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Senate Journal of the Second Extra Session
of the Thirty-Third General Assembly of the State of Tennessee,
which Convened at Nashville on
Thursday, the 25th Day of April, A. D. 1861

Electronic Edition.

Tennessee. General Assembly. Senate


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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
1999.

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Library of Congress Subject Headings, 21st edition, 1998

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Title Page


SENATE JOURNAL
OF THE
SECOND EXTRA SESSION OF THE
THIRTY-THIRD GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OF THE
STATE OF TENNESSEE,
WHICH CONVENED AT
NASHVILLE ON THURSDAY, THE 25TH DAY OF APRIL, A. D. 1861

NASHVILLE:
J. O. GRIFFITH AND COMPANY, PUBLIC PRINTERS.
1861.


Page 3

SENATE JOURNAL.

THURSDAY MORNING, APRIL 25, 1861.

        At a meeting of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, begun and held at the city of Nashville, on Thursday, being the 25th day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and sixty-one, in pursuance of a Proclamation of His Excellency, Isham G. Harris, bearing date the 18th day of April, A. D. 1861, being the Third Session of the Thirty-Third General Assembly of said State. On which day, being that fixed by the Proclamation of the Governor for the meeting of the General Assembly, Taz. W. Newman, of the counties of Lincoln and Franklin, the Speaker; John McClarin of the county of Smith, the Clerk; Franc M. Paul, of the county of Shelby, Engrossing Clerk; and the following members of the Senate appeared and took their seats, viz:

        From the district composed of the counties of Johnson, Carter, Washington and Sullivan; Geo. R. McClellan.

        Hawkins, Hancock and Jefferson; Wm. M. Bradford.

        Claiborne, Grainger, Anderson and Campbell; M. V. Nash.

        Meigs, McMinn, Polk and Monroe; James T. Lane.

        Wilson and DeKalb; Jordan Stokes.

        Rutherford and Williamson; John W. Richardson.

        Bedford and Marshall; James M. Johnson.

        Warren, Cannon, Coffee, Grundy and Van Buren; Ed. J. Wood.

        Giles, Lawrence and Wayne; H. W. Hunter.

        Maury, Lewis, Hickman and Dickson; Thomas McNeilly.

        Davidson, John Trimble.

        Robertson, Montgomery and Stewart; Judson Horn.

        Benton, Humphreys, Perry, Decatur and Henderson; James E. Mickley.

        Madison, Haywood, Lauderdale and Tipton; R. W. Bumpass.

        Henry, Weakley and Obion; B. L. Stovall.

        Fayette and Shelby; Robert G. Payne.

        Smith and Sumner; James L. Thompson.

        Gibson, Carroll and Dyer; V. S. Allen.


Page 4

        Rhea, Bledsoe, Bradley, Hamilton and Marion; John A. Minnis.

        Knox and Roane; James S. Boyd.

        The Senate was called to order at 12 o'clock M., by the Speaker.

        Prayer by the Rev. Joseph Bardwell.

        The Proclamation of the Governor convening the General Assembly was read as follows:

PROCLAMATION BY THE GOVERNOR.

        WHEREAS, an alarming and dangerous usurpation of power by the President of the United States has precipitated a state of war between the sovereign States of America:

        Therefore, I, ISHAM G. HARRIS, Governor of the State of Tennessee, by virtue of the power and authority in me vested by the Constitution, do hereby require the Senators and Representatives of the two Houses of the General Assembly of said State, to convene at the Capitol in Nashville, on Thursday, the 25th day of April inst., 1861, at 12 o'clock M., to legislate upon such subjects as may then be submitted to them.

        In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the great seal of the State to be affixed at the Department at Nashville, on this 18th day of April, A. D. 1861.

By the Governor: ISHAM G. HARRIS.

J. E. R. RAY, Secretary of State.

        Ordered that a message be sent to the House of Representatives informing them that the Senate had assembled, and was ready for the transaction of public business.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        I am directed to inform the Senate that the House of Representatives is organized and ready for the transaction of public business.


        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution, (Senate Resolution No. 1,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That a Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations be appointed, to consist of five members on the part of the Senate and--members on the part of the House of Representatives; that a Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs be in like manner appointed to consist of three members on the part of the Senate and-- members on the part of the House of Representatives; and also that a Committee on Ways and Means be in like manner appointed,


Page 5

to consist of five members on the part of the Senate, and--members on the part of the House of Representatives.

        Resolved further, That all other Standing Committees of the regular session be continued in existence during the present session.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rules were suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. DeWolf, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has appointed the following Committee to act in conjunction with such Committee as the Senate may appoint, to wait upon His Excellency, the Governor, and inform him that the General Assembly is organized and ready for the transaction of public business, viz:

        Messrs. Williams of Hickman, Brazelton, Lea, Davis, and Mr. East.


        The message was taken up, and the Speaker appointed Messrs. Bumpass, Stokes, and Mr. Wood on said Committee.

        Mr. Newman, (Mr. Wood in the Chair,) offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No 2,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Secretary of State have purchased and prepared the flag adopted by the Confederate States, with the coat of arms of Tennessee on the same, and it shall be placed over the Capitol of the State.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        Mr. Bumpass from the Joint Committee to wait upon the Governor, reported that the duty had been performed, and that His Excellency would communicate, with the General Assembly immediately.

        On motion, the rules of the regular session were adopted for the government of this.

        A message was received from His Excellency, the Governor, by the hands of J. E. R. Ray, Secretary of State, and read as follows:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, April 2, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        The President of the United States--elected according to the forms of the Constitution, but upon principles openly hostile to its provisions--having wantonly inaugurated an internecine war


Page 6

between the people of the slave and non-slave holding States, I have convened you again at the seat of Government, for the purpose of enabling you to take such action as will most likely contribute to the defence of our rights, the preservation of our liberties, the sovereignty of the State, and the safety of our people; all of which are now in imminent peril by the usurpations of the authorities in Washington, and the unscrupulous fanaticism which runs riot throughout the Northern States.

        The war thus inaugurated is likely to assume an importance nearly, if not equal, to the struggle of our revolutionary fathers, in their patriotic efforts to resist the usurpations and throw off the tyrannical yoke of the English Government; a war the duration of which and the good or evil that must result from it, depends entirely, in my judgment, upon the readiness with which the citizens of the South harmonize as one people, and the alacrity with which they respond to the demands of patriotism.

        I do not think it necessary to recapitulate, at this late hour, the long train of abuses to which the people of Tennessee, and our sister States of the South have been subjected by the anti-republican spirit that has for many years been manifesting itself in that section, and which has at last declared itself our open and avowed enemy. In the message which I addressed to you at your called session in January last, these things were somewhat elaborately referred to, as constituting, in my judgment, the amplest reason for considering ourselves in imminent danger, and as requiring such action on the part of the Legislature as would place the State in an attitude for defence, whenever the momentous crisis should be forced upon us; and, also, as presenting to the North the strongest argument for peace, and if possible, securing a reconstruction of the Union, thus already dissolved by the most authoritative, formal, and matured action of a portion of the slaveholding States. Minor differences upon abstract questions--the ardent devotion of our people to the preservation of the Union, originating with their great loyality to the Government--and a more hopeful view of the subject than I had been able to take, coupled with the supposed peaceful intentions of the authorities at Washington, have resulted in leaving the State poorly prepared for the sad realities which are now upon us.

        But unfortunate as this may be, I am nevertheless encouraged with the belief that we are at last, practically, a united people. Whatever differences may have heretofore existed amongst us, growing out of party divisions, as to the right of Secession as a Constitutional remedy against Federal usurpation, all admit the moral right asserted by our fathers, of each and every


Page 7

people to resist wrong, and to maintain their liberties by whatever means may be necessary; "that Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed, and that whenever any form of government becomes destructive of the ends for which it was created, it is the right of the people to alter and abolish it, and to institute a new government, laying its foundation on such principles, and organizing its powers in such form as shall to them seem most likely to effect their safety and happiness." Standing by this common sentiment, with the bloody and tyrannical policy of the Presidential usurper fully before us; in the face of his hordes of armed soldiery, marching to the work of Southern subjugation; the people of the proud Commonwealth of Tennessee--true to their honor, true to the great principles of free institutions, true to the lessons of their fathers, and true to their brethren of the South, the subjects of a common oppression--have united, almost with one voice, in declaring their fixed resolve to resist the tyrant; and in pledging their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor to the maintenance of their rights, and the rights of their sister States of the South.

        It cannot be overlooked that, in assuming an attitude of this character--forced upon us by the remarkable exigency of the times--we are, in effect, dissolving our connection with the Federal Union. As established by our fathers, that Union no longer exists. However much we may have cherished it heretofore, no intelligent and candid man can deny that it has ceased to be a blessing, and has become a curse; that it is no longer a high and sacred means of protection, but an engine of oppression; that it has ceased to be a bond of brotherhood, and has become a hateful connection between communities at war. It would be idle, therefore, to speak of ourselves any longer as members of the Federal Union; and while it is believed by many, whose opinions are entitled to the highest respect, that, by reason of the subversion of the Constitution by the authorities in power, inaugurating a revolution between the States thereof, each and every individual is already released from his former obligations to that government, yet, as best comporting with the dignity of the subject, and also from a due regard to those who may hold a different opinion--and farther still, that all the world may be advised of our action--I respectfully suggest that our connection with the Federal Union be formally annulled in such manner as shall involve the highest exercise of sovereign authority by the people of the State, and best secure that harmony, so much to be desired, in times like the present, upon questions even of mere detail. Until this is done Many conscientious citizens may feel embarrassed in their action from their supposed relation to the General Government.


Page 8

In emergencies like the present, while it is our duty to act with due deliberation and prudence, unbiased as far as possible by excitement or prejudice, it is nevertheless of the highest importance that we should act with promptitude and decision.

        Whatever grounds of hope may have been supposed to exist heretofore for an adjustment of the difficulties between the two sections of the Federal Union; however anxious we may have been to continue members of the same common family with the people of the North, such hope and expectation no longer exis in the mind of any rational man, who desires to maintain the honor and equality of the State, and the inviolability of her peculiar institutions.

        The present administration, elected upon avowed purposes of hostility to the South--purposes which all knew then as well as now, could not be carried into effect, without an internecine war and a dissolution of the Union--has exerted every energy, resorted to every strategy, and disregarded every constitutional barrier, in order to hasten the accomplishment of the unholy mission for which the people of the Northern section had elevated it to power. They have lost no time--they have neither hesitated nor faltered. The low duplicity in which their Administration was inaugurated--trusting, while conceding nothing, to lull the South into a fatal security, furnishing ground for divisions in the border slave States, while constant though secret preparation for the work of subjugation was going on, is now exposed and leaves us no alternative but independence out of the Union, or subjugation in it. The dishonorable and treacherous practices which have so far characterized the authorities at Washington, admonish us, that in the impending struggle we are scarcely to expect the rules of honorable warfare. Having its origin in a disordered moral sentiment of the North--not finding the ordinary restraints of patriotism among their people--deriving its power from a usurpation and perversion of the functions of government--having no middle-ground short of positive subjugation of the South, or a defeat which exposes its disgrace to the civilized world--I fear the time has passed when peace can be hoped for by the mere moral force of a united South, without a trial of arms. Having succeeded in confusing and dividing the border slave States, they have had ample time for military preparations. The veil which concealed their recent movements has been thrown aside. The note of war has been sounded, and in the imperial proclamation, recently issued, the people of the Confederate States and all who sympathize with them are treated as rebels, and twenty days is allowed them to "disperse" and return to their allegiance to the authorities at Washington. Without waiting for the expiration of the twenty days, in addition to the regular army and


Page 9

naval forces, a militia force of seventy-five thousand has been called into the field to execute this edict, by the power of arms. As if purposely intended to add additional insult to the people of Tennessee, I have been called upon, as their Governor, to furnish a portion of these troops. I have answered that demand as in my judgment became the honor of the State, and leave the people to pass upon my action.

        The Federal Union of the States, thus practically dissolved, can never be restored; or if ever thus restored, it must, by the very act, cease to be a Union of free and independent States, such as our fathers established. It will become a consolidated centralized Government, without liberty or equality, in which some will reign and others serve the few tyrannize and the many suffer. It would be the greatest folly to hope for the reconstruction of a peaceful Union, upon terms of fraternity and equality, at the end of an internecine war. There can be no desirable Union without fraternity. And if we could not have that, before the unholy crusade which is now being waged against us, we cannot have it after they shall have wantonly imbrued their unholy hands in the innocent blood of our people, from no worthier motive than a desire to destroy our equality and subvert our liberties.

        Therefore, I respectfully recommend the perfecting of an Ordinance by the General Assembly, formally declaring the independence of the State of Tennessee of the Federal Union, renouncing its authority, and re assuming each and every function belonging to a separate sovereignty; and that said Ordinance, when it shall have been thus perfected by the Legislature, shall, at the earliest practicable time, be submitted to a vote of the people, to be by them adopted or rejected.

        When the people of the State shall formally declare their connection with the remaining States of the Union dissolved, it will be a matter of the highest expediency,--I might almost say of unavoidable political necessity--that we shall at. the same time, or as soon thereafter as may be, connect ourselves with those with whom a common interest, a common sympathy, and a common destiny identify us, for weal or for woe. That each of the Southern States, as they throw off their connection with the Federal Government, should take an independent position in the contest, without that concert of action which alone can be secured by political unity, is a proposition which surely no one will assent to, who anticipates the dangers of the hour and the necessity for perfect harmony in the work of our general defence.

