ordnance officer be hereafter performed by the Arsenal keepers of Charleston and Columbia, under the supervision of the Adjutant and Inspector-General," and also strike out all else that relates to said ordnance officer.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The report was agreed to, and the Bill was amended, pursuant to the leave granted. The title was changed to A Bill to amend the law in relation to the General Staff; the third reading of the Bill was concluded, the title was changed to "An Act," and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        A Bill to alter the law in relation to the election of District Officers, received the third reading, was passed; title changed to "An Act," and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        A Bill in relation to the Southern Express Company, and for other purposes. On the third reading, the House of Representatives had stricken


Page 153

out the Senate's amendment, which was a substitute for the entire Bill, and had changed the title of the Bill, to A Bill to provide additional remedies for the default of common carriers. The Senate sent a message, insisting on restoring its amendments, and asking a Committee of Conference, informing the House of Representatives that the Senate had appointed Messrs. Fickling, Moses and Boykin the Committee on the part of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following:

        An Act to amend an Act, entitled An Act to suppress the distillation of spirituous liquors in this State; also,

        An Act to continue in force the laws heretofore enacted in relation to the cultivation of cotton; and they were referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        Mr. MOSES submitted the following report:

        The Committee of Free Conference, to whom was referred "A Bill to extend an Act, entitled An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act entitled 'An Act in reference to the suspension of specie payments by the Banks of the State, and for other purposes, to the first day of January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-four,' " ask leave to report:

        That they have considered the same, and recommend that the Senate have leave to restore the section of the Bill struck out by the House, with the following words at the end of the section, as an amendment, "or shall sell or dispose of its gold or silver coin, except to the State or the Confederate States."

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully agrees with the report of the Free Conference Committee on a Bill to extend an Act, entitled "An Act to extend some of the provisions of an Act, entitled An Act in reference to the suspension of specie payments by the banks, &c.," "that the Senate have leave to restore the section stricken out by the House," and add to the section the words "or shall sell or dispose of its gold or silver coin, except to the State or Confederate States."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The report was agreed to. The Bill was amended according to leave granted; received the third reading, was passed, its title changed to "An Act," and was returned to the House of Representatives.


Page 154

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully insists upon striking out the amendments of the Senate to the Bill to make provision for the support of the families of soldiers, and agree to the appointment of a Committee of Conference, and do appoint Messrs. W. G. DeSaussure, Dawkins and Campbell on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. ARTHUR, from the Committee of Conference on the subject of this message, reported that the Committee of Conference had agreed to recommend that $600,000 should be stricken out to insert $500,000.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the unfavorable report of the Committee on the New State House, on the report of the Committee on the State House and Grounds, of the House of Representatives, on the report of the acting Commissioner and Architect. The report of the Senate Committee was agreed to, and the House report was rejected.

        The following Bills received the third reading, and were passed. The titles were changed to Acts, and they were returned to the House of Representatives, viz:

        A Bill to establish certain roads, bridges and ferries; and

        A Bill to procure supplies and furnish the implements of agricultural and manufacturing industry for the soldiers and people of the State, by a union of the State with the Importing and Exporting Company of South Carolina.

        The following reports of the Committee on Claims, of the House of Representatives, were concurred in, and were returned to the House of Representatives:

        On the petition of Wm. R. Huntt, Secretary of State, for duties performed by him in his office;

        On the petition of Isaac H. Means, Secretary of State, for services rendered in his office;

        On the account of A. S. Willington & Co., for public printing;

        On the account R. H. Greneker, for public printing;

        On the petition of R. W. Gibbes, for public printing;

        On the petition of W. B. Johnston, for expenses incurred by him as Recording Agent of the State;

        On the petition of John D. Bateman, for compensation for losses sustained by the revocation of his license to distil spirituous liquors.


Page 155

        On the report of the Treasurer of the Lower Division, on the claim of Dr. John May, for property impressed for public use.

        On motion of Mr. McKEWN, it was

        Ordered, That when the Senate adjourns, it shall stand adjourned to meet to-morrow, at 11 o'clock, A. M.

        On motion of Mr. W. D. JOHNSON, the Senate adjourned at 12 o'clock, midnight.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1863.

