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Hill & Swayze's Confederate States Rail-Road & Steam-Boat Guide, Containing the
Time-Tables, Fares, Connections and Distances on all the Rail-Roads of the Confederate States;
also, the Connecting Lines of Rail-Roads, Steam-Boats and Stages. And Will Be Accompanied
by a Complete Guide to the Principal Hotels, with a Large Variety
of Valuable Information, Collected, Compiled and Arranged by J. C. Swayze:

Electronic Edition.

J. C. Swayze, Collected, Compiled and Arranged by


Funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services
supported the electronic publication of this title.


Text scanned (OCR) by Gina Cash
Images scanned by Gina Cash
Text encoded by Lee Ann Morawski and Joshua G. McKim
First edition, 2001
ca. 700K
Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
2001.

        © This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.

Source Description:
(title page) Hill & Swayze's Confederate States Rail-road & Steam-boat Guide, Containing the Time-Tables, Fares, Connections and Distances on all the Rail-roads of the Confederate States; also, the Connecting Lines of Rail-roads, Steam-boats and Stages. And will be Accompanied by a Complete Guide to the Principal Hotels, with a Large Variety of Valuable Information:
J. C. Swayze.
90p.
Griffin, Georgia:
Hill & Swayze, Publishers,
1862

Call number 2672.05conf(Rare Book Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)


        The electronic edition is a part of the UNC-CH digitization project, Documenting the American South.

        This electronic edition has been created by Optical Character Recognition (OCR). OCR-ed text has been compared against the original document and corrected. The text has been encoded using the recommendations for Level 4 of the TEI in Libraries Guidelines.
        Original grammar, punctuation, and spelling have been preserved. Encountered typographical errors have been preserved, and appear in red type.
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Library of Congress Subject Headings, 21st edition, 1998

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Illustration


PUBLISHED MOTNHLY. PRICE 75 CENTS.
HILL & SWAYZE'S
CONFEDERATE STATES
RAIL-ROAD & STEAM-BOAT
GUIDE,
CONTAINING THE
Time-Tables, Fares, Connections and Distances on all the
Rail-Roads of the Confederate States; also, the
connecting lines of Rail-Roads, Steam-boats
and Stages.
AND WILL BE ACCOMPANIED BY
A COMPLETE GUIDE TO THE PRINCIPAL HOTELS,
With a large variety of valuable information, collected,
compiled and arranged

BY

J. C. SWAYZE.

GRIFFIN, GEORGIA:
HILL & SWAYZE, Publishers, and for sale by all Booksellers in the Confederacy.
Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1862, by HILL & SWAYZE, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the Northern District of the State of Georgia.


Page 2

COMPARATIVE TIME-TABLE,

        Showing the Time at the Principal Cities of the Confederate States, compared with Noon at Richmond, Va.

         There is no "Standard Rail-Road time" in the Confederate States, but each rail-road company adopts independently the time of its own locality, or of that place at which its principal office is situated. The inconvenience of such a system, if it can be called, must be apparent to all, but is most annoying to persons strangers to the fact. From this cause, many miscalculations and misconnections have arisen, which not unfrequently have been of serious consequence to individuals, and have, as a matter of course, brought into disrepute all Rail-road Guides, which of necessity give the local times. In order to relieve, in some degree, this anomaly in American rail-roading, we present the following table of local time, compared with that of Richmond, Va:


Page 3

HOTEL DIRECTORY.

         This Directory will contain none but the best Hotels in each city-- those that the traveler may feel assured are worthy of the public patronage. Also, Houses on the roads where trains stop for meals.

OMNIBUS DIRECTORY.

         COLUMBUS OMNIBUS LINE.--Omnibusses always in attendance upon the arrival of trains at either of the Depots, or at the steam-boat landing, to convey travelers to any of the Hotels, or private houses. Tickets can be purchased in the cars of an Agent, who will exchange checks for baggage, thus saving travelers the annoyance of looking after their baggage. A. GAMMEL, Proprietor.

         MONTGOMERY OMNIBUS LINE.--Omnibusses leave the Hotels 45 minutes before the departure of Cars or Boats. Check Agents will be found on all trains to check baggage to either Hotel or private house.


Page 7

RAIL-ROAD TIME-TABLES,
PUBLISHED MONTHLY
UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF THE RAIL-ROAD COMPANIES.

MACON & WESTERN ROAD,

ISAAC SCOTT, Pres't,
ALFRED L. TYLER, Sup't,
Macon, Ga.

        
Macon to Atlanta.       March 22. Atlanta to Macon.      
Mail. Fr't. Fare Mls. Stations. Mls. Fare Fr't. Mail.
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
9 00 5 30     . . . . .Macon. . . . . 103 5 00 4 00 12 54
9 10       . . . . .Junction. . . . .       12 47
9 35   40 8 . . . . .Howard's. . . . . 95 4 60   12 29
10 00   75 15 . . . . .Crawford's. . . . . 88 4 25   12 05
10 20   1 00 21 . . . . .Smarr's. . . . . 82 4 00   11 45
10 48   1 25 26 . . . . .Forsyth. . . . . 77 3 75   11 28
11 08   1 50 32 . . . . .Collier's. . . . . 71 3 50   11 08
11 27   1 75 37 . . . . .Goggins. . . . . 66 3 25   10 46
11 45   2 00 42 . . . . .Barnesville. . . . . 61 3 00   10 30
12 15   2 40 49 . . . . .Milner. . . . . 54 2 50   10 10
12 35   2 55 54 . . . . .Thornton. . . . . 49 2 35   9 45
1 20   3 20 60 . . . . .Griffin. . . . . 43 2 00   9 25
1 45   3 05 67 . . . . .Fayette. . . . . 36 1 75   8 58
2 15   3 65 74 . . . . .Lovejoy's. . . . . 29 1 35   8 31
2 40   4 00 81 . . . . .Jonesboro. . . . . 22 1 00   8 08
2 58   4 25 86 . . . . .Morrow's. . . . . 17 75   7 30
3 20   4 50 92 . . . . .Rough & Ready. . . . . 11 50   7 08
3 38   4 75 97 . . . . .East Point. . . . . 6 25   6 55
4 00 4 10 5 00 103 . . . . .Atlanta. . . . .     6 30 6 30
p.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Macon with Central Georgia [p56], and South-Western [p54], Rail-Roads. At Barnesville with Upson county road [p53], to Thomaston. At Atlanta with Georgia Rail-Road [p8], Western & Atlantic Rail-Road [p41], and Atlanta & West Point Rail-Road [p42].

         FORSYTH, capital of Monroe county, Georgia, contains besides the county buildings, several churches, the Monroe Female University, and about 600 inhabitants.

         GRIFFIN, a flourishing town on the Macon & Western road, capital of Spalding county. The situation is one of the most pleasant and healthy in the State. Population about 3,000.

         JONESBOROUGH, a post-village in Fayette county, on the Macon & Western road, 22 miles from Atlanta, and 21 from Griffin. Population about 900.


Page 8

GEORGIA RAIL-ROAD.

JOHN P. KING, President,
GEO. YONGE, Gen'l Sup't,
A. WEBSTER, Gen'l Ticket Ag't,
Augusta, Geo.

        
Augusta to Atlanta.       May 10. Atlanta to Augusta.      
Mail. Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Mail.
p.m. a.m.     Leave. Arrive.     p.m. a.m.
6 00 7 00     . . . . .Augusta. . . . . 171 8 00 5 47 5 30
6 37 7 37 50 10 . . . . .Belair. . . . . 161 8 00 5 15 4 58
7 35 8 35 1 00 20 . . . . .Berzelia. . . . . 151 7 50 4 31 4 15
7 53 8 53 1 25 26 . . . . .Saw Dust. . . . . 145 7 25 4 11 3 55
8 09 9 08 1 50 29 . . . . .Dearing. . . . . 142 7 00 3 59 3 42
8 39 9 39 1 75 37 . . . . .Thomson. . . . . 134 6 50 3 28 3 07
9 13 10 16 2 25 47 . . . . .Camak. . . . . 124 6 25 2 39 2 33
        (Warrenton Branch.)     A. M.  
9 10       . . . . .Camak. . . . . 4 25 9 25  
9 35   2 50 4 . . . . .Warrenton. . . . .     9 00  
9 56 11 03 3 00 58 . . . . .Barnett. . . . . 113 5 75 1 56 1 49
        Washington Branch.        
9 10       . . . . .Barnett. . . . . 16 1 00 3 30  
10 45   3 75 16 . . . . .Washington. . . . .     2 00  
10 16 11 24 3 25 65 . . . . .Crawfordsville. . . . . 106 5 25 1 36 1 29
10 57 12 07 3 75 76 . . . . .Union Point. . . . . 95 4 75 12 59 12 51
        (Athens Branch.)        
  1 10     . . . . .Union Point. . . . . 40 2 25 11 40  
  1 32 4 00 5 . . . . .Woodville. . . . . 35 2 00 11 24  
  2 05 4 50 13 . . . . .Maxey's. . . . . 27 1 75 10 50  
  2 24 4 50 17 . . . . .Antioch. . . . . 23 1 25 10 30  
  3 10 5 00 23 . . . . .Lexington. . . . . 17 1 00 9 50  
  3 58   30 . . . . .Winters. . . . .     8 57  
  4 25 5 75 40 . . . . .Athens. . . . .     8 25  
11 26 12 33 4 00 83 . . . . .Greensboro. . . . . 88 4 00 12 31 12 23
12 17 1 17 4 75 96 . . . . .Buckhead. . . . . 75 3 75 11 45 11 33
12 46 1 43 5 00 104 . . . . .Madison. . . . . 67 3 25 11 13 11 02
1 19 2 13 5 50 112 . . . . .Rutledge. . . . . 59 3 00 10 41 10 29
1 48 2 56 6 00 119 . . . . .Social Circle. . . . . 52 2 50 10 17 10 05
2 28 3 35 6 50 130 . . . . .Covington. . . . . 41 2 00 9 33 9 23
3 06 4 12 7 00 140 . . . . .Conyers. . . . . 31 1 50 8 57 8 47
3 31 4 36 7 25 147 . . . . .Lithonia. . . . . 24 1 25 8 30 8 20
4 02 5 06 7 75 155 . . . . .Stone Mountain. . . . . 16 75 8 00 7 49
4 37 5 38 8 00 164 . . . . .Decatur. . . . . 7 25 7 24 6 55
5 00 6 00 8 00 171 . . . . .Atlanta. . . . .     7 00 6 30
a.m. p.m.     Arrive. Leave.     p.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Augusta with South Carolina road [p10], and Augusta & Savannah road [p58]; and at Atlanta with Western & Atlantic road [p41], Atlanta & West Point road [p42], and Macon & Western road [p7].


Page 9

         WARRENTON, a pleasant and flourishing post-village, capital of Warren county, Georgia, on Goulden's creek, 4 miles South of the Georgia road, with which it is connected by a branch. Population about 1,000.

         WASHINGTON, a handsome town, capital of Wilkes county, Georgia, is situated on the dividing ridge between the Broad and Little Rivers, 16 miles North of the Georgia road, with which it connects by a branch. Population about 1,600.

         CRAWFORDSVILLE, capital of Taliferro county, Georgia, 65 miles west of Augusta. Population about 800.

         UNION POINT, Green county, Georgia, at the junction of the Athens Branch with the Georgia road, and 76 miles from Augusta. It has become quite celebrated recently through the exertions of its ladies ministering to the wants of sick and wounded soldiers. They have established a Way-Side Home, and invite all that need such assistance, without money and without price.

         LEXINGTON, a thriving town, capital of Oglethorpe county, Georgia, is situated in a healthy and fertile region. The main part of the town is three miles from the Athens branch of the Georgia road. --Population about 1,400.

         ATHENS, a flourishing town in Clarke county, Georgia, situated on the Oconee river, at the terminus of the Athens branch of the Georgia rail-road, 92 miles W. N. W. from Augusta. The situation is healthy and the climate delightful. Among the public buildings are five churches, a town-hall, bank, and several Hotels. The Franklin College is one of the best institutions in the State. Population about 4,000.

         GREENSBOROUGH, capital of Green county, Georgia, 83 miles west of Augusta, is a very pleasant town. Population about 800.

         MADISON, capital of Morgan county, Georgia, is a fine town 104 miles from Augusta, surrounded by a beautiful and fertile country.-- Madison has long been distinguished for excellent schools. About 300 pupils receive instruction here. Population about 1,600.

         SOCIAL CIRCLE, a post-town of Walton county Georgia, pleasantly situated, and was christened by the original settlers-- English.

         COVINGTON, capital of Newton county Georgia, 130 miles west of Augusta, contains, besides the county buildings, an academy, several stores, and about 400 inhabitants.

         STONE MOUNTAIN, a post-town of DeKalb county, Georgia. At this place is an isolated, dome-shaped granite rock, which is visited annually by several thousand persons, and is considered one of the most magnificent natural objects in the State. The height is about 2200 feet above the sea. A tower 180 feet high, was erected on the summit, commanding a prospect of great extent and picturesque beauty, but which fell several years since.

         DECATUR, capital of DeKalb county, Georgia. The situation is one of the most healthful, and agreeable. Population, 800.


Page 10

SOUTH CAROLINA ROAD.

W. J. MAGRATH, Esq., President,
H. T. PEAKE, General Superintendent,
Charleston, S. C.

        
Charleston to Augusta.         January 15. Augusta to Charleston.        
Pass Mail Pass   Fare Mls STATIONS. Mls.   Fare Pass Mail Pass
a.m. p.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. a.m. p.m.
7 00 6 30 8 15     . . . . . Charleston . . . . . 137 5 50 3 30 5 15 4 00
7 18 6 50 8 35 20 5 . . . . . 5 Mile Turn Out. . . . . 132 5 30 3 08 4 55 3 43
7 25 7 00 8 45 30 7 . . . . .7 Mile Pump. . . . . 130 5 20 3 00 4 47 3 35
7 38 7 11 8 58 40 10 . . . . . 10 Ml. Turn Out. . . . . 127 5 10 2 50 4 35 3 25
7 48 7 24 9 10 50 13 . . . . .Sineath's. . . . . 124 5 00 2 38 4 23 3 15
8 05 7 40 9 28 70 17 . . . . .Ladson's. . . . . 120 4 80 2 21 4 08 3 00
8 23 8 00 9 48 90 22 . . . . .Summerville. . . . . 115 4 60 2 00 3 48 2 42
8 37 8 15 10 05 1 05 26 26 M'l Turn Out 111 4 45 1 45 3 33 2 28
8 55 8 36 10 26 1 25 31 . . . . .Ridgeville. . . . . 106 4 25 1 25 3 13 2 10
9 03 8 48 10 35 1 35 33 . . . . .Inabinet's. . . . . 104 4 15   3 05 2 03
9 18 9 00 10 52 1 40 37 . . . . .Ross. . . . . 100 4 00 1 03 2 50 1 48
9 32 9 16 11 10 1 65 41 . . . . . 41 Ml. Turn Out. . . . . 96 3 85 12 47 2 34 1 35
9 43 9 29 11 22 1 75 44 . . . . . Bird's Turn Out. . . . . 93 3 70 12 35 2 22 1 23
9 58 9 45 11 40 1 90 48 . . . . .George's. . . . . 89 3 55 12 20 2 05 1 10
10 12 10 00 11 57 2 10 52 . . . . .Reeves's. . . . . 85 3 40 12 05 1 05 12 55
10 35 10 25 12 22 2 30 58 . . . . . 58 Ml. Turn Out. . . . . 79 3 15 11 28 1 25 12 35
10 50 10 40 12 40 2 50 62 . . . . .Branchville. . . . . 75 3 00 11 10 1 10 12 20
          Colum. Branch.          
12 20   1 10     . . . . . Branchville. . . . . 68 3 00     10 50
12 35   1 25 2 65 66 . . . . . 66 Ml. Turn Out. . . . . 64 2 55 10 24   10 33
12 52   1 48 2 85 71 . . . . . Rowe's Pump. . . . . 59 2 35 10 03   10 15
1 08   2 05 3 00 75 . . . . . 75 Ml. Turn Out. . . . . 55 2 20 9 45   9 58
1 22   2 20 3 15 79 . . . . .Orangeburg. . . . . 51 2 05 9 30   9 42
1 38   2 38 3 30 83 . . . . .Stilton's. . . . . 47 1 90 9 12   9 28
1 48   2 50 3 45 86 . . . . .Jamison's. . . . . 44 1 75 9 00   9 15
2 10   3 15 3 70 92 . . . . .Lewisville. . . . . 38 1 50 8 35   8 52
2 22   3 28 3 80 95 . . . . . 95 Ml. Turn Out. . . . . 35 1 40 8 22   8 40
2 36   3 45 3 95 99 . . . . .Fort Motte. . . . . 31 1 25 8 05   8 25
3 20   4 30 4 20 105 . . . . .Kingsville. . . . . 25 1 00 7 40   8 00
          Camden Branch          
3 20         . . . . .Kingsville. . . . . 37 1 50     7 40
3 35     4 35 109 . . . . .Clarkson's. . . . . 33 1 30     7 25
3 55     4 55 114 . . . . .Manchester Jun. . . . . 28 1 25     7 05
4 02     4 65 116 . . . . .Middleton. . . . . 26 1 05     6 58
4 28     4 90 123 . . . . .Claremont. . . . . 19 75     6 30
5 05     5 30 133 . . . . .Boykin's. . . . . 9 35     5 53
5 40     5 70 142 . . . . .Camden. . . . .         5 20
          Colum. Br. Con.          
3 40   4 48 4 40 110 . . . . .Gadsden. . . . . 20 80 6 58   7 12
4 10   5 20 4 70 118 . . . . .Hopkins. . . . . 12 50 6 22   6 45
4 35   5 42 4 95 124 . . . . .Hampton's. . . . . 6 25 5 56   6 22
4 55   6 10 5 10 128 Charlotte Junc. 1 5 5 36   6 05
5 00   6 15 5 20 130 . . . . .Columbia. . . . .     5 30   6 00


Page 11

Pass Mail Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Mail Pass
a.m. p.m.       Leave Arrive       a.m. a.m.
11 20 11 10       . . . . . Branchville. . . . . 75 3 00   12 40 12 00
11 45 11 32   2 70 67 . . . . . Edisto Turn O. . . . . . 70 2 80   12 20 11 42
12 02 12 00   2 90 72 . . . . .Midway. . . . . 65 2 60   12 00 11 22
12 15 12 20   3 05 76 . . . . .Lowry's. . . . . 61 2 45   11 42 11 08
12 32 12 43   3 25 81 . . . . .Graham's. . . . . 56 2 25   11 20 10 48
12 50 1 05   3 45 86 . . . . . Lee's Turn Out. . . . . 51 2 05   11 00 10 30
1 03 1 25   3 60 90 . . . . .Blackville. . . . . 47 1 90   10 44 10 13
1 25 1 53   3 85 96 . . . . . 96 Mile Turn O. . . . . . 41 1 65   10 19 9 50
1 35 2 06   3 95 99 . . . . .Williston. . . . . 38 1 50   10 05 9 40
1 50 2 25   4 10 103 . . . . .White Pond. . . . . 34 1 35   9 50 9 22
2 05 2 45   4 30 107 . . . . .Windsor. . . . . 30 1 20   9 32 9 08
2 15 3 00   4 40 110 . . . . .110 Mile T. O. . . . . 27 1 10   9 20 8 55
2 30 3 23   4 60 115 . . . . .Johnston's. . . . . 22 90   8 59 8 38
2 50 3 46   4 80 120 . . . . .Aiken. . . . . 17 70   8 36 8 18
3 10 4 13   5 05 126 . . . . .Graniteville. . . . . 11 45   8 13 7 55
3 18 4 22   5 10 128 . . . . .Marsh's. . . . . 9 35   8 05 7 46
3 23 4 31   5 20 130 . . . . .Bath. . . . . 7 25   7 55 7 38
3 45 5 00   5 50 137 . . . . .Augusta. . . . .       7 30 7 15
p.m. a.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m. a.m.

         EXTRA TRAINS.--Passenger train leaves Charleston for Summerville, 22 miles, daily, at 2:25 p. m., arriving at Summerville at 3:40 p. m. Returning, leaves Summerville at 7:15 a. m., and arrives in Charleston at 8:30 a. m. Passenger trains will run between Kingsville and Columbia on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Leave Kinsgville 8:05 a. m., and arrive at Columbia at 9:50 a. m. Leave Columbia at 12:10 p. m., and arrive at Kingsville at 1:40 p. m.

         Also, an extra train will be run on the Camden Branch, on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, as follows--Leave Camden at 11:40 p. m., and arrive at Kingsville 1:50 a. m. Leave Kingsville 8:05 a. m., and arrive at Camden 10:20 a. m..

         CONNECTIONS.--At Charleston, with Charleston & Savannah rail-road [p60], and North Eastern rail-road [p61]. At Branchville with Columbus branch of South Carolina road. At Augusta with Georgia rail-road [p8], and Augusta & Savannah rail-road [p58]. At Kingsville, on the main branch, with Camden Branch. At Columbia with Greenville & Columbia rail-road [p12] and Charlotte & South Carolina rail-road [p14]. Camden Branch connects at Manchester Junction with Wilmington & Manchester rail-road [p20].

         AUGUSTA, on the Savannah river, 230 miles from its mouth, and the head of navigation, is the second city in the State. It contains several large factories, and is a great centre for trade. The situation of the city is the most beautiful of any in the Confederacy. Population, 18,000.

         BRANCHVILLE, a small post-town at the junction of the Columbia branch with the main line of the South Carolina road, in Orangeburg district, South Carolina, 68 miles south of Columbia.


Page 12

GREENVILLE & COLUMBIA ROAD.

T. C. PERRIN, Prest., Abbeville, S. C.
E. F. RAWORTH, Gen'l Supt., Columbia, S. C.

        
Columbia to Greenville.         may-- Greenville to Columbia.        
Pass Fr't. Fr't. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Fr't. Fr't. Pass
a.m. a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m. p.m.
7 30 6 30 8 00     . . . . .Columbia. . . . . 143 8 00 4 40 5 30 4 15
7 57     50 6 . . . . .Frost's Mill. . . . . 136 8 25     3 48
8 34     1 00 15 . . . . .Littleton. . . . . 128 7 75     3 13
9 24     1 50 25 . . . . .Alston. . . . . 118 7 00     2 32
9 38     1 75 28 . . . . .Hope's. . . . . 114 6 75     2 08
9 53     2 00 31 . . . . .Pomaria. . . . . 111 6 75     1 54
10 27     2 50 40 . . . . .Prosperity. . . . . 103 6 25     1 16
10 45       44 . . . . . Maffett's T.O. . . . . . 99       12 57
11 08     3 00 47 . . . . .Newberry. . . . . 96 5 75     12 45
11 17     3 00 48 . . . . .Helena. . . . . 95 5 75     12 35
11 31       51 . . . . . Burtons Tank . . . . . 92       12 03
11 49     3 25 54 . . . . . Silver Street . . . . . 88 5 25     11 49
12 18     3 75 61 . . . . .Boazman's. . . . . 82 5 00     11 17
12 35     4 00 65 . . . . .Chappell's. . . . . 78 4 75     11 03
12 57       70 . . . . .Brick House. . . . . 72       10 38
1 16     4 50 75 . . . . .Ninety-Six. . . . . 68 4 00     10 18
1 33       79 . . . . .79 Mile T.O. . . . . 64       10 03
1 45     5 00 82 . . . . .New Market. . . . . 61 3 75     9 48
2 18     5 00 85 . . . . .Greenwood. . . . . 58 3 50     9 35
2 33       89 . . . . .89 Mile T.O. . . . . 54       9 17
3 00     5 75 94 . . . . .Cokesbury. . . . . 49 3 00     8 53
          Abbeville Br.          
3 00         . . . . .Cokesbury. . . . . 11       8 45
4 00     6 00 11 . . . . .Abbeville. . . . .   3 75     7 45
3 23     6 00 99 . . . . .Barmore's. . . . . 43 2 75     8 24
3 35     6 25 102 . . . . .Donnald's. . . . . 40 2 50     8 11
4 05     6 50 109 . . . . .Honea-Path. . . . . 34 2 00     7 45
4 29       114 . . . . .114 Mile T.O. . . . . 29       7 16
4 54     7 00 117 . . . . .Belton. . . . . 26 1 50     6 58
          Anderson Br.          
4 54         . . . . .Belton. . . . . 9       6 33
5 40     7 00 9 . . . . .Anderson. . . . .   2 25     5 40
5 19     7 50 124 . . . . .Williamston. . . . . 18 1 25     6 04
6 00     8 00 135 . . . . .Golden Grove. . . . . 8 8 50     5 16
6 30 4 00 5 08 8 00 143 . . . . .Greenville. . . . .     6 30 7 15 4 45
p.m. p.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Columbia with branch of South Carolina rail-road [p10] and with Charlotte & South Carolina rail-road [p14]. At Alston with Spartanburg & Union rail-road [p13]. At Newberry with Laurens rail-road [p32] for Laurensville. At Cokesbury and Belton with branches, and at Greenville with stages northward.


Page 13

SPARTANBURG & UNION ROAD.

THOS. B. JETER, President and Superintendent, Unionville, S. C.

        
Spartanburg to Alston.       April 15. Alston to Spartanburg.      
Pass Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Pass
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
4 15 *9 10     . . . . .Spartanburg. . . . . 68 4 00 7 20 2 10
4 30 9 26   4 . . . . .Cedar Springs. . . . . 64   7 05 1 57
4 40 9 35   6 . . . . .Rich Hill. . . . . 62   6 54 1 46
4 46 9 41   8 . . . . .Batesville. . . . . 60   6 49 1 41
4 55 9 50   10 . . . . .Pacolet. . . . . 58   6 41 1 33
        . . . . .Gist's. . . . .        
5 27 10 28   19 . . . . .Jonesville. . . . . 49   6 04 1 00
        . . . . .Pinkney. . . . .        
6 25 11 15   28 . . . . .Unionville. . . . . 40   5 25 12 25
        . . . . .Stark Gregory. . . . .        
7 00 11 50   37 . . . . . Sautuc . . . . . 31   4 47 11 45
        . . . . . Kelley's . . . . .        
7 30 12 20   45 . . . . .Simsville. . . . . 23   4 15 11 20
7 46 12 36   48 . . . . .Shelton. . . . . 20   4 00 11 02
8 03 12 55   52 . . . . .Lyle's Ford. . . . . 16   3 42 10 46
8 20 1 13   56 . . . . .Strother's. . . . . 12   3 24 10 29
        . . . . .Hughey's. . . . .        
9 08 2 00 4 00 68 . . . . .Alston. . . . .     *2 35 9 40
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         *This train is run only on Tuesdays and Fridays. By this Schedule, detention at Alston is avoided, by going up on Mondays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, and by going down on Tuesdays and Fridays; and on these two days, persons coming down on the Greenville train can go up this road the same day.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Spartanburg with stages for Rutherfordton, Hendersonville and Ashville. At Alston with Greenville & Columbia rail-road [p12].