        Such a political Union with the people of the Confederate States is rendered essential, by the fact, t at we have made no provision for arming, organizing, provisioning, and embodying


Page 10

our military forces, while the Government of the Confederate States, foreseeing this invasion, has had an eye to the necessities of the emergency, and stands prepared generously to lend us its assistance in this unprovoked and cruel struggle. If we accept that assistance, we should do it in a spirit of mutual trust and confidence, prepared to share its burdens equally, while we avail ourselves of its advantages. A Government thus perfectly organized can more thoroughly command the resources and aggregate the revenues of the country than isolated States, fighting without unity, and moving without a common and responsible head. These resources, being thus concentrated, because it is natural intuition to rally round such a Government, in such an emergency, for self-preservation and defence, can be disbursed with more efficiency, and with less cost to the people than when the revenues, necessary to support the war, are scattered by divided counsels and not controlled by a common bureau. The same may be said with regard to military operations. Unity of movement, to secure unity of purpose in attack or defence, is absolutely necessary to success. The people of the whole South, thus united by a firm political compact, moving under the direction of one Government, and animated by the sense of common perils and by a unanimous determination to maintain their rights, liberties, and institutions, are invincible, and must speedily conquer an honorable peace. The war must necessarily be protracted or brief in proportion to the union among themselves.

        I, therefore, further recommend that you perfect an ordinance, with a view to our admission as a member of the Southern Confederacy, (which, it is evident, must soon embrace the entire slaveholding States of the South,) to be submitted in like manner, and at the same time, but separately, for adoption or rejection by the people; so that they may have the opportunity to approve the former and reject the latter, or adopt both, as in their wisdom may seem most consistent with the future welfare of the State. However fully satisfied the Executive and Legislature may be, as to the urgent necessity for the speedy adoption of both these propositions, it is our duty to furnish the amplest means for a fair and full expression of the popular will.

        In the opening of a revolution, fraught with such consequences, and the close of which no one can foresee, it is a matter of the highest moment that we determine, as speedily as possible our future political relations, delaying only long enough to reach the will and voice of the people. Under existing circumstances, I can see no propriety for encumbering the people of the State with the election of delegates, to do that which it is in your power to enable them to do directly for themselves.


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The most direct as well as the highest act of sovereignty, according to our theory, is that by which the people vote, not merely for men, but for measures submitted for their approval or rejection. Since it is only the voice of the people that is to be heard, there is no reason why they may not as readily and effectively express themselves upon an ordinance framed and submitted to them by the Legislature, as if submitted to them by a Convention. The Southern States, all of whom are now engaged in resistance to the encroachment of Abolition power, will necessarily encounter embarrassments, arising from a want of unity of action, until such time as they shall all be united under a common Government.

        The mode of action suggested, in addition to the advantage of its being the speediest of all others, will be attended with less expense to the State, which is of far greater importance now than at any former period of our history, owing to the general embarrassment of the people, which must continue at least during these troubles, and to the heavy appropriations that you will have necessarily to make to defray the expense of our defences.

        If, however, it should be deemed advisable that a Convention, representing the sovereignty of the people, should be called by the General Assembly, in preference to submitting an ordinance of independence directly to them, though I deem the latter measure more expedient, under the circumstances, I am not prepared to say that harmony and unanimity will not thus be effected. The Senators and Representatives, coming, as they do, directly from their constituents, are the best judges of this measure. It cannot be regarded other than a question of detail, inasmuch as a very large majority of the people regard them elves as being forever absolved from all obedience to a Government that has developed the coldest and most deliberate purpose to inaugurate a civil and sanguinary war among them.

        I deem it proper to remark in this connection that the Constitution of the Confederate States, while it retains all that is valuable of the Constitution of the former United States, is an improvement in many essential points upon that instrument, as conceded by those even who were unfriendly to the mode and manner in which it originated.

        The only additional matter to which I shall call your attention --and first in importance--is the necessity of such legislation as will put the State upon war footing immediately. I will not insult your intelligence or question your patriotism so far as to resort to argument to prove the necessity of this measure, but content myself by recommending the passage of a law regulating the raising and thorough organization of an efficient


Page 12

volunteer force for immediate service, in any emergency which may arise, and a thorough and perfect organization of the militia, so that in case of necessity the whole force of the State can be speedily brought into action.

        In my message to your extra session in January last, I laid before you the report of the Keeper of Public Arms, showing the number, character, and condition of the arms of the State, to which I refer you for information on that subject. Since that report was made, I have ordered and received at the arsenal, fourteen hundred rifle muskets. If upon this subject further or more accurate information is desired, it shall be laid before you by the report of the proper officer.

        It requires no argument from me to prove the absolute necessity of an immediate appropriation of a sum sufficient to thoroughly arm and equip such military force as the State may probably need in the prospective difficulties which lie before us. In addition to which, I respectfully recommend that you appropriate a sum sufficient to provision and maintain such force as is intended for the field, and an ample contingent military fund, to be subject to the order and disbursement of a Military Board, under such restrictions as you may see proper to impose.

        The establishment of a Military Board, to consist of at least three persons, and invested with power to make all needful rules and regulations for organization and maintenance, I regard as indispensably necessary to a perfect military organization and equipment in the State, and the fact that the Legislature cannot foresee and provide for the various contingent expenses necessarily incidental to a state of war, justifies and makes necessary the contingent military fund referred to.

        I trust, gentlemen, that I have not so far mistaken your intelligence and patriotism as to render necessary that I should invoke you in the name of all that is sacred and dear to us as a people--even the sanctity of our domestic firesides--to forget past differences, and whatever may tend in the least to distract your counsels in the present momentous crisis, in which we have been involved by the unprovoked and tyrannical usurpation of a people who, forgetting the lessons of their fathers, have overthrown the fairest government upon earth, in the mere wantonness of an unnatural sectional prejudice amounting to a sectional hate, and a disregard of those great principles of justice and equality upon which the Federal Union was based. I trust that to-day there are in Tennessee no Whigs, no Democrats; but that we are one people--all patriots, all brothers, recognizing a common interest and a common destiny; and that we will stand as one man in defence of our honor and of our rights. I pray you cultivate a feeling of this kind, and to


Page 13

disseminate it amongst your constituents. It is only by such united and determined action, on the part of the people of the whole South, that we can hope to avoid the of the calamities of the bloodiest and most devastating civil war that has afflicted any nation in the history of the civilized world.

        I trust that a few days will be amply sufficient to dispose of the business which I have laid before you. Your presence may soon be needed in the field, and if not, will be required at home for counsel among your constituents.

        Trusting that an All Wise Providence may watch over your deliberations, and direct you in the adoption of such measures, as may most subserve the maintenance of the rights and liberties of the people, I submit the determination of these matters to your hands.

ISHAM G. HARRIS.


SECRET SESSION.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate went into Secret Session.

        Mr. Bumpass offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No 3.):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Secretary of State be authorized to have published for the use of the State, two thousand copies of Hardee's and two thousand of Scott's Military Tactics, to be bound in plain, cheap, substantial binding, one copy of each to be furnished to each commissioned and non-commissioned officer engaged in military duty under the authority of the State, and that the same be paid for as other public printing; that the Secretary contract for the same on the best terms practicable.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Newman (Mr. Bumpass in the Chair,) offered Senate Resolution No. 4, as follows:

        Resolved, That Messrs. Bradford, Lane, and Wood be appointed by the Senate to wait on the Banks of the city and ascertain how much money each can and will loan to the State, on the faith of a tax on the property of the State, being levied by this session to refund the same; that said committee report immediately.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, (Mr. Bumpass in the Chair) the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning 9 o'clock.


Page 14

FRIDAY MORNING, APRIL 26,1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        S. S. Stanton, Senator from the counties of White, Jackson, and Macon, appeared and took his seat.

        D. V. Stokely, Senator from the counties of Greene, Cocke, Sevier and Blount, appeared and took his seat.

        Mr. Bradford moved that the members of the House of Representatives be allowed to enter the Senate chamber during the hours of secret session, and communicate freely with the Senators upon the business before them.

        Mr. Thompson presented a memorial from Dr. R. Thompson of the city of Nashville, in relation to a three barrelled self-loading cannon, invented by him in 1842. The memorial was read and referred to the committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Payne presented a petition from Geo. W. Harris, in relation to an important invention in gunnery, recently perfected by him asking that it be investigated by the General Assembly.

        On motion of Mr. Payne the petition was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 5.):

        Resolved by the Senate, that the Committee on Federal Relations be requested to prepare a plan for separating the State of Tennessee from the States of the Union adhering to the Compact known as the Constitution of the United States of America, and for extinguishing the federal authority within the limits of said State; said Committee will also prepare a plan for fixing the future political relations of the State of Tennessee. Said Committee is requested to report at its earliest convenience.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and referred to the Committee on Federal Relations.

        Mr. Stanton offered the following resolution (Senate, Resolution No. 6,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor of this State be, and he is hereby authorized to make contracts to ration, and subsist the military forces of the State, by such supplies as may be deemed prudent and necessary, as well as for arms and other munitions as may be important to equip the military forces of the State, to be procured before further action of this General Assembly, by the passage of acts, &c.,


Page 15

and this Assembly hereby pledges itself to follow up said purchases or engagements with a bill or act making the necessary appropriation of money to meet or liquidate the same and that the Governor be allowed to appoint such agents he is as may be necessary to carry out the provisions of this resolution.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Minnis introduced Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people an Ordinance dissolving their connection with the General Government, which passed its first reading.

        Mr. Thompson offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No.1,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the members and officers of the Legislature be allowed to draw their per diem and mileage from time to time during the present extra session.

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, the rule was suspended, and the resolution was ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to House of Representatives.

        Mr. Newman (Mr. McClellan in the chair) offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 8,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That a Military Board be created, to consist of the Governor and two assistants, the assistants shall be immediately appointed by the Governor, to be confirmed by the Senate.

        Resolved, That the Governor shall proceed immediately to organize an Adjutant General's Department, a Commissary Department, a Quartermaster's Department, and a Paymaster's Department. These appointments shall be made outside of, and in addition to the present staff officers of the Governor, and each one of said officers shall hold the rank of Colonel of Infantry, commissioned and appointed by the Governor to be confirmed by the Senate.

        Resolved, That the army regulations of the United States of 1857, shall be adopted as far, applicable in the organization and regulation of said departments.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their clerk, Mr. Campbell, as follows:


Page 16

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and concurred in Senate Resolution No. 6, to authorize the Governor to make immediate purchase of subsistence and rations, arms, &c., for the State, and ordered its immediate return to the Senate, and the same is herewith returned.


        The Speaker announced the following on the part of the Senate as the members of the Joint Select Committee provided for by Senate Resolution No. 1, viz:

        On Military Affairs--Messrs. Lane, Bradford and Wood.

        On Ways and Means--Messrs. Stanton, McNeilly, Bumpass, cClellan, and Stovall.

        On Federal Relations--Messrs. Payne, Stokes, Richardson, Minnis, and Allen.

        On motion of Mr. McClellan, Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to vote of the people an Ordinance dissolving their connection with the General Government, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations.

        Mr. Stokely offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 9,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor of the state of Tennessee be requested to make known to Abraham Lincoln, President of the United States, and to Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America, that it is the earnest desire of the people of this commonwealth, that peace may be preserved between the United States and the Confederate States of America, and in order to that end, we request that all troops and forces of the United States, situated in the Confederate States, or any other slaveholding State, be withdrawn therefrom by the said Abraham Lincoln, and that the said Presidents are further requested to have all the States belonging to each Republic, or they themselves appoint delegates or commissioners to meet together peaceably, to arrange a fair and equitable division of the slaveholding States from the non-slaveholding States and Territories of the former United States of America, that thereby all the States may obtain their rights without the shedding of brothers blood.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, by their Clerk, Mr. Campbell as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 7, recommending to agriculturalists to devote their lands to the culture of grain and grasses and the same is herewith transmitted for the action of the State.



Page 17

        The House has adopted Senate Resolution No. 8, to allow members and officers of the General Assembly to draw their mileage and per diem, as it falls due, and the same is herewith returned to the Senate for enrolment.

        Mr. Mickley, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as correctly engrossed Senate Resolutions Nos. 1, 6, 8 and 9.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 2 o'clock by the Speaker.

        Mr. Bradford, from the committee appointed to wait upon the Banks, and, ascertain the amount of money they would loan the State, submitted a communication from the Presidents and Cashiers of the Planters' and Union Banks; which was read and referred to the Joint Select Committee on Ways and Means.

        House Resolution No. 7, recommending agriculturalists to devote their lands to the culture of grains and grasses, was taken up and adopted.

        Mr. Payne moved that the vote adopting the resolution be reconsidered, which was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the resolution was laid on the table.

        Mr. Stovall offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 10,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor of the State be, and he is hereby authorized to order immediate organization of all the regiments and companies tendered to him in the State; that they be drilled by their respective officers, and held in immediate readiness for service in the State, if necessary, or to assist any of our sister Southern States in the present revolution, in defence of liberty and justice.

        On motion of Mr. Stovall, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, the message of his Excellency, the Governor, was taken up, and its several recommendations referred to the appropriate committees.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate adjourned until to morrow morning, 10 o'clock.


Page 18

SATURDAY MORNING, APRIL 27, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        Prayer by the Rev. Dr. Quintard.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        Mr. Payne from the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations, reported back Senate Resolution No. 9, to bring about, if possible, a peaceable settlement of present political difficulties, asked to be discharged from its further consideration.