        The Senate met at 11, A. M., pursuant to adjournment. Prayer by the Rev. Mr. Jones.

        The Clerk read the Journal of the proceedings of yesterday.

        Mr. McALILEY submitted the report of the Committee on Finance and Banks on the report of the Committee of Ways and Means, of the House of Representatives, on so much of the Message of his Excellency the Governor as relates to a communication on the subject of the Finances of the Confederate States, received from a Committee of the House of Delegates of Virginia; which was referred to the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,

        A resolution in relation to the reduction of certain claims referred to in the third report of the State Auditor; which was concurred in, and ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following papers, in which it had concurred:

        The report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances on the account of Evans & Cogswell, for stationery furnished the General Assembly;

        A resolution in relation to the accounts against the Lower Division;

        The report of the Committee on Claims on the contingent accounts of the State House Keeper; and

        An Act to refund to the Soldiers' Board of Relief for Marlboro' District, money advanced by them.


Page 156

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate, for concurrence,

        The report of the Committee on the Military,

        On so much of Message No. 6 of the Governor, as relates to the communication of Major Niernsee; and

        On so much of Message No. 7 as relates to the State Works at Greenville; both of which were referred to the Committee on the Military and Pensions.

        Resolution to appoint proxies for the State in the Spartanburg and Union Railroad, for the year 1864;

        Resolution as to the returns of Soldiers' Boards of Relief;

        Resolution in relation to the purchase of the law library of the late Hon. James L. Petigru; all of which were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate, with its concurrence,

        The report of the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices, on the Comptroller General's Report on contingent accounts against the Lower Division of the Treasury.

        The House of Representatives also returned to the Senate,

        An Act to amend an Act in relation to the supply of labor for the military defence of the State, passed in September, A. D., 1863; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following messages:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully insists upon the original "Bill to provide additional remedies for the default of common carriers," and agrees to a Committee of Conference, and appoints Messrs. Duryea, Campbell and Croft, on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully insists upon refusing to grant leave to the Senate to amend the Bill to grant the aid of the State to the Shelby and Broad River Railroad Company, in the manner asked, and agrees to the appointment of a Committee of Conference, and appoints Messrs. J. M. DeSaussure, W. G. DeSaussure and O'Connor, on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.



Page 157

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 16, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully informs the Senate that it has agreed on the report of the Committee of Conference on "the Bill to provide relief to the families of soldiers," &c., that is to say, strike out "six hundred" and insert "five hundred" thousand dollars.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. WARE, from the Committee on Accounts and Vacant Offices, made a report on the report of the Committee on Offices and Officers, to whom were referred sundry petitions for the appointment of District Officers. The report was ordered for immediate consideration, and the House report was concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. GARLINGTON made a report from the Committee on Military and Pensions, on the following reports of the Committee on the Military, of the House of Representatives:

        On so much of the Message No. 6 of the Governor, as relates to Major Hammond's communication;

        On the report of the agent to record names of deceased soldiers;

        On so much of Message No. 4 as relates to estimates for military expenditures; all of which were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives.

        A Bill to amend and renew the charter of the Columbia and Hamburg Railroad Company, and to produce conformity in the charters granted to said Company by the States of Georgia and South Carolina, received the third reading, and it was resolved that it do pass; that the title thereof be changed; that it be called "An Act;" and it was sent to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. MANNING, from the Committee on the College, Education and Religion, asked leave to be discharged from the further consideration of the following reports of the Committee on Education of the House of Representatives:

        On the Report of the Treasurer of the Board of Trustees of the South Carolina College;

        On the Report of the Commissioners of the Cedar Spring Institution for the Deaf, Dumb and Blind;

        On Barnard E. Bee's debt to the Ludlam School Fund; and

        On Message No. 4 of the Governor and accompanying papers; all of which were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives, except the last, which was ordered to lie on the table.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate,


Page 158

        The report of the Committee on Claims on the account of P. B. Glass & Co., for stationery furnished the House of Representatives; which was concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully insists upon refusing the amendments of the Senate to "A Bill to declare and amend the exemption law of this State," &c., and agrees upon a Committee of Conference, and appoints Messrs. Bradley, Hutson and Oliver on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate a resolution in relation to a burial place for soldiers. The Senate returned a message, asking leave to add the name of Hon. E. J. Arthur to the number of Commissioners; to which the House of Representatives returned the following reply:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully grants leave to the Senate to amend the resolution in relation to a burial place for soldiers, &c., by adding the name of E. J. Arthur to the Commission.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The resolution was amended accordingly, and concurred in and returned.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate a resolution in relation to the clerks in the offices of Adjutant and Inspector General, Commissary and Quartermaster General.