         ABBEVILLE, capital of Abbeville district, South Carolina, situated on an affluent of Little river, 97 miles west by north of Columbia. It is connected by a branch, with the Greenville & Columbia road. --Population about 600.

         ANDERSON, capital of Anderson district, South Carolina; a branch of the Greenville & Columbia road extends to this point. It contains several churches and stores. Population about 400.

         GREENVILLE, a fine town, capital of Greenville district, South Carolina, on Reedy river, near its source, 143 miles north-west of Columbia. Population about 1,400.

         SPARTANBURG, capital of Spartanburg district, South Carolina. The town contains some fine buildings, among which are those for College purposes, provided for by the bequest of Benjamin Wofford.

         ALSTON, at the junction of the Spartanburg & Union rail-road with the Greenville & Columbia rail-road, is in Fairfield district, S. C.


Page 14

CHARLOTTE & SOUTH CAROLINA ROAD.

WM. JOHNSTON, President, Charlotte, N. C.
THOS. R. SHARP, Gen'l Supt., Columbia, S. C.

        
Columbia to Statesville.       may 13. Statesville to Columbia.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Mail. Acc.
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
7 30 6 00     . . . . .Columbia. . . . . 152 9 00 5 00 5 10
8 10 5 57 50 10 . . . . .Killian's Mill. . . . . 141 8 50 4 20 4 13
8 39 7 32 1 25 15 . . . . .Doko. . . . . 136 8 00 3 54 3 41
9 18 8 19 1 50 25 . . . . .Ridgeway. . . . . 126 7 75 3 13 2 52
9 40 8 45 1 75 30 . . . . .Simpsons's. . . . . 121 7 50 2 50 2 25
10 15 9 20 2 25 36 . . . . .Winnsboro'. . . . . 115 7 25 2 18 1 53
10 33 9 41 2 50 41 . . . . .Adger's S. . . . . 110 7 00 1 57 1 29
10 45 9 55 2 60 44 . . . . .White Oak T.O. . . . . 107 6 75 1 45 1 15
11 01 10 14 2 75 48 . . . . . Young's T. O. . . . . . 103 6 50 1 29 12 56
11 26 10 41 3 00 52 . . . . . Blackstock . . . . . 100 6 25 1 14 12 39
11 41 10 58 3 25 55 . . . . .Cornwell's T.O. . . . . 96 6 00 12 49 12 12
12 36 11 54 3 50 63 . . . . .Chester. . . . . 88 5 50 12 19 11 36
1 06 12 32 4 00 70 . . . . .Lewis' T.O. . . . . 81 5 25 11 26 10 36
1 24 12 52 4 25 73 . . . . .Smith's S. . . . . 78 5 00 11 11 10 18
2 04 1 42 4 75 83 . . . . .Rock Hill. . . . . 68 4 50 10 30 9 27
2 32 2 20 5 50 90 . . . . .Fort Mill. . . . . 61 4 00 9 59 8 46
2 50 2 50 5 75 96 . . . . .Morrow's T.O. . . . . 55 3 75 9 40 8 15
3 50 3 50 6 00 106 . . . . .Charlotte. . . . . 45 3 00 9 00 7 15
4 53 a.m.   118 . . . . .Alexandrianna. . . . . 33   7 27 p.m.
5 44     129 . . . . .Davidson College. . . . . 22   6 41  
5 57     132 . . . . .Centre. . . . . 19   6 23  
6 10     135 . . . . .Moore's. . . . . 16   6 10  
6 27     139 . . . . .Shepherd's. . . . . 12   5 53  
6 55     145 . . . . .Troutman's. . . . . 6   5 25  
7 30   9 00 152 . . . . .Statesville. . . . .     5 00  
p.m.       Arrive Leave     a.m.  

         CONNECTIONS.--At Columbia with Greenville & Columbia [p12], and branch South Carolina rail-road [p10]. At Chester with King's Mountain road [p16]. At Charlotte with North Carolina [p15], and Wilmington, Charlotte & Rutherford Rail-Roads [p18].

         COLUMBIA, capital of South Carolina, and seat of justice of Richland District on the left or east bank of the Congaree river, immediately below the confluence of the Saluda and Broad. It is pleasantly situated, and plain and regularly laid out, with streets about 60 feet wide, bordered with ornamental trees. Its public buildings are of the first class, consisting of South Carolina College, Court-House, Market-House, Insane Asylum, several fine Churches, Academies, a theological Seminary and the State-House, which, when finished will be one of the most magnificent on this continent. The work is suspended on account of the war. Population 10,000.


Page 15

NORTH CAROLINA ROAD.

THOS. WEBB, President, Hillsboro', N. C.
T. J. SUMNER, Eng'r and Sup't, Company Shops, N. C.

        
Charlotte to Goldsboro.       March 17. Goldsboro to Charlotte.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m.
5 40 6 20     . . . . .Charlotte. . . . . 223 11 25 6 15 5 15
6 15 7 00   9 . . . . .Query. . . . .     5 35 4 35
6 45 7 30 75 13 . . . . .Harrisburg. . . . . 210 10 50 5 15 4 15
7 35 8 10 1 00 21 . . . . .Concord. . . . . 202 10 00 4 30 3 35
        . . . . .Coleman's. . . . .        
8 50 9 15 1 75 34 . . . . .China Grove. . . . . 189 9 50 3 25 2 30
9 40 10 10 2 25 43 . . . . .Salisbury. . . . . 180 9 00 2 35 1 40
10 20 10 55 2 50 51 . . . . .Holtsburg. . . . . 172 8 50 1 45 12 50
11 05 12 05 3 00 60 . . . . .Lexington. . . . . 163 8 25 12 55 11 55
12 00 12 55 3 50 71 . . . . .Thomasville. . . . . 152 7 50 11 55 10 55
12 40 1 50 4 00 78 . . . . .High Point. . . . . 145 7 25 11 15 10 15
1 05 2 15 4 25 83 . . . . .Jamestown. . . . . 140 7 00 10 53 9 47
2 05 3 15 4 75 93 . . . . .Greensboro. . . . . 130 6 50 10 00 8 55
2 45 3 55 5 00 101 . . . . .McLean's. . . . . 122 6 25 9 08 8 05
3 25 4 35 5 50 108 . . . . .Gibonsville. . . . . 115 5 75 8 30 7 30
4 15 5 25 5 75 115 . . . . .Company's Shops. . . . . 108 5 50 7 50 6 50
4 27 5 37 5 75 117 . . . . .Graham. . . . . 106 5 25 7 05 6 05
4 40 5 50 6 00 119 . . . . .Haw River. . . . . 104 5 25 6 52 5 52
5 15 6 25 6 25 125 . . . . .Mebane's. . . . . 98 5 00 6 20 5 20
6 00 7 20 6 75 135 . . . . .Hillsboro. . . . . 88 4 50 5 10 4 30
7 30 8 35 7 00 149 . . . . .Durham's. . . . . 74 4 25 3 50 3 20
  9 00 7 50   . . . . .Brassfield's. . . . .   3 75 3 15 2 50
8 35 9 50 8 00 162 . . . . .Morrisville. . . . . 62 3 00 2 35 2 10
    8 25   . . . . .Camp Mangum. . . . .   2 75    
10 30 12 05 8 75 175 . . . . .Raleigh. . . . . 49 2 50 1 20 1 00
11 40 1 15 9 50 189 . . . . .Stallings'. . . . . 34 1 75 1 30 11 05
12 45 2 20 10 00 201 . . . . .Smithfield. . . . . 22 1 00 1 20 10 00
1 40 3 15 10 50 211 . . . . .Boon Hill. . . . . 12 50 9 25 9 05
2 40 4 15 11 25 223 . . . . .Goldsboro. . . . .     8 20 8 00
p.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--The North Carolina rail-road connects at Charlotte with the Charlotte & South Carolina rail-road [p14], and the Wilmington, Charlotte & Rutherford road [p18]; at Salisbury with Western North Carolina rail-road [p19] to Morganton; at Greensboro with branch to Danville; at Raleigh with Raleigh & Gaston rail-road [p22]; at Goldsboro with Wilmington & Weldon road [p17], and Atlantic & North Carolina rail-road [p21].

         CHARLOTTE, N.C., is a flourishing town, and is destined to be a great rail-road centre. Population, 3,000.

         RALEIGH, N. C., capital of the State, is situated a few miles West of Neuse river. It contains several public buildings and charitable institutions, and is an important rail-road centre. Population, 5,000.


Page 16

KING'S MOUNTAIN ROAD.

W. C. BEATTY, President,
EDWARD THOMAS, Superintendent,
Yorkville, S. C.

        
Chester to Yorkville.       January-- Yorkville to Chester.      
Pass Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Pass
p.m.       Leave Arrive       a.m.
1 30       . . . . .Chester. . . . . 22 1 00   9 30
    15 3 . . . . .Poor House. . . . . 19 85    
    25 7 . . . . .Smith's. . . . . 15 75    
    35 8 . . . . .Lowreysville. . . . . 14 65    
    40 9 . . . . .Sandy River Road. . . . . 13 60    
    50 10 . . . . .District Line. . . . . 12 50    
    60 12 . . . . .McConnell's. . . . . 10 40    
    70 15 . . . . .Guthriesville. . . . . 7 30    
    80 18 . . . . .Philadelphia. . . . . 4 20    
3 00   1 00 22 . . . . .Yorkville. . . . .       8 00
p.m.       Arrive Leave       a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Chester with Charlotte & South Carolina road [p14]. At Yorkville with Stages (p14).

CHERAW AND DARLINGTON ROAD.

ALLAN MCFARLAN, President,
----, Superintendent,
Cheraw, S. C.

        
Florence to Cheraw.       January-- Cheraw to Florence.      
Pass Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS Mls. Fare Acc. Pass
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
7 15 7 05     . . . . .Florence. . . . . 40 2 00 6 15 11 30
7 45 8 15 50 10 . . . . .Darlington. . . . . 30 1 50 5 35 11 00
8 25 9 10 90 18 . . . . .Dove's. . . . . 22 1 10 5 00 10 35
8 55 10 13 1 30 26 . . . . .Society Hill. . . . . 14 70 4 30 10 13
9 24 10 45 1 65 30 . . . . .Cash's. . . . . 10 35 3 55 9 48
9 45 11 15 2 00 40 . . . . .Cheraw. . . . .     3 30 9 30
p.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Florence with Wilmington & Manchester [p20] and North-Eastern Rail-Roads [p61].

         CHESTER, capital of Chester district, South Carolina, at the junction of the King's Mountain, with the Charlotte & South Carolina rail-road.

         YORKVILLE, capital of York district, South Carolina, the northern terminus of the King's Mountain rail-road.

         FLORENCE, in Darlington district, South Carolina, is situated on the Wilmington & Manchester rail-road, and at the point of junction of the North-Eastern and Cheraw & Darlington rail-road, and is destined to be a place of importance.


Page 17

WILMINGTON & WELDON ROAD.

S. D. WALLACE, President,
S. F. FREMONT, Eng'r and Sup't,
J. W. THOMPSON, Treasurer,
L. H. de ROSSET, Secretary
W. M. POISON, Ticket Agent,
W. J. TOPP, Freight Agent.
Wilmington, N. C.

        
Wilmington to Weldon.       march 20. Weldon to Wilmington.      
Mail. Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Mail.
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
7 00 7 00     . . . . .Wilmington. . . . . 162 9 00 4 30 5 00
7 36 7 38 50 9 . . . . .North East. . . . . 153 8 50 3 55 4 24
7 44 7 47 50 11 . . . . .Marlboro'. . . . . 151 8 50 3 46 4 14
7 55 8 00 75 14 . . . . .Rocky Point. . . . . 148 8 25 3 33 4 00
8 29 8 36 1 25 22 . . . . .Burgaw. . . . . 140 7 75 3 00 3 34
8 56 9 07 1 50 29 . . . . .South Washington. . . . . 133 7 50 2 28 3 00
9 12 9 24 1 75 33 . . . . .Leesburg. . . . . 129 7 25 2 11 2 42
9 50 10 04 2 00 38 . . . . .Teachey. . . . . 124 7 00 1 50 2 20
10 36 10 55 2 25 48 . . . . .Magnolia. . . . . 114 6 75 12 49 1 30
11 07 11 32 2 75 55 . . . . .Warsaw. . . . . 107 6 25 12 20 12 57
11 45 12 14 3 50 63 . . . . .Faisons . . . . . 99 5 50 11 43 12 16
12 16 12 45 3 75 70 . . . . .Mount Olive. . . . . 92 5 25 11 13 11 44
12 40 1 09 4 00 75 . . . . .Dudley. . . . . 87 5 00 10 50 11 20
12 54 1 21 4 25 78 . . . . .Everettsville. . . . . 84 4 75 10 34 10 03
1 28 2 00 4 50 84 . . . . .Goldsboro'. . . . . 78 4 50 10 10 10 35
2 02 2 36 5 00 92 . . . . .Pikesville. . . . . 70 4 00 9 30 9 48
2 10 2 52 5 25 95 . . . . .Nahunta. . . . . 67 3 75 9 18 9 34
2 48 3 23 5 75 102 . . . . .Black Creek. . . . . 60 3 25 8 46 9 02
3 37 3 50 6 00 108 . . . . .Wilson*. . . . . 54 3 00 8 20 8 37
4 14 4 27 6 50 116 . . . . .Joyner, P.M. . . . . . 46 2 50 7 28 7 40
4 53 5 06 7 00 125 . . . . .Rocky Mount. . . . . 37 2 00 6 50 7 00
a.m. p.m.     (Tarboro Branch.)     p.m. a.m.
7 50 7 00     . . . . .Rocky Mount. . . . .     4 00 6 25
8 15 7 15     . . . . .Tarboro'. . . . .     2 30 5 15
5 27 5 41 7 50 143 . . . . .Battleboro'. . . . . 29 1 50 6 17 6 22
5 50 6 05     . . . . .Whitaker's. . . . .     6 00 5 55
6 16 6 36 8 00 154 . . . . .Enfield. . . . . 19 1 00 5 25 5 26
7 03 7 26 8 50 162 . . . . .Halifax. . . . . 8 50 4 36 4 36
7 35 8 00 9 00 706 . . . . .Weldon. . . . .     4 00 4 00
p.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--Connects at Wilmington with Wilmington & Manchester rail-road [p20], for points South and West; at Goldsboro with North Carolina rail-road [p15] and Atlantic & North Carolina rail-road [p21]; at Rocky Mount with branch to Tarboro, and at Weldon with Seaboard & Roanoke rial-road [p23], Petersburg rail-road [p26], and Raleigh & Gaston rail-road [p22].


         * Good Breakfast and Supper House. Train stops twenty minutes.



Page 18

WILMINGTON, CHARLOTTE & RUTHERFORD ROAD.

(EASTERN DIVISION.)

HAYWOOD W. GUION, President,
NATHAN S. CARPENTER, General Superintendent,
ROGER P. ATKINSON, Chief Eng. and M'r Trans.,
Wilmington, N. C.

        
Wilmington to Old Hundred.       May 20 Old Hundred to Wilmington      
  Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass  
  a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m.  
  9 00     . . . . .Wilmington. . . . . 105 5 50 4 00  
    10 00 25 5 . . . . .River Side. . . . . 100 5 25 2 58  
  10 40 75 15 . . . . .North-West. . . . . 90 4 75 2 20  
  11 28 1 30 26 . . . . .Marlville. . . . . 79 4 20 1 32  
  12 17 1 90 38 . . . . .Rosindale. . . . . 67 3 60 12 45  
  12 52 2 30 46 . . . . . Brown Marsh . . . . . 59 3 20 12 10  
  1 27 2 70 54 . . . . .Bladenboro. . . . . 51 2 80 11 35  
  2 28 3 40 68 . . . . .Lumberton. . . . . 37 2 10 10 36  
  3 05 3 80 76 . . . . .Moss Neck. . . . . 29 1 70 9 57  
  3 39 4 20 84 . . . . .Red Banks. . . . . 21 1 30 9 22  
  3 55 4 45 89 . . . . .Shoe Heel. . . . . 16 95 9 06  
  4 36 4 75 95 . . . . .Laurinburg. . . . . 10 75 8 37  
  5 28 5 05 101 . . . . .Laurel Hill. . . . . 4 45 7 30  
  1 03 5 50 105 . . . . .Old Hundred. . . . .     1 03  
  p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m.  

(WESTERN DIVISION.)

V. A. MCBEE, Acting Master of Transportation, Charlotte, N. C.

        
Charlotte to Cherryville.       May-- Cherryville to Charlotte.      
  Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass  
  a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m.  
  8 00     . . . . .Charlotte. . . . . 40   3 15  
  8 50     . . . . .Tuskaseege. . . . .     2 28  
  9 28     . . . . .Brevard. . . . .     1 53  
  9 59     . . . . .Sharon. . . . .     1 24  
  10 30     . . . . .Lincolnton. . . . .     12 55  
  11 15   40 . . . . .Cherryville. . . . .     12 00  
  a.m.     Arrive Leave     m.  

         CONNECTIONS.--This Road is divided into two divisions-- the Eastern and Western. The form ore extends from Wilmington to Charlotte, a distance of one hundred and eighty-eight miles-- one hundred and five of which are in operation. The Eastern terminus of the rail is five miles above Wilmington, and passengers are transported in a steamer to Wilmington, down the North-West branch of the Cape Fear River, where connection is made with Wilmington & Weldon [p17] and Wilmington & Manchester rail-roads [p20]. There is still a distance of unfinished Road on the Eastern Division of eighty-three miles, and connects at present at Old Hundred with Stages for Cheraw and points


Page 19

West and North. The Western Division extends from Charlotte to Rutherfordton--distance eighty-one miles, forty of which the cars are running on, connecting at Charlotte with North Carolina [p15] and Charlotte & South Carolina rail-roads [p14]. At Rutherfordton with Stages for points West.

WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA ROAD.

A. M. POWELL, President,
J. C. TURNER, Chief Engineer and Superintendent,
Salisbury, N. C.

        
Salisbury to Morganton.       April-- Morganton to Salisbury.      
  Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass  
  p.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m.  
  2 00     . . . . .Salisbury. . . . . 81 5 25 1 17  
  2 29 50 6 . . . . .Water Tank. . . . . 75 4 75 12 53  
  3 02 75 13 . . . . .Third Creek. . . . . 68 4 50 12 20  
  3 25 1 00 18 . . . . .Waddell's T.O. . . . . . 63 4 25 11 55  
  4 00 1 25 25 . . . . .Statesville. . . . . 56 4 00 11 25  
  4 37 1 75 33 . . . . .Plott's T.O. . . . . . 48 3 50 10 48  
  5 02 2 00 38 . . . . .Catawba. . . . . 43 3 25 10 23  
  5 55 2 50 50 . . . . .Newton. . . . . 31 2 75 9 30  
  6 15 3 50 54 . . . . .White Sulphur. . . . . 27 1 75 9 10  
  6 50 3 75 60 . . . . .Hickory Tavern. . . . . 21 1 50 8 40  
  7 35 4 25 70 . . . . . Icard's . . . . . 11 1 00 7 55  
  7 55 5 00 75 . . . . .H.R. . . . . . 6 25 7 30  
    5 25 81 . . . . .Morganton. . . . .        
  p.m.     Arrive Leave        

         CONNECTIONS.--At Salisbury, with North Carolina rail-road [p15]. At Head of the Road, with stages to Morganton, and points North-East.

         SALISBURY, N. C., the county seat of Rowan county, is about ten miles west of the Yadkin river, and one hundred and thirty-two miles west of Raleigh. It is one of the most important places in western North Carolina, and is at the eastern terminus of the Western & North Carolina rail-road. The North Carolina rail-road passes through the town. Population in '60, 2,500.

         STATESVILLE, capital of Iredell county, North Carolina, and at the point of junction of the Atlantic, Tennessee & Ohio rail-road with Western North Carolina rail-road.

         NEWTON, capital of Catawba county, North Carolina, is situated in a fertile and beautiful country. It is the seat of one of the best Colleges in the State. Population 800.

         MORGANTON, capital of Burke county, North Carolina, and a pleasant and beautiful town, situated on the Catawba river 200 miles west of Raleigh. It contains a Court-House, jail, bank and several churches. Population about 700.


Page 20

WILMINGTON & MANCHESTER ROAD.

THOS. D. WALKER, President,
HENRY M. DRANE, Superintendent,
J. LING, Treasurer,
W. A. WALKER, Secretary.
J. C. SMITH, Ticket Agent,
J. MCLAUREN, Freight Agent,
Wilmington, N. C.

        
Wilmington to Kingsville.       March 10. Kingsville to Wilmington.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m.
5 20 6 15     . . . . .Wilmington. . . . . 171   6 00 6 00
6 05 7 07   9 . . . . .Register's. . . . . 162   5 16 5 12
6 38 7 41   17 . . . . .Brinkley's. . . . . 154   4 47 4 44
7 15 8 17   27 . . . . .Maxwell's. . . . . 144   4 03 4 01
8 00 9 01   34 . . . . .Flemington. . . . . 137   3 32 3 36
8 40 9 38   44 . . . . .Whiteville. . . . . 127   2 50 2 41
9 18 10 14   53 . . . . .Grist's. . . . . 118   210 2 05
9 31 10 28   57 . . . . .Cerro Gordo. . . . . 114   1 51 1 46
9 56 10 56   63 . . . . .Fair Bluff. . . . . 108   1 29 1 25
10 31 11 37   72 . . . . .Nichol's. . . . . 99   12 45 12 45
11 01 12 15   78 . . . . .Mullin's. . . . . 93   12 13 12 18
11 36 12 45   86 . . . . .Marion. . . . . 85   11 34 11 46
12 14 1 12   94 . . . . .Great Pee Dee. . . . . 77   10 46 11 14
1 05 1 50   101 . . . . .Mar's Bluff. . . . . 70   10 05 10 36
1 47 2 40   107 . . . . .Florence. . . . . 64   9 36 10 09
2 44 3 30   119 . . . . .Timmonsville. . . . . 52   8 31 9 10
3 26 4 09   128 . . . . .Lynchburg. . . . . 43   7 50 8 30
4 08 4 48   137 . . . . .Maysville. . . . . 34   7 09 7 51
4 53 5 27   146 . . . . .Sumpterville. . . . . 25   6 30 7 12
6 02 6 17   157 . . . . .Manchester. . . . . 14   5 25 6 08
6 26 6 36   162 . . . . .Wateree. . . . . 9   4 59 5 39
7 20 7 28   171 . . . . .Kingsville. . . . .     4 00 4 45
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Wilmington with the Wilmington & Weldon rail-road [p17], and with steamboats for Fayettville. At Florence with the Cheraw & Darlington rail-road [p16] and North-Eastern rail-road [p61]. At Wateree with the Camden branch of South Carolina rail-road [p10]. At Kingsville with Columbia branch of South Carolina rail-road [p10].

         WILMINGTON, N. C., on Cape Fear river, 34 miles from the sea, was in times past noted for its extensive trade in naval stores and lumber, but since the opening of the war it has been frequently threatened by the enemy, and has from that and other causes sunk almost into insignificance. Its approaches by water are strongly fortified, and the city is now more a barracks than a place of trade. It is the centre of several important rail-roads. Population, in 1860, 10,000.

         SUMTERVILLE, capital of Sumter district, South Carolina, one hundred and forty-six miles from Wilmington.


Page 21

ATLANTIC & NORTH CAROLINA ROAD.

JOHN D. WHITFORD, President,
W. H. HARVEY, Superintendent,
Goldsboro, N. C.

        
Morehead City to Goldsboro'.       May -- Goldsboro' to Morehead City.      
Pass Frt. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Frt. Pass
a.m.       Leave Arrive       p.m.
        . . . . .Morehead City. . . . . 95      
      3 . . . . .Carolina City. . . . . 92      
      11 . . . . .Shepardsville. . . . . 84      
      19 . . . . .Havelock. . . . . 76      
      25 . . . . .Croaton. . . . . 70      
      30 . . . . .Wood's Brick Yard. . . . . 65      
      36 . . . . .Newbern. . . . . 59      
      44 . . . . .Batchelor's Creek. . . . . 51      
      47 . . . . .Tuscarora. . . . . 48      
      53 . . . . .Core Creek. . . . . 42      
      59 . . . . .Dover. . . . . 36      
      65 . . . . .South West. . . . . 30      
6 00     69 . . . . .Kinston. . . . . 26 1 50   5 10
    50 76 . . . . .Falling Creek. . . . . 19 1 00    
    75 81 . . . . .Mosely Hall. . . . . 14 75    
    1 00 86 . . . . .Bests. . . . . 9 50    
8 00   1 50 95 . . . . .Goldsboro'. . . . .       3 10
a.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--The greater portion of this road is in the hands of the enemy. It connects at Goldsboro with the Wilmington & Weldon [p17] and North Carolina rail-roads [p15].

         NEWBERN, capital of Craven county, North Carolina, is situated at the confluence of the Neuse and Trent rivers, about 120 miles South-east of Raleigh. It was for many years the capital of the State; but now, alas, in the possession of our enemies. The Neuse river, which is more than a mile wide at this place, is navigated by steamboats about eight months of the year. The entrance from the sea is through Ocracoke Inlet.

         KINSTON, capital of Lenoir county, North Carolina, 80 miles South-east of Raleigh. It has been the scene of a battle in the present war; but its defenders maintained their ground. The Atlantic & North Carolina rail-road is now operated only as far as Kinston.

         FALLING CREEK, post-town of Wayne county, North Carolina.

         MOSELY HALL, post-town of Lenoir county, North Carolina.

         GOLDSBORO, N. C., two miles from Neuse river, which is navigable for light draft vessels to this point. At one time a force of the enemy ten thousand strong approached the town, both by land and water, and succeeded in getting near enough to the rail-road bridge, two miles below, with their gun-boats to burn it. A fierce battle ensued, and the enemy were routed.


Page 22

RALEIGH & GASTON ROAD.