        Mr. Lane from the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, reported as follows:

        The Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, have had under consideration the petitions of Geo. W. Harris and Dr. R. Thompson, and recommend that a Special Committee be raised for their further consideration. The Committee have also had under consideration Senate Resolution No. 10, and recommend its passage.

J. T. LANE, Chairman.


        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as correctly enrolled joint resolutions to allow members and officers of the General Assembly to draw their mileage and per diem, and to authorize the Governor to make immediate purchases of subsistence and rations, arms, &c., for the State.

        Mr. Trimble asked and obtained leave of absence the during the day.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 11,):

        Resolved by the Senate, That his Excellency, the Governor, be requested, if compatible with the public interest, to communicate to this body in secret session, whether he has any facts in his possession going to show that the commerce of this State has been obstructed, or goods intended for Tennessee detained or confiscated by persons acting under Federal authority. It is respectfully asked that he will give all the information he has to this body relative to the foregoing inquiry.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        Mr. Minnis introduced Senate Bill No. 2, for the relief of the various Railroad companies of the State of Tennessee; passed first reading.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Campbell, their clerk as follows:


Page 19

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and concurred in Senate Resolution No. 1, providing for Joint Select Committees on Federal Relations, Military Affairs, and on Ways and Means, and the Speaker of the House of Representatives has appointed Messrs. Caldwell, Vaughn, Dudley, Baker of Perry, Porter, Williams of Hickman, East, and Farley, on the Committee on Federal Relations; Messrs. Gantt, Farrelly, Hurt, Mayfield, and Ewing, upon the Committee on Military Affairs; and Messrs. Lea, Wisener, Whitmore, Barksdale, Davis, Harris, Doak, and Guy, on the Committee on Ways and Means.


        Mr. Stanton offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 12,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That this Assembly will hereafter sustain any reasonable expenses incident to the stationing of squads, as guards, at any and all railroad bridges and depots, within this State, whenever, in the judgment of the Governor, it becomes necessary.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        A communication was received from the Governor, and read as follows:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, April 27, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate:

        In answer to your resolution of this date, I have to communicate the fact that some days since, one hundred tons of lead were ordered from St. Louis by the steamer Hillman, for the use of the State. On yesterday I received a dispatch from Capt. H. H. Harrison, giving an account of the seizure and plundering of the boat of a part of its freight, which was the property of the State and citizens of Tennessee, which dispatch I herewith transmit for your examination. I have further to state that Capt. H. H. Harrison has reached the Capital, from whom you can get a more full report if desirable.

ISHAM G. HARRIS.


        On motion of Me Stanton, the Doorkeeper was ordered to request Capt. Harrison to come before the Senate and give a more detailed account of the seizure of the steamer Hillman and her cargo.

        Mr. Richardson asked and obtained leave of absence for the remainder of the day.


Page 20

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Campbell, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        I am directed by the House of Representatives to transmit to the Senate a series of resolutions which were adopted in Wilson county, and the same is herewith transmitted to the Senate.

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 5, approving the action of the Governor, in refusing troops to Abraham Lincoln, and ordered its immediate transmission to the Senate; and the same is herewith transmitted.


        House Resolution No 5, approving the action of the Governor in refusing troops to Abraham Lincoln, was taken up and adopted, and ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrolment.

        Senate Resolution No. 10, authorizing the Governor to organize the regiments and companies tendered to him, and hold them in readiness for service, was taken up.

        Mr. Newman (Mr. Allen in the Chair,) offered the following amendment:

        Be it further resolved, That each regiment and independent company as organized, shall report the field and company officers with non-commissioned officers and privates to the Secretary of State, and the commissioned officers shall be commissioned by the Governor, and entered into the service, first by regiments and battalions, and then by companies according to the date of the organization.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Boyd demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes . . . . . 17
  • Noes . . . . . 2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Stanton, Stovall, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--17.

        In the negative:

        Messrs. Boyd and Nash--2.

        So the resolutions were adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, Mr. Stokely was excused from voting on the resolutions.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was, suspended, and the resolutions ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        The Speaker presented a communication from the officers of


Page 21

the Bank of Tennessee, in relation to a loan by the bank to the State, which was read and referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 3 o'clock by the Speaker.

        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolutions Nos. 10 and 12 as correctly engrossed.

        On motion of Mr. Stovall, it was ordered that the Secretary of State be admitted to the Senate Chamber during the secret sessions, and the Clerk was directed to request him to keep private all bills or resolutions filed in his office, until such time as the secrecy attaching to the same shall be removed.

        Mr. McClellan, from the Committee on Military Affairs, reported back Senate Resolution No. 34, directing the Secretary of State to have printed two thousand copies each of Hardee's and Scott's Tactics, and recommend its adoption.

        The resolution was then taken up.

        Mr. McClellan moved to strike out the word "non-commissioned" when it occurs in the resolution; which motion was agreed to.

        The resolution as amended was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Resolution No. 9, to bring about if possible, a peaceable settlement of present political difficulties, was taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes . . . . .11
  • Noes . . . . .8

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Boyd Bradford, Horn, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, Nash, Stokes, Stokely, Stovall, and Mr. Wood--11.


Page 22

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Payne Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Newman--8.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        Mr. Wood moved to reconsider the vote adopting the resolution; on which motion, Mr. Horn demanded the ayes and noes which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .15
  • Noes. . . . .6

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McClellan, McNeilly, Nash, Payne, Stanton, Stovall, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--15.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Horn, Minnis, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--6.

        So the motion to reconsider prevailed.

        Mr. Stanton then asked and obtained leave to withdraw the resolution for examination.

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the Senate adjourned till Monday morning 11 o'clock.

MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 29, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of Saturday was read and confirmed.

        Reeve T. Hildreth, Senator from the counties of Overton, Fentress, Morgan and Scott, appeared and took his seat.

        The Speaker tendered the resignation of John E. Bennett, as Doorkeeper of the Senate.

        On motion of Mr. Stovall, the resignation was accepted, and the Senate went into the election of a doorkeeper to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of John E. Bennett.

        Mr. Bradford nominated Mr. J. D. Swan, of the county of Davidson.

        No other nominations being made, the roll was called.

        Senators voting for Mr. Swan are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter,


Page 23

Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Nash Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Stokely, Stovall, Thompson, Trimble. Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--22.

        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as correctly engrossed Senate Resolution No. 3, and as correctly enrolled Joint Resolution to provide for the raising of Joint Select Committees on Federal Relations, Military Affairs, and Ways an Means.

        A message was received from his Excellency, the Governor, by the hands of J. E. R. Ray, Secretary of State, as follows:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, April 29th, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate and House of Representatives:

        I deem it proper to announce to you the fact that the Hon. Henry Washington Hilliard, of Alabama, who is accredit to Tennessee by the President of the Confederate States of America, and charged with the duty of representing the views and policy of that government is now at the Capitol, and ready to confer with the Legislative Department of the State upon questions of interest and importance to the State of Tennessee and the Confederate States, at such time as you may see proper to fix upon for such conference.

Respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS.

        Mr. Swan, the Doorkeeper elect of the Senate, appeared and was sworn into his office by R. L. Crenshaw, Esq., one of the Justices of the Peace of Davidson county.

        Mr. Payne, from the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations, reported back Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people an Ordinance dissolving their connection with the General Government, with a bill in lieu, entitled a bill to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention of the State, and recommend its adoption.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their clerk, Mr. Campbell as follows.

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and concurred in Senate Resolution No. 10, authorizing the Governor to organize the regiments and companies tendered him, and hold them in readiness for service.

        The House of Representatives has also concurred in Senate


Page 24

Resolution No. 12, providing for stationing guards at railroad bridges, and the said resolutions are herewith returned to the Senate for enrollment.

        I am also directed by the House of Representatives to transmit to the Senate a series of resolutions forwarded to this General Assembly from Knox county, recommending the attitude Tennessee should assume in the present crisis; also, another series of resolutions on the same subject from Jefferson county, and they are herewith transmitted.


        Mr. Trimble offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 13,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Congress of the United States be requested to call a convention for proposing such amendments to the Constitution of the United States as are necessary to give peace to our country, and restore harmony among the States, and that a copy of this resolution be transmitted to the Congress of the United States.

        On motion of Mr. Trimble, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.

        Mr. Allen moved that the resolution be referred to the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations, which was disagreed to.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Trimble demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .8
  • Noes. . . . .16

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Horn, Nash, Stokely, and Mr. Trimble--8.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bumpass, Stanton, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Richardson Stanton, Stokes, Stovall, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--16.

        So the resolution was rejected.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Campbell, their clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 10, raising a committee of three on the part of the House, consisting of Messrs. Lea, Davis, and Porter, to confer with such committee as may be appointed on the part of the Senate, to confer with Hon. H. W. Hillard, in connection with the Governor, on the subject matter of his mission from the Confederate States, and the same is herewith transmitted to the Senate for its action thereon.


        On motion of Mr. Stanton, House Resolution No. 10, to raise a


Page 25

Joint Select Committee to confer with the Hon. H. W. Hilliard Commissioner from the Government of the Confederate States, was taken up.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the resolution was so amended as to provide for three members of said committee on the part of the Senate.

        The resolution as amended was adopted.

        The Speaker appointed on said committee on the part of the Senate, Messrs. Bumpass, Stanton, and McClellan.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 14,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That a Joint Select Committee be appointed to consist of five members on the part of the Senate, and members on the part of the House of Representatives, whose duty it shall be to prepare an address to the people of Tennessee upon the dangerous crisis in our affairs, and the necessity for prompt and decisive action.

        Mr. Payne moved that the rule be suspended and the resolution taken up; on which resolution Mr. Boyd demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .10
  • Noes. . . . .9

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, Payne, Stovall, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--10.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Hildreth, Horn, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Trimble--9.

        The motion to suspend the rule was disagreed to, two-thirds not voting in the affirmative.

        Mr. Bradford offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 15,):

        Resolved by the Senate of Tennessee, That the injunction of secresy be removed.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        Mr. Thompson offered the following resolution, (Senate Resolution No. 16,):

        WHEREAS, By order of the Governor of Illinois, the steamer C. E. Hillman, laden from St. Louis to Nashville, with sundry purchases, was boarded and dispossessed of all her cargo by troops concentrated at Cairo; therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That Governor Harris be, and he is hereby requested, immediately to open a correspondence, by telegraph, with the Governor Illinois, making a demand for a restitution of the cargo of the C. E.


Page 26

Hillman and such damages as have resulted to the owners of said boat by such unjust and lawless conduct of the Illinois troops.

        Resolved, That should no satisfactory answer from the Governor of Illinois be forthwith received, the Governor of Tennessee immediately issue an order to the proper authorities to seize and possess any property, lands, notes, bonds, moneys or any effects whatever, belonging to any citizen or citizens of the State of Illinois, and to pursue such other course as his wisdom may dictate to redress the grievance or vindicate the outrage perpetrated upon the citizens, and the insult and indignity offered to the State of Tennessee.

        The resolutions lie over under the rule.

        Mr. Stokely introduced Senate Bill No. 3, to amend the militia laws of the State, requiring captains to give notice, which passed its first reading.

        Mr. Wood introduced Senate Bill No. 4, to establish a military organization, and arm and equip the State, which passed its first reading.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 5, to amend the charter of the city of Memphis, which passed its first reading.

        Mr. Thompson moved to appoint a Special Committee of three, to whom should be referred the petitions of Dr. R. Thompson and G. W. Harris, in relation to inventions in gunnery made by them, which motion was agreed to.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Thompson, Johnson and Bradford on said committee.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order by the Speaker at 2 o'clock.

        Senate Resolution No. 2, directing the Secretary of State to purchase a flag for the Capitol, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. McClellan, was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations.

        Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people an Ordinance dissolving their connection with the Federal Government, was taken up on second reading.


Page 27

        The bill offered in lieu by the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations, being a bill to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention of the State, was adopted, and the bill passed its second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, was re-committed to the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations.

        Senate Bill No. 2, for the relief of the various railroads in Tennessee, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Minnis offered a bill in lieu, entitled a bill in relation to the payment of interest on State bonds owned by parties in Northern States, which was adopted, and the bill passed its second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. Mickley, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as correctly enrolled joint resolutions to authorize the Governor to organize the regiments and companies tendered him, and hold them in readiness for service; and joint resolution to provide for stationing guards at railroad bridges in this State.

        Mr. Bumpass, from the Joint Select Committee to wait upon Hon. H. W. Hilliard, Commisioner from the Confederate States of America, reported that the Committee had waited upon Mr. Hilliard, and had been informed by him that he would address the General Assembly at any time that body might designate, in reference to the objects of his mission, and the Committee had named to-morrow at 11 o'clock, in the Hall of Representatives, as the time and place for the delivery of said address.