        On motion of Mr. W. D. JOHNSON, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend, by striking out the Adjutant and Inspector General.

        Mr. MOSES made a report from the Committee on the Judiciary, on the reports of the Attorney General and Solicitors, recommending that they be received and filed. The report was agreed to.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate resolutions authorizing the President of the Bank of the State of South Carolina to advance a certain sum to continue the work on the New State House; and

        A resolution in relation to printing the Act making provision for the relief of soldiers; and they were considered and disagreed to.


Page 159

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following papers, in which it had concurred:

        The report of the Committee on Confederate Relations, on so much of the Governor's Message No. 7, as relates to the subject of impressment by agents of the Confederate Government;

        A resolution requesting the Governor to correspond with the President of the Confederate States in relation on the quantity of freight for the Confederate States Government on the ships of the Importing and Exporting Company;

        A resolution in relation to the books of the office of Secretary of State.

        Mr. MOSES offered a resolution in relation to the reports of the Commissioners to ascertain what tax payers in certain Parishes shall be exempted from the war tax of 1861; and as to tax executions against the property belonging to soldiers; which was considered and agreed to.

        Mr. MOSES also offered a resolution in relation to the printing of the Acts, Reports and Resolutions, and Journals of the extra session of 1861, with those of December, 1863.

        Mr. OSWALD offered a resolution for the appointment of Trustees of the Walterboro' Male Academy; all of which were considered and agreed to, and sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate for concurrence the following reports and resolutions, viz:

        The report of the Committee on Internal Improvements on a resolution in relation to granting the use of the Columbia Canal to the Mutual Supply Association;

        A resolution as to funds in the hands of State Agent for slave labor on the coast;

        A resolution authorizing the Treasurer of the Upper Division to act for the Treasurer of the Lower Division.

        Mr. BONNEAU submitted the report of the Board of Soldiers' Relief for Christ Church; which was ordered to lie on the table.

        On motion of Mr. McALILEY a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend so much of a Bill to make appropriations for the year commencing in October, A. D. 1863, as refers to soldiers' families, by striking out "six," and inserting "three," before "hundred thousand dollars." To this the House of Representatives returned the following reply:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully insists upon its refusal to amend the Appropriation


Page 160

Bill, as asked by the Senate, and agrees to a Committee of Conference, and appoints Messrs. DeSaussure, Pinckney and Johnston on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. McALILEY submitted the following report:

        The Committee of Conference to whom was referred the Bill to make appropriations for the year commencing in October, one thousand eight hundred and sixty-three, report that they have met, and recommend that leave be granted to the Senate to amend the twenty-third line of the eighth section of printed Bill, by striking out "six," and inserting "five."

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate that Messrs. J. H. Evins, Duryea and Cooper, have been appointed, on the part of the House, as the Commission on the resolution in relation to the sustenance and education of soldiers' children, and requests a similar Commission on the part of the Senate.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate concurred. Messrs. E. G. Palmer and E. J. Arthur were appointed the Commission on the part of the Senate, and a message was returned accordingly.

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the following report, which was considered and agreed to, and a message was sent to the House of Representatives pursuant to the recommendation of the Committee:

        The Committee of Conference of the two Houses, to whom was referred the matter of disagreement between them in relation to "A Bill" to grant the aid of the State to the Shelby and Broad River Railroad Company, ask leave to report, that they have considered the matter referred, and recommend that the Senate recede from the amendment adopted by that body, and disagreed to by the House of Representatives, to wit: striking out in the twelfth line of the printed Bill (the eighth line of the manuscript) the


Page 161

words, "from any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated," and inserting the words, "to draw upon the Bank of the State of South Carolina for so much of the sinking fund as may be necessary," and that the words, "from any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated," be stricken out, and the following words inserted, to wit; "to sell of the shares owned by the State in the Greenville and Columbia Railroad Company a sufficient amount to raise said sum of three hundred thousand dollars; Provided, That said shares shall not be sold below their par value."