W. J. HAWKINS, President, Ridgeway, N. C.
P. A. DUNN, Superintendent, Forestville, N. C.

        
Raleigh to Weldon.       March 14. Weldon to Raleigh.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. m.
10 00 11 30     . . . . .Raleigh. . . . . 100 5 00 12 25 12 00
10 25 12 25 25 5 . . . . .Mill Brook. . . . . 95 4 75 11 53 11 30
10 46 12 51 50 10 . . . . .Huntsville. . . . . 90 4 50 11 37 11 14
11 10 1 16 1 00 16 . . . . .Wake. . . . . 84 4 25 11 08 10 46
11 57 2 04 1 50 27 . . . . .Franklinton. . . . . 73 3 75 10 23 9 57
12 45 2 54 2 00 37 . . . . .Kittrell's. . . . . 63 3 25 9 40 9 12
1 22 3 36 2 25 44 . . . . .Henderson. . . . . 56 2 75 8 45 8 15
2 27 4 14 2 75 55 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 45 2 25 8 10 7 30
2 44 4 41 3 00 58 . . . . .Ridgeway. . . . . 42 2 25 7 58 7 15
3 06 5 05 3 25 62 . . . . .Warrenton. . . . . 38 2 00 7 35 6 50
3 30 5 31 3 50 66 . . . . .Macon. . . . . 34 1 75 7 14 6 27
3 52 5 55 3 75 70 . . . . .Brown's. . . . . 30 1 50 6 54 6 07
4 16 6 25 4 00 77 . . . . .Littleton. . . . . 23 1 25 6 29 5 40
4 40 6 56 4 25 82 . . . . .Summit. . . . . 18 90 6 05 5 15
4 52 7 06 4 50 86 . . . . .Gaston. . . . . 14 60 5 48 4 54
5 25 7 38 4 65 90 . . . . .Midway. . . . . 10 40 5 30 4 25
6 00 8 05 5 00 100 . . . . .Weldon. . . . .     5 00 4 00
p.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Raleigh with North Carolina rail-road [p15]. At junction with Roanoke Valley rail-road [p23] for Townesville and Clarksville. At Gaston with Gaston Branch Road [p26] for Hicksford; there connects with Petersburg rail-road [p26]. At Weldon with Wilmington & Weldon, [p17] Seaboard & Roanoke [p23] and Petersburg rail-roads [p26].

         FRANKLINTON, N. C., post-town of Franklin county, twenty-seven miles from Raleigh. It grew up in a very few years, and is one of the most pleasant villages on the Raleigh & Gaston road. Population about 600.

         HENDERSON, a thriving post-village in Granville county, North Carolina, forty-four miles north of Raleigh.

         RIDGEWAY, a post-town in Warren county, North Carolina, fifty-eight miles from Raleigh, and the terminus of the Roanoke Valley rail-road.

         WARRENTON, capital of Warren county, North Carolina, sixty-two miles from Raleigh, is situated near the source of Fishing creek, a branch of Tar river. Population 1400.

         GASTON, N. C., at one time the terminus of the Raleigh & Gaston rail-road, is situated in Northampton county, on the left bank of the Roanoke river, eighty-six miles from Raleigh.


Page 23

SEABOARD & ROANOKE ROAD.

S. M. WILSON, President,
JEROME PENDLETON, Superintendent,
Weldon, N. C.

        
Portsmouth to Weldon.       March 17. Weldon to Portsmouth.      
Mail.   Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare   Mail.
p.m.       Leave Arrive       m.
        . . . . .Portsmouth. . . . . 80 4 00    
    85 17 . . . . .Suffolk. . . . . 63 3 15    
12 30   1 55 31 . . . . .Franklin. . . . . 49 2 55   12 00
12 47       . . . . .Murfee's. . . . .       11 46
1 39   2 50 50 . . . . .Newsom's. . . . . 30 1 50   10 50
2 38   2 70 54 . . . . .Boykins. . . . . 26 1 30   10 26
2 55   2 85 57 . . . . .Branchville. . . . . 23 1 15   10 12
3 29   3 15 63 . . . . .Margarettsville. . . . . 17 85   9 44
4 10   3 50 70 . . . . .Seaboard. . . . . 10 50   9 17
5 00   4 00 80 . . . . .Weldon. . . . .       8 30
p.m.       Arrive Leave       a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--A portion of this road is within the enemy's lines. Connects at Weldon with Wilmington & Weldon, [p17] Raleigh & Gaston [p22] and Petersburg rail-roads [p26].

ROANOKE VALLEY ROAD.

WM. A. SMITH, President,
A. HOPKINS, Eng'r and Sup't.,
Clarksville, Va.

        
Clarksville to Junction.       April-- Junction to Clarksville.      
Pass Frt. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Frt. Pass
a.m.       Leave Arrive       m.
6 00       . . . . .Clarksville. . . . . 22 1 50   4 00
7 00   75 12 . . . . .Townesville. . . . . 10 75   3 00
8 00   1 50 22 . . . . .Junction. . . . .       2 00
a.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Junction with Raleigh & Gaston rail-road (p22).

         PORTSMOUTH, VA., the eastern terminus, proper, of this road is now in possession of the Federals. It is capital of Norfolk county situated on the left bank of Elizabeth river, opposite the city of Norfolk, eight miles from Hampton Roads. The river, which is about half a mile wide, forms a safe and excellent harbor, accessible to vessels of the largest size. The town was founded over one hundred years ago.

         CLARKSVILLE, VA., on the south bank of the Roanoke river, a little below the confluence of the Dan and Staunton, 102 miles south-west of Richmond. It contains four churches, one bank, and over one thousand inhabitants. It is the terminus of the Roanoke Valley rail-road, and is destined to be a town of considerable importance.


Page 24

NORLOLK & PETERSBURG ROAD.

GEN. WM. MAHONE, President, and Gen. Sup't.,
HENRY FINK, Superintendent, Transportation,
JAMES C. SPRIGG, Engineer and Superintendent.
Petersburg, Va.

        
Petersburg to Norfolk.       May 30. Norfolk to Petersburg.      
Pass   Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare   Pass
a.m.       Leave Arrive       p.m.
8 00       . . . . .Petersburg. . . . . 80 2 00   5 00
8 50   1 00 13 . . . . .Disputanta. . . . . 67 1 00   3 40
9 50   1 25 21 . . . . .Waverly. . . . . 59 75   2 50
10 40   1 75 29 . . . . .Wakefield. . . . . 51 25   2 00
10 45   2 00 36 . . . . .Ivor. . . . . 44     1 10
      40 . . . . .Zuni. . . . . 40      
      47 . . . . .Winsor. . . . . 33      
      58 . . . . .Suffolk. . . . . 22      
      80 . . . . .Norfolk. . . . .        
a.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Petersburg with Richmond & Petersburg, [26] Petersburg [p26], and Lynchburg & Petersburg (South Side) rail-roads [p25]. The cars run only to Ivor at present, the Norfolk terminus being in possession of the enemy.

MEMPHIS AND OHIO ROAD.

SUPERINTENDENT'S OFFICE, Meridian, Miss.

         MR. J. C. SWAYZE: Dear Sir--The Memphis and Ohio Rail-Road is in the lines of the enemy. The rolling stock, machinery and material were removed, and are now at this place. The bridges were all burned by order of our own military authorities.

         The enemy have never attempted to build the bridges, or to operate any portion of the road.

Yours, &c.,

SAM. B. JONES, Gen'l Sup't.


         PETERSBURG, a handsome city in Dinwiddie county, Va., on the right or South bank of the Appomattox river, twenty-two miles South of Richmond, and ten miles from James river, at City Point. It is the third city of Virginia in point of population, and possesses extensive facilities for business. Vessels of one hundred tons ascend the river to the city and those of larger size to Walthams landing, six miles below. The falls of the river, which arrest the ascent of the tide immediately above the city, furnish extensive water-power. Population about 16,000.

         NORFOLK, at one time the second city in Virginia is capital of Norfolk county, now possessed by the troops of the United States. --It is situated on the right or North bank of Elizabeth river, eight miles from Hampton Roads, and thirty-two miles from the sea. The harbor is large, safe, and easy of access, admitting vessels of the largest class to come to the wharves.


Page 25

PETERSBURG & LYNCHBURG (SOUTH-SIDE) ROAD.

THOS. H. CAMPBELL, President,
H. D. BIRD, General Superintendent,
Petersburg, Va.

        
City Point to Lynchburg.       March 30. Lynchburg to City Point.      
Mail Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
        . . . . .City Point. . . . .        
4 00 4 50     . . . . .Petersburg. . . . . 123 5 00 6 00 4 28
4 50 6 02 50 10 . . . . .Sutherlands. . . . . 113 5 00 4 57 3 38
5 54 7 08 1 00 20 . . . . .Ford's. . . . . 103 5 00 3 48 2 43
6 37 7 56 1 25 27 . . . . .Wilson's. . . . . 96 4 75 3 06 2 03
7 00 8 22 1 55 31 . . . . .Wellville. . . . . 92 4 75 2 40 1 38
7 36 9 04 1 75 37 . . . . .Blacks and Whites. . . . . 86 4 45 2 08 1 08
8 13 9 46 2 10 43 . . . . .Nottoway C.H. . . . . . 80 3 75 1 32 12 33
9 15 11 10 2 15 52 . . . . .Burkeville. . . . . 71 2 85 12 40 11 43
10 03 12 09 2 55 61 . . . . .Rice's. . . . . 63 2 75 11 21 10 48
10 46 1 08 3 05 69 . . . . .Farmville. . . . . 55 2 65 10 28 9 45
1 44 2 19 3 65 79 . . . . .Prospect. . . . . 44 2 10 9 17 8 45
11 27 3 12 4 15 87 . . . . .Pamplin's. . . . . 36 2 00 8 24 8 00
1 30 4 29 4 85 99 . . . . .Appomattox. . . . . 24 1 30 7 07 6 55
2 00 5 00 5 00 105 . . . . .Spout Spring. . . . . 18 90 6 26 6 20
2 27 5 55 5 00 110 . . . . .Concord. . . . . 13 65 5 56 5 55
3 30 7 30 5 00 123 . . . . .Lynchburg. . . . .     4 30 4 45
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Petersburg with Richmond & Petersburg [p26], Norfolk & Petersburg [p24], and Petersburg rail-roads [p26]. At Burkeville with Richmond & Danville road [p28], and at Lynchburg with Orange & Alexandria [p33], and Virginia & Tennessee roads [p34].

         LYNCHBURG, VA., is finely situated on a steep declevity on the right, or south bank of James river, one hundred and twenty miles W. S. W. of Richmond, and twenty miles south-east of the Blue Ridge. The river is here about two hundred yard's wide, and is spanned by a fine bridge; it affords abundant water-power, which is employed in the manufacture of cotton, wool, flour, &c. The town was founded in 1786, and incorporated in 1805. Population about 14,000.

         WELLVILLE, in Nottoway county, Va., thirty-one miles from Petersburg.

         NOTTOWAY COURT HOUSE, capital of Nottoway county, Virginia, nine miles from the junction with the Richmond & Danville rail-road, and forty-three miles from Petersburg. Population about 300.

         BURKEVILLE, in Prince Edward county, Virginia, at the junction of the South-Side rail-road with the Richmond & Danville rail-road, fifty-two miles west of Petersburg.

         FARMVILLE, in Prince Edward county, Virginia, finely situated on the Appomattox river. It is a thriving town. Population about 1,600.


Page 26

RICHMOND & PETERSBURG ROAD.

CHARLES ELLIS, Prest.
E. H. GILL, Gen'l Supt.,
Richmond, Va.

        
Richmond to Petersburg.       April 1. Petersburg to Richmond.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
5 55 4 55     . . . . .Richmond. . . . . 22 1 50 6 30 7 30
    40 5 . . . . .Temple's. . . . . 17 1 50    
6 44 5 45 60 8 . . . . .Rice's. . . . . 14 1 00 5 50 6 43
  6 05 75 11 . . . . .Half Way Station. . . . . 11 75   6 22
7 24 6 23 1 00 13 . . . . .Chester. . . . . 9 60 5 10 6 08
    1 50 16 . . . . .Port Walthall Junct'n. . . . . . 6 40    
8 20 7 20 1 50 22 . . . . .Petersburg. . . . .     4 10 5 00
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Richmond with Richmond & Danville [p28], Virginia Central [p30], Richmond , Frederic & Potomac [p27], and York River rail-roads [p27]. At Petersburg with Norfolk & Petersburg [p24], Petersburg & Lynchburg (South Side) [p25], and Petersburg Roads [p26].

PETERSBURG ROAD.

W. T. JOYNES, President,
C. O. SANFORD, Ch. Engineer and Sup't,
Petersburg, Va.

        
Petersburg to Weldon.       March 13. Weldon to Petersburg.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m.
9 45 9 00     . . . . .Petersburg. . . . . 63 3 00 3 00 2 30
10 30 9 55 50 10 . . . . .Reams'. . . . . 53 2 50 2 00 1 50
11 20 11 00 1 00 21 . . . . .Stony Creek. . . . . 42 2 00 12 55 1 00
12 10 12 00 1 50 30 . . . . .Jaratt's. . . . . 33 1 50 12 00 12 00
1 05 12 50 2 00 40 . . . . .Bellfield. . . . . 23 1 00 11 05 11 05
2 05 2 00 2 25 43 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 20 75 10 00 10 05
        (Gaston Branch.)        
        . . . . .Hicksford. . . . . 18 1 00    
    50 8 . . . . .Ryland's. . . . . 10 50    
    75 15 . . . . .Summit. . . . . 3 15    
    1 00 18 . . . . .Gaston. . . . .        
2 45 2 45 2 50 50 . . . . .Pleasant Hill. . . . . 13 50 9 15 9 30
3 00 3 00 3 00 63 . . . . .Weldon. . . . .     9 00 9 15
p.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Petersburg with Richmond & Petersburg [p26], Petersburg & Lynchburg (South Side) [p25], and Norfolk & Petersburg Roads [p24]. At Junction with Gaston branch, and at Weldon with Seaboard & Roanoke [p23], Wilmington & Weldon [p17], and Raleigh & Gaston Roads [p22].

         Through fare between Richmond and Weldon, $5, including Omnibus fare through Petersburg. Enquire for the Long Omnibusses.


Page 27

RICHMOND, FREDERICK & POTOMAC ROAD.

PETER V. DANIEL, Prest.,
S. RUTH, Supt, Trans.,
Richmond, Va.

        
Richmond to Fredericksburg       march 12. Fredericksburg to Richmond.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m.
6 30 3 15     . . . . .Richmond. . . . . 61 4 00 8 55 5 35
7 06 3 50 50 8 . . . . .Hungary. . . . . 53 3 50 8 20 4 59
7 52 4 33 1 10 16 . . . . .Ashland. . . . . 45 2 90 7 45 4 30
8 12 4 55 1 40 21 . . . . .Taylorsville. . . . . 40 2 60 7 05 4 02
8 24 5 06 1 50 24 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 37 2 50 6 54 3 50
8 50 5 30 2 00 30 . . . . .Chesterfield. . . . . 31 2 00 6 31 3 24
9 15 5 52 2 25 35 . . . . .Penola. . . . . 26 1 75 6 05 2 58
9 37 6 10 2 60 40 . . . . .Milford. . . . . 21 1 40 5 50 2 40
10 25 p.m. 3 25 49 . . . . .Guinea's. . . . . 12 75 a.m. 2 00
11 00   4 00 61 . . . . .Fredericksburg. . . . .       1 05
a.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Richmond with Richmond & Danville [p28], Virginia Central [p30], Richmond & Petersburg [p26], and York River rail-roads [p27]. At Junction with Virginia Central again [p30.] At Fredericksburg with branch to Acquia creek.

RICHMOND & YORK RIVER ROAD.

ALEX. DUDLEY, President,
JOHN MCFARLAND, Superintendent,
Richmond.

        
Richmond to West Point.       April 1. West Point to Richmond.      
Mail.   Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare   Mail.
a.m.       Leave Arrive       p.m.
8 00       . . . . .Richmond. . . . . 38 2 00   6 00
8 35   1 00 7 . . . . .Savage's. . . . . 31 1 00   5 25
8 45   1 00 11 . . . . .Meadow. . . . . 27 1 00   5 15
9 00   1 25 13 . . . . .Dispatch. . . . . 25 75   5 00
9 10   1 25 15 . . . . .Summit. . . . . 23 75   4 40
9 40   1 50 20 . . . . .Tunstall's. . . . . 18 50   4 20
10 00   2 00 24 . . . . .White House. . . . . 14     4 00
      29 . . . . .Fish Hall. . . . . 9      
      31 . . . . .Sweet Hall. . . . . 7      
      34 . . . . .Romankoke. . . . . 4      
      38 . . . . .West Point. . . . .        
a.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Richmond with Richmond & Danville [p28], Virginia Central [p30], Richmond Frederick & Potomac [p27], and Richmond & Petersburg rail-roads [p26]. This road is in operation only a portion of the distance, from the close proximity of the enemy. Regular trains run only between Richmond and White House. Occasional trips are made farther down the road.


Page 28

RICHMOND & DANVILLE ROAD.

L. E. HARVIE, Prest.,
CHAS. G. TALCOTT, Supt.,
Richmond, Va.

        
Richmond to Danville.       may 8. Danville to Richmond.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
4 00 7 30     . . . . .Richmond. . . . . 141 11 35 5 25 6 00
        . . . . .Manchester. . . . .        
4 40     8 . . . . .Powhite. . . . .     4 45  
5 10 8 37 1 15 13 . . . . .Coalfield. . . . . 127 10 30 4 15 4 43
    1 55 18 . . . . .Tomahawk. . . . . 122 9 90    
6 03 9 27 1 90 22 . . . . .Powhatan. . . . . 118 9 55 3 25 3 45
6 30 9 52 2 30 27 . . . . .Mattoax. . . . . 113 9 20 2 57 3 14
6 48 10 09 2 55 30 . . . . .Chula. . . . . 110 8 90 2 41 2 52
7 33 10 52 3 00 36 . . . . .Amelia C.H. . . . . . 104 8 50 2 02 2 10
8 16 11 24 3 60 43 . . . . .Jetersville. . . . . 97 7 90 1 28 1 23
    4 10 50 . . . . .Jennings' O. . . . . 90 7 35    
9 00 12 02 4 40 53 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 87 7 10 12 51 12 30
p.m.   5 00 61 . . . . .Price's. . . . . 79 6 50   p.m.
  1 03 5 30 65 . . . . .Meherrin. . . . . 75 6 15 11 57  
  1 46 6 00 73 . . . . .Keysville. . . . . 67 5 50 11 14  
  2 23 6 60 81 . . . . .Drake's Branch. . . . . 59 4 90 10 36  
  2 39 6 85 84 . . . . .Mossingford. . . . . 56 4 65 10 22  
  3 10 7 30 90 . . . . .Roanoke. . . . . 50 4 15 9 54  
  3 51 7 70 94 . . . . .Clover. . . . . 46 3 80 9 34  
  4 14 8 15 100 . . . . .Scottsburg. . . . . 40 3 30 8 52  
    8 50 104 . . . . .Wolf Trap. . . . . 36 3 00    
  4 47 8 85 109 . . . . .Boston. . . . . 31 2 65 8 24  
  5 18 9 50 117 . . . . .News' Ferry. . . . . 23 1 95 7 52  
  5 53 10 30 127 . . . . .Barksdale. . . . . 13 1 20 7 21  
  6 25 10 90 135 . . . . .Ringgold. . . . . 5 55 6 53  
      140 . . . . .North Side. . . . .        
  6 45 11 35 141 . . . . .Danville. . . . .     6 30  
  p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m.  

         CONNECTIONS.--At Richmond, with Richmond & Petersburg rail-road (p26), Richmond & York River rail-road (p27), Richmond, Frederick & Potomac rail-road (p27), and Virginia Central rail-road (p30). At Junction with Petersburg & Lynchburg (South-Side) rail-road [p25], fifty-three miles from Richmond, for points West, and Petersburg East, and at Danville with Branch Road to Greensboro, and there connects with the North Carolina road (p15).

         RICHMOND, Va., the seat of Government of the Confederate States, and capital of the State of Virginia, at the head of navigation and tide-water on the James River. It is the largest city in Virginia, and one of the most beautiful in the Confederacy. The situation of the city and the scenery of the environs are much admired, combining in a high degree, the elements of grandeur, beauty, and variety. The


Page 29

29 river winding along verdant hills which rise with graceful swells and undulations, is interrupted by numerous islands and granite rocks, among which it tumbles and foams for a distance of several miles. --The city is built on several hills, the most considerable of which are the Shockoe and Richmond hills, separated from each other by Shockoe creek. The capital, and other public buildings are situated on Shockoe hill; the top of which is an elevated plain in the west part of the city. The capital, from its size and elevated position, is the most conspicuous object in Richmond. It stands in the centre of a public square of about eight acres, is adorned with a portico of Ionic columns and contains a Marble Statue of Washington. The river is navigable to this point for vessels drawing ten feet of water. Richmond possesses an immense water power, derived front the falls of James river, which from the commencement of the rapids, a few miles above the city, descends about one hundred feet to the tide-level. Few places in the country possess greater natural advantages for productive industry. Population about 36,000.

         MANCHESTER, in Chesterfield county, Virginia, on the James River, opposite Richmond, with which it is connected by a bridge. It is beautifully situated, and contains many elegant residences erected by persons doing business in Richmond. It has manufactories of tobacco, cotton and flour. Population about 2,400.

         AMELIA COURT-HOUSE, capital of Amelia county, Virginia, thirty-six miles from Richmond. It contains besides the county buildings several stores, churches, &c.

         JETERSVILLE, in Amelia county, Virginia, forty-three miles from Richmond, a pleasant post-town.

         JENNING'S ORDINARY, in Nottoway county, Virginia, took its name from the proprietor of a rail-road dining house, fifty miles from Richmond.

         KEYSVILLE, Virginia, a pleasant post-town, seventy-three miles west of Richmond.

         MOSSINGFORD, a post-town in Charlotte county Virginia. Stages connect from here with several places in Virginia and North Carolina.

         ROANOKE, a post-village on the Richmond and Danville rail-road, ninety miles from Richmond.

         SCOTTSBURG, in Halifax county, Virginia, is a very pleasant post-village, one hundred miles from Richmond.

         BARKSDALE, in Halifax county, Virginia, one hundred and twenty-seven miles from Richmond and thirteen from Danville.

         RINGGOLD, a post village in Pittsylvania county, Virginia, one hundred and thirty-five miles from Richmond.

         DANVILLE, Va., the South-western terminus of the above road, is situated on the Dan river, at the head of navigation, five miles from the North Carolina line, and is the centre of a country abounding in coal, iron, limestone, etc. Population, 3,000


Page 30

VIRGINIA CENTRAL ROAD.

E. FONTAINE, Prest.,
H. D. WHITCOMB, Gen'l Supt.,
J. GARRETT, Treas. and Sec'ry,
Richmond, Va.

        
Richmond to Jackson's River.       may-- Jackson's River to Richmond.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
A.M. P.M.     Leave Arrive     A.M. P.M.
7 00 2 15     . . . . .Richmond. . . . . 195 12 00 11 00 6 15
7 44 2 48 75 9 . . . . .Atlee's. . . . . 186 11 50 10 21 5 35
8 22 3 24 1 25 18 . . . . .Hanover C.H. . . . . . 177 10 75 9 58 4 58
9 03 4 20 2 00 27 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 167 10 75 9 08 4 15
9 25 4 11 2 25 33 . . . . .Noel's. . . . . 162 10 00 8 33 3 50
9 56 5 10 2 75 40 . . . . .Beaver Dam. . . . . 155 9 50 8 09 3 20
10 16 5 29 3 00 45 . . . . .Bumpass. . . . . 150 9 25 7 51 2 57
10 39 5 47 3 25 50 . . . . .Frederick's Hall. . . . . 145 9 00 7 33 2 36
11 04 6 11 3 75 56 . . . . .Tolersville. . . . . 139 8 50 7 11 2 09
11 30 6 33 4 00 62 . . . . .Louisa C.H. . . . . . 133 8 25 6 50 1 42
11 52 6 54 4 25 67 . . . . .Trevillian's. . . . . 128 8 00 6 30 1 19
12 48 7 30 4 75 76 . . . . .Gordonsville. . . . . 119 7 50 6 00 12 40
1 08 P.M. 5 00 81 . . . . .Lindsay's. . . . . 114 7 00 A.M. 11 53
1 19   5 25 83 . . . . .Cobham. . . . . 112 7 00   11 45
1 48   5 50 90 . . . . .Keswick. . . . . 105 6 50   11 14
2 03   5 75 93 . . . . .Shadwell. . . . . 102 6 25   11 02
2 36   6 00 97 . . . . .Charlottesville. . . . . 98 6 00   10 42
3 07   6 50 104 . . . . .Ivey. . . . . 91 5 75   9 51
3 22   6 75 107 . . . . .Mechum's River. . . . . 88 5 50   9 36
3 57   7 25 115 . . . . .Greenwood. . . . . 80 5 00   9 01
4 36   7 75 124 . . . . .Waynesboro. . . . . 71 4 50   8 23
4 57   8 00 129 . . . . .Fisherville. . . . . 66 4 25   8 00
6 30   8 25 136 . . . . .Staunton*. . . . . 59 3 75   7 30
7 28   8 75 144 . . . . .Swoope's. . . . . 51 3 55   5 00
9 20   9 75 159 . . . . .Craigsville. . . . . 36 2 50   2 50
10 30   10 25 168 . . . . .Goshen. . . . . 27 2 00   1 50
11 20   10 75 175 . . . . .Millborough. . . . . 19 1 50   1 00
    11 50 186 . . . . .Griffith's. . . . . 9 75    
    12 00 195 . . . . .Jackson's River. . . . .        
A.M.       Arrive Leave       P.M.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Richmond with Richmond, Frederick & Potomac, [p27] Richmond & York River [27], Richmond & Petersburg [p26], and Richmond & Danville rail-roads [p28]. With Orange & Alexandria rail-road [p33] at Gordonsville for Orange, Culpepper and points North and at Charlottesville for Lynchburg and points South. At Staunton with Stage lines for Winchester and points North, and Lexington and points South. At Millboro' for Rockbridge, Allum, Warm Hot and Healing Springs, and White Sulphur Springs and points West.


         *The Mail Train from Richmond lies at Staunton from 5 25 P. M. until 6 30 A. M. Returning, arrives at 6 00 P. M., and remains until 7 30 A. M.



Page 31

         HANOVER, C. H., capital of Hanover county, Virginia is situated one mile from the Pamunky river, and eighteen miles north of Richmond. This place is memorable as the scene of Patrick Henry's early triumphs, and more recently as the birth-place of Henry Clay, and during the present war, has been the scene of blood and carnage.

         FREDERICK'S HALL, in Louisa county, Virginia, fifty miles from Richmond, is a small post-village.

         TOLERSVILLE, in Louisa county, Virginia, fifty-six miles from Richmond, a post-town.

         LOUISA, C. H., capital of Louisa county, Virginia, sixty-two miles From Richmond, is a pleasant post-town.

         GORDONSVILLE, in Orange county, Virginia, and at the junction of the north east section of the Orange & Alexandria rail-road with the Virginia Central, seventy-six miles from Richmond.

         COBHAM, in Albemarle county, Virginia, eighty-three miles from Richmond.