        Mr. Bumpass moved that the address be delivered in public, and that all the proceedings connected with the reception of the Hon. H. W. Hilliard, and his invitation to address the General Assembly be made public; which motion was agreed to.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Campbell, as follows:

Mr. Speaker:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 11, proposing a Convention of the two Houses, on to-morrow at 11 o'clock, for the purpose of hearing an address by the Hon. H. W. Hilliard, Commissioner from the Confederate States of America; and House Resolution No. 12, authorizing the Adjutant-General to have the use of the Archive room in the Capitol, both of which are herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed the following enrolled joint resolutions, and they are herewith returned for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate, viz:


Page 28

        Joint resolution approving the action of the Governor in refusing troops to Abraham Lincoln;

        Joint resolution providing for the stationing of guards at railroad bridges in this State;

        Joint resolution to authorize the Governor to organize the regiments and companies tendered him, and hold them in readiness for service;

        Joint resolution to authorize the Governor to make immediate purchases of subsistence and rations, arms, &c., for the State;

        Joint resolution providing for raising Joint Committees on Federal Relations, Military Affairs, and Ways and Means.


        House Resolution No. 11, proposing a Convention of the two Houses on to-morrow at 11 o'clock, for the purpose of hearing communications from Hon. H. W. Hilliard, was taken up and concurred in by the Senate.

        House Resolution No. 12, authorizing the Adjutant-General to have the use of a room in the Capitol, was taken up and concurred in by the Senate.

        On motion of Mr. Stovall, the rule was suspended, and House Resolutions Nos. 11 and 12, ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        A series of resolutions adopted at a mass-meeting of the citizens of Wilson county, were read and ordered to lie on the table.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate adjourned until tomorrow morning 9 o'clock.

TUESDAY MORNING, APRIL 30, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        The Speaker submitted a communication from the Central Bureau of Military Supplies, in relation to the aims and objects of said association, which was read; and on motion of Mr. Trimble, was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

        Senate Resolution No. 16, requesting the Governor to inquire into the seizure of the cargo of the steamer C. E. Hillman, was taken up.


Page 29

        Mr. Stanton moved that the preamble to the resolution be amended by inserting after the word "whereas" the words we are informed; which motion was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Hildreth, the further consideration of the resolution was postponed until this afternoon.

        Mr. Payne from the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations reported as follows:

        The undersigned begs leave to report that the Joint Select Committee have under the direction of the Senate, instructed him to report a bill entitled, a bill to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention he State.

R. G. PAYNE, Chairman.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the order of business was suspended, and the bill reported by the Joint Select Committee, taken up on its third reading.

        Mr. Minnis moved that the bill be considered section by section; which motion was agreed to.

        The first section of the bill was read; the committee recommended the filling of the blank with the 1st day of June.

        Mr. Hildreth moved to fill the blank with the 4th Monday in June; on which motion he demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .7
  • Noes. . . . .15

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, Stanton, and Mr. Trimble--7.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--15.

        So the motion was disagreed to.

        Mr. Stokely moved to fill the blank with the 15th of June; on which motion Mr. Trimble demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Yeas. . . . .10
  • Nays. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Horn, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Trimble--10.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--10.

        So the motion was disagreed to.


Page 30

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the blank was filled by inserting the 8th day of June.

        The second section of the bill was read, when Mr. Lane moved to strike out the preamble to the said section.

        Pending the question to strike out, the hour of eleven o'clock having arrived, the Senate proceeded in a body to the Hall of the House of Representatives, to hear the address of the Hon. H. W. Hilliard, Commissioner from the Confederate States of America.

IN CONVENTION.

        The President of the Convention called the same to order, and directed the Clerk to read the resolution providing for the assembling of the Convention.

        The Hon. H. W. Hilliard, was then introduced to the Convention, and delivered an address upon the object of his mission to the State of Tennessee.

        The object for which the Convention was called, having been accomplished, the President declared it dissolved.

        The Senators returned in a body to their Chamber.

        On motion of Mr. Wood, the Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 2 o'clock by the Speaker.

        The consideration of Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people, a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a convention of the State, was resumed; the question being upon the motion of Mr. Lane to strike out the preamble to the second section of the bill.

        The motion to strike out prevailed.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to strike out the words "and of right ought to be" where they occur in the section; which motion was disagreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the words "and ordinance" in the last line of the section were stricken out.


Page 31

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the words "of the State of Tennessee," were striken out of the section.

        The second section of the bill as amended was then adopted.

        The third section of the bill was then taken up for consideration.

        Mr. Horn moved to strike out the words "Declaration or No Declaration" where they occur in the section; which motion was disagreed to.

        Mr. Stokely moved to strike out "17th" where it occurs in the section, and insert 24th; which motion prevailed.

        The third section as amended was adopted.

        Section 4 was then taken up for consideration.

        The recommendation of the Committee to strike out the--, section was concurred in, and the section striken out.

        The Committee through Mr. Minnis, offered the following section in lieu:

        SECTION 4. Be it further enacted, That in the election to be held under the provisions of this act, upon the Declaration submitted to the people, all volunteers and other persons connected with the service of this State qualified to vote for members of the Legislature in the counties where they reside, shall be entitled to vote in any county in the State where they may be in active service, or under orders, or on parole at the time of said election; and all other voters shall vote in the county where they reside, as now required by law in voting for members to the General Assembly.

        Upon the adoption of the section in lieu, Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .5

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stovall, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Stokely and Mr. Trimble--5.

        So the section in lieu offered by the committee was adopted.

        Section 5 of the bill was taken up, read and adopted.

        Section 6 of the bill was taken up and read.

        Mr. Payne moved to strike out "10th" where it occurs in the section, and insert "17th;" which motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Richardson moved to amend the section by adding the following:

        Provided, That a majority of the votes cast shall be for the Declaration.


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        Upon the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Boyd demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .17
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, McClellan, Nash, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Stovall, and Mr. Trimble--17.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Mickley, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Thompson, Wood and Mr. Speaker Newman--7.

        So the amendment was adopted.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        The seventh section of the bill was read and adopted.

        Mr. Trimble offered the following additional section to the bill.

        Sec.--. Be it further enacted, That if the Convention make any change in the present Constitution of the State of Tennessee, the same shall be submitted to the legal voters of the State of Tennessee, and be approved of by a majority of them before the same take effect or have any force; which was adopted.

        Mr. Stanton offered the following as a preamble to the declaration in the second section of the bill.

        In view of the existing state of federal or political affairs, surrounding and affecting the rights, safety, sympathy and honor of Tennessee, we, the people of said State deem it a right as well as our duty to adopt and proclaim to the world the following declaration:

        Upon the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Stanton demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .8
  • Noes. . . . .16

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Johnson, Lane, McClellan, McNeilly, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Newman--8.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Mickley, Minnis, Nash, Payne, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, Stovall, and Mr. Trimble--16.

        So the amendment was rejected.

        Mr. Minnis moved to amend the 6th section of the bill by striking out the 17th of June and inserting the first Monday in July, which was agreed to.

        The bill as adopted and amended then passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .20
  • Noes. . . . .4

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[TORN PAGE]

        Mr. Newman (Mr. Richardson in the Chair) moved that the rule be suspended and the bill be ordered and engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives, which was agreed to.

        Mr. Bumpass offered Senate Resolution No. 17, as follows:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That Taz. W. Newman is authorized to make arrangements with the Confederate States to arm a regiment organized by him for service; that he is authorized to make the arrangement for the best improved rifles, and any arrangement made by him, for said arms for said regiment, amounting to 800 rifles, is fully authorized by the General Assembly of Tennessee, and the General Assembly most respectfully requests the Confederate States to furnish the same to said regiment.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended and the resolution was taken up and adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        The consideration of Senate Resolution No. 16, which was postponed this morning, was resumed.

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, the second resolve was stricken out.

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, the resolution was amended so as to request the Governor to communicate to the General Assembly any correspondence he may have with the Governor of Illinois, in relation to the seizure of the steamer Hillman, at Cairo.

        The resolution as amended was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Resolution No. 14, providing for a Joint Select Committee to prepare an address to the people, was taken up and adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, was ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Bill No. 3, to amend the militia law of the State, requiring Captains to give notice, passed second reading.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:


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[TORN PAGE]

        I am directed by the House of Representatives to transmit to the Senate a communication, with a series of resolutions, forwarded to this General Assembly from Roane county; also,

        A petition from Giles county, praying this General Assembly, to pass an ordinance of secession, and they are herewith accordingly transmitted.

        On motion of Mr. Wood, the order of business was suspended, and House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up.

        Mr. Wood asked and obtained leave to withdraw the bill.

        Senate Bill No. 4, to establish a military organization, and arm and equip the State, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Wood offered House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, in lieu of the bill under consideration and the same was adopted, and passed upon its second reading.

        Senate Bill No. 5, to amend the charter of the city of Memphis passed second reading.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, fifty copies of House Bill No. 1, offered in lieu of Senate Bill No. 4, and adopted, were ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate.

        Mr. Payne moved that three thousand copies of the Governor's. message be minted for the use of the Senate, which was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, House Bill No. 1, adopted in lieu of Senate Bill, No. 4, was made the special order for to-morrow at 10 o'clock.

        Proceedings and resolutions of public meetings held in the counties of Giles, Jefferson, Knox, and Roane, were read and laid on the table.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

WEDNESDAY MORNING MAY 1, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.


Page 35

        Mr. Stokely asked and obtained leave to change his vote on the final passage of Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention of the State, from the negative to the affirmative.

        Geo. B. Peters, Senator from the counties of Hardin, McNairy, and Hardeman, appeared and took his seat.

        Mr. Peters asked and obtained leave to record his vote in the affirmative upon the passage of Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention of the State.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution, Senate Resolution No. 18:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor be, and he is hereby authorized and requested to appoint three Commissioners on the part of Tennessee, to enter into a Military League with the authorities of the Confederate States, and with the authorities of such other slaveholding States as may wish to enter into it, having in view the protection and defence of the entire South against the war that is now being carried on against it.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Horn introduced Senate Bill No. 6, to regulate the time of holding the Circuit, Chancery, and Supreme Courts of the State; which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Horn, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Senate Resolution No. 15, to remove the injunction of secrecy, was taken up; when

        Mr. Stokely asked and obtained leave to withdraw the same for examination.

        Senate Resolution No. 9, to bring about if possible a peaceable adjustment of present political difficulties, was taken up.

        Mr. Stokely, by unanimous consent of the Senate, withdrew the same from the calendar.

        Mr. Stanton offered the following resolution, Senate Resolution No. 19:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Hon. H. W. Hilliard is hereby respectfully requested to furnish a copy of his late address to this General Assembly in order that the same may be published.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended and the resolution was taken up and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported


Page 36

as correctly engrossed Senate Bill No. 1, and Senate Resolutions Nos. 14, 16, 17, 18, and 19.

        Mr. Bradford moved that the Senate take a recess until 2 o'clock P. M., which motion was agreed to.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 2 o'clock by the Speaker.

        Mr. Newman (Mr. Lane in the Chair) addressed the Senate as follows:

Gentlemen of the Senate:

        Impelled by a sense of duty which I owe to my country, as well as my own convictions as to the manner in which I may best subserve its interest, I beg leave to resign my position as your Speaker, in order that I may meet engagements which I have made heretofore, as a volunteer in the military defence of the South. It is gratifying to me to know that there are others within this Chamber upon whom the duties which I now resign will devolve, and who are more competent to discharge the same than myself. Nor do I feel that my presence or vote will be needed in this body to carry out and effectuate the great objects for which we have been convened. In the wisdom, discretion and patriotism of this body, I have the utmost confidence, and feel that the safety and honor of Tennessee is in safe-keeping as long as it may be committed to your care. My association with you has already left impressions on my mind and my heart, which will go with me through whatever battles I may meet, and comfort me in the most trying hour of life, and will be buried with me, whether at home or abroad. Yea, it will even last beyond the termination of my life; for I will transmit it to my best friends and nearest relations, and hope that they will cultivate and cherish the same warm feelings of gratitude that I now entertain towards you all, for the preferment you have heretofore given me, and for your kind indulgence of whatever blunders and errors I may have committed from time to time, as your presiding officer. If, at any time, I have possibly given offence to the feelings of any Senator, allow, me to say that it would mortify my heart to know it. I am certain that I never have intended to mar the feelings of any Senator, and can but indulge the hope that I have not. I


Page 37

must be permitted to tender you this one more acknowledgment of your kindness towards me, and while I go to defend the rights and honor of the South at the point of the bayonet, I assure you that the most grateful feelings and sentiments of my heart are left with you, and I promise you that the same patriotic purposes which control your action in this Assembly will control and actuate me in the army wherever my humble services may be accepted by my country. The interest and honor of the South admits of no divisions or distinctions among Southern States. We are all one in soil, institutions, sympathy and glory, and I shall shoulder arms for any battle-field on the globe, where it is necessary to vindicate Southern honor. You will very much gratify me to accept this my resignation.


        On motion of Mr. Payne, the resignation of Mr. Newman as Speaker of the Senate was accepted, and the thanks of the Senate were tendered him for the able and impartial manner in which he had discharged the duties of the position.

        The Senate then went into an election for Speaker to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Newman.

        Mr. Thompson nominated B. L. Stovall, of the county of Obion.

        There being no other nominations, the Senate proceeded to vote, with the following result:

  • For Mr. Stovall. . . . .21
  • For Mr. Richardson. . . . .1

        Senators voting for Mr. Stovall are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, Nash, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--21.

        For Mr. Richardson:

        Mr. Stovall--1.

        Mr. Stovall having received a majority of all the votes cast, was declared duly and constitutionally elected Speaker of the Senate for the remainder of the term.

        The Speaker elect was conducted to the Chair by Messrs. Bradford and Johnson.