        Mr. FICKLING submitted the following report:

        The Committee of Conference, to whom was referred the matter of difference between the two Houses, in relation to "a Bill to provide additional remedies for the default of common carriers," ask leave to report that they have considered the same, and recommend that the amendments of the Senate, contained in the paper marked "A," be adopted with the following amendments: In section three, strike out the words "as herein provided in relation to the process," and insert, "as hereinbefore provided for the service of process in actions against the Southern Express Company." Strike out of the same section the word "ten," and insert "thirty," and between the word "days," and the word "to," on the same line, insert the word "thereafter."

        That section two of the House Bill, with the following amendments, be added to the Bill as a fourth section--strike out the word "leading," between the words "three" and "newspapers."

        Strike out the words "a week," between the words "once" and "during," and insert the words "in two months."

        That the title of the Bill be changed so as to read, "A Bill in relation to the Southern Express Company, and to provide additional remedies for the default of common carriers."

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following message:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate that it agrees with the report of the Conference Committee, on the "Bill to provide additional remedies for the default of common carriers," &c.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.



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        The Bill was amended pursuant to leave granted. The third reading was concluded, it was passed, the title changed to an Act, and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following message:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate that it agrees with the report of the Conference Committee, on the Appropriation Bill, by striking out in eighth section and twenty-third line, "six" and inserting "five."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Bill was then amended, pursuant to leave granted, the third reading was concluded, the Bill was passed, the title was changed to an Act, and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following message:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully asks leave to the Senate to amend the report of the Committee on Engrossed Acts, on the Message No. 2 of his Excellency the Governor, which refers to the engrossing the Joint Resolutions of the Legislature, &c., by adding the following:

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate returned a message granting leave to amend the first, and refusing leave to amend the second resolution.


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        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully asks leave of the Senate to rescind the resolution of the General Assembly to adjourn sine die, at 5 o'clock, P. M., this day.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Senate returned a message refusing leave to rescind the resolution, and proposing to rescind so much as fixes the hour. To which the House of Representatives returned the following reply:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully concurs with the Senate to amend the resolution to adjourn, by striking out 5 o'clock, P. M.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following message:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully grants leave to the Senate to amend the resolution in relation to assistants of Adjutant and Inspector General, Commissary General and Quartermaster General, by striking out the words, "The Adjutant and Inspector General."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The resolution was then amended, pursuant to leave granted, and concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. E. G. PALMER made a report from the Committee on Agriculture and Internal Improvements, on the report of the Committee on Internal Improvements of the House of Representatives in relation to allowing the use of the Columbia Canal to the Mutual Supply Association. The report was ordered for immediate consideration, and the report of the House Committee was concurred in and returned.

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the following report:


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        The Committee of Conference, to whom were referred the matters of difference between the Senate and House of Representatives, in relation to a "Bill to declare and amend the Exemption laws of the State," report:

        That they recommend that the Senate do agree to the House amendment, striking out in the eleventh line of the second section the words, "over the age of forty years;" that the House do consent that the Senate should strike out the House amendment, inserting in the thirteenth line of the same section the words, "and those who were engaged as such at the commencement of the war;" that the House consents that the Senate shall strike out of the sixteenth line of the same section the words, "civil employment; and also, in the twenty-first line the words, "or white persons over the age of forty-five years;" and also, to restore the word "ten." in the place of "twenty," in the twenty-eight line of the same section, but shall insert in the same line, "and has been in operation at least two months previous to being called into service;" and that the Senate do agree to the House amendment, adding at the end of the third section the words, "Provided, The said order shall be published for thirty days."

        At 2 o'clock, P. M., the Senate went into secret session, and so remained until half-past 2 o'clock, P. M., when the doors were opened, and the regular session was resumed.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate of its agreeing with the report of the Conference Committee on a "Bill to grant the aid of the State to the Shelby and Broad River Railroad Company."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Bill was amended pursuant to leave granted; the Bill received the third reading; it was passed; the title was changed to "An Act," and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        At fifteen minutes past 3 o'clock, P. M., on motion of Mr. MOSES, business was suspended until 7 o'clock, P. M.