         SHADWELL, post town in Albemarle county, Virginia, and ninety-three miles from Richmond.

         CHARLOTTSVILLE, capital of Albemarle county, Virginia, is a fine town on the right bank of the Riavanna river. It is beautifully situated in a fertile valley. One mile west of the town is the University of Virginia, which was founded in 1719 under the auspices of Thomas Jefferson, and is endowed by the State. An Observatory is attached to this institution. Monticello, the residence of Jefferson, who was a native of Albemarle county, is three miles distant. Charlottesvile contains churches of the Presbyterians, Episcopalians, Baptists and Methodists. Population about 2,600.

         GREENWOOD, a post-town in Doddridge county, Virginia, is one hundred and fifteen miles from Richmond.

         WAYNESBORGUGH, a post town in Augusta county, Virginia, on the South river, and at the base of the Blue Ridge, one hundred and twenty-four miles from Richmond. Population about 600.

         STAUNTON, capital of Augusta county, Virginia, is situated on a small branch of the Shenandoah river, near its source, and is one hundred and thirty-six miles from Richmond. Staunton is the seat of the Western Lunatic Asylum, and of the Virginia Institute for the Deaf and Dumb, and Blind. It contains several Churches, Academies, Seminaries, &c. The surrounding country is highly productive, and beautifully diversified, forming part of the Great Valley of Virginia. In the limestone formation of this region, extensive caverns recur, among which the most remarkable is Weyer's Cave, about 18 miles north-east of Staunton. Population about 2,600.

         MILLBOROUGH, a post-town in Bath county, Virginia, one hundred and seventy-five miles from Richmond, is pleasantly situated, and is in the vicinity of some celebrated medicinal springs.

         JACKSON'S RIVER, the Western terminus of the Virginia Central rail-road, is a pleasant little town near the stream from whence it derives its name.


Page 32

TALLAHASSEE ROAD.

EDWARD HOUSTON, Pres't and Sup't, Tallahassee, Fla.

         This line, twenty-two miles in length, running from Tallshassee to St. Marks, is operated only a portion of the distance at present, owing to the presence of the enemy at its Southern terminus.

FLORIDA ROAD.

D. L. YULEE, President, Homosassee, Fla.

         This road was just completed before the war, from Fernandina to Cedar Keys, connecting the Atlantic coast with the Gulf of Mexico, in a distance of one hundred and fifty-five miles. It is still operated inland, but both ends are in possession of the enemy.

LAURENS ROAD,

J. W. SIMPSON, President,
B. S. JONES, Superintendent,
Laurensville, S. C.

         Passenger train leaves Newberry at 11:45 a. m., and arrives at Laurens at 2:45 p.m.

         Passenger train leaves Laurens at 7:00 a. m., and arrives at Newberry at 9:50 p. m.

         Distance, 32 miles. Through fare, $1 50.

MIDDLE GEORGIA ROAD,

Dr. JONES, President, Madison, Ga.

         The Middle Georgia Rail-Road Company had just completed its organization at the breaking out of the war, which event caused it to suspend its operations. It is designed to form a link in a direct line from Memphis to Charleston, by way of the Savannah, Griffin & North Alabama rail-road. Its route is nearly a direct one, starting at Griffin, Georgia, passing through Monticello, Jasper county, and terminating at Madison, on the line of the Georgia rail-road.

CLINTON & PORT HUDSON ROAD.

G. A. NEAFUS, President,
JOHN HERTZLER, Superintendent,
N. A. KNIGHT, Chief Engineer,
Clinton, La.

         Running from Clinton to Port Hudson, Louisiana--21 miles long. Can make one trip daily, leaving Clinton at 8 A. M. Returning leave Port Hudson, at 1 P. M.

         Connects at Port Hudson with the Mississippi river; at Clinton, with stages for Magnolia, and points on the New Orleans & Great Northern Road.


Page 33

ORANGE & ALEXANDRIA ROAD.

J. S. BARBOUR, Jr., President,
H. W. VANDERGRIFT, Eng. and Superintendent,
Lynchburg, Va.

        
Alexandria to Lynchburg       Sept. 15. Lynchburg to Alexandria.      
Pass   Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare   Pass
a.m.       Leave Arrive       p.m.
        . . . . .Alexandria. . . . . 170      
      9 . . . . .Springfield. . . . . 161      
      14 . . . . .Burke's. . . . . 156      
      18 . . . . .Fairfax. . . . . 152      
      23 . . . . .Union Mills. . . . . 147      
      27 . . . . .Manassas Junction. . . . . 143      
      31 . . . . .Bristoe. . . . . 139      
      38 . . . . .Catlett's. . . . . 132      
      41 . . . . .Warrenton Juction. . . . . 129      
      47 . . . . .Bealeton. . . . . 123      
      51 . . . . .Rappahannock. . . . . 119      
      56 . . . . .Brandy. . . . . 114      
9 00     62 . . . . .Culpepper. . . . . 108     4 30
9 50     69 . . . . .Mitchell's. . . . . 101     3 45
10 25     74 . . . . .Rapidan. . . . . 96     3 10
11 00     79 . . . . .Orange C.H. . . . . . 91     2 35
11 30     84 . . . . .Madison. . . . . 86     2 05
12 00     88 . . . . .Gordonsville. . . . . 82     1 30
m.     95 . . . . .Cobham. . . . . 75     p.m.
      102 . . . . .Koswick. . . . . 68      
p.m.     105 . . . . .Shadwell. . . . . 65     a.m.
3 00     110 . . . . .Charlotteville. . . . . 60 3 50   10 30
3 50   70 121 . . . . .North Garden. . . . . 49 3 00   9 40
4 18   1 00 126 . . . . .Covesville. . . . . 44 2 65   9 27
4 50   1 40 134 . . . . .Rockfish. . . . . 36 2 25   8 55
5 15   1 85 141 . . . . .Lovington. . . . . 29 1 80   8 30
5 35   2 10 146 . . . . .Arrington. . . . . 24 1 55   8 10
6 05   2 50 153 . . . . .New Glasgow. . . . . 17 1 20   7 40
6 25   2 80 159 . . . . .Amherst C.H. . . . . . 11 85   7 20
6 45   3 20 164 . . . . .McIvor's. . . . . 6 50   7 00
7 15   3 50 170 . . . . .Lynchburg. . . . .       6 30
p.m.       Arrive Leave       a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--Since the occupation of the Alexandria end of this road by the enemy, through trains have been discontinued. That portion of the road running towards the Rappahannock from Gordonsville is operated separately, making connection with Virginia Central road at Gordonsville, [p30] and running, usually, as far as Culpepper. At Charlotteville the south-western division connects with the Virginia Central, and at Lynchburg Virginia & Tennessee [p34], and Petersburg & Lynchburg (South Side) rail-roads [p25].

         CULPEPPER, C. H,, more properly known as Fairfax, is the capital of Culpepper County.


Page 34

VIRGINIA & TENNESSEE ROAD.

ROBERT L. OWEN, President,
THOS. DODAMEAD, Gen'l Supt.,
Lynchburg, Va.

        
Lynchburg to Bristol.       April 1. Bristol to Lynchburg.      
Mail Frt. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Frt. Mail
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
4 15 4 45     . . . . .Lynchburg. . . . . 204 12 25 5 00 4 00
      4 . . . . .Halsey's. . . . . 200      
      8 . . . . .Clay's. . . . . 196      
5 03   60 10 . . . . .Forest. . . . . 194 11 65   3 18
    1 00 16 . . . . .Goode's. . . . . 188 11 25    
    1 15 19 . . . . .Lowry's. . . . . 185 11 10    
6 15   1 50 25 . . . . .Liberty*. . . . . 179 10 75   2 20
    1 80 30 . . . . .Thaxton's. . . . . 174 10 45    
7 10   2 20 37 . . . . .Buford's. . . . . 169 10 00   1 15
8 00   2 80 47 . . . . .Bonsack's. . . . . 157 9 45   12 30
      50 . . . . .Gish's Mill. . . . . 154 9 05    
8 29   3 20 53 . . . . .Big Lick. . . . . 151 8 65   12 00
9 00   3 60 60 . . . . .Salem. . . . . 144     11 30
      70 . . . . .Thomas. . . . . 134 7 85    
9 59   4 40 73 . . . . .Big Spring. . . . . 131 7 70   10 36
10 20   4 50 76 . . . . .Shawsville. . . . . 128     10 20
    4 85 81 . . . . .Big Tunnel. . . . . 123 7 40    
11 10   5 15 86 . . . . .Christiansburg. . . . . 118 7 10   9 30
      91 . . . . .Vickers. . . . . 113 6 50    
12 05   5 75 96 . . . . .Central Depot*. . . . . 108 6 00   8 40
12 45   6 25 104 . . . . .Dublin. . . . . 100     7 55
    6 75 112 . . . . .Martin's. . . . . 92 5 50    
      119 . . . . .Clark's. . . . . 84 4 75    
2 15   7 45 125 . . . . .Mac's Meadow. . . . . 79 4 30   6 20
3 10   7 95 132 . . . . .Wytheville. . . . . 72     5 40
4 10   8 70 145 . . . . .Mount Airy. . . . . 59 3 55   4 20
      154 . . . . .Atkins'. . . . . 50 2 65    
5 20   9 60 160 . . . . .Marion. . . . . 44 2 20   3 00
    10 00 167 . . . . .Seven Mile Ford. . . . . 37      
6 40   10 50 176 . . . . .Glade Spring. . . . . 28 1 75   1 30
    10 80 180 . . . . .Emery College. . . . . 24 1 45    
7 45   11 35 189 . . . . .Abingdon. . . . . 15 90   12 20
      195 . . . . .Montgomery's. . . . . 9      
      200 . . . . .Millard's. . . . . 4      
8 55 6 30 12 25 204 . . . . .Bristol. . . . .     3 45 11 00
p.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Lynchburg with Petersburg & Lynchburg (p25), and Orange & Alexandria Rail-Roads [p33]. At Bonsack's with Stages to Sweet Sulphur Springs. At Salem with stages to White Sulphur Springs. At Dublin with stages to Red and Salt Sulphur Springs. At Bristol with East Tennessee & Virginia Rail Road [p36].


         *Good Breakfast and Supper House. Train stops 20 minutes.



         *The Freight Train stops over night both ways at Central Depot.



Page 35

         LIBERTY, a beautiful town, capital of Bedford county, Virginia, twenty-five miles west of Lynchburg. It commands a sublime view of the peaks of Otter, which are not less than seven miles distant, though they appear to be in the immediate vicinity. It contains the county buildings, four churches, several stores and about 700 inhabitants.

         BUFORD'S, a post-village in Bedford county, Virginia, thirty-seven miles from Lynchburg.

         BIG LICK, or known also as Gainsborough, is a post-village in Roanoke County, Virginia, fifty-three miles from Lynchburg.

         SALEM, capital of Roanoke county, Virginia, is situated on the Roanoke river, one hundred and eighty miles west of Richmond. It stands in the great valley between the Blue Ridge and North Mountain. Population about 6,600.

         SHAWSVILLE, a post-town in Montgomery county, Virginia, seventy-six miles from Lynchburg.

         CHRISTIANSBURG, capital of Montgomery county, Virginia, a very pleasant town. Population about 700.

         CENTRAL DEPOT, ninety-six miles from Lynchburg, is where the Virginia and Tennessee rail-road have located their machine shops, &c.

         WITHEVILLE, formerly Evansham, a neat and pleasant town, capital of Wythe county, Virginia. It is situated in an elevated valley or plateau, among the Alleghany mountains. Many persons congregate here in quest of recreation and pleasure. Population about 900.

         MOUNT AIRY, in Pittsylvania county, Virginia, one hundred and forty-five miles from Lynchburg. It contains several churches, Mills, &c.

         MARION, capital of Smythe county, Virginia, is situated on the middle fork of the Holston river, one hundred and sixty miles from Lynchburg.

         GLADE SPRING, a post town in Washington county, Virginia. It is a fine, and healthy location, and is the resort of many visitors.

         EMERY COLLEGE, is the seat of Emery and Henry Colleges, founded by the Methodists in 1838, and are now in successful operation.

         ABINGDON, a handsome town, capital of Washington county, Virginia, is pleasantly situated in a valley between the main forks of Holston river, about seven miles from each, and about eight miles from the Tennessee line. It is the most considerable town in the south-west part of Virginia, and is in the midst of one of the most fertile sections in the State. Population about 1,600.

         BRISTOL, TENN. & VA, the point of junction of the Virginia & Tennessee rail-road with the East Tennessee & Virginia rail-road, is a small town immediately on the line between the States of Tennessee and Virginia. It is a pleasantly situated little town, and will no doubt be the centre of considerable business. A newspaper is published here. Population about 700.


Page 36

EAST TENNESSEE & VIRGINIA ROAD.

JOHN R. BRANNER, President,
L. C. HOSS, Superintendent,
Knoxville, Tenn.

        
Bristol to Knoxville.       April-- Knoxville to Bristol.      
Mail. Fr't. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Fr't. Mail.
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
9 05 4 00     . . . . .Bristol. . . . . 130 6 50 8 00 11 10
10 13   55 11 . . . . .Zollicoffer. . . . . 119 5 95   10 13
10 50   1 00 20 . . . . .Carter's. . . . . 110 5 50   9 38
11 22   1 25 25 . . . . .Johnson's. . . . . 105 5 25   9 18
11 56   190 32 . . . . .Jonesboro. . . . . 98 4 90   8 47
12 21   1 85 37 . . . . .Telford's. . . . . 93 4 65   8 05
12 45   2 15 43 . . . . .Limestone. . . . . 87 4 35   7 38
1 04   2 35 47 . . . . .Fullen's. . . . . 83 4 15   7 20
1 30   2 50 50 . . . . .Henderson's. . . . . 80 4 00   7 04
1 57   2 80 56 . . . . .Greenville. . . . . 74 3 70   6 32
2 48   3 35 67 . . . . .Midway. . . . . 63 3 15   5 45
3 41   3 75 75 . . . . .Rogersville Junction. . . . . 55 2 75   4 54
4 00   3 90 78 . . . . .Whitesburg. . . . . 52 2 60   4 38
4 21   4 10 82 . . . . .Russelville. . . . . 48 2 40   4 21
4 53   4 40 88 . . . . .Morristown. . . . . 42 2 10   3 55
5 39   4 80 96 . . . . .Talbott's. . . . . 34 1 70   3 15
6 25   5 05 101 . . . . .Mossy Creek. . . . . 29 1 45   2 53
6 44   5 25 105 . . . . .Newmarket. . . . . 25 1 25   2 13
7 17   5 65 113 . . . . .Strawberry Plains. . . . . 17 85   1 36
8 00   6 00 120 . . . . .McMillan's. . . . . 10 50   12 55
8 40 8 45 6 50 130 . . . . .Knoxville. . . . .     4 00 12 00
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Bristol with Virginia & Tennessee rail-road [p34]. At Rogersville Junction with Rogersville & Jefferson rail-road [p62]. At Knoxville with East Tennessee & Georgia rail-road [p37], forming a continuous line from Dalton and Chattanooga to Richmond.

         GRREENVILLE, capital of Green county, Tennessee, is the seat of Greenville College, and is a finely situated town. Population 600.

         NEW MARKET, in Jefferson county, Tennessee, is situated in a productive valley, and contains Holstein College, and a female institute.

         KNOXVILLE TENN., at one time capital of the State, is built on the Holston, four miles below the confluence of French and Broad River, and one hundred and eighty-five miles east of Nashville. The River is navigable from this point down, for light draft steamboats, at all seasons, and in spring-time, as far up as Kingsport. The city, however, is now amply supplied with Rail-Roads, having the East Tennessee & Georgia Rail-Road from the south, and the East Tennessee & Virginia Rail-Road from the east coming into it, and in a short time after the cessation of hostilities, this despoiled section will, with its wonted vigor and enterprise, extend its Rail-Road facilities in every hoter direction. Knoxville is destined to be one of the first interior Rail-Road centres, and a place of considerable commercial importance.


Page 37

EAST TENNESSEE & GEORGIA ROAD.

C. WALLACE, President,
R. C. JACKSON, Superintendent,
Knoxville, Tenn.

        
Knoxville to Dalton.       march 16. Dalton to Knoxville.      
Pass Fr't. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Fr't. Pass
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. a.m.
9 12 4 00     . . . . .Knoxville. . . . . 110 6 50 4 13 11 42
10 06   60 7 . . . . .Ebenezer. . . . . 103 6 00   10 49
10 27   90 14 . . . . .Concord. . . . . 96 5 50   10 28
11 22   1 40 21 . . . . .Lenori's. . . . . 90 5 00   9 46
11 53   1 75 28 . . . . .Loudon. . . . . 82 4 75   9 10
12 24   2 10 35 . . . . .Philadelphia. . . . . 75 4 25   8 42
1 00   2 50 45 . . . . .Sweetwater. . . . . 65 4 00   8 06
1 21   2 75 50 . . . . .Reagan's. . . . . 60 3 75   7 47
2 00   3 00   . . . . .Mouse Creek*. . . . .   3 50   7 28
2 33   3 25 55 . . . . .Athens. . . . . 55 3 25   6 42
3 16   3 80 63 . . . . .Rinville. . . . . 47 2 75   6 09
3 50   4 20 70 . . . . .Charleston. . . . . 40 2 30   5 27
4 17   4 60   . . . . .Herndon. . . . .   1 90   5 01
4 54   5 00 83 . . . . .Cleveland. . . . . 27 1 65   4 36
        (Chattanooga Branch.)        
4 54       . . . . .Cleveland. . . . . 27 1 75   4 26
5 31   5 40   . . . . .McDonald. . . . .   1 25   3 44
6 24   5 75   . . . . .Ooltowah. . . . .   90   3 12
6 52   6 00   . . . . .Tyner's. . . . .   50   2 46
7 40   6 50 110 . . . . .Chattanooga. . . . .       2 00
6 10   5 60 95 . . . . .State Line. . . . . 15 90   3 36
6 45   6 00 101 . . . . .Varnell's. . . . . 9 50   3 10
7 30 1 40 6 50 110 . . . . .Dalton. . . . .     4 20 2 20
p.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Knoxville with East Tennessee & Virginia rail-road [p36] for points East. At Cleveland with Chattanooga branch. At Dalton with Western & Atlantic Rail-Road [p41].


         *First rate Breakfast and Dinner House. Trains stops 30 minutes.


         LOUDON Tenn., 28 miles from Knoxville, derives its name from the Earl of Loudon, who commanded the British forces in America in 1756, Cumberland Mountains lie on the West of the town. Pop. 1,500.

         ATHENS, capital of McMinn county, Tennessee, fifty-five miles from Knoxville, contains, besides the county buildings, several seminaries. Population about 900.

         CLEVELAND Tenn., is the point of junction of the Chattanooga branch with the main line of the above road. It is also the terminus of a proposed road from Asheville, N. C. Population, 1,000.

         DALTON, Ga., is a small town at the junction of the East Tennessee & Georgia Road with the Western & Atlantic, and promises to be a very important Rail-Road town. Population, about 2,000.


Page 38

NASHVILLE & CHATTANOOGA ROAD.

V. K. STEVENSON, Prest.,
E. W. COLE, Gen'l Supt.,
JOHN T. WHALING, Ass't Supt..
Chattanooga, Tenn.

        
Chattanooga to Nashville.       June 7. Nashville to Chattanooga.      
Pass Fr't Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Fr't Pass
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
7 15 5 30     . . . . .Chattanooga. . . . . 151 10 75 6 00 4 30
7 50   50 7 . . . . .Warhatchie. . . . . 144 10 25   3 55
8 05       . . . . .Cross Hollow Side Track. . . . .       3 40
8 20       . . . . .Summit Side Track. . . . .       3 25
8 30   1 00 14 . . . . .Whiteside. . . . . 137 10 00   3 10
9 10   1 50 22 . . . . .Shellmound. . . . . 129 9 25   2 30
9 45   2 00 28 . . . . .Bridgeport. . . . . 123 8 75   2 00
    2 50 35 . . . . .Willow Tree. . . . . 116 8 25    
10 50   2 75 38 . . . . .Stevenson. . . . . 113 8 00   1 00
11 20   3 00 43 . . . . .Bass Station. . . . . 108 7 75   12 15
11 50   3 50 48 . . . . .Anderson. . . . . 103 7 25   11 50
12 25   4 00 57 . . . . .Tantallon. . . . . 94 6 75   11 05
1 05   4 50 64 . . . . .Cowan. . . . . 87 6 25   10 25
1 50   5 00 68 . . . . .Decherd. . . . . 83 5 80   10 00
2 20   5 25 74 Estell Springs 77 5 50   9 20
3 10   5 75 80 . . . . .Tullahoma. . . . . 71 5 00   8 50
3 50   6 25 88 . . . . .Normandy. . . . . 63 4 50   8 05
4 30 6 00 6 75 95 . . . . .Wartrace. . . . . 56 4 00 5 30 7 30
p.m. p.m. 7 00 100 . . . . .Bellbuckle. . . . . 51 3 60 a.m. a.m.
    7 50 106 . . . . .Fosterville. . . . . 45 3 25    
    7 75 109 . . . . .Christiana. . . . . 42 3 00    
    8 10 115 . . . . .Wade's. . . . . 36 2 50    
    8 50 119 . . . . .Murfreesboro. . . . . 32 2 25    
    9 20 131 . . . . .Smyrna. . . . . 20 1 50    
    9 50 135 . . . . .Lavergne. . . . . 16 1 25    
    9 65 137 . . . . .Kimbro's. . . . . 14 1 00    
    9 80 139 . . . . .Davis. . . . . 12 85    
    10 00 142 . . . . .Antioch. . . . . 9 65    
    10 20 144 . . . . .Bakers. . . . . 7 50    
    10 75 151 . . . . .Nashville. . . . .        
        Arrive Leave        

         CONNECTIONS.--At Chattanooga with Western & Atlantic Rail Road for points South, [p41] and with East Tennessee & Georgia Rail-Road for the East [p37]. At Stevenson with Memphis & Charleston Rail-Road [p39]. At Cowan with branch to Tracy City. At Deckard with branch to Fayetteville. At Tullahoma with the McMinnville & Manchester Rail-Road [p47]. At Wartrace with branch to Shelbyville.

         This road is in operation only as far as Murfreesboro' at present, the Nashville end being in possession of the Federals.


Page 39

MEMPHIS & CHARLESTON ROAD.

SAM. TATE, President,
W. J. ROSS, Gen'l Sup't,
Marion, Miss.
D. BRYANT, Acting Sup't, Huntsville, Ala.

        
Stevenson to Tuscumbia.       may 27. Tuscumbia to Stevenson      
Pass   Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare   Pass
p.m.       Leave Arrive       a.m.
1 00       . . . . .Stevenson. . . . . 126 4 25   10 40
        . . . . .Flackler's. . . . .        
1 53   60 12 . . . . .Bellefonte. . . . . 114 4 65   9 46
2 19   85   . . . . .Scottsborough. . . . .   3 40   9 21
2 56   1 15 23 . . . . .Larkinsville. . . . . 103 3 10   8 46
        . . . . .Boyd's. . . . .        
3 49   1 65 34 . . . . .Woodville. . . . . 92 2 60   7 55
4 17   1 90 38 . . . . .Paint Rock. . . . . 88 2 55   7 25
        . . . . .Gurley's. . . . .        
5 08   2 10 48 . . . . .Brownsborough. . . . . 78 1 85   6 36
        . . . . .Fearn's. . . . .        
5 45   3 00 59 . . . . .Huntsville. . . . . 67 1 25   5 45
        . . . . .Matthews'. . . . .        
6 37   3 50 68 . . . . .Madison. . . . . 58 75    
        . . . . .Jones' Lane. . . . .       7 03
        . . . . .Bibb's Lane. . . . .        
7 30   4 00 78 . . . . .Mooresville. . . . . 48 25   6 11
8 10   4 25 83 . . . . .Decatur. . . . . 43     5 35
a.m.     89 . . . . .Trinity. . . . . 37     a.m.
      94 . . . . .Hillsborough. . . . . 32      
      102 . . . . .Courtland. . . . . 24      
      108 . . . . .Jonesborough. . . . . 18      
      115 . . . . .Leighton. . . . . 11      
      126 . . . . .Tuscumbia. . . . .        
        Arrive Leave        

         CONNECTIONS.--At Stevenson with Nashville & Chattanooga rail-road ((p38). At Decatur, with Nashville & Decatur rail-road (p40), now being operated by the Memphis & Charleston rail-road Company.

         Until further notice, trains will run tri-weekly between Huntsville and Decatur, on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

         The entire Western division, and a part of the Eastern division of this road, is in the possession of the Federals. Trains run through to Tuscumbia, but we presume no regular schedule can be adopted.

         STEVENSON, in Jackson county, Alabama, at the junction of the Memphis and Charleston rail-road with the Nashville and Chattanooga rail-road, thirty-seven miles from Chattanooga.

         HUNTSVILLE, a beautiful city, capital of Madison county, Alabama. It contains many handsome and costly buildings, five or six churches, two seminaries, and about 4000 inhabitants.


Page 40

NASHVILLE & DECATUR ROAD.

SAM TATE, President,
W. J. Ross, Gen'l Sup't.,
Marion, Miss.
D. BRYANT, Acting Sup't., Huntsville, Ala.

        
Pulaski to Decatur.       may 27. Decatur to Pulaski.      
Pass   Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare   Pass
a.m.       Leave Arrive        
8 20       . . . . .Decatur. . . . . 43 2 75   5 35
9 45   75   . . . . .Athens. . . . .   2 00   4 15
10 32   1 25   . . . . .Elkmont. . . . .       3 18
11 07   1 75   . . . . .State Line. . . . .   1 00   2 47
11 30   2 00   . . . . .Prospect. . . . .   75   2 26
12 03   2 25   . . . . .Aspen Hill. . . . .   50   1 56
12 40   2 75 43 . . . . .Pulaski. . . . .       1 20
p.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Decatur with Memphis & Charleston Road (p39). Until further notice, trains will run tri-weekly between Decatur and Pulaski--on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays.

ROME (GEORGIA) ROAD.

WM. S. COTHRAN, Presid't,
C. H. STILLWELL, Supt.,
J. W. STILLWELL, Ticket Ag't.
Rome, Geo.

        
Rome to Kingston.       march-- Kingston to Rome.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m.
8 30 4 00     . . . . .Rome. . . . . 20 1 00 6 30 1 00
9 00 4 30 25 5 . . . . .Dyke's Creek. . . . . 15 75 6 00 12 30
9 40 5 10 60 12 . . . . .Eve Station. . . . . 8 40 5 20 11 50
10 00 5 30 1 00 20 . . . . .Kingston. . . . .     5 00 11 30
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. a.m.