        In assuming the duties of Speaker, Mr. Stovall addressed the Senate as follows:

Gentlemen of the Senate:

        Allow me to offer the members of the Senate, my warmest gratitude for the generous confidence which they have reposed, by calling me, by their unanimous voice, to preside over the deliberations of this body, for the remainder of the session. We have recently been called together, in this extraordinary session,


Page 38

to deliberate upon the most important questions which have ever been presented to the people of Tennessee--involving, perhaps, the destiny of our people, and the perpetuity of our institutions. Thus far we have mingled together with a fraternal feeling and unanimity, which have inspired every Senator's heart with gratification and it is my hopeful trust that during the remainder of the session, the same spirit shall animate the action of every Senator.

        The gallant State for which we are legislating will soon take her position amid the storm which overshadows the prospective history of the country; and it is my ardent desire that we shall all be united hereafter, as heretofore, in giving to her that position which shall not compromise her right or violate her honor.

        Distrustful, as any Senator must be in assuming the labors of the position of your Speaker, I invoke your charitable indulgence for apparent and real errors, and promise to discharge the trust committed to me without "partiality, favor, or affection."


        Ordered, That a message be sent to the House of Representatives informing that body of the resignation of the Speakership, by Mr. Newman, and the election of Mr. Stovall to that position.

        Mr. Stokely moved that the injunction of secrecy be removed from the proceedings incident to the resignation and election of Speaker, which motion was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the vote adopting House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, in lieu of Senate Bill No. 4, to establish a military organization, and arm and equip the State, was reconsidered.

        Mr. Payne moved that the vote passing House Bill No. 1, in lieu of Senate Bill No. 4, on its second reading, be reconsidered, which motion was agreed to.

        House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up and passed on its first reading.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Campbell, their clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed enrolled joint resolution, authorizing the Adjutant General to have the use of a room in the Capitol; also,

        Joint resolution to allow members and officers of the General Assembly to draw their per diem and mileage; both of which are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives has considered, and adopted Senate Resolution, directory to Governor Harris, in relation to opening a correspondence with the Governor of Illinois by telegraph; also


Page 39

        Joint Resolution to appoint a Joint Select Committee to prepare an address to the people; and the Speaker of the House has apointed on the part of the House of Representatives, the following Representatives on said committee, viz: Messrs, Gantt, Hurt, Guy, Lea, Martin, Brazleton, Pickett, and Mr. Ewing, both of which are herewith transmitted to the Senate for enrollment.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Payne, Minnis, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Wood, on the part of the Senate, on the Joint Select Committee to prepare an address to the people of Tennessee, as provided for by Senate Resolution No. 14.


        On motion of Mr. Stokes, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock.

THURSDAY MORNING, MAY 2, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        Messrs. Stokes and Richardson were excused from serving upon the Joint Select Committee to prepare an address to the people of Tennessee and Messrs. Bradford and Stanton were appointed in their stead on said committee.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and tabled Senate Resolution No. 17, to authorize Taz. W. Newman to make arrangements with the authorities of the Confederate States; also,

        Has considered and adopted, Senate Resolution No. 18, to appoint Commissioners from the State of Tennessee, to confer with the authorities of the Confederate States in regard to entering into a Military League, and the same is herewith returned to the Senate for enrollment.


        Mr. Payne offered the following-resolution (Senate Resolution No. 20,):

        WHEREAS, The present government of the United States has made unprovoked war upon the State of Tennessee, as well as the other slaveholding States, in violation of the Constitution, thereby


Page 40

manifesting a purpose of subjugation, and believing that any representation from this State in the Congress of the United States would be dishonoring to the State: Therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That our Senators in Congress be urgently requested to resign their seats, and in nowise to countenance by their presence, the legislation of a government that has resolved itself into a military despotism.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution was taken up.

        On motion of Mr. Hildreth, the resolution was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations.

        Mr. Hildreth offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 21.):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the injunction of secresy be removed as to the bill submitting a Declaration to a vote of the people, and to call a Convention.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.

        Mr. Payne moved to lay the resolution on the table, on which motion, Mr. Hildreth demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .17
  • Noes. . . . .6

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--17.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, and Mr. Speaker Trimble--6.

        So the resolution was laid on the table.

        Mr. Minnis, from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported back Senate Bill No. 2, in relation to the payment of interest on State bonds owned by parties in the Northern States, with a recommendation by a majority of the committee that it be rejected, the chairman dissenting from the recommendation.

        Mr. Minnis, from the Judiciary Committee, reported back Senate Bill No. 6, to regulate the time of holding the Circuit, Chancery, and Supreme Courts of the State, the majority of the committee recommending its rejection.

        Mr. Thompson from the Select Committee, to whom was referred the petitions of Geo. W. Harris, and Dr. R. Thompson, in relation to inventions in gunnery made, by them, reported as follows:

        The undersigned to whom was referred the petition of Geo. W.


Page 41

Harris, in reference to an original invention of his, of a model for a cannon, submits the following report:

        We are satisfied from the examination which we have made that this gun can be made at any establishment where ordinary cannon are constructed, and of ordinary material--can be used with grape, canister, roundshot and shell. If rifled, it possesses the great advantage of the patched ball, precisely similar to the old fashioned rifle, being perhaps the only breach-loader yet invented, accomplishing this end. The sight is taken through the gun, being open from end to end, thus giving, as we think, accuracy in taking the direction and bearing, together with power, efficacy and safety in the construction of the tube. It is composed of but three pieces, and each one strong, simple, and durable --one fourth of the whole weight can be instantly taken off and thus facilitate rapid charges.

        Mr. Harris represents that it can be fired with perfect safety fifteen times per minute, and being a truthful and reliable man, we give credit to his representations.

        From all appearances, raw recruits may be taught to use this gun in an hour. It most assuredly must be so constructed that firing will be rapid, its management simple, and its cost comparatively cheap.

        Mr. Harris proposes to render any assistance by personal superintendence of its construction, for the sake of Tennessee, without compensation, only asking the privilege of doing so.

        Mr. Harris thinks $250 will be about the cost of constructing a three or four pounder, but his means are not sufficient to allow him to do so at his own cost.

        The committee therefore recommend, that an appropriation be made to construct a test gun, and if it shall prove to be as efficacious as represented, they recommend that the Legislature make such arrangements as will secure the manufacture of such number as the interest of the State and the exigency of the times shall demand.

Respectfully submitted,

JAS. L. THOMPSON, Chairman.

May 2, 1861.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 7, to incorporate the Tennessee Arms Company, which passed its first reading.

        House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force and for other purposes, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. McNeilly moved to insert after the words "of whom" in the first section, the following: or any less number which the wants of the service may require, which was agreed to.

        Mr. Peters moved that the second paragraph of the 25th section be amended by inserting after the word "therefore," the following


Page 42

words: and wherever the words "President of the United States" occur, the words the Governor of the State of Tennessee, shall be substituted therefor; which motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Peters offered the following additional sections to the bill, to be inserted between the 17th and 18th sections.

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That a Board of Inspectors shall be appointed to inspect volunteer troops before they are mustered into service, consisting of the three senior regimental officers present on duty with the troops, including the commanding officer and the senior medical officer of the army present.

        SEC.--.Be it further enacted, That before any volunteers are mustered into service, the Board of Inspectors provided in this act shall determine the physical and mental ability of each man, and report the result of their inspection to the officer appointed to muster said volunteers into service.

        Which amendments were adopted.

        Mr. Lane moved to strike out the word "enrollment," in the last line of the 28th section of the bill, and insert the following words: "leaving their respective places of abode for rendezvous," also to strike out in the third line of the 29th section of the printed bill the word "shall" and insert the words may be at the discretion of the Governor and Military Board; which amendments were referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Minnis offered the following amendment, to be inserted after the word "arms" in the 7th line of the printed bill, and have the power to purchase one or more powder mills for the manufacture of powder, if in their judgment, with the advice of the Military Board the same shall be necessary for the interest and safety of the State.

        The amendment was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendments which were read and referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That Gen. S. R. Anderson, Gen. Washington Barrow and Major G. A. Henry, shall be, and are hereby, appointed Commissioners with full power to purchase the property known as the Sycamore Powder Mills.

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That the foregoing Commissioners be, and hereby are authorized to take into consideration the propriety of purchasing the property of Patton Howell, of Jefferson county or erecting a factory for manufacturing guns upon his premises.

        The bill as amended was then passed on its second reading and with the pending amendments recommitted to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Senate Bill No. 6, to regulate the time of holding Circuit Chancery and Supreme Courts, passed second reading.


Page 43

        Senate Bill No. 3, to amend the militia laws of the State, requiring captains to give notice, was taken up on its third reading and referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered Senate Resolution No. 3, providing for printing Hardee's and Scott's Military Tactics for the use of the State.

        And after having adopted two amendments thereto, concurred in the same, which with the amendments thereto (under order of the House,) is returned to the Senate for concurrence.

        The House has adopted House Resolution No. 20, authorizing B. R. Johnson and J. E. R. Ray, to compile such books as will be required for the military of the State, and the same is herewith immediately transmitted to the Senate for concurrence as ordered by the House.

        I am directed by the House to transmit to the Senate, a series of resolutions from Blount county, and they are herewith transmitted.

        The House has considered and concurred in Senate Resolution No. 19, to request a copy of the address of the Hon. H. W. Hilliard to this General Assembly for publication, and the same is herewith returned for enrollment.


        House message returning Senate Resolution No. 3, to print Hardee's and Scott's Military Tactics for the use of the State, with amendments, was taken up and the amendments concurred in and the resolution ordered to be enrolled.

        House Resolution No. 20, authorizing B. R. Johnson and J. E. R. Ray, to compile such books as may be required by the military of the State, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported the following joint resolutions as correctly enrolled, viz:

        Joint resolution requesting Governor Harris to open a correspondence with the Governor of Illinois, relative to the seizure of the steamer Hillman.

        Joint resolution to appoint a Joint Select Committee to prepare an address to the people of Tennessee.

        Joint resolution to appoint Commissioners from the State of Tennessee to confer with the authorities of the Confederate States of America, in relation to entering into a Military League.


Page 44

        The proceedings of a meeting of the citizens of Blount county were read and ordered to lie on the table.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.

FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 3, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        Mr. Stovall (Mr. Allen in the. Chair), offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 22,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That in view of the large number of Black Republican troops now in the occupation of the city of Cairo, Illinois, and the additional number that may be speedily concentrated there, and of the proximity of said city of Cairo to the northern boundary of West Tennessee, and the facilities for invading that division of our State by the Mississippi river and Mobile and Ohio Railroad, and in view of the unarmed and defenceless condition of that section of the State, it is the opinion of the General Assembly, that a wise foresight and prudent precaution, demand that an armed force be stationed without delay at Union City, in Obion county, or some other suitable point, near our northern border; and that such other means of defence in the way of fortifications or otherwise, be adopted as will best enable us to successfully resist any invasion which may be attempted by our enemies from said city of Cairo, and that the Executive be requested to carry out these suggestions.

        On motion of Mr. Stovall, the rule was suspended and the resolution was taken up, and referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Thompson, from the Select Committee to whom was referred the petition of Dr. Rezin Thompson, reported as follows:

        The Special Committee to whom were referred the improvement in gunnery offered by Dr. Rezin Thompson, have had under inspection the same, and although they were not presented with a perfect model for the want of time for the inventor to make a practical display of the merits claimed for the gun, yet he demonstrated


Page 45

to your Committee the following improvements: it can be discharged with precision ranging the whole horizon, at least forty times per minute. It is not subject to accident, it is but little heavier than an ordinary cannon of the same calibre; it does not heat by rapid firing; it can be made to act as a rifle cannon; it is self-loading and requires but three men to manage it efficiently; it is easily understood and simple of construction; the cost of construction will be but little more than a single shooter, we believe the gun is worthy the consideration of the Legislature of Tennessee and as the inventor freely tenders to this State the privilege of manufacturing and using his improvement, and is willing to superintend the manufacture of the same. Your committee believe it would be wise policy on the part of this Legislature to make an appropriation to test the merits of this gun as claimed by the inventor, in connection with the improvement of G. W. Harris, upon which your committee have already reported; they would recommend that an appropriation of one thousand dollars be made to be placed in the hands of the Military Board of this State to test fairly and fully the improvements in gunnery presented by the inventors. All of which is respectfully submitted.

JAS. L. THOMPSON, Chairman Committee.


        Mr. Stokely offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 23):

        Resolved, That the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, will adjourn sine die, on Monday the 6th day of May, 1861, at 2 o'clock P. M.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        Senate bill No. 7, to incorporate the Tennessee Arms Company, passed its second reading.

        Senate bill No. 2, in relation to the payment of interest on State bonds owned by parties in the Northern States, was taken up on its third reading.

        Mr. Minnis moved to strike out all after the enacting clause of the bill and insert the following:

        That all laws or parts of laws now in existence in the State of Tennessee, requiring the Governor to appoint a receiver to take charge of railroads and railroad assets, for the non-payment of the accruing interest on State bonds endorsed for or loaned to said roads, be so amended that the Governor may or may not appoint such receiver, at his discretion.

        SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That this act take effect from and after its passage.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended, then passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .19
  • Noes. . . . .1

Page 46

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Nash, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Stovall, and Mr. Thompson--19.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Mr. Hildreth--1.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended, and the bill was ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Payne from the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations, reported back Senate Resolution No. 20, requesting our Senators in Congress to resign their seats, and recommended its adoption.