        RECESS.


        At 7 o'clock, P. M., the PRESIDENT resumed the chair, and the Senate proceeded with business.


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        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following message:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully informs the Senate that it agrees with the Conference Committee report on the Bill to declare and amend the exemption laws of this State.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The Bill was amended accordingly; the third reading was concluded; it was passed; the title was changed to "An Act," and it was returned to the House of Representatives.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate,

        An Act to amend and renew the charter of the Columbia and Hamburg Railroad Company, and to produce conformity in the charters granted to said Company by the States of Georgia and South Carolina; which was referred to the Committee on Incorporations and engrossed Acts.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate a resolution in relation to the continuance of work on the New State House.

        Mr. ARTHUR moved that a message be sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the resolution.

        Resolved, 1. That the further prosecution of the work on the New State House, including the quarrying of rock, and all other work, be discontinued, and that the contract with Messrs. Sisson & Dougherty in relation to the marble work, with their consent, be rescinded from and after the first day of January next.

        Resolved, 2. That the Governor be authorized and directed to dispose of by sale, at such time and in such manner as he may think best, all the tools, wagons, mules and other chattels used in carrying on the above work, and so much of the machinery as he may think it to the interest of the State to dispose of; and that he place the building and the material now on hand to be used in its corporation under the charge of some suitable person or persons for its protection and safe keeping.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the report of the Committee on the Military,

        On so much of the Governor's Message as relates to the State Works at Greenville.

        On motion of Mr. MOSES, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, asking leave to amend the resolution appended as follows, viz:


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        By inserting after the words "the State Works at Greenville," the following words, viz: "at public sale."

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate the following reports and resolutions, which were concurred in, and returned to the House of Representatives, viz:

        The report of the Committee on Education, on a resolution as to the house of the Steward and Marshal of the South Carolina College;

        Resolution to appoint a proxy to represent the stock in the Greenville and Columbia Railroad Company;

        Report of the Committee on Claims, on the account of the Charleston Mercury, for printing;

        Report of the Special Committee on the report of the Soldiers' Board of Relief on the consolidated reports of those Boards;

        Report of the Committee on the Judiciary as to the records removed from Charleston in the office of the Secretary of State;

        Report of the Committee on the Military, on a resolution of inquiry of his Excellency the Governor relative to the call for troops from Charleston;

        The reports of the Committee of Ways and Means,

        On so much of Message No. 1 of his Excellency the Governor as refers to the State Auditor;

        On the report of the Commissioners for the removal of non-combatants from Charleston;

        On the report of the Comptroller General;

        On the report of the President and Directors of the Bank of the State of South Carolina;

        On so much of the Message No. 6 of his Excellency the Governor as relates to the report of Gen. W. G. DeSaussure on claims against the Confederate Government; which was ordered to lie on the table.

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following papers in which it had concurred:

        Report of the Joint Special Committee on relief to soldiers' families, on so much of the Governor's Message as refers to a gift of five hundred yards of cloth per week, instead of a sale of ten thousand yards;

        Report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances, on the petition of James Legare, for compensation for a slave executed;

        Resolution in relation to the premises occupied by the Bursar and Marshal of the South Carolina College;

        Resolution in relation to fines and penalties for default of slave labor.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate for concurrence the report of the Committee on the Judiciary, on so much of the Governor's


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Message No. 7 as relates to the acts and circulars of impressing officers; which was ordered to lie on the table.

        Mr. GARLINGTON submitted the report of the Committee on the Military and Pensions on a resolution from the House of Representatives, in relation to detailing physicians, recommending that the Senate do not concur. The report was agreed to, and the resolution was rejected.

        Messrs. MOSES and ARTHUR were appointed the Commission on the part of the Senate in relation to the purchase of the law library of the late J. L. Petigru, Esq., and a message was sent to the House of Representatives, informing that House of the appointment.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully grants leave to the Senate to amend the resolution of the Military Committee in relation to the State Works at Greenville, by inserting after "the State Works at Greenville" the words "at public sale."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        The report was amended pursuant to the leave granted, and was concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives.