         TWO TRAINS PER DAY.--This Road connects at Rome with Steamboat, Tuesday morning to Greensport, Ala., 180 miles; with Stage every morning to Jacksonville and Blue Mountain, and with Hacks to Gadsden, tri-weekly. Connects with Western and Atlantic Rail-Road (p41) at Kingston. Rail-Road hence to Blue Mountain now in process of construction by Government.

         PULASKI, a thriving town, capital of Giles county, Tennessee, is situated on a branch of Elk river, seventy-five miles south of Nashville. It is a place of "contention and strife," between the contending armies of Tennessee; it having changed hands several times. Its once enterprising prosperity is entirely crushed and no business is now trausacted there unless it be in relation to military matters. It is the present terminus or the Nashville & Decatur rail-road.


Page 41

WESTERN & ATLANTIC (STATE) ROAD.

JOHN S. ROWLAND, Superintendent,
GEO. D. PHILLIPS, Auditor,
E. B. WALKER, Supt. Transportation,
BEN. MAY, Treasurer,
Atlanta, Ga.

        
Atlanta to Chattanooga.       march 8. Chattanooga to Atlanta.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m.
6 45 7 00     . . . . .Atlanta. . . . . 138 6 00 2 38 4 20
7 30 7 45   8 . . . . .Vinings. . . . . 130   1 53 3 30
7 50 8 05     . . . . .Ruff's. . . . .     1 35 3 05
8 15 8 30 1 00 20 . . . . .Marietta. . . . . 118 5 00 1 20 2 45
9 15 9 15 1 25 25 . . . . .Big Shanty. . . . . 113 4 75 12 47 2 05
9 45 9 45 1 50 35 . . . . .Acworth. . . . . 103 4 50 12 10 1 22
10 20 10 20 1 75 40 . . . . .Allatoona. . . . . 98 4 25 11 49 12 50
10 52 10 52 1 90 43 . . . . .Etowah. . . . . 95 4 10 11 23 12 17
11 07 11 07 2 00 47 . . . . .Cartersville. . . . . 91 4 00 11 16 12 10
11 35 11 35   49 . . . . .Rogers. . . . . 89   11 00 11 27
11 40 11 42 2 25 52 . . . . .Cass. . . . . 86 3 75 10 52 11 10
12 15 12 15 2 50 59 . . . . .Kingston. . . . . 79 3 50 10 28 10 40
12 58 12 58 3 00 69 . . . . .Adairsville. . . . . 69 3 00 9 52 9 52
2 00 2 00 3 50 78 . . . . .Calhoun. . . . . 60 2 50 9 20 9 10
2 28 2 28 3 75 84 . . . . .Resaca. . . . . 56 2 25 8 56 8 42
2 55 2 55 4 00 91 . . . . .Tilton. . . . . 47 2 00 8 34 8 15
3 35 3 35 4 50 100 . . . . .Dalton. . . . . 38 1 75 7 55 7 38
4 08 4 08 4 75 107 . . . . .Tunnel Hill. . . . . 31 1 50 7 20 6 53
4 33 4 33     . . . . .Catoosa. . . . . 27   6 55 6 25
4 43 4 13 5 00 115 . . . . .Ringgold. . . . . 23 1 00 6 26 6 02
5 12 5 12 5 25 120 . . . . .Johnson. . . . . 18 75 6 02 5 35
5 40 5 40 5 50 128 . . . . .Chickamauga. . . . . 10 60 5 37 5 10
6 00 6 00   133 . . . . .Boyce. . . . . 5   5 12 4 50
6 25 6 25 6 00 138 . . . . .Chattanooga. . . . .     4 50 4 25
p.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Atlanta with Georgia [p8], Macon & Western [p7], and Atlanta & West Point Rail-Roads [p42]. At Marietta with stages to Dahlonega. At Kingston with Rome Rail-Road (p40). At Dalton with East Tennessee & Georgia Rail-Road (p37). At Chattanooga with Nashville & Chattanooga, (p38) and branch of East Tennessee & Georgia Rail-Roads (p37).

         ATLANTA, a flourishing city in Fulton county, Georgia, known as the Gate City, from its being the grand centre of all the rail-roads north, south, east and west. The situation is elevated, and remarkably healthy. It is one of the most active business cities in the Confederacy; contains several fine churches, schools, Machine shops, and other improvements. Population about 20,000.

         MARIETTA, capital of Cobb County, Georgia, is a handsome town, situated on an eminence that overlooks the country around. It is surrounded by a fine farming country. It contains the State Military Academy, and is a well built and pleasant town. Population 3,000.


Page 42

ATLANTA & WEST POINT ROAD.

JOHN P. KING, Prest., Augusta, Geo.
GEO. G. HULL, Gen'l Supt.,
W. P. ORME, Sec. and Treas.,
Atlanta, Ga.

        
Atlanta to West Point.       march-- West Point to Atlanta.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
a.m. P.M.     Leave Arrive     P.M. A.M.
5 30 6 30     . . . . .Atlanta. . . . . 87 4 25 5 28 6 20
5 57 6 55 30 6 . . . . .East Point. . . . . 81 3 95 5 08 6 00
6 42 7 41 90 19 . . . . .Fairburn. . . . . 68 3 35 4 26 5 17
7 06 8 05 1 25 25 . . . . .Palmetto. . . . . 62 3 00 3 58 4 50
7 32 8 31 1 75 36 . . . . .Powells. . . . . 51 2 50 3 30 4 21
7 56 8 55 2 20 40 . . . . .Newnan. . . . . 47 2 25 3 10 4 00
8 55 9 42 2 60 51 . . . . .Grantville. . . . . 36 1 65 2 24 3 15
9 22 10 11 3 00 58 . . . . .Hogansville. . . . . 29 1 25 1 59 2 50
9 45 10 36     . . . . .Whitfield. . . . .     1 31 2 21
10 09 11 01 3 50 71 . . . . .La Grange. . . . . 16 75 1 10 2 00
10 47 11 38 4 00 80 . . . . .Long Cane. . . . . 7 25 12 34 1 23
11 07 11 58 4 25 87 . . . . .West Point. . . . .     12 10 1 00
A.M. P.M.     Arrive Leave     P.M. A.M.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Atlanta with Western & Atlantic Rail-Road (p41) for points North; Georgia Rail-Road (p8) for points East, and Macon & Western to Griffin, Macon, and Savannah (p7). At West Point forms junction with Montgomery & West Point Rail-Road (p43).

         EAST POINT, a post-office in Fulton county, Georgia, six miles from Atlanta, and at the junction of the Atlanta & West Point rail-road with the Macon & Western.

         FAIRBURN, a post village on the line between Campbell and Fayette counties, nineteen miles from Atlanta.

         NEWNAN, capital of Coweta County, Georgia, is a fine promising town. It contains a brick Court House, two churches, two academies, and a newspaper office. Besides the rail-road from Atlanta to West Point passing through the town, the new road from Griffin to Decatur, Alabama, also passes through it.

         GRANTVILLE, a post-town in Coweta County, Georgia, fifty one miles from Atlanta.

         HOGANSVILLE, a post-town in Troup County, Georgia, thirteen miles from La Grange, the county seat.

         LA GRANGE, capital of Troup county, Georgia, is seventy-one miles from Atlanta, and is celebrated for its schools. The following named schools are located there: La Grange High School, the Brownwood University, the La Grange Female Seminary, and the La Grange Female Institution. Population about 1,400.

         LONG CANE, a post-town in Troup connty, Georgia, eighty miles from Atlanta, and seven from West Point.


Page 43

MONTGOMERY & WEST POINT ROAD.

CHARLES T. POLLARD, President,
DANIEL H. CRAM, Superintendent,
Montgomery, Ala.

        
West Point to Montgomery.       march-- Montgomery to West Point.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
P.M. A.M.     Leave Arrive     P.M. A.M.
1 00 12 40     . . . . .West Point. . . . . 88 4 50 11 25 11 40
1 42 1 23 50 11 . . . . .Cusseta. . . . . 77 4 00 10 40 11 00
2 15 1 54 1 00 18 . . . . .Rough & Ready. . . . . 70 3 50 10 07 10 28
        (Columbus Branch)        
  12 00     . . . . .Columbus. . . . . 95 4 75   12 41
  12 05     . . . . .Chattahooche. . . . .       12 10
  12 37 25 10 . . . . .Smith's. . . . . 85 4 50   11 37
  1 18 75 18 . . . . .Salem. . . . . 77 4 00   10 56
  1 50 1 25 25 . . . . .Yonge's. . . . . 70 3 50   10 23
  2 05 1 45 29 . . . . .Opelika. . . . .       10 05
2 54 2 16 1 20 22 . . . . .Opelika. . . . . 66 3 30 9 45 10 07
3 27 2 47 1 50 28 . . . . .Auburn. . . . . 60 3 00 9 12 9 18
4 04 3 20 1 80 35 . . . . .Loachapoka. . . . . 53 2 70 8 36 8 44
4 31 3 45 2 10 41 . . . . .Notasulga. . . . . 47 2 40 8 10 8 19
5 02 4 12 2 50 48 . . . . .Chehaw*. . . . . 40 2 00 7 41 7 52
5 16 4 26 2 70 52 . . . . .Clough's. . . . . 36 1 80 7 11 7 36
5 26 4 35 2 85 54 . . . . .Franklin. . . . . 34 1 65 7 04 7 29
5 40 4 50 3 00 58 . . . . .Cowles. . . . . 30 1 50 6 50 7 15
6 05 5 16 3 25 64 . . . . .Shorter's. . . . . 24 1 25 6 24 6 50
6 15 5 26 3 60 67 . . . . .Cliett's. . . . . 21 1 00 6 15 6 41
6 37 5 47 3 75 73 . . . . .Mt. Meigs. . . . . 15 75 5 50 6 19
6 47 6 08 3 95 77 . . . . .Tippecanoe. . . . . 11 55 5 36 6 08
6 59 6 23 4 15 82 . . . . .Six mile Station. . . . . 6 35 5 24 5 55
7 20 6 45 4 50 88 . . . . .Montgomery. . . . .     5 00 5 30
P.M. A.M.     Arrive Leave     P.M. A.M.

         CONNECTIONS.--At West Point with Atlanta & West Point Rail-Road (p42). At Opelika with branch to Columbus. At Montgomery with Alabama & Florida (p46), and Alabama & Mississippi Rivers Rail-Roads (p44), and with steamers for all points on the Alabama river.


         *Supper House.


         WEST POINT, Ga., on the West shore of the Chattahoochee river, is the point of junction of the Montgomery & West Point road with the Atlanta & West Point road. Population, 900.

         COLUMBUS, Ga., on the Chattahoochee river, opposite Girard, was one of the largest cotton marts of the State before the war, is also an important rail-road centre, has several manufactories in successful operation. Population, 10,000.

         MONTGOMERY, Ala., capitol of the State, on the Alabama river, 340 miles above Mobile, with which it is connected by regular lines of steamboats. Population, 12,000.


Page 44

ALABAMA & MISSISSIPPI RIVERS ROAD.

Dr. G. G. GRIFFIN,
A. Y. SHARPE, Sec'y & Treas'r.
M. B. PRITCHARD, Chief Eng'r & Sup't.
Demopolis, Ala.

        
Selma to Meridian.       may 3. Meridian to Selma.      
Pass Mail. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Mail. Pass
p.m. a.m.     Leave. Arrive.     p.m. a.m.
3 00 7 30     . . . . .Selma. . . . . 107   3 00 9 30
3 30 8 00   8 . . . . .Woolsey's. . . . . 99   2 28 8 58
4 00 8 22   14 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 93   2 05 8 30
4 28 8 45   20 . . . . .Walker's. . . . . 87   1 40 7 58
4 40 8 58   22 . . . . .Bellevue. . . . . 85   1 30 7 45
5 00 9 10   24 . . . . .Coffee Springs. . . . . 83   1 18 7 35
5 30 9 27   30 . . . . .Uuiontown. . . . . 77   1 08 7 10
        (Newberne Branch.)        
5 30       . . . . .Uniontown. . . . . 11     7 00
6 15     11 . . . . .Newberne. . . . .       6 15
  9 47   35 . . . . .Fawnsdale. . . . . 72   12 40  
  10 13   42 . . . . .Macon. . . . . 65   12 15  
  10 27   45 . . . . .Van Dorn. . . . . 62   12 02  
  10 45   50 . . . . .Demopolis*. . . . . 57   11 45  
  12 00   55 . . . . .McDowell's. . . . . 52   9 45  
  12 45   66 . . . . .Coatopa. . . . . 41   8 46  
  12 58   69 . . . . .Lee's. . . . . 38   8 28  
  1 15   73 . . . . .Bennett's. . . . . 34   8 12  
  1 45   80 . . . . .York. . . . . 27   7 40  
  2 06   86 . . . . .Cuba. . . . . 21   7 20  
  2 36   94 . . . . .Toomsuba. . . . . 13   6 48  
  3 06   101 . . . . .Marion. . . . . 6   6 24  
  3 30   107 . . . . .Meridian. . . . .     6 00  
  p.m.     Arrive. Leave.     p.m.  

         CONNECTIONS.--At Montgomery with Montgomery & West Point [p43], and Alabama & Florida rail-roads (p46). At Selma with steamers up and down the Alabama river, and with Alabama & Tennessee River Rail-Road (p45). At Junction with Marion & Greensboro' Rail-Road, Running to Marion, Ala., (p63). At Uniontown with branch to Newberne. At Meridian with Southern (p50), and Mobile & Ohio Rail Roads (p48).

         It is the design of this road to run to Montgomery--making the line complete from Montgomery to Meridian. But, for the present passengers carried between Montgomery and Selma by a line of daily steamers.


         *From Demopolis to McDowell's, passengers are carried by Steamboat Marengo on the Tombigbee river. Before taking the boat at Demopolis westward, however, passengers have ample time to get a good dinner at the River Hotel, also, on leaving the boat eastward.



Page 45

ALABAMA & TENNESSEE RIVER ROAD.

THOS. A. WALKER, President, Jacksonville, Ala.
W. ROTHROCK, Gen'l Sup't, Selma, Ala.

        
Selma to Blue Mountain.       may 5. Blue Mountain to Selma.      
Pass Frt. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Frt. Pass
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
9 30 5 55     . . . . .Selma. . . . . 135 6 75 5 40 2 20
10 04   45 9 . . . . .Burnsville. . . . . 126 6 30   1 52
10 31   80 16 . . . . .Jones'. . . . . 119 5 95   1 26
10 52   1 10 22 . . . . .Plantersville. . . . . 113 5 65   1 06
11 24   1 55 31 . . . . .Maplesville. . . . . 104 5 20   12 35
12 08   1 95 39 . . . . .Randolph. . . . . 96 4 80   12 08
12 39   2 40 48 . . . . .Centerville. . . . . 87 4 35   11 21
1 01   2 75 55 . . . . .Montevallo. . . . . 80 4 00   10 59
1 22   3 05 61 . . . . .Lime Kilns. . . . . 74 3 70   10 36
1 45   3 30 66 . . . . .Shelby Springs. . . . . 69 3 45   10 17
2 07   3 60 72 . . . . .Columbiana. . . . . 63 3 15   9 51
2 35   4 05 81 . . . . .Wilsonville. . . . . 54 2 70   9 21
2 56   4 30 86 . . . . .Coosa. . . . . 49 2 45   9 04
3 06   4 45 89 . . . . .Childersburg. . . . . 46 2 30   8 54
3 36   4 90 98 . . . . .Alpine. . . . . 37 1 85   8 23
4 18   5 45 109 . . . . .Talladega. . . . . 26 1 30   7 43
4 35   5 75 115 . . . . .Curry's. . . . . 20 1 00   7 24
4 51   6 00 120 . . . . .Munford. . . . . 15 75   7 07
5 07   6 25 125 . . . . .Silver Run. . . . . 10 50   6 50
5 24   6 50 130 . . . . .Oxford. . . . . 5 25   6 34
5 40 5 45 6 75 135 . . . . .Blue Mountain. . . . .     6 10 6 15
p.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Selma with Alabama & Mississippi Rivers Rail-Road (p44), to Meridian and Vicksburg, and with Steam-Boats to Mobile and Montgomery (p64). At Blue Mountain with Stages for Rome.

         SELMA, Ala., on the Alabama river, 70 miles below Montgomery, is an active business place. The Alabama & Mississippi Rivers Rail-Road passes through the city, and forms a link in the great chain of roads from the seabord to the Mississippi. The road is not, however, in operation East of Selma, but the connection is made with Montgomery by a line of steamers belonging to the company. Population, 5,000

         TALLADEGA, Ala., is somewhat generally known as being in the gold region of North Alabama. It is an old town of considerable activity in trade, and promises to rank among the leading inland cities.

         BLUE MOUNTAIN, Ala., the present terminus of the Alabama & Tennessee River Rail-Road, is a very small village, principally noted from its being a centre for stage lines, and proposed railroads, one of which is now being built through from Rome, Ga., by the Confederate Government.


Page 46

ALABAMA & FLORIDA ROAD.,

CHAS. T. POLLARD, President,
SAMUEL G. JONES, Eng. and Supt.,
Montgomery, Ala.

        
Montgomery to Pollard.       April 1. Pollard to Montgomery.      
Mail. Fr't. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Fr't Mail.
a.m. p.m.     Leave. Arrive.     p.m. a.m.
9 30 9 00     . . . . .Montgomery. . . . . 112 6 00 1 15 3 45
10 03   50 8 . . . . .McGhee's. . . . . 104 5 50   3 20
11 02   1 00 20 . . . . .Letohatchie. . . . . 92 5 00   2 30
11 30     24 . . . . .Givhan's. . . . . 87     2 00
11 50   1 50 27 . . . . .Calhoun. . . . . 85 4 50   1 48
12 15   2 00 32 . . . . .Ft. Deposit. . . . . 80 4 00   1 20
1 25   2 75 43 . . . . .Greenville*. . . . . 69 3 25   12 25
2 15   3 00 52 . . . . .Bolling. . . . . 60 3 00   11 25
2 42   3 50 60 . . . . .Georgiana. . . . . 52 2 50   11 03
3 10   3 75 65 . . . . .Garland. . . . . 47 2 25   10 35
3 50     75 . . . . .Gravella. . . . . 37 1 50   9 45
4 08   4 50 80 . . . . .Evergreen. . . . . 32     9 25
4 35   4 75 85 . . . . .Sparta. . . . . 27 1 25   8 35
4 55     90 . . . . .Castleberry. . . . . 22     8 07
5 50   5 50 105 . . . . .Brewton. . . . . 7 50   7 12
6 15 10 00 6 00 112 . . . . .Pollard. . . . .     12 45 6 45
p.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Pollard with Mobile and Great Northern Rail-Road (p47), for Mobile. From Pollard to Pensacola the Road is discontinued--the Federals occupy Pensacola end.


         * BEDELL HOUSE--Trains stop 20 minutes for meals--a good house.


VICKSBURG, SHREVEPORT & TEXAS ROAD.

CHARLES G. YOUNG, President, Monroe, La.

        
From DeSoto to Monroe.       -- From Monroe to DeSoto.      
      Mls. STATIONS. Mls.      
        Leave Arrive        
        . . . . .DeSoto. . . . . 74      
      20 . . . . .Tullulah. . . . . 54      
      26 . . . . .Quebec. . . . . 48      
      30 . . . . .Dallas. . . . . 44      
      39 . . . . .Delhi. . . . . 35      
      63 . . . . .Girard. . . . . 11      
      74 . . . . .Monroe. . . . .        
        Arrive Leave        

         This road starts at DeSoto, on the west bank of the Mississippi River, and opposite Vicksburg, and extends to Shreveport, Louisiana. It is finished to Monroe, La., a distance of seventy-four miles. The Federals have possession of the eastern terminus.


Page 47

MOBILE & GREAT NORTHERN ROAD.

Col. W. D. DUNN, President,
G. JORDAN, Chief Eng. And Supt.,
Mobile, Ala.

        
Mobile to Pollard.       April-- Pollard to Mobile.      
Pass Fr't. Fare Mls. STATIONS Mls. Fare Fr't. Pass
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
11 45 11 45     . . . . .Mobile. . . . . 72 3 50 2 00 2 00
1 10   1 00 13 By. . . . .Blakely. . . . .Boat 59 2 50   12 45
2 45   1 50 22 . . . . .Tensas. . . . . 50 2 00   11 40
3 21   1 50 31 . . . . .Bay Minette. . . . . 41 2 00   10 20
4 15   2 00 43 . . . . .Perdido. . . . . 29 1 50   9 20
4 48   2 75 51 . . . . .Williams. . . . . 21 75   8 39
5 07   2 75 56 . . . . .Canoe. . . . . 16 75   8 17
5 38   3 00 64 . . . . .Miles. . . . . 8 50   7 40
6 15 12 00 3 50 72 . . . . .Pollard. . . . .     10 30 7 00
p.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Mobile with Mobile & Ohio Rail-Road (p48), for points North, and with Steamers for Alabama and Tombigbee Rivers. At Pollard with Alabama & Florida Rail-Road (p46).

MCMINNVILLE & MANCHESTER ROAD.

P. H. MARBURY, President,
P. H. COFFEE, Superintendent,
McMinnville, Tenn.

        
McMinnville to Tullahoma.       January--. Tullahoma to McMinnville.      
Pass Frt. Fare Mls. STATIONS Mls. Fare Frt. Pass
a.m.       Leave Arrive       p.m.
8 15       . . . . .McMinnville. . . . . 35 1 50   4 30
8 30   20 4 . . . . .Smartt's. . . . . 31 1 35   4 15
9 00   50 10 . . . . .Morrison. . . . . 25 1 00   3 45
9 15   65 15 . . . . .Sumitville. . . . . 20 85   3 30
10 15   1 00 23 . . . . .Manchester. . . . . 12 50   2 30
10 45   1 25 29 . . . . .Concord. . . . . 6 25   2 00
11 15   1 50 35 . . . . .Tullahoma. . . . .       1 30
a.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Tullahoma with Nashville & Chattanooga Rail-Road (p38), for points North and South.

         MCMINNVILLE, capital of Warren county, Tennessee, may be considered as occupying the battle-ground of this revolution. It is seventy-five miles south-east of Nashville.

         TULLAHOMA, a post-town and important rail-road station in Coffee county, on Rock Creek, seventy miles south-east of Nashville. The McMinnville and Manchester rail-road, forms a junction here with the Nashville and Chattanooga rail-road.


Page 48

MOBILE & OHIO ROAD.

HON. MILTON BROWN, President,
A. F. IRWIN, Treasurer,
J. P. RUTLAND, Secretary,
O. S. BEERS, Auditor,
L. J. FLEMING, Chief Eng. & Gen'l Supt.
J. P. FRESENIUS, Ass't Superintendent,
J. J. WILLIAMS, Agent,
M. M. HANKINS, Master Machinist.
Mobile, Ala.

        
Mobile to Corinth.       Sept. 7. Corinth to Mobile.      
Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
A.M. P.M.     Leave Arrive     A.M. P.M.
7 00 5 00     . . . . .Mobile. . . . . 328 16 45 8 40 8 00
7 13 5 15 25 3 . . . . .Toulminville. . . . . 325 16 35 8 25 7 46
7 22 5 25 25 5 . . . . .Whistler. . . . . 323 16 10 8 15 7 36
7 31 5 35 35 7 . . . . .Eight Mile. . . . . 321 16 00 8 05 7 26
7 47 5 55 55 11 . . . . .Kushla. . . . . 317 15 80 7 47 7 08
7 56 6 04 65 13 . . . . .Mauvila. . . . . 315 15 70 7 38 7 00
8 02 6 08 70 14 . . . . .Oak Grove. . . . . 314 15 65 7 32 6 52
8 10 6 18 80 16 . . . . .Bell Air. . . . . 312 15 55 7 25 6 45
8 20 6 30 90 18 . . . . .Chunchula. . . . . 310 15 45 7 08 6 30
8 50 7 04 1 25 25 . . . . .Beaver Meadow. . . . . 303 15 10 6 35 5 55
9 07 7 24 1 45 29 . . . . .Langdon. . . . . 299 14 90 6 18 4 35
9 16 7 35 1 60 31 . . . . .Sydney. . . . . 297 14 75 6 06 5 20
9 24 7 45 1 65 33 . . . . .Citronelle. . . . . 295 14 70 6 00 5 12
10 07 8 35 2 15 43 . . . . .Deer Park. . . . . 285 14 20 5 10 4 22
10 37 9 05 2 50 50 . . . . .Escatawpa. . . . . 278 13 95 4 35 3 45
10 55 9 25 2 70 54 . . . . .Brushy Creek. . . . . 274 13 75 4 20 3 25
11 30 10 05 3 10 62 . . . . .State Line. . . . . 266 13 35 3 41 2 40
12 05 10 45 3 55 71 . . . . .Buckatunna. . . . . 257 12 90 3 00 1 58
12 30 11 15 3 80 76 . . . . .Winchester. . . . . 252 12 65 2 30 1 28
12 56 11 45 4 15 82 . . . . .Waynesboro. . . . . 246 12 30 2 05 12 56
1 40 12 30 4 60 92 . . . . .Red Bluff. . . . . 236 11 85 1 12 12 15
2 00 12 50 4 80 96 . . . . .Shubuta. . . . . 232 11 65 12 50 11 55
2 32 1 30 5 20 104 . . . . .Desoto. . . . . 224 11 25 12 12 11 22
2 53 1 55 5 45 109 . . . . .Quitman. . . . . 219 11 00 11 45 11 00
3 20 2 25 5 75 115 . . . . .Choctaw. . . . . 213 10 70 11 10 10 30
4 00 2 50 6 00 120 . . . . .Enterprise. . . . . 208 10 45 10 43 10 10
4 38 3 35 6 50 129 . . . . .Okatibbee. . . . . 199 9 95 9 57 9 22
5 20 4 00 6 75 134 . . . . .Meridian. . . . . 194 9 70 9 27 9 00
5 45 4 27 7 00 139 . . . . .Marion. . . . . 189 9 45 9 00 8 25
6 20 5 03 7 30 146 . . . . .Lockhart. . . . . 182 9 15 8 20 7 47
6 52 5 34 7 65 153 . . . . .Lauderdale. . . . . 175 8 80 7 45 7 17
7 15 6 00 7 90 158 . . . . .Tamola. . . . . 170 8 55 7 15 6 52
7 40 6 27 8 15 163 . . . . .Gainesville Junction. . . . . 165 8 30 6 50 6 27
8 05 7 00 8 45 169 . . . . .Sucarnochee. . . . . 159 8 00 6 23 5 55
8 40 7 35 8 80 176 . . . . .Scooba. . . . . 152 7 65 5 50 5 20
9 08 8 05 9 10 181 . . . . .Wahalak. . . . . 147 7 35 5 20 4 50
9 38 8 35 9 40 187 . . . . .Shuqulak. . . . . 141 7 05 4 50 4 20


Page 49

Pass Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Pass
P.M. A.M.     Leave Arrive     P.M. A.M.
10 28 9 25 9 90 197 . . . . .Macon. . . . . 131 6 55 4 00 3 25
11 06 10 07 10 30 205 . . . . .Brooksville. . . . . 123 6 15 3 13 2 43
11 27 10 30 10 50 210 . . . . .Crawford. . . . . 118 5 95 2 53 2 22
12 08 11 10 10 95 218 . . . . .Artesia. . . . . 110 5 50 2 10 1 40
        (Columbus Branch.)        
2 00 2 20     . . . . .Artesia. . . . . 15 70 11 40 11 00
2 50 3 10 11 25 225 . . . . .Cobbs. . . . . 8 40 10 50 10 20
3 30 3 50 11 65 233 . . . . .Columbus. . . . .     10 00 9 30
12 40 11 45 11 20 223 . . . . .Mayhew. . . . . 105 5 25 1 45 1 10
12 55 12 20 11 35 227 . . . . .Tibbee. . . . . 101 5 10 1 30 12 55
1 20 12 45 11 60 232 . . . . .West Point. . . . . 96 4 85 12 45 12 30
1 55 1 22 12 00 239 . . . . .Loohatan. . . . . 89 4 45 12 07 11 50
2 27 1 52 12 25 245 . . . . .Prairie. . . . . 83 4 20 11 36 11 20
3 05 2 35 12 70 253 . . . . .Egypt. . . . . 75 3 75 11 00 10 35
3 40 3 15 13 05 261 . . . . .Okolona*. . . . . 67 340 10 20 9 55
4 18 3 55 13 45 268 . . . . .Shannon. . . . . 60 3 00 9 35 9 10
4 48 4 20 13 70 274 . . . . .Verona. . . . . 54 2 75 9 10 8 40
5 08 4 40 13 95 278 . . . . .Tupelo. . . . . 50 2 50 8 50 8 20
5 48 5 25 14 35 287 . . . . .Saltillo. . . . . 41 2 10 8 10 7 35
6 10 5 55 14 60 291 . . . . .Guntown. . . . . 37 1 85 7 45 7 10
7 00 6 20 14 85 297 . . . . .Baldwyn. . . . . 31 1 60 7 20 6 40
7 53 7 15 15 40 308 . . . . . Boonville . . . . . 20 1 05 6 10 5 32
8 30 8 00 15 80 316 . . . . .Rienzi. . . . . 12 65 5 30 4 55
9 25 9 00 16 45 328 . . . . .Corinth. . . . .     4 30 4 00
A.M. P.M.     Arrive Leave     P.M. P.M.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Mobile with Mobile & Great Northern Rail-Road (p47), for Montgomery and points North-East, and with steamers for the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers. At Meridian with Southern Mississippi (p50), and Alabama & Mississippi Rivers Rail-Roads (p44). At Artesia with branch to Columbus. At Corinth with Memphis & Charleston road (p39), East and West.