        Senate Resolution No. 20, requesting our Senators in Congress to resign their seats, was taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Bradford demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .9

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, McClellan, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--9.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Richardson offered the following protest, which was ordered to be spread upon the Journal:

PROTEST.

        The undersigned voted against the resolution requesting our Senators to resign their seats in the Congress of the United States, because they believe it ought not to be passed by the Legislature, while the Declaration of Independence of the State from the Government of the United States is pending before the people for ratification or rejection. To vote for the resolution before the ratification, would be speaking in advance of the action of the people.

        Under existing circumstances, the undersigned are free to confess, that if they were Senators in Congress, they would not take their seats; and, as the people will act upon the question before the meeting of Congress, they believe that the General Assembly at this session, ought not to give any instructions on the subject.


Page 47

        And as it is necessary to secure the united action of the people in the protection and defence of the State against all hostile aggressions and invasions, they think it impolitic and unwise to give such instructions at this time. If the Senators should, after the people declare their independence of the General Government, take their seats in the Congress, then the ensuing Legislature can, and, doubtless will, dispose of the subject.

        Under these impressions, they think it impolitic to pass this resolution; and, therefore, protest against it, preferring to leave our Senators to act upon their own responsibility for the present.

V. S. ALLEN.
JORDAN STOKES.
W. M. BRADFORD.
GEO. R. McCLELLAN.
JNO. W. RICHARDSON.
R. T. HILDRETH.


        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Campbell, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 18, directing the Governor to issue to Capt. Sevier's company ninety-four Minnie guns; also,

        House Resolution No. 24, for the concentration of armed troops at Union City, in Obion county, or near the Northern boundary of West Tennessee; both of which are herewith transmitted to the Senate for concurrence.

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed the following joint resolutions, viz:

        Joint resolution requesting Governor Harris to open a correspondence by telegraph with the Governor of Illinois, in relation to the seizure of the cargo of the steamer C. E. Hillman, at Cairo;

        Joint resolution to appoint Commissioners from the State of Tennessee to confer with the authorities of the Confederate States, in regard to entering into a Military League;

        Joint resolution to appoint a joint select committee to prepare an address to the people of Tennessee;

        Joint resolution to request a copy of the address of the Hon. H. W. Hilliard to the General Assembly for publication;

        Joint resolution directing the printing of Hardee's Military Tactics for the use of the State.

        All of said enrolled resolutions are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


        Senate Bill No. 6, to regulate the time of holding the Circuit,


Page 48

Chancery, and Supreme Courts of the State, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Minnis offered a bill in lieu, which was adopted, and the bill passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .14
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Stokely, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--14.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Hildreth, Johnson, Lane, Nash, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--7.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        House Resolution No. 18, to authorize the Governor to issue ninety-four Minnie rifles to Capt. Sevier's company of volunteers was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Wood, was passed over informally.

        House Resolution No. 24, requesting the Governor to send a force to Union City, in Obion county, or to the neighborhood, for the protection of that portion of the country from invasion, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, was laid on the table.

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the Senate took a recess till 3 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 3 o'clock by the Speaker.

        Mr. Payne moved to reconsider the vote ordering transmission of Senate Resolution No. 20, requesting our Senators in Congress to resign their seats, to the House of Representatives; which motion was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the vote adopting the resolution was reconsidered.


Page 49

        Mr. Payne was allowed to withdraw the, resolution from the calendar, by the unanimous consent of the Senate.

        Mr. Lane, from the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, reported as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs to whom was referred House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, with various amendments, have had the same under consideration, and recommend the adoption of amendments from No. 1 to 15, inclusive.

J. T. LANE, Chairman.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Campbell, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has passed on third and last reading House Bill No. 7, to repeal section 96 of the militia law of Tennessee, passed the 28th day of January, 1840; also, House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly, and the same are herewith transmitted for the consideration of the Senate.


HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly, passed its first reading, and was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

        House Bill No. 7, to repeal section 96 of the militia law of Tennessee, passed the 28th of January, 1840, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Stanton moved to consider the bill section by section; which motion was agreed to.

        Section 1st was read and adopted.

        Section 2d was read.

        Mr. Stokes offered the following in lieu of the first sentence of the section:

        SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That in the performance of this duty, the Governor shall take charge of the military, direct the military defence of the State, organize the different arms, and with the concurrence of the Military and Financial Board, hereinafter provided for, control the military fund, make contracts for arms, ordnance, ordnance stores, procure materials for the construction of arms, employ artificers, organize one or more Armories for the construction of arms, and do all things necessary for


Page 50

the speedy and efficient organization of a force adequate for the public safety; which was adopted.

        The committee's amendment to add to the section the following words, was adopted:

        And appoint such number of clerks as may be necessary, under such rules and regulations as they may adopt.

        Mr. Stokes moved to strike out in the last clause of the section the words, "subject to his control;" which motion prevailed.

        The second section as amended was adopted.

        The section was read.

        Mr. Stokes offered the following section in lieu:

        SEC. 3. Be it further enacted, That the force provided for by this act shall be organized into regiments, brigades and divisions, the whole to be commanded by the Senior Major General, who shall immediately enter upon the duty of organizing the entire force for the field.

        Which was adopted.

        The section as amended was then adopted.

        The 4th section was read.

        The recommendation of the committee to add to the section the following was concurred in:

        And that the rank of Quartermaster General, Inspector General, Adjutant General, and Commissary General shall be that of Colonel of Cavalry, and the rank of their assistants shall be that of Lieutenant Colonel, Major, and Captain of Infantry.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        Section 5th was read.

        The recommendation of the committee to strike out the word "Board," wherever it occurs in the section, and insert Department, was concurred in.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        Section 6th was read.

        Mr. Stokes offered the following section in lieu:

        SEC. 6. Be it further enacted, That there shall be two Major Generals, and such number of Brigadier Generals as the proper and efficient command of said force may require, who shall be nominated by the Governor, and confirmed by the General Assembly, with power, to appoint their own staff, and a Chief of Engineers, with such assistants as the service may require, to be nominated and confirmed in the same manner; which was adopted.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        The 7th section was read; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, was stricken out.

        The 8th and 9th sections were read and adopted.

        The 10th section was read.


Page 51

        Mr. Payne moved that the blank in said section be filled by the insertion of the word ten; which was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the section was further amended by inserting after the word "and," in the 5th line of the section in the printed bill, the words, and also an additional tax of fifty per cent. on.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        Sections 11 to 15 inclusive, were read and adopted.

        Section 16th was read.

        Mr. Richardson moved to strike out the word "six," in the 4th line of the section, in the printed bill, and insert three; which was agreed to.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        Sections 17th and 18th were read and adopted.

        Section 19th was read.

        The recommendation of the committee to amend by inserting after the word "regiment," in the 9th line of the section, in the printed bill, the words, by the Colonel, and to strike out in the last line the word "elected," and insert selected, was concurred in.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        Section 20th was read and adopted.

        Section 21st was read; and,

        On motion of Mr. McClellan, was stricken out.

        Section 22d was read.

        The recommendation of the committee to strike out in the 38th line of the section, in the printed bill, the word "second," and insert same, was concurred in.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        Section 23d, 24th and 25th were read and adopted.

        Section 26th was taken up and read.

        Pending the question on its adoption, on motion of Mr. Payne, the further consideration of the bill was postponed until to-morrow morning.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.


Page 52

SATURDAY MORNING, May 29, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 24,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That so much of a resolution heretofore passed by the Assembly requiring the Secretary of State to procure the publication of Hardee's Tactics, by letting out the work to the lowest bidder be, and the same is hereby repealed, and that the publication be made under the contract with the public printers, as in other cases of public printing.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 25,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the refusal of his Excellency, Isham G. Harris, to call an election for members to Congress meets with our unqualified approval, believing such a course due to the honor of the State, and demanded by the wishes of the people.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.

        Mr. Stokely moved that the resolution be referred to the Committee on Federal Relations; which motion was disagreed to.

        The resolution was adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        The unfinished business of yesterday, being House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was resumed, the question being upon the adoption of the 26th section of the bill.

        The 26th section of the bill was adopted.

        The 27th section of the bill was read.

        The recommendation of the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs to add to the section the following words: and such flags and banners as may be nescessary, was concurred in, and the section as amended was adopted.

        The 28th section was read.

        The Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs recommend an addition to the section in the following words: and the commanding


Page 53

officer of Artillery may appoint recruiting officers to muster into service recruits, to be assigned to companies afterwards, who shall receive pay and subsistence from the time of enrollment.

        The recommendation of the committee was concurred in, and the section as amended was adopted.

        The 29th section was read.

        The recommendation of the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, to strike out in the 3d line of the section, in the printed bill, the word "shall," and insert may, was concurred in.

        Mr. Payne moved to amend the section by adding the following words: Provided, That in all cases where regiments shall have previously organized and elected their officers, such organization and election may be treated by the Governor as good and valid; which amendment was adopted.

        The section as amended was adopted.

        The 30th, 31st, 32d, 33d, and 34th sections were read and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Peters, the vote adopting his amendment offered yesterday, to be inserted between the 17th and 18th sections of the bills, was reconsidered, and the amendment rejected.

        The Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs offered the following as section 35 of the bill, which was adopted:

        SEC. 35. Be it further enacted, That to enable the County Court to carry into effect without delay, the provisions of the 14th, 15th, and 16th sections of this act, the Chairman of the County Court is empowered to assemble, at any time, the members of the Quarterly Court, who, when assembled, shall have all the powers exercised by them at the regular Quarterly Session.

        The following amendments to compose sections 36 and 37 of the bill, submitted by the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs were adopted:

        SEC. 36. Be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Inspector General of the State, to be appointed under this act and such assistants as the Governor may appoint, to muster into the service of the State of Tennessee, each company and regiment after the same are inspected, at such times and places as the Governor shall designate; and when said troops are so mustered into the service of the State, they shall be subject to all the rules and articles of war, as adopted by this act.

        SEC. 37. Be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of each Captain, upon being mustered into the service, to furnish a complete roll of the officers and men in his company to the Inspector General who shall file one copy of the same in the Adjutant General's office, and one copy to be delivered to the Colonel of each regiment when formed, and it shall be the duty of the Adjutant General to furnish blank forms to the Captains of companies.


Page 54

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment, to compose the 38th section of the bill; which was adopted, viz:

        SEC. 38 Be it further enacted, That the corporate authorities of towns and cities are hereby empowered and authorized to levy a military tax upon personal and real estate, not to exceed the one-half of one per cent. and on privileges not greater than one-half the amount now paid to the State, such money so to be raised shall be used for military purposes, under the direction of the authority so levying and collecting the same.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the vote by which the word "same," in the 38th line of the 22d section, was stricken out and the word second substituted therefor, was reconsidered.

        Mr. Stokes moved that the recommendation of the committee be non-concurred in; which motion prevailed.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment, to compose the 39th section of the bill which was adopted, viz:

        SEC. 39. Be it further enacted, That the Governor, by and with the consent of the Military or Financial Board or Bureau, shall be authorized to purchase and carry on any manufactory or manufactories of gunpowder which may be deemed necessary for the use of State, purchase or lease any interest in any lead, saltpetre, or other mines, and work the same for the use of the State; and may also, in the name of the State, make Contracts for the manufacture of fire arms or any other munitions of war to be manufactured in the State, and make such advancements in payment for the same as may be deemed advisable to insure the ready and speedy supply thereof for the use of the State: Provided, that when such contract is made or entered into, the individual or company making the same shall give bond and security for the repayment thereof, if the arms or other munitions of war for which such advancement may be made, shall not be furnished within the time agreed upon for their delivery, or shall not be of the character contracted for.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment, to compose the 40th section of the bill; which was adopted, viz:

        SEC. 40. Be it further enacted, That for the purpose of aiding in supplying the State with arms for the public defence, that the act of 30th January, 1861, incorporating the Memphis Arms Company be, and the same is hereby confirmed, and the corporators declared to be entitled to exercise all the rights and privileges intended to be given by said act and it is further enacted, that M. W. Clusky, John Overton, Robert C. Brinkley, Sam. Tate, Moses J. Tricks, Robertson Topp, Wm. R. Hunt, Fred. W. Smith, J. E. R. Ray, Moses White, and Edmund Mumford be added to the list of corporators.

        Mr. Stanton offered the following amendment, to compose the 41st section of the bill; which was adopted, viz:


Page 55

        SEC. 41. Be it further enacted, That the Governor, and all other authorities having charge of finances in the movement contemplated by this act, shall make full reports to the General Assembly of the State, of the amounts expended as well as the various purposes for which said expenditures may have been made.

        Mr. Thompson moved to reconsider the vote adopting the 5th section of the bill; which was agreed to.

        Mr. Thompson then offered the following in lieu of the 5th section; which was adopted, viz:

        SEC. 5th. Be it further enacted, That there shall be organized by the Governor, a Medical Board, consisting of a Surgeon General and two other Surgeons, the members of which Board shall be nominated by the Governor, and confirmed by the General Assembly, who shall examine all applicants for Surgeon and Assistant Surgeon, and certify their qualifications to the Governor for commission in said service, and which Board shall be subject to field service as other Surgeons of the army. And the said Board are hereby directed, other things being equal, to recommend from volunteer forces such Regimental Surgeons and Assistants as the service may require.

        Mr. Trimble moved to reconsider the vote adopting the second section of the bill; which motion failed.

        The bill as amended and adopted then passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .5

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, Wood and Mr. Speaker Stovall--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Hildreth, Nash, Stokely and Mr. Trimble--5.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action thereon.