        The following messages were received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully insists upon its second resolution on the report of the Committee on Engrossed Acts, on the Governor's Message No. 2 relating to the duties of the Clerks of the Senate and House of Representatives respecting joint resolutions, &c., and asks for a Committee of Conference, and do appoint, on the part of the House, Messrs. Duryea, J. H. Williams and Fair, as the Committee.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully refuses to grant leave to the Senate to amend the resolution to "continue certain work on the New State House, as proposed by the Senate."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.



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        The Senate concurred in the appointment of the Committees of Conference. Messrs. McALILEY, THOMSON, and ROBERDS were appointed on the first, and Messrs. ARTHUR, W. D. JOHNSON, and S. W. PALMER were appointed on the last, and messages were returned accordingly.

        Mr. MOSES offered the following resolution, which was unanimously agreed to:

        Resolved, unanimously, That the thanks of the Senate be tendered to the Hon. W. D. PORTER, its President, for the able and courteous manner in which he has discharged the duties of the Chair.

        When the PRESIDENT resumed the Chair, Mr. THOMSON announced the action of the Senate.

        The PRESIDENT responded as follows:

        Gentlemen of the Senate:

        Your resolution of compliment is received in the spirit in which it is offered. I am much gratified by the kind feeling it manifests, and beg to assure you that that feeling is warmly reciprocated to each and every one of you.

        The last two years have been very eventful--certainly the most eventful in the whole course of your lives. You have been actors in a drama such as has been seldom or never seen, and participants in a war conducted on a scale of the very first magnitude. Events have transpired, and are transpiring, scenes have been enacted, and are now being enacted around and in the midst of you, the remembrance of which will not be lost among men. All this will be historical, and will live as long as human records live. How this young Confederacy rose to the height of this grand struggle and surmounted it. How this little State made the first great breach, and filled up the gap with her glorious dead; and still holds her brave and beating bosom there, and will hold it to the glorious end. The story of these things will thrill and delight and instruct the heart of the world hereafter, as it does now. What a romance and what a history there is in Fort Sumter--truth outdoing fiction. Like Salamis and Thermopylae, Sumter will become a household name among men; a familiar name and a spell wherewith to excite all who have at heart a love of liberty to deeds of gallant


Page 169

daring and heroic constancy in its behalf. How hero men and hero boys stood at the channel gate of our seaport; how they defended that isolated, sea-girt little spot of earth against the heaviest artillery that ever thundered in the world, till the walls of brick and mortar crumbled into ruins; how they did not lose one jot of heart or hope, but lay behind those ruins, and in the intervals of fire and under fire, with a patience, skill and endurance never surpassed, out of the shattered material around them erected a new barrier and constructed a new fort, like some phoenix of war, out of the ashes of battle; how amidst the deadliest storm of shot and shell they replaced often and again their fallen battle flag, rent and riven to shreds, flaunting it anew, with invincible defiance, in the face of the foe; and how they still hold that foe at bay, defying his utmost malice, frustrating his most strenuous endeavors, and compelling even from him a reluctant admiration. These are lessons to be learned by heart, examples to be treasured for imitation, and glories to be recorded to the imperishable honor of the State. A cause so brightly illustrated, and so gloriously defended, cannot and will not fail--it must be victorious.

        Senators of South Carolina, it is your praise never to have despaired of the republic, to have had faith in the cause, and in the people by whom it was espoused, and to have proved yourselves, under the most trying vicissitudes, equal to the exigencies of the great occasion. More need not be said. The cause for which so many sacrifices have been made, so many privations endured, and so much precious blood shed, can never utterly perish. It is the determination of our people to die freemen rather than to survive slaves. This spirit is inextinguishable, and the people who are animated by it may be defeated, and harassed, and overrun, but can never be conquered.

        You are about to part. It is pleasant to know that you part, not in feud or in anger, but with the kindliest feeling as brothers and friends. In the chances of these perilous times it is more than probable that you will not all meet again. Some have gone before, and others will soon follow. May you so live, that you will not fear to die. It is my hope and my prayer that one of the choicest blessings of heaven--the smiles of a happy household--may greet each and all of you upon your return to your respective homes.

        The House of Representatives sent to the Senate for concurrence the report of the Committee on Internal Improvements on the report of the Solicitor of the Northern Circuit in reference to the Rocky Mountain Canal; which was concurred in and returned to the House of Representatives.