         * The cars run only as far as Okolona at present.


         MOBILE, Ala.--A wealthy city on the West side of Mobile river, 30 miles from the Gulf; is connected with the inland cities on the Alabama and Tombigbee rivers by steamboats. The bay is blockaded by the Federal fleet, but the entrance is protected against them by a number of very powerful fortifications. Population 30,000.

         MERIDIAN, Miss., on the line of this road, is a village formerly known by the name of Sowashee, and is destined to be a very important rail-road city. It is the terminus of the Southern and the Alabama and Mississippi Rivers Rail-Roads. Population, 1,000.

         COLUMBUS, Miss., the capital of Lowndes county, and terminus of the Columbus branch of the Mobile & Ohio rail-road.


Page 50

SOUTHERN (MISSISSIPPI) ROAD.

---- President,
MORRIS EMANUEL, V. President,
CHARLES S. WILLIAMS, Superintendent,
Vicksburg, Miss.

        
Vicksburg to Meridian.       march-- Meridian to Vicksburg.      
Pass Exp. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Exp. Pass
P.M. A.M.     Leave Arrive     A.M. P.M.
12 05 4 45     . . . . .Vicksburg. . . . . 140 8 00 11 40 10 55
12 29       . . . . .Four mile Siding. . . . .       10 31
1 17   50 10 . . . . .Bovina. . . . . 130 7 50   9 45
2 07   1 00 18 . . . . .Edwards. . . . . 122 7 00   8 55
2 43       . . . . .Midway. . . . .       8 15
3 15   1 50 27 . . . . .Bolton. . . . . 113 6 50   7 48
4 06   2 00 36 . . . . .Clinton. . . . . 104 6 00   6 57
5 30   2 50 44 . . . . .Jackson Junction. . . . . 96 5 50   6 00
5 40   2 50 45 . . . . .Jackson Station. . . . . 95 5 00   5 25
6 20   3 00 52 . . . . .Howell's. . . . . 88 5 00   4 44
7 35   3 50 59 . . . . .Brandon. . . . . 86 4 50   3 54
7 06   4 00 64 . . . . .Speer's. . . . . 76 4 00   3 22
8 14   4 00 70 . . . . .Pelahatchie. . . . . 70 4 00   2 42
9 08   4 50 79 . . . . .Morton. . . . . 61 3 50   1 47
10 18   5 00 89 . . . . .Forest. . . . . 51 3 00   12 17
11 15   5 50 100 . . . . .Lake. . . . . 40 2 50   11 19
12 14   6 00 110 . . . . .Newton. . . . . 30 2 00   10 17
12 49   6 50 119 . . . . .Hickory. . . . . 21 1 50   9 32
1 19   7 00 126 . . . . .Chunckey. . . . . 14 1 60   8 53
2 09   7 50 134 . . . . .Tunnel Hill. . . . . 6 50   7 54
3 00 11 20 8 00 140 . . . . .Meridian. . . . .     3 00 7 00
A.M. P.M.     Arrive Leave     A.M. A.M.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Meridian with Mobile & Ohio Rail-Road (p48), and Alabama & Mississippi Rivers Rail-Road (p44), East. At Jackson Junction with New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern Rail-Road (p51), North and South. At Vicksburg with Vicksburg & Shreveport Rail-Road (p46), and Steamers on the Mississippi River.

         VICKSBURG, Miss., forty-six miles from Jackson, on the Mississippi river, is now one of the strongholds of the Confederacy. The eneemy has made several attempts to take the city, but so far has failed. He has now turned his attention to altering the channel of the river, by digging a canal across the peninsula opposite Vicksburg, by which means he hopes to navigate the Father of Waters without coming in contact with the great natural defenses of Vicksburg. Population in 1860, 5,000.

         CLINTON, a post-town in Hinds county, Mississippi, nine miles west of Jackson. It is the seat of the Mississippi Oollege.

         BRANDON, capital of Rankin county, Mississippi, fourteen miles east of Jackson, and fifty-nine from Vicksburg. Population about 700


Page 51

NEW ORLEANS, JACKSON & GREAT NORTHERN ROAD,

H. J. RANEY, President,
T. S. WILLIAMS, Gen'l Supt.,
Canton Miss.

        
Pouchatoula to Canton.       march--. Canton to Pouchatoula.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
A.M.       Leave Arrive       A.M.
7 00       . . . . .Pouchatoula. . . . . 162 8 00   6 20
7 40   50 10 . . . . .Tickfaw. . . . . 152 7 50   5 50
8 15   1 00 20 . . . . .Amite. . . . . 142 7 00   5 10
8 55   1 50 31 . . . . .Tangipahoa. . . . . 131 6 50   4 35
9 30   2 00 40 . . . . .Osyka. . . . . 122 6 00   3 35
10 10   2 50 50 . . . . .Magnolia. . . . . 112 5 50   3 00
10 45   3 00 60 . . . . .Summit. . . . . 102 5 00   2 20
12 30   4 00 81 . . . . .Brook Haven. . . . . 81 4 00   1 00
1 10   4 50 91 . . . . .Bahala. . . . . 71 3 50   11 55
1 50   5 00 101 . . . . .Hazlehurst. . . . . 61 3 00   11 15
2 30   5 50 110 . . . . .Crystal Springs. . . . . 52 2 50   10 40
3 05   6 00 119 . . . . .Terry. . . . . 43 2 00   10 05
3 40 A.M. 6 50 130 . . . . .Byram. . . . . 32 1 50 P.M. 9 40
4 35 7 35 7 00 139 . . . . .Jackson. . . . . 23 1 00 4 30 9 00
5 05   7 50 146 . . . . .Tugaloo. . . . . 16     8 10
5 30   8 00 155 . . . . .Calhoun. . . . . 7     7 30
6 20 9 00 8 00 162 . . . . .Canton. . . . .     3 00 7 00
P.M. A.M.     Arrive Leave     P.M. A.M.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Canton with Mississippi Central Rail-Road (p62), North. At Jackson with Southern Rail-Road (p50), East and West. The Southern terminus of this road (New Orleans,) is occupied by the enemy.

         PONCHATOULA, La., at present the terminus of the New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern rail-road, is a post-town of some importance.

         BROOK HAVEN, a post town in Lawrence county, Mississippi, fifty-eight miles south of Jackson. Population about 400.

         JACKSON, Miss., is situated on Pearl River, and on the Southern (Miss.) Rail-Road, 45 miles front Vicksburg. It is the seat of the State government. Before the war Jackson was a noted cotton market, and one of the most flourishing in the State. It is connected by the New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern Rail-Road with all points North and South, and by the Southern Rail-Road with other Roads East and West. Population, 8,000.

         CANTON, capital of Madison county, Mississippi, is twenty-three miles north of Jackson. It is the Northern terminus of the New Orleans, Jackson & Great Northern rail-road, and the Southern terminus of the Mississippi Central rail-road.


Page 52

MOBILE & GIRARD ROAD,

W. H. MITCHELL, President,
B. E. WELLS, Superintendent,
Columbus, Ga.

        
Girard to Union Springs.       August 1. Union Springs to Girard.      
Pass Frt. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Frt. Pass
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
3 00 5 50     . . . . .Girard. . . . . 52 3 00 6 52 10 00
3 35   50 9 . . . . .Fort Mitchell. . . . . 43 2 50   9 30
4 10   1 00 18 . . . . .Seal's Station. . . . . 34 2 00   8 55
4 50   1 50 25 . . . . .Hatchachian. . . . . 27 1 60   8 15
5 45   2 00 35 . . . . .Piersons. . . . . 17 1 00   7 20
6 15   2 40 30 . . . . .Guerryton. . . . . 12 75   6 50
6 40   2 60 44 . . . . .Suspension. . . . . 8 50   6 25
7 00   2 80 47 . . . . .Chunnuggee. . . . . 5 30   6 05
7 25 11 28 3 00 52 . . . . .Union Springs. . . . .     1 10 5 35
a.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Girard with Branch of Montgomery & West Point (p43). At Seal's with stages for Eufaula. Girard is on the opposite side of the Chattahoochee river from Columbus, Ga., at which point this road connects with the Muscogee Rail-Road (p52). At Union Springs by stages to Clayton, Enon and Midway.

MUSCOGEE ROAD.

JOHN L. MUSTIAN, President,
W. L. CLARK, Superintendent,
Columbus, Geo.

        
Butler to Columbus.       march 12. Columbus to Butler.      
Pass   Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare   Pass
p.m.       Leave Arrive       p.m.
8 37       . . . . .Butler. . . . . 50 2 50   3 43
9 10   50 10 . . . . .Howard's. . . . . 40 2 00   3 11
9 48   1 00 20 . . . . .Geneva. . . . . 30 2 00   2 35
10 03   1 00 24 . . . . .Juniper. . . . . 26 1 75   2 18
10 16   1 25 27 . . . . .Box Spring. . . . . 23 1 50   2 06
10 28   1 50 30 . . . . .Upatoie. . . . . 20 1 00   1 53
11 10   2 00 41 . . . . . Schotulga . . . . . 9 50   1 13
11 40   2 50 50 . . . . .Columbus. . . . .       12 40
p.m.       Arrive Leave       p.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Butler with branch of South-Western Rail-Road (p54), for Macon. At Columbus with branch of Montgomery & West Point Road (p43), and with Mobile & Girard Rail-Road (p)52, now running as far as Union Springs, but intended to connect at Pollard with Mobile & Great Northern.

         UPATOIE, a post-town in Muscogee county, Georgia, twenty miles from Columbus.


Page 53

SAVANNAH, GRIFFIN & NORTH ALABAMA ROAD.

M. G. DOBBINS, President,
W. J. JOSSEY, Secretary and Treasurer,
Griffin, Ga.

         This company was organized October 6th, 1859, with a capital of over $700,000.

         The principal grading, from Griffin to the Chattahoochee river, in Coweta county, has been completed, and the company is now in good condition, being free from debt. And although the progress in building was temporarily suspended, on account of the war, still they are ready to resume whenever a favorable time arrives.

         This road makes important connections, as will be seen by reference to a map. Starting at Griffin, Ga., via Newnan, to Decatur, Ala., reducing the distance from Memphis to Savannah about 100 miles, and to Charleston 75 miles. It penetrates a populous and fertile section of country, hitherto undeveloped. Principal office at Griffin, Ga.

UPSON COUNTY ROAD.

ISAAC SCOTT, President,
ALFRED L. TYLER, Treasurer,
Macon, Ga.
R. H. GARLAND, Superintendent, The Rock, Ga.

        
Barnesville to Thomaston.       march--. Thomaston to Barnesville.      
Pass Frt. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Frt. Pass
p.m.       Leave Arrive       a.m.
3 00       . . . . .Barnesville. . . . . 16 1 25   11 15
3 45   75 8 . . . . .The Rock. . . . . 8 75   10 30
4 15   1 25 16 . . . . .Thomaston. . . . .       9 45
p.m.       Arrive Leave       a.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Barnesville with Macon and Western Rail-Road (p7), for points North, West, and East.

         BARNESVILLE, a thriving town of Pike county, Georgia, forty-two miles from Macon, and eighteen from Griffin, is situated at the junction of the Upson county rail-road with the Macon & Western rail-road. Population about 900.

         THE ROCK, in Upson County, Georgia, a post-town, fifty miles from Macon.

         THOMASTON. capital of Upson county, Georgia, has a handsome brick courthouse, two churches, two academies, and several stores. There is a cotton factory on Potato Crock, one mile from the village, which employs, when in operation, fifty operatlves. Population about 2,000.

         DECATUR, a pleasant post-town, in Morgan county, Alabama, on the left bank of the Tennessee river, and the designed Western terminus of the Savannah, Griffin & North Alabama rail-road.


Page 54

SOUTH-WESTERN ROAD.

R. R. CUYLER, Prest., Sav., Ga. VIRGIL POWERS, Supt., Macon, Ga.

        
Macon to Eufaula.       march 19. Eufaula to Macon.      
Mail. Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Mail.
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
6 20 5 25     . . . . .Macon. . . . . 143 6 60 6 52 5 21
6 47 5 52 40 8 . . . . .Seago's. . . . . 135 6 10 6 25 4 52
7 05 6 10 60 12 . . . . .Echeconnee. . . . . 131 5 95 6 10 4 37
7 23 6 26 90 17 . . . . .Jackson's. . . . . 126 5 70 5 52 4 17
7 40 6 41 1 10 21 . . . . .Powersville. . . . . 122 5 50 5 38 4 02
8 28 7 05 1 50 29 . . . . .Fort Valley. . . . . 114 5 20 5 14 3 30
        (Columbus Branch.)        
  7 21     . . . . .Fort Valley. . . . .   1 00 4 59  
  7 42 1 80 36 . . . . .Everett's. . . . . 14 70 4 37  
  8 05 2 15 42 . . . . .Reynold's. . . . . 8 35 4 13  
  8 22   46 . . . . .Thompson. . . . . 4   3 57  
  8 37 2 50 50 . . . . .Butler. . . . .     3 46  
8 55   1 80 36 . . . . .Marshalville. . . . . 106 5 45   2 47
9 06   2 00 39 . . . . .Winchester. . . . . 104 5 25   2 35
9 23   2 15 43 . . . . .Marthasville. . . . . 100 5 10   2 18
9 47   2 50 49 . . . . .Montezuma. . . . . 94 4 75   1 55
9 55   2 60 50 . . . . .Oglethorpe. . . . . 93 4 65   1 45
10 34   3 00 60 . . . . .Anderson. . . . . 83 4 25   1 09
11 16   3 50 70 . . . . .Americus. . . . . 73 3 75   12 29
11 52   4 00 80 . . . . .Sumter. . . . . 63 3 25   11 50
12 28   4 15 83 . . . . .Smithville. . . . . 60 3 10   11 37
        (Albany Branch.)        
12 30 4 50     . . . . .Smithville. . . . . 24 1 10 4 22 11 20
12 55 5 15 4 50 6 . . . . .Adams. . . . . 17 85 4 02 11 00
1 25 5 45 4 80 13 . . . . .Wooten's. . . . . 11 55 3 35 10 33
2 03 6 30 5 35 24 . . . . .Albany. . . . .     2 50 9 50
12 59   4 60 91 . . . . .Brown's. . . . . 52 2 65   10 59
1 27   5 00 98 . . . . .Dawson. . . . . 45 2 25   10 35
2 10   5 50 108 . . . . .Ward's. . . . . 34 1 75   9 55
2 52   6 00 113 . . . . .Cuthbert. . . . . 24 1 25   9 20
        (Fort Gaines Branch.)        
2 55 9 45     . . . . .Cuthbert. . . . . 22 1 00 2 03 9 25
3 05 9 55 6 15 2 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 20 85 1 53 9 15
3 44 10 36 6 50 10 . . . . .Coleman. . . . . 12 50 1 06 8 27
4 38 11 33 7 00 22 . . . . .Port Gaines. . . . .     12 05 7 30
3 35   6 50 129 . . . . .Morris. . . . . 14 75   8 33
3 58   6 65 134 . . . . .Hatcher. . . . . 9 60   8 12
4 31   7 00 141 . . . . .Georgetown. . . . . 1 25   7 39
4 38   7 25 143 . . . . .Eufaula. . . . .       7 30
p.m.       Arrive Leave       a.m.

         See connection on next page.


Page 55

         CONNECTIONS OF SOUTH-WESTERN ROAD.--At Macon with Central Georgia Rail-Road (p56), for Savannah, and the Macon & Western for Griffin, Atlanta, and points North-West. At Fort Valley with branch to Butler, and there forms junction with Muscogee Rail-Road (p52). At Smithville with branch for Albany, as per schedule. At Cuthbert with branch to Fort Gaines, on the Chattahoochee river, and at Eufaula, with boats on the Chattahoochee river for points North and South.

         MACON, capital of Bibb county, Georgia, on the Ocmulgee river, 191 miles W. N. W. of Savannah, and 103 miles S. E. of Atlanta. Macon is the centre of an active trade. Rose Hill Cemetery, situated on the river, half a mile distant from the city, is much admired by visitors. Population about 8,000.

         POWERSVILLE, a post-office in Houston county, Georgia, twenty-one miles from Macon.

         FORT VALLEY, a post-town in Houston county, Georgia, twenty-nine south-west from Macon. The Columbus branch of the South-western road here deflects to the right or west. Population, 900.

         WINCHESTER, a post-village in Macon county, Georgia, thirty-nine miles from Macon.

         OGLETHORPE, a fine city in Macon county, Georgia, on the Flint River, and fifty miles south-west of Macon. Population about 2,600.

         AMERICUS, a fine post-town, capital of Sumter county, Georgia, on the Muckalee Creek, seventy miles south-west of Macon. It contains three or four churches, two academies, and 2,000 inhabitants.

         SMITHVILLE, a post-town in Lumpkin county, Georgia, and at which place the Albany branch of the South-western rail-road deflects to the left.

         ALBANY, a flourishing town, in Baker county, Georgia, on the right bank of Flint river, at the mouth of Knichafonee Creek, one hundred and seven miles south of Macon. Steamboats navigate the river to this point. Albany contains several churches, and is a town of considerable importance. Population about 900.

         CUTHBERT, capital of Randolph county, Georgia, one hundred and thirteen miles south-west from Macon, and contains, besides the county buildings, three or four churches, and two academies. Population about 900.

         FORT GAINES, a fine town in Early county, Georgia, on the Chattahoochee river. It is situated on a high bluff, one hundred and sixty feet above common water mark. Steamboats navigate the river for about eight months of the year. This is the terminus of the Fort Games branch of the South-western rail-road.

         EUFAULA, a handsome and pleasant post-town of Barbour county, Alabama, on the right bank of the Chattahoochee river, It is finely situated on a high bluff, which rises about two hundred feet above the level of the river. It is the terminus of the main line of the South-western rail-road. Population about 3,400.


Page 56

CENTRAL (GEORGIA) ROAD.

R. R. CUYLER, President,
GEO. W. ADAMS, Gen'l Sup't,
Savannah, Ga.

        
Savannah to Macon.         April 28. Macon to Savannah.        
Mail. Pass Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Pass Mail.
a.m. p.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m. a.m.
5 00 4 00 7 15     . . . . .Savannah. . . . . 190 10 00 5 35 7 49 8 06
5 32 4 33 7 56 1 00 9 . . . . .Pooler. . . . . 181 9 50 4 48 7 17 7 34
5 45 4 48 8 12 1 25 13 . . . . .Bloomingdale. . . . . 177 9 25 4 30 7 04 7 21
6 08 5 14 8 46 1 50 20 . . . . .Eden. . . . . 170 9 00 3 58 6 41 6 59
6 35 5 41 9 18 1 75 26 . . . . .Marlow. . . . . 164 8 75 3 19 6 13 6 34
6 51 6 03 9 38 2 00 30 . . . . .Guyton. . . . . 160 8 50 2 58 5 57 6 17
7 09 6 25 10 00 2 25 35 . . . . .Brewer. . . . . 155 8 25 2 30 5 29 5 52
7 30 6 50 10 27 2 50 40 . . . . .Egypt. . . . . 150 8 00 2 06 5 11 5 31
7 50 7 14 10 53 2 75 45 . . . . .Oliver. . . . . 145 7 75 1 33 4 47 5 04
8 05 7 34 11 14 3 00 50 . . . . .Halcyondale. . . . . 140 7 50 1 11 4 28 4 46
8 20 7 52 11 34 3 25 55 . . . . .Cameron. . . . . 135 7 25 12 47 4 11 4 26
8 50 8 28 12 12 3 50 62 . . . . .Ogeechee. . . . . 128 7 00 12 11 3 44 3 56
9 01 8 40 12 25 3 75 65 . . . . .Shelton. . . . . 125 6 75 11 51 3 27 3 38
9 22 9 05 12 52 4 00 70 . . . . .Scarborough. . . . . 120 6 50 11 24 3 07 3 16
10 15 10 20 1 30 4 50 79 . . . . .Millen. . . . . 111 6 00 10 40 2 35 2 40
10 29 10 36 a.m. 4 75 83 . . . . .Cushingville. . . . . 107 5 75 p.m. 1 51 1 57
10 55 11 02   5 00 90 . . . . .Herndon. . . . . 100 5 50   1 27 1 33
11 16 11 23   5 25 96 . . . . .Burton. . . . . 94 5 25   1 04 1 10
11 28 11 34   5 50 99 . . . . .Sebastopol. . . . . 91 5 00   12 53 12 58
11 42 11 49   5 75 103 . . . . .Bostwick. . . . . 87 4 75   12 37 12 43
12 10 12 18   6 00 111 . . . . .Speirs. . . . . 79 4 50   12 09 12 17
12 20 12 29   6 25 114 . . . . .Key West. . . . . 76 4 25   11 54 12 04
12 47 12 58   6 50 122 . . . . .Davisboro. . . . . 68 4 00   11 26 11 38
1 12 1 26   6 75 130 . . . . .Powers. . . . . 60 3 75   10 57 11 11
1 30 1 46   7 00 134 . . . . .Tennille. . . . . 56 3 50   10 40 10 55
1 51 2 10   7 25 141 . . . . .Robinson. . . . . 44 3 25   10 13 10 31
2 09 2 30   7 50 146 . . . . .Oconee. . . . . 41 3 00   9 55 10 14
2 41 3 06   8 00 154 . . . . .Toomsboro. . . . . 36 2 50   9 18 9 39
3 04 3 32   8 50 162 . . . . .McIntyre. . . . . 28 2 00   8 52 9 15
p.m.         Eatonton Branch         p.m.
12 30         . . . . .Eatonton. . . . . 38 2 00     11 50
1 05     25 9 . . . . .Dennis. . . . . 30 1 75     11 17
1 26     75 14 . . . . .Merriwether. . . . . 25 1 50     10 53
2 10     1 00 22 . . . . .Milledgeville. . . . . 17 1 00     10 21
2 51     1 50 30 . . . . .Whiting. . . . . 8 50     9 32
3 24     2 00 38 . . . . .Gordon. . . . .         850
3 37 4 11   9 00 170 . . . . .Gordon. . . . . 20 1 50   8 21 8 47
4 15 4 53   9 50 181 . . . . .Griswold. . . . . 9 1 00   7 18 8 03
4 46 5 28   10 00 190 . . . . .Macon. . . . .       6 40 7 30
p.m. a.m.       Arrive Leave       a.m. p.m.

         A deduction of Fifty cents from above rates will be made on each ticket purchased from Agents. (See connections on next page.)


Page 57

         CONNECTIONS.--At Savannah with the Charleston & Savannah (p60), and the Savannah, Albany & Gulf Rail-Roads (p59). At Millen with the Augusta & Savannah Rail-Road (p58). And at Macon with the Macon and Western (p7), and South-western (p54) and Muscogee Rail-Roads (p52.)

         SAVANNAH, GA., on Savannah river eighteen miles from the ocean, and ninety-six miles South-West of Charleston, S. C., is the largest, commercial city in the State. It is another of those beleaguered cities on our sea-coast continually watched by the enemy and its inhabitants expecting it to be assailed at any moment. Fort Pulaski, the only fort of prominence at the mouth of the Savannah river, was surrendered to the enemy on the 11th of April, 1862, and which he now holds. The city and its approaches are securely fortified, the commanding general determined to destroy the city rather than allow the enemy to possess it. Population, in 1860, 35,000.

         HALCYONDALE, a post-town in Scriven county, Georgia, fifty miles from Savannah.

         OGEECHEE, a post-town in Scriven county, Georgia, sixty-two miles from Savannah.

         SCARBOROUGH, a post-town in Scriven county, Georgia, seventy miles from Savannah.

         MILLEN, a post-town in Scriven county, Georgia, at the junction of the Augusta & Savannah rail-road with the Georgia Central.

         CUSHINGVILLE, a post-village in Burke county, Georgia, eighty-three miles from Savannah.