        House Resolution No. 18, to authorize the Governor to issue to Capt. Sevier's company of Davidson county, ninety four Minnie rifles was taken up and concurred in by the Senate.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrolment.

        Mr. Lane from the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, reported back Senate Resolution No. 22, relative to the stationing of troops at or near Union City, in Obion county, and recommended its rejection.

        Senate Resolution No. 22, was then taken up; and,


Page 56

        On motion of Mr. Lane, was laid on the table.

        Mr. Bradford, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as correctly engrossed Senate Bills Nos. 2 and 6.

        Mr. Wood from the Committee on Ways and Means reported as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Committee of Ways and Means to whom was referred House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly, have had the same under consideration, and after filling several blanks recommend its passage.

        

ED. J. WOOD, Chairman.

May 4, 1861.

        House Bill No. 7, to repeal section 96 of the Militia Law of Tennessee, passed 28th January 1840, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly, passed second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, was recommitted to the Committee on Ways and Means.

        House Resolution No. 20, to appoint J. E. R. Ray and B. R. Johnson to compile books required by the militia of the State, was taken up, and on motion of Mr. Lane, was laid on the table.

        Senate Bill No. 3, to amend the Militia Law of the State, requiring captains to give notice, was taken up, and passed on third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .19
  • Noes. . . . .1

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall --19.

        In the negative are:

        Mr. Nash--1.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. Richardson, the Senate adjourned until Monday morning 10 o'clock.


Page 57

MONDAY MORNING, MAY 6,1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the reading of the Journal was dispensed with.

        House Bill No. 7, to repeal section 96 of the Militia Law of Tennessee passed January 28th, 1840, was taken up and passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Stokely, Thompson, Wood and Mr. Speaker Stovall--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs Boyd and Nash--2.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrolment.

        Mr. Bradford, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as correctly engrossed Senate Resolution No. 25.

        Mr. Stanton offered Senate Resolution No. 26, as follows:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That of the copies of Hardee's Military Tactics ordered to be printed, one copy to each of the Senators and Representatives of this General Assembly be, and the same is hereby ordered to be printed.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has passed on third and last reading House Bill No. 5, to prevent the collection of debts due by citizens of Tennessee, to citizens of the non-slaveholding States during hostilities; also House Bill No. 8, to amend section


Page 58

4743 of the Code of Tennessee, and ordered their immediate transmission to the Senate for further action thereon; and they are herewith transmitted.

        The House of Representatives has considered and passed on third reading, Senate Bill No, 1, to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention of the State; and has materially amended the same, and ordered its immediate return with the amendments to the Senate for concurrence, which is herewith returned.

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed enrolled resolution authorizing the Governor to issue to Capt. Sevier's company ninety-four Minnie guns, and the same is herewith transmitted to the Senate for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


        House Bill No. 5, to prevent the collection of debts due by citizens of Tennessee, to citizens of non-slaveholding States, during hostilities, was taken up and passed its first reading; and, on motion of Mr. Trimble, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        House Bill No. 8, to amend section 4743 of the Code of Tennessee, was taken up and passed first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Trimble, referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate took a recess for thirty minutes.

        The time for which the recess was taken having expired, the Speaker called the Senate to order.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        I am directed by the House of Representatives to transmit to the Senate two memorials, from citizens of Hardin county, protesting against Tennessee seceding, or joining the Southern Confederacy; also, a memorial from Lawrence county recommending the suspension of the collection of all debts, and they are herewith transmitted.


        The memorials from Hardin county, praying the Legislature pass no act looking towards the secession of Tennessee from the Federal Union, were read, and laid on the table.

        The memorial from Lawrence county, praying the passage of a law suspending the collection of all debts during the continuance of hostilities, was read, and laid on the table.

        Mr. Payne presented a memorial from a Committee appointed by the Committee of Public Safety of the city of Memphis, praying the Legislature to suspend the payment of interest upon the


Page 59

public bonded debt of the State in the hands of citizens of non-slaveholding States; which was read, and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, was ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Minnis, from the Committee on the Judiciary, submitted the following report:

        The Judiciary Committee have had under consideration Senate Resolution No. 24, directing that the Public Printer be contracted with for the printing of Hardee's Tactics. The Committee have ascertained that a portion of this work is already done by the Public Printer, and he is ready to have the balance done immediately; and that immediate and present demand is great for this work and that the Public Printer proposes to do this work for the State, and not claim to make a profit on the same. A majority the Committee recommend the adoption of the resolution.

        Resolution No. 24, in relation to printing Hardee's Military Tactics was taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Bradford from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolution No. 26 as correctly engrossed.

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, the Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order by the Speaker at 2 o'clock.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has concurred in all of Senate amendments, save amendments Nos. 4, 5, and 8, to House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, which perfected by the House, and are herewith transmitted to the Senate for their concurrence.



Page 60

        The House Message returning House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, with Senate amendments amended, was taken up.

        Mr. Horn moved to refer the bill and amendments to the Committee on Ways and Means; which motion was disagreed to.

        The House amendments to Senate amendments to said bill were all concurred in.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the bill was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrolment.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, House message returning Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention of the State, with amendments, was taken up.

        House amendment No. 1, in lieu of the Ordinance and Declaration in the original bill, was taken up.

        Mr. Payne moved to concur in the amendment of the House of Representatives in lieu, on which motion

        Mr. Bradford demanded the ayes and noes, which was ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .20
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--20.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Nash, and Mr. Stokely--4.

        So the amendment was concurred in.

        The House amendment to strike out the words "Declaration" and "No Declaration," wherever they occur in the third section, and insert "Separation" and "No Separation," was,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, concurred in.

        House amendment to said bill, in lieu of sections 5, 6, 7, and 8 of the original bill, were taken up.

        Mr. Payne moved that the Senate concur in said amendment; upon which motion Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .17
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--17.

        Those voting in the negative are:


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        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--7.

        So the amendment was concurred in.

        House amendment to amend the caption of the bill was then concurred in.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be enrolled.

        Mr. Newman moved that the Senate, the House of Representatives concurring, remove the injunction of secrecy, so far so it relates to Senate Bill No. 1; which motion failed.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, three thousand copies of the act to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the people of Tennessee, and for other purposes, were ordered to be printed for use of the Senate.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate adjourned till 9 o'clock to-morrow morning.

TUESDAY MORNING, MAY 7, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        Mr. Minnis from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported back House Bill No. 5, to prevent the collection of debts due by citizens of Tennessee to citizens of the non-slaveholding States, during hostilities and House Bill No. 8, to amend section 4743 of the Code, a majority of the committee recommending the passage of the bills.

        Mr. Trimble asked and obtained leave to record his vote in the negative upon the concurrence of the Senate in House amendments to Senate amendments to House Bill No. 1, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force and for other purposes; and on House amendments to Senate Bill No. 1, to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of the State of Tennessee, and to call a Convention of the State.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 27,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That


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the Governor be requested to communicate to this body whether he has received, either from the Governor of Illinois, or President of the United States, any communication in relation to the recent Capture of property belonging to the State and citizens of Tennessee by the Federal forces from the steamer Hillman, at Cairo; and, if not, what steps, if any, he has taken to secure indemnity for the robbery.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution was ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Stokely offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 28,):

        Resolved by the Senate, That the Governor is respectfully asked whether he has any further communication to make to this Senate at the present session, and that a committee of three be appointed by the Speaker to immediately wait upon the Governor for that purpose.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        The Speaker appointed on the committee provided for by the above resolution, Messrs. Stokely, Bradford and Mr. McClellan.

        House Bill No. 5, to prevent the collection of debts due by citizens of Tennessee to citizens of non-slaveholding States during hostilities, was taken up and passed its second reading.

        House Bill No. 8, to amend section 4743 of the Code, passed second reading.

        Mr. Minnis offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 29,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That whenever it shall become necessary for the Governor to make any appointments, in pursuance of an act entitled "An act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes," passed at the present session, and there shall be no Legislature in session, the Governor shall make the appointment; the appointee shall immediately enter upon the discharge of his duties, and his appointment shall be ratified or rejected by the next succeeding Legislature.

        Resolved, That so much of said act as provides that the Governor may accept regiments organized before the passage of said act shall not give to such regiment any right of seniority, which they would not otherwise be entitled to.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Resolution No. 23, to adjourn sine die, was taken up.


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        Mr. Payne offered the following in lieu of the resolution:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That this body will adjourn on Wednesday, the 8th inst., at 2 o'clock P. M., till 12 o'clock M. on Monday, the 17th of June.

        On the adoption of the resolution in lieu, Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, Trimble, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Hildreth, Nash, and Mr. Stokely--4.

        So the resolution in lieu was adopted.

        Mr. Hildreth moved to strike out the words "till 12 o'clock M. Monday the 17th of June," when they occur in the resolution; upon which motion he demanded the ayes and noes, which were taken, and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .8
  • Noes. . . . .14

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely and Mr. Trimble--8.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--14.

        So the motion to strike out failed.

        The question occurring on the adoption of the resolution, Mr. demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .8

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Trimble--8.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        Mr. Payne moved that the rule be suspended and the resolution


Page 64

engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives; which motion prevailed.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 2 o'clock by the Speaker.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has amended and concurred in Senate Resolution No. 26, to furnish each member of the Senate and House of Representatives copies of Hardee's Tactics, and ordered its immediate return to the Senate for further action, and the same is herewith returned.

        The House has considered Senate Resolution No. 24, in relation to printing Hardee's Tactics, and concurred in the same, and ordered its immediate return to the Senate for enrollment.

        The House of Representatives has appointed a committee of three, consisting of Messrs. Hebb, Martin, and Guy, to join with such committee as the Senate may appoint, to wait upon the Governor, to know of him if he has any further communication to make to this Legislature.

        The House of Representatives has passed on third reading, Bill No. 10, to amend sections 2682, 2683, 2684 and 4765 of the Code, and ordered its immediate transmission to the Senate for further action thereon, and the same is herewith transmitted.

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed enrolled act to repeal so much of section 96 of the Militia Law passed January 28, 1840, as prescribes an oath to support the Constitution of the United States; and also enrolled act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, and they are herewith transmitted to the Senate for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


        House Message returning Senate Resolution No. 26, to furnish members of the Senate and House of Representatives with copies


Page 65

of Hardee's Tactics, with an amendment, was taken up; and, on motion of Mr. Stanton, the amendment was concurred in.

        House Bill No. 10 to amend sections 2682, 2683, 2684 and 4765 of the Code, was taken up and passed its first reading.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Minnis and Horn on the part of the Senate to act with the committee appointed by the House of Representatives to wait upon his Excellency, the Governor, and ascertain if he has any further communication to make to this session of the General Assembly.

        Mr. Richardson offered Senate Resolution No. 30, as follows:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the obligation of secrecy on the members as to the proceedings of this Legislature be now removed; and that the public printers are hereby required and commanded to print immediately three thousand copies each of the act submitting the Ordinance of Separation to a vote of the people and also of the Army Act, and send them to the members of the Assembly in their proper proportions by mail, and draw on the Treasurer of the State for postage on the same.

        Resolved further, That the printers also publish as rapidly as possible, all the Acts and Resolutions passed by this General Assembly together with the Journals of both Houses.

        The resolutions lie over under the rule.

        Mr. Minnis from the Joint Select Committee to wait upon the Governor to ascertain whether he had any further communication to make to the General Assembly at its present session, reported that the committee had called upon the Governor and that he would possibly communicate with the Legislature before its adjournment.

        Senate Resolution No. 5, on Federal Relations, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was laid on the table.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has passed on third and last reading, Senate Bill No. 2, in relation to the payment of interest on State Bonds owned by parties in the Northern States and amended the same, and ordered its immediate return to the Senate with amendments for concurrence, and the same is herewith returned.

        The House has adopted House Resolution No. 33, inviting the President and Congress of the Confederate States to Nashville, and tendering them the Capitol, should the voters of Tennessee


Page 66

declare themselves independent of Federal authority; and the same is herewith transmitted to the Senate for concurrence, as ordered by the House.


        The House Message returning Senate Bill No. 2, in relation to the payment of interest on State Bonds owned by parties in the Northern States, with an amendment was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Richardson, the amendment was concurred in by the Senate.

        House Resolution No. 33, inviting the President, Cabinet, and Congress of the Confederate States to Nashville, and tendering them the Capitol, was taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Bradford demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .10
  • Noes. . . . .9

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Hunter, Johnson, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson and Mr. Wood--10.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Horn, Lane, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--9.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        Mr. Payne moved to suspend the rule and order the return of the resolution to the House of Representatives for enrollment, which was agreed to.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has amended and adopted Senate Resolution No. 27, calling on the Governor to make certain communications to this body in relation to the recent seizure of property at Cairo, belonging to this State and citizens, and the same with amendment is herewith returned for concurrence.


        House Message returning Senate Resolution No. 27, calling on the Governor to make certain communications to this body in relation to the recent seizure of property at Cairo, belonging to this State and citizens of Tennessee, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the amendment was concurred in.

        A message was received from His Excellency, the Governor by the hands of J. E. R. Ray, Secretary of State as follows:


Page 67

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, May 7, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate
and House of Representatives:

        By virtue of the authority of your joint resolution, adopted on the 1st day of May, inst., I appointed Gustavus A. Henry, of the county of Montgomery, Archibald O. W. Totten, of the county of Madison, and Washington Barrow, of the county of Davidson, on the part of Tennessee, to enter into a Military League with the authorities of the Confederate States, and with the authorities of such other slaveholding states as may wish to enter into it; having in view the protection and defence of the entire South against the war that is now being carried on against it."