Page 170

        The House of Representatives returned to the Senate the following papers in which it had concurred:

        The report of the Committee on Confederate Relations on the report of W. G. DeSaussure, relative to claims against the Confederate Government;

        A resolution in relation to reports of Commissioners to ascertain what tax payers in certain Parishes should be exempted from the war tax of 1861, and as to tax executions against property belonging to soldiers; and

        A resolution for the appointment of Trustees of the Walterboro' Male Academy.

        The Senate proceeded to the

        A resolution for suspending the 32d Rule of the Senate during the present session; and

        The unfavorable report of the Committee on Claims and Grievances on the petition of Jacob Wessel, praying compensation for losses sustained by the revocation of his license to distil alcohol, were agreed to.

        The following messages were received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully insists upon refusing to grant leave to the Senate to amend the resolution to "continue certain work on the New State House," and agrees to the appointment of a Committee of Conference, and do appoint Messrs. J. M. DeSaussure, Kirk and Boylston, on the part of the House.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate of its appointment of Messrs. Dawkins and Campbell, as the Commission on the part of the House in relation to the purchase of the law library of the late Mr. Petigru.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Mr. McALILEY submitted the following report, which was considered and agreed to:

        The Committee of Conference, to whom were referred the matters of difference between the two Houses, in relation to that part of Message No. 2


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of his Excellency the Governor, which refers to engrossing the joint resolutions of the Legislature and certain resolutions of the Senate, ask leave to report:

        That they have considered the same, and recommend that the first resolution of the House Committee be adopted, and that the second resolution of the House Committee, together with the report of the Senate Committee, be not agreed to.

        Mr. WARE made a report from the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts, reporting that the Acts which had passed at the present session had been engrossed, and were now ready for ratification.

        Mr. ARTHUR submitted the report of the Committee of Conference in relation to the continuance of work on the New State House ; which was considered and agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence, and was immediately returned by that House with its concurrence.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        This House respectfully informs the Senate that it agrees with the Conference Committee report on Message No. 2 of his Excellency the Governor, referring to engrossing the joint resolutions, &c.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        In conformity with the report of the Committee of Conference and this message, the Senate amended the report of the Committee on Incorporations and Engrossed Acts on that part of Message No. 2 of his Excellency the Governor which refers to engrossing resolutions, and with certain resolutions of the Senate, by striking out the second resolution appended to the report of the House Committee on Engrossed Acts. The Senate concurred in and returned the first resolution--no action having been taken on the report.

        The following message was received from the House of Representatives:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully informs the Senate that it agrees with the report of the Conference Committee on a resolution to "continue certain work on the New State House."

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.



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        The House of Representatives also returned, with concurrence, the report of the Committee of Conference on the same subject.

        Mr. WARE offered a resolution requesting the Governor to furnish ten copies of the discourse of the Rev. Dr. Palmer to each member of the Legislature; which was considered and agreed to, and was sent to the House of Representatives for concurrence, and was immediately returned by that House with its concurrence.

        On motion of Mr. WARE, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, inviting that House to attend forthwith in the Senate Chamber for the purpose of ratifying the Acts passed at the present session, to which the House of Representatives returned the following reply:

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, December 17, 1863.

Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Senate:

        The House respectfully accepts your invitation to attend in the Senate Chamber forthwith, to ratify the Acts passed at this General Assembly.

        By order of the House,

A. P. ALDRICH, Speaker.


        Whereupon the Speaker of the House of Representatives, accompanied by the members, and attended by the officers, appeared in the Senate Chamber, when the following Acts were duly ratified, in the presence of the members of both houses of the General Assembly.

        On motion of Mr. McKEWN, a message was sent to the House of Representatives, delivered orally by the Clerk, informing the House that the Senate had disposed of the business before it, and was now ready to adjourn sine die.

        On motion of Mr. S. W. PALMER, and pursuant to the order previously made by the two houses, the PRESIDENT, at fifteen minutes to 3, A. M., pronounced the Senate adjourned sine die.


Page 175

INDEX
TO THE JOURNAL OF THE SENATE, AT THE SESSIONS OF 1863.


Page 177

INDEX.


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