         DAVISBOROUGH, a post-town in Washington county, Georgia, one hundred find thirty-two miles from Savannah.

         TENNILLE, in Washington county, Georgia, one hundred and thirty-four miles from Savannah.

         OCONEE, in Washington county, Georgia, one hundred and forty-six miles from Savannah.

         GORDON, in Wilkerson County, Georgia, at the junction of the Milledgeville branch with the main line of the Georgia Central railroad. Population about 1,200.

         EATONTON, capital of Putnam county, Georgia, is situated on a high ridge, twenty-miles north-west from Milledgeville. It is a place of considerable importance on account of its schools. Population about 900.

         MILLEDGEVILLE, capital of the State of Georgia, and seat of justice of Baldwin county, is situated on the west bank of the Oconee river, one hundred and fifty-eight miles from Savannah. It is surrounded by a beautiful and fertile country, and contains a number of handsome residences. The Oconee river furnishes excellent water power here, and was once navigated below by small steamers, but these are now superceded by rail-roads. The State House is a fine Gothic edifice. Milledgeville contains a penitentiary, an Arsenal of the State, a court-house, five churches, one academy, and is the seat of the Oglethorpe College. Population about 4,000.


Page 58

MACON & BRUNSWICK ROAD.

A. E. COCHRAN, President,
G. A. DURE, Superintendent,
Macon, Ga.

        
Macon to Brunswick.       march 20. Brunswick to Macon.      
  a.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m.  
  8 00     . . . . .Macon. . . . . 35 1 75 3 00  
  8 25 35 6 . . . . .Bridge. . . . . 29 1 40 2 30  
  8 55 60 12 . . . . .Denson's. . . . . 23 1 15 2 05  
  9 20 75 15 . . . . .Marion. . . . . 20 1 00 1 45  
  9 40 1 00 20 . . . . .Paces. . . . . 15 75 1 15  
  10 10 1 25 25 . . . . .Buzzard Roost. . . . . 10 50 12 50  
  11 00 1 75 35 . . . . .Coley's. . . . .     11 45  
  a.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m.  

         CONNECTIONS.--At Macon, with Central Railroad (p58), Macon & Western (p7), and South-Western Rail-Roads (p54). At Coley's, with stages for South-Eastern points.

AUGUSTA & SAVANNAH ROAD.

R. R. CUYLER, President,
GEO. W. ADAMS, Sup't,
Savannah, Ga.

        
Augusta to Millen.       April 28. Millen to Augusta.      
Mail. Pass Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Pass Mail
a.m. p.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
6 25 6 20     . . . . .Augusta. . . . . 53 3 00 6 14 6 08
7 00 6 56 1 00 9 . . . . .Allens. . . . . 43 2 50 5 41 5 35
7 23 7 20 1 30 16 . . . . .Beck's Mill. . . . . 36 2 25 5 13 5 06
7 41 7 40 1 50 20 . . . . .McBean's. . . . . 33 2 00 4 59 4 53
8 04 8 02 1 50 26 . . . . .Green's Cut. . . . . 27 1 75 4 35 4 27
8 36 8 30 2 00 32 . . . . .Waynesboro. . . . . 21 1 50 4 09 4 00
8 58 8 51 2 30 38 . . . . .Thomas. . . . . 15 1 25 3 38 3 33
9 17 9 11 2 50 42 . . . . .Lumpkin. . . . . 11 1 00 3 21 3 18
9 38 9 35 2 75 48 . . . . .Lawton. . . . . 5 50 2 54 2 51
9 56 9 55 3 00 53 . . . . .Millen. . . . .     2 33 2 30
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     p.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Augusta with Georgia Rail-Road (p8), for points West, and with South Carolina Rail-Road (p10), for points East and North. At Millen with Georgia Central Rail-Road (p56), for Macon and Savannah.

         WAYNESBOROUGH, a town of some importance, capital of Burke county, Georgia, 32 miles South of Augusta. It contains, besides the county buildings, two churches, and academy and several stores.


Page 59

SAVANNAH, ALBANY & GULF ROAD.

MAJ. JOHN SCRIVEN, Pres't,
Savannah, Ga.
G. J. FULTON, Superintendent,

        
Savannah to Thomasville.       October--. Thomasville to Savannah      
Pass Fr't Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Fr't. Pass
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     a.m. p.m.
7 00 6 00     . . . . .Savannah. . . . . 200 9 00 5 05 6 00
7 44   50 9 . . . . .Miller's. . . . . 191 8 60   5 20
8 25   1 00 16 . . . . .Way's. . . . . 184 8 10   4 43
8 55   1 25 24 . . . . .Fleming*. . . . . 176 7 85   4 16
9 25   1 50 32 . . . . .McIntosh. . . . . 168 7 60   3 49
9 55   2 00 40 . . . . .Walthourville. . . . . 160 7 10   3 22
10 20   2 30 46 . . . . .Johnson*. . . . . 154 6 80   3 01
11 05   2 50 53 . . . . .Doctortown. . . . . 147 6 50   2 28
11 30   2 85 58 . . . . .Drady's. . . . . 142 6 15   2 09
12 20   3 25 68 . . . . .Satilla. . . . . 132 5 75   1 33
1 00   3 65 77 . . . . .Patterson. . . . . 123 5 33   1 02
1 28   4 00 86 . . . . .Blackshear. . . . . 114 5 00   12 28
2 30   4 50 96 . . . . .*Tebeauville*. . . . . 104 4 50   11 50
3 11   5 00 108 . . . . .Glenmore. . . . . 92 4 00   10 45
4 03   5 75 122 . . . . .Homerville*. . . . . 78 3 25   9 54
4 35   6 25 131 . . . . .Lawton. . . . . 69 2 75   9 22
5 03   6 75 139 . . . . .Stockton. . . . . 61 2 25   8 54
5 22   7 00 144 . . . . .Naylor. . . . . 56 2 00   8 35
6 06   7 50 157 . . . . .Valdosta. . . . . 43 1 50   7 52
7 30   8 00 174 . . . . .Quitman*. . . . . 26 1 00   6 52
7 56   8 25 181 . . . . .Groover. . . . . 19 75   6 04
8 25   8 50 189 . . . . .Boston. . . . . 11 50   5 36
9 00 1 58 9 00 200 . . . . .Thomasville. . . . .     7 00 5 00
p.m. a.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Savannah with Georgia Central (p56), and Charleston & Savannah Rail-Roads (p60). At Thomasville with stages for Bainbridge, Chattahoochee and Tallahassee, Florida. The eventual terminus of this road is designed to be at some point on the Chattahoochee river. Bainbridge is on its route.

         Stations indicted by an asterisk (*) is where the train stops for Breakfast. Those by a dagger (*) for Dinner.

         WARTHOURVILLE, a post-town in Liberty county, Georgia, forty miles South-west of Savannah, is the largest place in the county. It contains two flourishing academies, and about 400 inhabitants.

         BOSTON, a post-town in Thomas county, Georgia, eleven miles south-east of Thomasville.

         THOMASVILLE, a post-town, and capital of Thomas county, Georgia, two hundred miles from Savannah, and at present the terminus of the Savannah, Albany & Gulf rail-road. It contains a court-house which is creditable to the county, and a school called the Fletcher Institute, under the direction of the Methodists. Population about 600.


Page 60

CHARLESTON & SAVANNAH ROAD.

R. L. SINGLETARY, President,
H. S. HAINES, Eng'r and Sup't,
Charleston, S. C.
W. H. SWINTON, Secretary and Treasurer.

        
Charleston to Savannah.       April 27. Savannah to Charleston.      
Mail. Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Mail.
p.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. p.m.
10 30 7 30     . . . . .Charleston. . . . . 104 8 00 5 30 12 45
11 15 8 40 1 00 12 . . . . .Rantowles. . . . . 92 7 50 4 25 12 00
11 33 9 08 2 00 17 . . . . .Ravenel. . . . . 87 7 50 3 57 11 41
12 10 9 47 2 00 23 . . . . .Adams Run. . . . . 81 6 50 3 20 11 13
12 27 10 45 2 50 30 . . . . .Jacksonboro. . . . . 74 6 00 2 38 10 45
1 00 11 35 3 25 39 . . . . .Green Pond. . . . . 65 5 25 1 45 10 12
1 43 12 35 4 00 50 . . . . .Salkehatchie. . . . . 54 4 50 12 35 9 30
2 00 1 00 4 50 55 . . . . .Pocataligo. . . . . 49 4 00 11 55 9 11
2 23 1 30 4 75 61 . . . . .Coosawhatchie. . . . . 43 3 50 11 25 8 50
2 55 2 15 5 50 70 . . . . .Grahamville. . . . . 34 2 75 10 35 8 15
3 52 3 30 6 75 84 . . . . .Hardeeville. . . . . 20 1 75 9 10 7 19
4 14 4 10 7 50 89 . . . . .Savannah River. . . . . 15 1 75 8 30 6 57
4 35 4 40 7 50 94 . . . . .Monteith. . . . . 10 75 7 55 6 37
5 10 5 15 8 00 101 . . . . .Junction. . . . . 3   7 15 6 10
5 20 5 30 8 00 104 . . . . .Savannah. . . . .     7 00 6 00
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. a.m.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Charleston with South Carolina (p10), and North-Eastern Rail-Roads (p61). At Jacksonboro with stages to Walterboro. At Savannah with Central Georgia (p56], and Savannah, Albany & Gulf Rail-Roads (p59).

         GREEN POND, a post-town in Union district, South Carolina, thirty-nine miles from Charleston and sixty-five from Savannah.

         COOSAWATCHIE, capital of Beaufort district, South Carolina, sixty-one miles from Charleston and forty-three from Savannah.

         POCATALIGO, S. C., is a small town, brought into notice recently from its having been thescene of a battle, and the threats of the enemy to advance at that point from their gun-boats. It derives its name, we are informed by a correspondent of the Atlanta Intelligencer, from the following source:

         "One day some of the early settlers on the sound caught a turtle, and were trying to drive him homeward, but they made slow progress with the zigzag locomotion creature. At this juncture some of the shore Indians came up with the party, and said to one of the drivers, 'Poke he tail he go;' refering to an excellent method of pushing the varmint along. They followed the natives' advice and found it succeed admirably--with which result they were so much pleased that they called the place as nearly the sentence as possible. But it has gradually, in the wear of centuries, come down to a plain compound word, to wit: Pocataligo."

         We cannot be held responsible for the validity of the foregoing, but presume the gentleman who gives the information is well posted.


Page 61

NORTH-EASTERN ROAD.

A. F. RAVENEL, President,
S. S. SOLOMONS, Eng'r and Sup't.
Charleston, S. C.

        
Florence to Charleston.       Dec. 10. Charleston to Florence.      
Pass Acc. Fare Mls. STATIONS. Mls. Fare Acc. Pass
a.m. a.m.     Leave Arrive     p.m. a.m.
3 45 9 15     . . . . .Florence. . . . . 102 6 00 6 15 6 45
4 15 10 02 50 9 . . . . .Effingham. . . . . 93 5 50 5 25 6 15
4 37 11 38 1 00 16 . . . . .Coward's. . . . . 86 5 25 4 46 5 53
4 58 11 15 1 50 23 . . . . .Graham's. . . . . 79 4 75 4 07 5 32
5 19 11 51 1 75 30 . . . . .Cade's. . . . . 72 4 25 3 28 5 11
5 44 12 33 2 25 38 . . . . .Kingstree. . . . . 64 3 75 2 43 4 46
6 04 1 04 2 75 44 . . . . .Salter's. . . . . 58 3 50 2 08 4 26
6 20 1 30 3 05 49 . . . . .Lane's. . . . . 53 3 20 1 40 4 10
6 30 1 45 3 25 52 . . . . .Gourdin's. . . . . 50 3 00 1 10 4 00
7 05 2 20 3 50 57 . . . . .St Stephen's. . . . . 45 2 75 12 35 3 25
7 31 3 15 4 00 65 . . . . .Bonneau's. . . . . 37 2 25 11 55 3 00
7 57 4 09 4 25 73 . . . . .Monck's Corner. . . . . 29 1 75 11 15 2 33
8 16 4 48 4 75 79 . . . . .Strawberry. . . . . 23 1 50 10 30 2 14
8 29 5 14 5 00 83 . . . . .Mt. Holly. . . . . 19 1 25 10 10 2 01
8 45 5 46 5 25 88 . . . . .Porcher's. . . . . 14 1 00 9 45 1 45
9 04 6 23 5 75 94 . . . . .8 Mile T. O. . . . . . 8 50 9 15 1 26
9 30 7 10 6 00 102 . . . . .Charleston. . . . .     8 00 1 00
a.m. p.m.     Arrive Leave     a.m. a..m

         CONNECTIONS.--At Florence with Wilmington & Manchester, (p20) and Cheraw & Darlington rail-roads (p16). At Charleston with South Carolina (p10) and Charleston & Savannah rail-roads (p60).

         FLORENCE, S. C., is a town of great importance, as the centre of several Rail-Roads. It is 107 miles from Wilmington, and 102 miles from Charleston, and forms a shipping point for an extensive section.

         EFFINGHAM, a post-town in Darlington district, South Carolina, ninety-three miles west of Charleston.

         KINGSTON, a post-town, capital of Williamsburg district of South Carolina, on the left bank of Black river, sixty-four miles from Charleston, and one hundred miles from Columbia.

         MONK'S CORNER, a post village in Charleston district, South Carolina, twenty-nine miles from Charleston.

         CHARLESTON, S. C., the largest city in the State, and one of the principal cities of the Confederacy, is situated on a tongue of land between Ashley and Cooper rivers, which unite immediately below the city, and form a spacious harbor, communicating with the ocean at Sullivan's Island, seven miles below. Cooper and Ashley rivers are from thirty to forty feet deep, the former fourteen hundred, and the latter twenty-one hundred yards wide. A sandbar extends across the mouth of the harbor, affording, however, two entrances, of which the deepest near Sullivan's Island, has sixteen feet of water at low tide.--Population, 55,000.


Page 62

SHELBY AND BROAD RIVER ROAD.

B. D. HASELL, President, Cherokee Ford, S. C.

         A meeting of subscribers to the capital stock of this enterprise was held, agreeable to public announcement, at the works of the Magnetic Iron Company, at Cherokee Ford, Union District, S. C,, on the 29th April, 1863. The following Directors were elected:

         DIRECTORS--G. S. Cameron, A. M. Latham, T. D. Wagner, A. R. Holmesly, D. Froneberger, W. J. T. Miller.

ETOWAH ROAD.

MARK A. COOPER, President, Etowah, Ga.

         The Etowah road extends to Etowah from Allatoona, on the Western & Atlantic road, a distance of four miles. Trains run daily in connection with the Western & Atlantic trains.

BRUNSWICK & FLORIDA ROAD.

H. G. WHEELER, President, Brunswick, Ga.

         Extends from Brunswick to McDonald, where it forms junction with the Savannah, Albany & Gulf road.

FLORIDA, ATLANTIC & GULF CENTRAL ROAD.

J. A. NIBLACK, President, Lake City, Fla.

         This road extends from Jacksonville, to Lake City, Florida, and is a link in a continuous line, as contemplated before the war, from the Atlantic seaboard to Pensacola.

MISSISSIPPI CENTRAL ROAD.

W. GOODMAN, President,
E. D. FROST, Superintendent,
Canton, Miss.

         The Mississippi Central has been more or less interrupted by the enemy for the last year, and is now, to a considerable extent, in his possession. The line extends from Canton, Mississippi, to Jackson, Tennessee, a distance of two hundred and thirty-seven miles.

ROGERSVILLE & JEFFERSON ROAD.

R. G. FANE, Superintendent, Rogersville, Tenn.

         This road is in operation from Rogersville junction to Jefferson, and its trains run in connection with those of the East Tennessee & Virginia rail-road.

CHERAW & COALFIELDS ROAD.

S. S. SOLOMONS, Chief Superintendent.

         Mr. Solomons advertises for proposals for the grading and masonry upon twenty miles of this road.


Page 63

ROME & BLUE MOUNTAIN ROAD.

C. H. SMITH, Secretary.

         This road is now in course of construction by the Confederate Government, and is intended to extend from Rome, Georgia, to Blue Mountain, Alabama, where it will form junction with the Alabama & Tennessee River rail-road, making a most desirable cut-off, in pressing cases, for the transportation of troops and stores for army purposes.

CAHAWBA, MARION & GREENSBORO ROAD.

E. D. KING, President, Cahawba, Ala.

         This road is completed from Cahawba, where it connects with Steamboats on the Alabama River, to Marion. It is designed to extend to Greensboro, on the line of the Northeast and Southwest road.

NORTH-EAST & SOUTH-WEST ALABAMA ROAD.

ALFRED BATTLE, President, Tuscaloosa, Ala.

         A proposed road from Wills Valley road, to Meridian, Mississippi, a distance of two hundred and seven miles. No part of the road is operated as yet, that we can learn.

WILLS VALLEY ROAD.

         From Chattanooga, Tennessee, to Wills Valley, twenty miles, where it was intended to connect with the North-east & South-west road.

GULF AND SHIP ISLAND ROAD.

         The Register of the Land Office, at Paulding Mississippi, Mr. J. M. Bradley, Jr., informs us that he has just prepared a list of the sobtic lands granted to the Gulf and Ship Island rail-road Company, and that they amount to the enormous aggregate of one million five hundred thousand five hundred and twenty-one acres in the Paulding District. The Road will receive over two hundred thousand acres besides. At the lowest estimate this body of land is worth five millions of dollars, a sum more than sufficient to construct the entire road.

BLUE RIDGE ROAD.

         Surveyed from Anderson, South Carolina, to Knoxville, Tennessee, a distance of two hundred miles; but its progress has been retarded by the war. It is now operated from Anderson, where it forms junction with the Anderson branch of the Greenville & Columbia road, to Pendleton, a distance of eighteen miles.

WESTERN ROAD.

         An unfinished line from Fayetteville, to High Point, N. C., where it forms junction with the North Carolina Road. It is at present operated about half the distance. Trains run daily.


Page 64

        

Illustration

STEAM-BOAT ROUTES.

ALABAMA RIVER DAILY STEAM-BOAT LINE.

         The following first-class Steam-Boats are now making regular daily trips between Mobile and Montgomery, under the general management of Cox, Brainard & Co.:

  • SOUTHERN REPUBLIC,. . . . .Captain MAYER.
  • ST. NICHOLAS, . . . . . Captain LOUGHLIN.
  • JEFF DAVIS, . . . . . Captain BUCKLEY.
  • HENRY J. KING, . . . . . Captain FINEGAN.
  • SENATOR, . . . . . Captain BALDWIN.
  • ST. CHARLES, . . . . . Captain CLAUDIS.
  • LA GRANDE, . . . . . Captain ENGLISH.

         One of the above boats will leave each end of the route every day, and will carry the passengers of the Alabama & Tennessee River Rail-Road, between Selma and Montgomery.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Mobile with Mobile & Ohio (p48), and Mobile & Great Northern Rail-Roads (p47). At Cahawba with Road to Marion (p63). At Selma with Alabama & Tennessee River (p45), and Alabama & Mississippi Rivers Rail-Roads (p44). At Montgomery with Montgomery & West Point (p43), and Alabama & Florida Rail-Roads (p46).

CHATTAHOOCHEE RIVER STEAM-BOATS.

         The following Boats form a Line between Columbus and Chattahoochee:

  • UCHEE,. . . . .Captain STAPLER.
  • JACKSON,. . . . . Captain D. FRY.
  • INDIAN,. . . . . Captain C. D. FRY.
  • RIVER BRIDE,. . . . . Captain BRANNON.

         CONNECTIONS.--At Columbus with Muscogee [p52), Columbus Branch of Montgomery & West Point (p43), and Mobile & Girard Rail-Roads (p52). At Eufaula with terminus of South-Western Rail-Road (p54), and at Chattahoochee with stages for points in Florida.


Page 65

COOSA RIVER STEAMBOAT LINE.

        
Rome to Greensport.   June 25. Greensport to Rome.  
Mls. Fare LANDINGS. Mls. Fare
    . . . . .Rome. . . . . 176 7 00
35 1 25 . . . . .Poullaine's. . . . . 141 5 75
45 1 50 . . . . .Wright's. . . . . 132 5 50
60 2 00 . . . . .Cothran's. . . . . 116 5 00
75 2 50 . . . . .Cedar Bluff. . . . . 101 4 50
90 3 00 . . . . .Centre. . . . . 86 4 00
105 3 50 . . . . .Adams'. . . . . 71 3 50
120 4 00 . . . . .Camp's Bluff. . . . . 56 3 00
130 5 00 . . . . .Turkey Town. . . . . 47 2 00
150 6 00 . . . . .Gadsden. . . . . 26 1 00
162 6 50 . . . . .Gilbert's. . . . . 14 50
176 7 00 . . . . .Greensport. . . . .    

         One boat leaves every Monday morning at 7 o'clock; arrives at Greensport Tuesday at 5 o'clock, A. M., and returns same day; arrives at Rome, Thursday at 10 o'clock, A. M. The other boat leaves on no regular day, but makes the same trip.

CAHAWBA, MARION & GREENSBORO ROAD.

J. L. WHITSETT, President,
W. R. WYATT, Gen'l Sup't.
Marion, Ala.

         Train leaves Marion daily at 7; connects with down train on Alabama & Mississippi Rail-Road to Selma, and connects with train for Meridian. Leaves Junction with Alabama & Mississippi Rail-Road at 4, after connecting with train from Meridian and Selma; arrives at Marion at 5; connects with 4 horse Stage for Gainesville and intermediate points.

         This road formerly was run to Cahawba, but the Confederate States have taken the iron from where it crossed the Alabama & Mississippi Rail-Road to Cahawba, to complete Alabama & Mississippi Rail-Road to Meridian. It was in rapid progress of construction to New Prospect, on N. E. & S. W. Rail-Road via Greensboro', but the war stopped operations on it. The most of the grading, bridges and masonry, is completed to Greensboro'.

         SHELBY SPRINGS.--This is a most delightful spot, and is fitted up as a summer resort for families or guests. Also, dinner house for passengers by the up train. J. J. Norris, Proprietor.

         ETOWAH HOUSE.--Near the Depot and Steamboat landings; also general Stage office. G. S. Black, Proprietor.

         KINGSTON HOTEL.--Two story House opposite the Depot. Supper House for passengers by Rome Rail-Road. C. A. Smith, Proprietor.


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Illustration

EDITOR'S
PORTFOLIO

HINTS TO TRAVELERS.

         It behooves travelers, in these times of confidence men, pick-pockets and thieves, to keep a wary eye upon their valuables. Put your money in some pocket or other place of difficult access, when you start on a "trip." If you have hand-baggage, such as a carpet-bag, or the like, keep it where you can see it; and if you change cars, don't trust it to strangers to carry for you. If you should travel through Augusta, beware of a big blustering butcher of a fellow, who collects the stage fare, before you start, for carrying you from one depot to another, and when you arrive at the other, is there again to demand of you still another fare. This game has been practiced to some extent by this same individual, and as he is employed by a monopoly in the omnibus business, there is no retreat from him unless you walk.

         In arriving at Montgomery depot by the evening train from Mobile, be careful not to hand your baggage to any stranger who may offer to assist you. Some thieves at this place have a bewitching fashion of relieving travelers of their hand baggage--which is done in this way: as the traveler, with his valise of carpet-bag is about to enter the omnibus, the thief, lantern in hand, stands at the door, as if belonging to the omnibus, and in an authoritative manner says: "It's too much crowded in there to take in your baggage, let me pill it on top o' the 'bus"--and ten chances to one the unthinking traveler falls into the trap, hands over his valise or what-not, and never sees it again. And if you should lose your valise in that way, and go to the police-office in Montgomery, with the hope of giving them something in their way to do, a big burly Irishman will look up at you, half asleep, and say--"How the divil d'ye think I kin find the thafe; an' besides that, the depot is out o' the corporation, an' we haint got no right to go out there to look afther no thafe."

         In these times of war and martial law, it is necessary for the traveler to be armed with a passport. In case there are none issued by the local authorities in the neighborhood of his home, he should go to the first Provost Marshal's office on his route and procure one; to do which


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he must present the necessary vouchers as to his individuality. At every military post through which he may pass, it is necessary to renew the passport or have it countersigned. By following this rule he will save time and annoyance.

         Travelers going long distances should trace out their route before Starting, and make memoranda of places at which it is desirable to make halts. It will save much time and expense.

         Tickets should be procured at the office before starting, as on nearly all rail-roads an additional charge is made in the cars. Children under 5 years of age, accompanied with parents, usually ride free; those between 5 and 12 are charged half price. Conductors usually judge for themselves of the age of children

         Baggage should be checked before starting.

         On almost all the trains will be found Baggage, or Express Agents, who will take charge of baggage on the arrival at the termini. They are regularly authorized by the rail-road companies, and can be safely intrusted with its safe delivery.

         It often happens that travelers, by some want of information, or care, lose their baggage; and to regain it, give themselves, as well as the rail-road companies, much unnecessary trouble. In every such case, if the person is at a distance, and wishes to recover the article lost, write to the Superintendent of the road, on which such loss was sustained, stating the day, which direction the train was going, and the hour at which it passed some given point on the road. When this information is all correctly given, the Superintendent will know at once which officer in the employ of the company to approach.

         Soldiers, to travel now-a-days, must have correct papers, or it is no go. He must have, in the first place, his furlough; upon that he can get his passports from one military post to another, which he should always be careful to have, as it will save him time and trouble. Transportation is granted at almost every rail-road terminus or junction upon the order of his commanding officer. In case he has not such order, his furlough will entitle him to the soldiers' rate, which, on most of the railroads is about half the usual fare.

         It has been legally decided that applicants for tickets on rail-roads can be ejected from the cars if they do not offer the exact amount of their fare. Conductors are not bound to make change. All rail-road tickets are good until used, and conditions "good for this day only," or otherwise admitting time of genuineness, are of no account. Passengers who lose their tickets can be ejected from the cars unless they purchase a second one. Passengers are bound to observe decorum in the cars, and are obliged to comply with all reasonable demands to show their tickets. Standing upon the platform or otherwise violating the rule of the company, renders a person liable to be put from the train. No person has a right to monopolize more seats than he has paid for, and any article left in a seat, while the owner is temporarily absent, entitles him to the place upon his return.

         Travellers going to Virginia to visit their relatives in the army, or to bring home wounded soldiers, should, if they are over the age of conscription, furnish themselves with certificates from the County


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Court Clerk of their respective counties, setting forth that they are over the age for conscription.

         Soldiers must show their furloughs in order to purchase half rate Tickets. This should be done cheerfully, for unless this examination be made by Ticket Agents, many persons who are not entitled to half rate tickets would procure the same under pretense of being soldiers.

         Ticket Agents are responsible for the mistakes they make, and as many of them are poor men and have families to support from small salaries, several questions should not be asked agents at the same time; this tends to confuse them and cause them to make mistakes. No passenger should ask a question unless the agent is waiting on him. Let each one take his turn at procuring a ticket, and not half a dozen at once.

         ABREVIATIONS USED IN THE TIME-TABLES.--Acc., Accommodation train; Exp., Express Train; Pass., Passenger Train.

         The lines extending across the page in the tables, divide the stations on a branch, from the stations on the main line.

         The right-hand columns of the Time-Tables read up, the left-hand read down. As an additional aid to the Traveler, let him observe if the miles read from 1 to 10, 20, or more; he will thus be enabled to understand how the Table runs, whether up or down.

TO SUPERINTENDENTS.

         Superintendents are earnestly requested to mail their Time-Tables when changes are made in the departure and arrival of their different trains to and from their different points of destination, in order that we may be enabled to make the "Guide" as perfect as possible.

         TRAVELERS, who make use of the "Guide" will oblige the publishers by informing them of any inaccuracies they may find therein; and any information calculated to prove beneficial to the traveling community will be read by at least three or four hundred thousand persons.

TO ADVERTISERS

         Business men will at once see the great advantage of the Guide over every other publication, as a general advertising medium. Therefore, it is needless for us to waste time and space in expatiating upon its merits, in that particular respect. So we would merely say to all--be sure to send in your advertisement early, remembering that they will be read by at least three of four hundred thousand persons.

COLUMBIA & AUGUSTA RAIL-ROAD.

         We see by the Columbia and Augusta papers, that a Spirit of the right kind is being shown by the people of South Carolina and Georgia, in regard to the projected road between the two most beautiful cities in our whole Confederacy. This is a worthy project, and we hope soon to see that the whole line is


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under contract. The following extract from an article in the South Carolinian, is to the point:

         "At this time, when the coast and seaport cities are threatened with raids from the reckless and vandal foe, it can scarcely be possible for us to attach too much importance to the necessity of building this road, and that at once. The influence for good which it will produce under existing circumstances will be incalculable. It will develop the resources and increase the wealth of the sections named, and benefit, in some degree, the whole Confederacy.

         Where this road is desired to pass, enterprise and industry are sure of their rewards. Patriotism would be a feeble passion, and wealth would lose much of its value, as a means of promoting the public good, were the citizens of Augusta, Hamburg, Edgefield, Columbia and North Carolina, to fail to be struck with the special significance that the immediate building of this road will stamp on the economy of the country in every way. It will save time and money to the Government. It binds together in indissoluble links of iron, two enterprising and wealthy cities, (Columbia and Augusta,) which are destined to act a prominent part in the magnificent future of Southern progress and independence.

         With regard to the geography of the country we have precise and accurate information. A complete and satisfactory survey has been made, which developes the important fact that it is the shortest and the best route to locate the road, and that it will make an air line from Mississippi to Virginia, passing through a beautiful section remote from the coast."

         Mr. L. H. de Rosset, will please accept thanks for a number of valuable Rail-Road items.

         Not long since I called upon some lady friends of mine, and was ushered into the parlor by the servant girl. She asked what name she should announce, and I, wishing to take them by surprise, replied Amicus (a friend). She seemed at first a little puzzled, but quickly regaining her composure, she in the blandest manner possible observed, "What kind of a cuss, sir?"

         The curious man goes about to gratify his curiosity; but he will probably never travel far enough to find anything more curious than himself.


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THE LADIES' CAR.

         Since the war began, the "Ladies' Car," has become an "indispensable institution" upon all well regulated Rail-Roads, and is frequently the scene of many a gallantry that is prompted by more selfish motives than a casual observer would at first suppose. To expose these uses and abuses, we propose, from time to time, to give our readers a medley of incidents, accidents, and occurrences--allowing the "Ladies' Car" to speak propria personoe; for all must acknowledge that she must know best of what she sees, while a single traveller would let the richest gems pass unseen. So, with this introduction we shall retire, and the Ladies' Car will tell her own stories.

         Ten! Yes, ten rough looking men have each taken two seats, and spread themselves accordingly, when a lady steps on the platform for admission to the so-called sanctuary and as she is shown in by the polite guard, she looks enquiringly about and asks:

         "Is this the Ladies' Car?"

         "Yes mem," replies the guard.

         "Well, it has little the appearance of it now, I declare," and the lady began looking where she might find a seat by herself.

         Who are these men? We will raise their hats from over their eyes (where they have pulled them for very shame of their own conduct) and see if we can distinguish to what order of humanity they belong.

         Hah! a Colonel! Well I declare! And a Confederate Colonel too-- worse and worse, but then the Superintendent escorted him and ordered him to be passed--so it must be all right--and besides that, he is a soldier, a long way from home, and "don't expect to marry in this section of country no how," so, I'll excuse him.

         You, sir! Who are you? Oh, I see--a Captain, and a man who always obeys orders, no matter what the ladies or anybody


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else says. Came in by the Colonel ordering the guard to "let that man pass." Very good; I must excuse him.

         And the next is--well, may I believe my eyes, another Captain, and a man who is quite as averse to disobeying orders as the one just passed. Well, under the same rule I shall have to excuse him.

         Number four, the best looking of all, and one whom I had hoped to see rise and give the lady his seat: preserved the same apparent unconcern for what was passing until the lady was seated, when he turned a volley of eyes upon her that were destined to do their work. He was a Lieutenant, and another man who takes pride in obeying orders. His Captain commissioned him to enter. Another excuse is of course necessary in this case.

         The next four are also soldiers, but unfortunately for them and me, they bear no distinguishing marks by which their rank can be distinguished, so we must set them down as privates.--Privates! astonishing! Privates in the Ladies' Car! What miracle could have been instrumental in this? Directly after the Lieutenant entered, a gentle tap was heard at his window, when he inquired: "Who's there?" the leader of the squad replied:

         "Its four o' your boys Lieutenant: can't you git us in there some how?"

         "Don't know--I'll see--go to the front door."

         The parties meet at the door designated, when the Lieutenant commands:

         "Guard, pass those men," and the guard steps aside and the boys pass in. What must I do now? Pass another excuse? I wish I had not excused the first encroachment, and then I should not have been bothered with this; but, as I have allowed a precedent, why I must abide by it--so, of course these last four are excusable.

         Two more remain, of whom I must speak. One is a tolerably


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rough looking case--and the question naturally arises--how in the world did he ever get into the Ladies' Car, where a guard is placed for the especial purpose of securing ladies against the presence of coarse, indecent looking men, the very picture of which my subject represents? I'll tell you--he is a particular friend of our trusty guard, who thinks he will treat his friend to a luxury in the way of women, if he can't in the way of wine. So he is accounted for, and a right good candidate is he to be excused for his trespass.

         The next is not very unlike the last in appearance. He is a friend of the brakeman, who takes great care to preserve the friendship of the guard, and thus through a train of influential influence he gains admittance to the coveted presence of the ladies. He, most certainly is excusable. Who wouldn't?

         Ladies now begin to come in--one by one the before described ten, relinquish their extra seats after the ladies ask for them, until at length the Lieutenant, capable of no further resistance to his natural gallantry gives up his seats to a bevy of pretty girls, and retreats to the nearest point from which a successful attack might be made on the lady who first entered, and who his eyes had not ceased to prey upon. He at length ventures a word. Ah! it is favorably received. How could it be otherwise though; a man of good appearance always takes with the ladies, and no questions asked about sense.

         There he goes, I thought that would be the end of it. He sits down beside her. I can safely put that down for a love affair, of which I may reveal the secrets one of these days. For the present I will leave them to enjoy themselves.

         "Ladies' Car, sir," says the sentinel almost continuously --"Ladies' Car!" and everybody who wishes to take the train is certain to approach the ladies' car first.

         "Ladies' Car, sir."

         "Of course it's the ladies' car, that's just the car I want."

         "Have you a lady aboard?"


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         "Certainly I have, or what do you think I'd be here for."

         "All right sir, pass in sir, excuse me sir," says my very polite guard, and a "fellah" that "knows the ropes," is admitted.

         Several are admitted in this manner until the car becomes overcrowded, while other cars on the train are comparatively empty. But who's to blame for this--all are excusable. The magnet is there and "human natur" does the rest.

         Another applicant for admission! Ah! I've seen that face before. Well, now, I should be loth to accuse him of trying to get into the ladies car, without the very palpable excuse of a lady on his arm. The guard tells him it is the Ladies' Car. He parleys--its no use, the ladies' car is invulnerable--he can't command the "influential influence," and he retires, falls back, retreats. He is an Editor! What a pity it is these editors have'nt a little more brass--they could see lots of fun if they would only put on the faces that some of our military men do, and especially the marriageable ones. But of this enough until another time.

         AN ingenious dandy conceals his baldness in Paris, by having a complete set of thirty-one wigs, each one longer haired than the other; at the end of the month he had his hair cut, by beginning again at No. 1.

         Some tasteful individual very correctly remarks that the best lip salve in creation is a kiss: the remedy should be used with great care, however, as it is apt to bring on an affection of the heart.

         A clear stream reflects all objects upon its shore, but is unsullied by them; so it should be with our hearts--they should show the effect of all objects, and yet remain unharmed by any.

         WE love to listen to the soft breathings of the flute, the Æolian melodies of the harp, and the bewildering tones of the violin, but then the kettle-drum--"ah! there's the rub" -a dub.

         A CERTAIN editor is delighted at having nearly been called "honey" by the gal he loves, because she saluted him at their last meeting as "Old Beeswax!"


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FIGHT WITH A JAGUAR, OR AMERICAN TIGER.

         The Galveston News, gives the following account of a desperate fight between Mr. Absalom Williams, who is about seventy years of age, his wife, and an enormous tiger:

         The tiger was first discovered on the premises of Mr. James Drake, who lives in the north portion of Jefferson county, where it entered his enclosure, attacked his horses, and killed one; besides wounding two others. While the tiger was committing its depredations, it was discovered by Francis Drake, son of the proprietor of the premises, who fired a shot gun at it, wounding it in the side, but not dangerously, when it made its escape[.] The next day, while Mr. and Mrs. Williams were sitting in their house (the rest of the family being absent), they were startled by a strange, noise in the yard, in front of their house. Mr. W., on going out, discovered his dog engaged with a tiger, when he seized an ox-yoke and aimed a blow at the "varmint," but, missing it, struck his dog. The dog then got away from the tiger, and retreated. In an instant the tiger sprung on Mr. Williams, and, seizing him by the hand, jerked him about twenty feet. The old gentleman, finding himself in the too powerful grasp of the wild animal, courageously determined to give it the best "rough and tumble fight" in his power; and, having no weapons within his reach, he seized the tiger by the throat with his other hand, and, throwing his whole strength forward, crushed the tiger to the ground, both falling side by side. At this time Mrs. Williams came to the rescue, with a gun, which she snapped at the tiger, but, there being no priming in the pan, it did not go off. Mr. W. then, with one arm round the tiger's body, and grasping its throat with his other hand, by an effort, disengaged himself. The tiger, discovering a new adversary in the person of Mrs. W., jumped at her, and attempted to grasp her head within its jaws, while it struck and lacerated her breast with its fore paws. She tried to avoid the monster, but was felled to the ground. The tiger made another grasp at her head, his upper teeth penetrating at the top of the skull and sliding along the bone, peeled off the skin till they met the lower teeth, which penetrated on the right side of her face.

         In the meantime, Mr. W. had seized the ox-yoke again, and, giving the tiger a tremendous blow, caused it to leave Mrs. W., when it leaped into the house and lot under the bed. The door was immediately closed, and the monster secured. Mr.


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W. was exhausted from the effects of his wounds, from which the blood flowed in streams; but not so his better half. When she saw their mutual foe thus attempt to take possession of their house, she determined to finish the battle, and, notwithstanding the severity of her wounds, her dress almost entirely torn from her person, and covered with blood, she deliberately took the gun, and, shaking some powder from the barrel into the pan, placed the muzzle between one of the openings which the logs of the house afforded, and fired with deadly aim. The tiger was killed. When subsequently measured, it was found to be twelve feet from the tip of its tail to its nose.

         During all the time the fight was going on, no one but those engaged in it were within hearing. Mr. W.'s nearest neighbor lives three miles off. However, as Mrs. W. was washing the blood from her person, a neighbor came riding by, and, alarmed at her appearance, inquired the cause. The old lady, unable from the loss of blood to speak, pointed to the dead body of the tiger.

        The escape of Mr. and Mrs. Williams is indeed wonderful, and they are now recovering gradually from their wounds.--Mr. W. jokes about the tiger fight, and intimates that the old lady was most enraged when the "varmint" took possession of his bed and house. It need hardly be added that Mr. Williams is a brave man. He fought the British at New Orleans, and subsequently the Mexicans, in the cause of Texas; but this last fight is, perhaps, the most singular of all. His wife, in intrepidity and daring, is worthy of him, and the two, together, are of that courageous class that have encountered forest wilds and frontier dangers--the pioneers of Christian civilization and American institutions.

         LET GOOD THINGS GO ROUND.--"Feller sogers," said a newly elected lieutenant of militia, "I'm all fired obliged to you for this shove up in the ranks you have given me. Feller sogers, I'm not going to forget your kindness soon, not by a darned sight; and I'll tell you what it is, I'll stick to my post like pitch to a pine board, so long as there's no fighting, but as I go in for rotation in office, and if we should come to blows with the enemy darn'd if I don't resign right off, and give every fellow a fair shake for fame and glory, and all that, ere."

         Every man cheerishes in his heart some object--some shrine at which his adoration is paid, unknown to his fellow-mortals.


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COURTSHIP AND CLEANING HOUSE.

         It was the most golden and glorious of September days. The veil of blue haze hanging like a canopy over the distant hills, seemed absolutely to quiver in the radiant glow of the autumn sunshine, and the grapes, whose amethystine clusters blushed through the trellis of leaves, grew deeper in colour and more bloomy, as if they had stolen the imperial dye of a thousand purple sunsets and brilliant dawns, as the sun mounted higher and higher in the cloudless dome of heaven. No frescoed ceiling, hung with jeweled pendants, was ever more beautiful than this arbour of grape leaves where the light and shadow danced in fitful arabesques with every moving wind--and so thought Richard Mayfield as he came slowly up the garden path that led to his brother's house.

         The mansion itself, however, was far from presenting the gala aspect which pervaded all nature, aud our hero's countenance underwent a ludicrous transformation, as he eyed the yawning windows and wide open doors.

         "By all the powers," said he to himself, "if Isabel isn't cleaning! Well, women are the most unaccountable creatures! Well, I do believe they delight in turning things upside down and making themselves and the rest of the world uncomfortable. What's the use of choking people with dust, and deluging 'em with soap and water twice a year? However, let the dear enigmas have their own way. I'm sure I am the last person in the world to object!"

         With these philosophical reflections yet in his mind, Mr. Mayfield defiantly threaded his way through a colony of whitewash pails and lime kettles that surrounded the front door, and entered upon the scene of action. It was quite plain from the shout with which the children greeted his appearance, that he was a general favorite.

         "Hallo, uncle Dick, we're cleaning house!" cried Master Henry Augustus Mayfield, who was mounted astride of a doubled up feather bed, castigating it fearfully with his mother's best parasol.

         "Ain't it splendid, Uncle Dick?" exclaimed Miss Julia, who was endeavoring to "pry out" the principle of sound from a thirty dollar music box, by introducing a carving knife into its interior works, while Mrs. Mayfield, half distracted by calls from diverse directions, was totally unconscious of the mischief being wrought.


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         "Dick, I am so puzzled and annoyed," she said. "Here is John called to the city by a pressing law-suit, and the whole house upside-down!"

         "Thought that was what you ladies liked," said Dick, perching himself upon the top of the dining table, and rescuing a shell basket from the destructive grasp of the smallest Mayfield of all.

         ["]And my cook has gone, and the fire won't burn, and the wall-whiteners haven't come this morning, and the parlor ceiling is half unfinished, and you know the sowing society is to be here to-morrow night--and Dick, what shall I do?"

         "Don't fret!" said Richard, soothingly, "I'll make the fire burn, or I'll know the reason why; and I can finish the ceiling for you!"

         "You?"

         "Yes me. Didn't I white my own room at college, when we boys had smoked it into the colour of an old snuff-box? And then I'll tack the carpet down, and see about putting those dislocated bedsteads together."

         "But, Dick, you must be too tired after dancing until twelve o'clock at the pic-nic last night."

         "Me tired? Fiddlestick! Where's the refractory stove?"

         The very fire was not proof against Dick's sunny determination. It broke into a cheerful blaze the moment he attacked its citadel, and Isabel's face brightened simultaneously. The skill with which he next erected a scaffolding and mouuted thereon, with a panoply of whitewash pails and brushes, was perfectly astonishing, the more so, as his slender figure, rather pale complexion, aristocratically small hands and feet, conveyed the idea of one who was adapted only to pic-nics and glittering ball rooms.

         "I suppose the workmen didn't leave their wardrobes, when they went away last evening, Bell?" he asked, when he had scaled the rather perilous height.

         "No," said his sister-in-law laughing.

         "Then just hand up that old sheet--and a piece of the bedcord yonder. Now, don't you admire my tout ensemble?"

         "Uncle Dick looks like a ghost," said Master Henry Augustus.

         "No he don't--he looks like the old miller down at the Pond," struck in Miss Julia.

         "Upon my word, I don't know which of you is the most


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complimentary," observed Richard drily. "Now, then, clear the track every soul of you, and give me a chance!"

         And he worked on, now breaking into a merry whistle, now pausing to survey his achievements, but oftenest of all, relapsing into thoughts of the beautiful young damsel at the pic-nic last night, who had been so studiously cold and reserved toward him.

         "She won't like me," thought he, "and I can't for the life of me tell why. Well, as I said before, women are unaccountable concerns!"

         "Amy," said Mrs. Brownleigh, to her pretty young cousin, "I wish you would just run over to Mrs. Mayfield's with this note. The children are at school, and I have no one to send."

         "Oh, no," said Amy, while a fresh tinge suffused her delicate checks. "I don't want to encounter that superfine young collegian."

         "Nonsense, he isn't there--he is staying with Harry Franklin."

         "Oh, then I will take the note." said Amy, rising, and looking round for her coquettish little gipsy hat.

         "You are the strangest girl, Amy." said her cousin. "What can be the reason that you dislike Richard Mayfield? He is handsome and so talented!"

         "I don't fancy these ornamental people," said Amy, demurely. "My husband must be of some use in the world!"

         "How do you know but that Mr. Mayfield is?"

         "Can't be possible," said Amy, archly shaking her curls. "His hands are too small for anything but lemon-coloured kid gloves. I'll wager a new bonnet, Alice, that he never did anything more laborious than to carry a box of cigars in his life!"

         Mrs. Brownleigh laughed, and Amy passed out of the vine-wreathed porch, wondering within herself whether Mr. Richard Mayfield had been very much vexed because she had refused to dance with him the evening before.

         Mrs. John Mayfield's house was at no very great distance, and as Amy was quite intimate with that lady, and understood the domestic saturnalia that was at present transpiring within her domains, she did not think it necessary to knock, but opened the door and walked in without ceremony.

         There stood Dick, the apex of a pyramidical scaffolding of boards, his fine broad cloth obscured by a lime-splashed sheet


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which was girded around his waist by a knot of rope, and his black curls overshadowed by a coarse, old straw hat, working away for dear life. His back was toward the door, and supposing the step to be that of his sister-in-law, he said gaily, without turning his head:

         "What! is the carpet ready so soon, Bell? I'm just through here, and I'll come and tack it down in a minute."

         Not receiving any answer, he threw down the brush and turned round.

         "Miss Brownleigh!"

         He never had looked so handsome in his life, and that was the first thought that rushed through Amy's mind, in the midst of all her embarrassment; for Dick had the advantage of the young lady in this respect--she was embarrassed, and he was not.

         He sprang, laughingly, to the ground a d threw off his ghostly drapery.

         "You must think I have a curious taste in costume," said he, archly, "but the truth is that Isabel has been disappointed in her work-people, and my mother is away from home, so I am helping her clean the house.["]

         "I did not know--I thought you had no taste--" stammered Amy, unconsciously speaking out her thoughts.

         "You supposed that I was nothing more than an ornamental piece of furniture? Ask Isabel about that," said Dick, half piqued, half smiling. "But can I be of any use to you now?"

         "I had a note from my cousin for Mrs. Mayfield," said Amy, still speaking scarce above her breath.

         "She has gone down to the further orchard," said Dick. "It is some distance, and not a very straight path. If you will wait until I remove a little of this lime, I shall be happy to escort you down there."

         Half an hour ago, Amy would have haughtily informed him "it was quite unnecessary for her to trouble him,"-- now she stood still and waited.

         It was a long walk under the spreading shadow of noble old apple trees, bending with their weight of crimson and russet fruit, and through meadows ankle deep in purple and bloom, and nodding plumes of golden-rod, yet, for all that, Amy was quite surprised when Mrs. Mayfield came in sight, carrying a little basket of rose-cheeked peaches from a pet tree beyond.

         We believe it is one of woman's special and incontrovertible privileges to change her mind--therefore, nobody was


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so much astonished when, three months subsequently, there was a rumor of the "engagement" of Mr. Mayfield and Miss Brownleigh! Still, however, Dick always declared that it was an insoluble mystery to him that when serenades and schottisches, poetry and perfumes, had all failed to win an entrance to the maiden's heart, a whitewash brush should have been the unromantic weapon which, at last, brought down the barricade!

AN AMERICAN AT WATERLOO.

         M. LEON GOZLAN, a clever French magazinist, has just published two volumes of Miscellanies, in one of which is an account of a visit he made, a few months ago, to the field of Waterloo, and he give us in it an illustration of French feeling. The following anecdote, told by one of the guides to M. Gozlan, as a fact which had come under his own special observation, is particularly rich: An English traveler and an American traveler ascended, at the same time, the Mountain of the Lion, to enjoy the vast panorama of the battle-field. The same guide served for both. He commenced his recital with as much impartiality as possible; but at length he could not avoid saying, "Here the French gave way before the impetuous charge of the English." Upon which, the American muttered, "That's not true!" The Englishman looked at him and the guide continued. Soon afterwards he was obliged to say, in the course of his narrative, "In the ravine to which I am pointing the French were put to flight by the English cavalry." "That's not true," repeated the obstinate American. The Englishman looked at him again, and calmly turned up his cuffs; the American did so too. A third time the guide, whose oratorical powers were now in full swing, announced a fact more glorious to the English than to the French, and a third time the American coolly added, "That's not true!" They went on for some time; but upon the eighth contradiction of the American, the Englishman threw himself upon him; the American parried the blow, and with clenched fists they bagan to box in solemn silence. They boxed upon a platform scarcely two yards across, and over a perpendicular precipice of more than a hundred and forty feet in depth. Their rage increased with the force of their blows; they closed, wrestled and fell, and locked in each other's embrace, they rolled from the top to the bottom of the mountain. They were neither dead nor wounded, but the American getting up from the ground, said to the Englishman, "No sir, it is not true."


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         RUMOURS are usually composed of a mixture of truth and falsehood, and there always mingles in the medley a sufficiency of truth to obtain credit for the falsehood.

         AMONG the Romans the gift of a ring was badge of liberation from slavery. Married people can best explain whether it is so amongst the moderns.

         POLITENESS pays about as well as almost anything else that costs as little. Think of it.

         THE captain of a vessel is not governed by his mate, but a married landsman generally is.

         WHEN you get pretty well out of employment, try attending to your own business for a while.

         ASSUMED qualities may catch the affections of some; but one must possess qualities really good to fix the heart.

         IF motives were always visible, men would often blush for their most brilliant actions.

         IT is astonishing, how keen even stupid people are in discovering imaginary affronts.

         THE penance we can do for envying another's merit is to endeavour to surpass it.

         RELIGION, of the heart may justly and truly be called the heart of religion.

         Books are embalmed minds--fame is a flower upon a dead man's heart.

         MEN wounded by the explosion of bombshells are wounded mortarly.

         THE ocean, which is forever sounding, sometimes gets sounded.

         A novel may be very old, and yet what is old cannot be novel.

         DILIGENCE is a fair fortune and industry a good estate.

         He who knows himself has occasion for humility.

         Do good with what thou hast, or it will do thee no good.

         PUT your money into a box if you like, but not a dice-box.


Page 82

CONFEDERATE STATES RAIL-ROAD GUIDE
COUNTING-HOUSE CALENDAR.

        
1863. Sunday . . . . . Monday . . . . . Tuesday . . . . . Wednesday . . . . . Thursday . . . . . Friday . . . . . Saturday . . . . . 1863. Sunday . . . . . Monday . . . . . Tuesday . . . . . Wednesday . . . . . Thursday . . . . . Friday . . . . . Saturday . . . . .
JANUARY . . . . .         1 2 3 JULY . . . . .       1 2 3 4
  4 5 6 7 8 9 10   5 6 7 8 9 10 11
  11 12 13 14 15 16 17   12 13 14 15 16 17 18
  18 19 20 21 22 23 24   19 20 21 22 23 24 25
  25 26 27 28 29 30 31   26 27 28 29 30 31  
FEBRUA'Y . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 AUGUST . . . . .             1
  8 9 10 11 12 13 14   2 3 4 5 6 7 8
  15 16 17 18 19 20 21   9 10 11 12 13 14 15
  22 23 24 25 26 27 28   16 17 18 19 20 21 22
                  23 24 25 26 27 28 29
                  30 31          
MARCH . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 SEPTEM.     1 2 3 4 5
  8 9 10 11 12 13 14   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  15 16 17 18 19 20 21   13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  22 23 24 25 26 27 28   20 21 22 23 24 25 26
  29 30 31           27 28 29 30      
APRIL . . . . .       1 2 3 4 OCTOBER . . . . .         1 2 3
  5 6 7 8 9 10 11   4 5 6 7 8 9 10
  12 13 14 15 16 17 18   11 12 13 14 15 16 17
  19 20 21 22 23 24 25   18 19 20 21 22 23 24
  26 27 28 29 30       25 26 27 28 29 30 31
MAY . . . . .           1 2 NOVEM. . . . . . . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  3 4 5 6 7 8 9   8 9 10 11 12 13 17
  10 11 12 13 14 15 16   15 16 17 18 19 20 24
  17 18 19 20 21 22 23   22 23 24 25 26 27 28
  24 25 26 27 28 29 30   29 30          
  31                            
JUNE . . . . .   1 2 3 4 5 6 DECEMB. . . . . .     1 2 3 4 5
  7 8 9 10 11 12 13   6 7 8 9 10 11 12
  14 15 16 17 18 19 20   13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  21 22 23 24 25 26 27   20 21 22 23 24 25 26
  28 29 30           27 28 29 30 31    



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