        The said Commissioners met the Hon. Henry W. Hilliard, the accredited representative of the Confederate States, at Nashville on this day, and have agreed upon and executed a Military League between the State of Tennessee and the Confederate States of America, subject, however, to the ratification of the Governments; one of the duplicate originals of which I herewith transmit for your ratification or rejection. For many cogent and obvious reasons, unnecessary to be rehearsed to you, I respectfully recommend the ratification of this League at the earliest practicable moment.

        

Very respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS.


CONVENTION BETWEEN THE STATE OF TENNESSEE AND THE CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA.

        The State of Tennessee, looking to a speedy admission into the Confederacy established by the Confederate States of America in accordance with the Constitution for the provisional Government of said States, enters into the following temporary Convention, Agreement and Military League, with the Confederate States, for the purpose of meeting pressing exigencies affecting the common rights, interests, and safety of said State and said Confederacy.

        FIRST.--Until the said State shall become a member of said Confederacy according to the Constitution of both powers, the whole military force, and military operations, offensive and defensive of said State, in the impending conflict with the United States, shall be under the chief control and direction of the President of the Confederate States upon the same basis, principles as if said State were now, and during the interval a member of said Confederacy; said force together with that of the Confederate States, to be employed for the common defence.


Page 68

        SECOND.--The State of Tennessee, will, upon becoming a member of said Confederacy, under the permanent Constitution of said Confederate States, if the same shall occur, turn over to said Confederate States, all the public property acquired from the United States, on the same terms, and in the same manner as the other States of said Confederacy have done in like cases.

        THIRD.--Whatever expenditures of money, if any, the said State of Tennessee shall make before she becomes a member of said Confederacy shall be met and provided for by the Confederate States.

        This Convention entered into and agreed in the City of Nashville, Tennessee, on the seventh day of May, A. D. 1861, by Henry W. Hilliard, the duly authorized Commissioner to act in the matter for the Confederate States, and Gustavus A. Henry, Archibald O. W. Totten, and Washington Barrow, Commissioners duly authorized to act in like manner for the State of Tennessee-- the whole subject to the approval and ratification of the proper authorities of both Governments respectively.

        In testimony whereof, the parties aforesaid have hereunto set their hands and seals, the day and year aforesaid in duplicate originals.

HENRY W. HILLIARD, [SEAL.]
Commissioner for the Confederate States of America.

GUSTAVUS A. HENRY, [SEAL.]
A. O. W. TOTTEN, [SEAL.]
WASHINGTON BARROW, [SEAL.]
Commissioners on the part of Tennessee.


        Mr. Payne offered Senate Resolution No. 31, as follows:

        WHEREAS, a Military League offensive and defensive was formed on this the 7th day of May, 1861, by and between A. O. W. Totten, Gustavus A. Henry, and Washington Barrow, Commissioners on the part of the State of Tennessee, and H. W. Hilliard, Commissioner on the part of the Confederate States of America, subject to the confirmation of the two Governments; be it therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That said league be in all respects ratified and confirmed, and the said General Assembly hereby pledges the, faith and honor of the State of Tennessee to a faithful observance of the terms and conditions of said league.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Boyd demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .14
  • Noes. . . . .6

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        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--14.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--6.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, the rule was suspended and Senate Resolution No. 30, to remove the obligation of secrecy, and to publish the proceedings of the Legislature, was taken up and adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Richardson, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Bradford submitted the following protest, which was ordered to be spread upon the Journal:

PROTEST.

        The ratification of the Military League entered into by the Commissioners on the part of Tennessee, and the accredited Commissioner of the Confederate States, being under consideration, the undersigned not being in feeling opposed to the league at a proper time, is not satisfied that such a league at this time is not a violation of Section 10, Article 1, of the Constitution of the United States, unless Tennessee had asserted her sovereignty. And taking the view that Tennessee is yet a member of the Federal Union, and members of the General Assembly not yet absolved from their obligations to support that Constitution, I voted "No," and therefore offer this protest.

W. M. BRADFORD.


        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 32, proposing to remove the secrecy of the present session, and the same is herewith transmitted for concurrence.


        House Resolution No. 32, to remove the injunction of secrecy from the proceedings of the Legislature, was taken up and adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Hildreth, the rule was suspended and the


Page 70

resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        Mr. Hildreth from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolutions Nos. 30 and 31, and Senate Bill No. 3, as correctly engrossed; and as correctly enrolled, an act to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of Independence, and for other purposes.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed enrolled act to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of Independence, and for other purposes, and the same is herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning 9 o'clock.

WEDNESDAY MORNING, MAY 8, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        Prayer by the Rev. C. T. Quintard.

        The Journal of Saturday and yesterday was read and confirmed.

        Mr. Bradford from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported the following joint resolutions as correctly enrolled viz: joint resolution directory to the Governor; joint resolution in relation to printing Hardee's Tactics; joint resolution to furnish each member and officer of the Senate and House of Representatives with copies of Hardee's Tactics; joint resolution ratifying and confirming a Military League with the Confederate States; also, enrolled act to amend the Railroad Laws.

        Mr. Bumpass asked and obtained leave to record his vote in the affirmative upon the adoption of Senate Resolution No. 31, to ratify and confirm the Military League between the State of Tennessee and the Confederate States of America, and House Resolution No. 33, inviting the President, Cabinet and Congress of the Confederate States of America to come to Nashville, in the event that the people


Page 71

of Tennesse declare their independence of Federal authority, and tendering them the Capitol.

        House Bill No. 10, to amend sections 2682, 2683, 2684, and 4765 of the Code, and for other purposes, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Lane offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That there may be attached to each regiment which is now or may hereafter be in the service of the State one chaplain elected by the regiment, and he shall be entitled to such compensation as is now allowed by the laws of the United States.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its second reading.

        House Bill No. 5, to prevent the collection of debts due by citizens of Tennessee to citizens of the non-slaveholding States during hostilities, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Payne moved to amend the first section of the bill by inserting after the words "agents and attorneys," the words "in this State;" which was agreed to.

        Mr. Payne moved to insert the words "or collect," after the words "sue for," in the first section; which motion prevailed.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SECTION 2. WHEREAS, It appears that the Federal Government has refused to pay the persons engaged in taking the census of 1860, and believing it to be the duty of this General Assembly to protect the interests of its citizens as far as possible, it is further enacted, that all marshals, deputy marshals, postmasters, custom-house officers, and other employees or agents of the said Government, who have in their hands any money or cash means belonging to said Government, shall forthwith pay over the same into the hands of the Treasurer of the State, taking his receipt therefor; and that the faith and honor of the State is hereby pledged for the ample and complete protection of such officers.

        SEC. 3. Be it further enacted, That all moneys received by the Treasurer of the State under the provisions of the foregoing section shall be in trust for the creditors of the Federal Government living in the State, the preference being given to the officers and agents employed in taking the census of 1860; said Treasurer upon satisfactory proof being made of the amount due said officers and agents from the Federal Government, shall pay the same as soon as paid over to him, taking proper vouchers therefor, and he shall report to the next General Assembly of the State.

        The amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .15
  • Noes. . . . .5

Page 72

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--15.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, and Mr. Stokes--5.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 8, to amend section 4743 of the Code, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .17
  • Noes. . . . .2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--17.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd and Nash--2.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        I am directed to inform the Senate that the House has concurred in Senate Resolutions Nos. 30 and 31, and the same are herewith returned for enrollment.


        On motion of Mr. Nash, the Senate took a recess of one hour.

        The time for which the recess was taken having expired, the Speaker called the Senate to order.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed the following enrolled joint resolutions and acts, and they are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate, viz:

        Joint resolution to furnish each member and officer of the Senate and House of Representatives with one copy of Hardee's Tactics.

        Joint resolution in relation to printing Hardee's Military Tactics.

        Joint resolution directory to the Governor.


Page 73

        Joint resolution ratifying and confirming a Military League with the Confederate States.

        An act to amend railroad laws.

        An act to amend Section 4743 of the Code of Tennessee.

        Joint resolution tendering the Capitol to the President and Congress of the Confederate States.

        The House of Representatives has considered Senate Resolution No. 23, to adjourn on Wednesday the 8th instant, and adopted two amendments thereto; and the resolution with amendments is herewith returned to the Senate for concurrence and enrollment.


        House Message returning Senate Resolution No. 23, to adjourn on Wednesday the 8th instant, with amendments, was taken up.

        House amendment changing the day of adjournment from Wednesday the 8th, to Thursday the 9th instant, was concurred in.

        House amendment providing that members shall receive no per diem during the recess was concurred in by the Senate.

        Mr. Lane offered the following Resolution (Senate Resolution No 32,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That in all cases where forces have been organized for the military service of Tennessee, the presentation of companies for inspection, and the actual inspection of the same by an inspecting officer appointed for the purpose by the Governor, whether such companies are inspected singly or as parts of regiments shall be conclusive testimony that the captains and other officers of such companies have been duly elected; and on the written certificates of ten captains who have associated their companies as a regiment being filed with the Governor, showing the voting of their several companies for Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel and Major, of such regiment, the Governor shall issue commissions to such persons as appear from such captains' certificates to have been respectively elected Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel and Major; provided in all cases such election of Colonel, Lieutenant Colonel and Major shall appear to have been made by a majority of the aggregate members of such ten companies. Precedence of regiments and corps, provided for the military service of Tennessee shall be determined by the date on which the written report of inspection of the same is filed.

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the rule was suspended and the resolution was taken up.

        Mr. Minnis moved to strike out the last clause of the resolution from the word "precedence," which was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, the resolution was laid on the table.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:


Page 74

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 37, authorizing the banks to issue notes of the denomination of one dollar under certain circumstances, and ordered its immediate transmission to the Senate for concurrence, and the same is herewith transmitted.


        Mr. Stanton offered the following Resolution (Senate Resolution No. 33,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Secretary of State be, and he is hereby authorized to have Hardee's Military Tactics stereotyped for the use of the State.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution Mr. Bumpass demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .10
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--10.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Nash, Richardson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--7.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Stanton offered the following Resolution (Senate Resolution No. 34,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That in the election authorized by this General Assembly at this session in reference to the separation of this State from the United States of America, all volunteer soldiers of this State that would be entitled to vote at home on the day of election, shall be allowed to vote any where, either in or out of the State if they should be at or before that time removed by the command of proper military authorities; and the Colonel in command of each regiment shall appoint judges, &c., to see that said election in its government and forms shall conform as near as practicable, to the rules and regulations of elections within this State, and shall certify the result forthwith to the Secretary of this State, and the votes thus taken shall be counted in the result of the general election aforesaid.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.


Page 75

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 2 o'clock by the Speaker.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 31, providing, for a Bank Congress of the Southern States, and ordered its immediate transmission to the Senate for concurrence, and the same is herewith transmitted.


        House Bill No 35, providing for a Bank Congress of the Southern States, was taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr, McClellan, the rule was suspended and the resolution was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House Resolution No. 37, to authorize the Banks to issue one dollar notes, and to authorize the Supervisor of Banks to temporarily suspend the operations of the Bank Code in certain cases, was taken up and rejected.

        Mr. Thompson moved to reconsider the vote rejecting the resolution, which motion was agreed to; the resolution was then adopted.

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Hildreth, and Nash--2.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was surpended and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has had under consideration Senate amendments to House Bill No. 5, to prevent the collection of debts due by citizens of Tennessee to citizens of non-slaveholding States, during hostilities; and concurred in amendments Nos.


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1 and 2, and non-concurred in amendments Nos. 4 and 5, and ordered the immediate return of the bill and amendments to the Senate for further consideration; and the same are herewith returned.


        House message non concurred in Senate amendments Nos. 4 and 5 to House Bill No. 5, to prevent the collection of debts due by citizens of Tennessee to citizens of the non-slaveholding States during hostilities, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the Senate receded from its amendments Nos. 4 and 5.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 39, protesting against the obstruction of the free navigation of the Mississippi, and ordered its immediate transmission to the Senate for concurrence; and the same is herewith transmitted.

        I am directed by the House of Representatives, to transmit to the Senate a message from the Governor; which is herewith transmitted.


        House Resolution No. 39, protesting against the obstruction of the free navigation of the Mississippi river, was taken up.

        Mr. Minnis offered the following amendment:

        Resolved further, That the Governor transmit a copy of the above resolution to the Governor of Illinois, and also to the President of the United States.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The resolution as amended was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. McClelland, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        The message from the Governor, with the papers accompanying it was taken up and read, as follows:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, May 8th, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate
and House of Representatives:

        In answer to your resolution of the 7th inst., requesting certain information, I have to reply that I have not received either from


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the Governor of the State of Illinois or the President of the United States any communication whatever "in relation to the recent capture of property belonging to the State and citizens of Tennessee" near Cairo, Illinois. As soon as I was informed of the seizure of the steamboat Hillman, with the cargo, I immediately addressed letters to the Governor of the State of Illinois and the President of the United States, copies of which I herewith transmit. Shortly thereafter, becoming satisfied in my own mind, from all the facts and circumstances, that the detention of the steamboat Hillman, and the capture of her cargo, were authorized by the Government, and learning that there was in the hands of Jesse Thompson, Surveyor of the Port of Nashville, an amount of bonds and money belonging to the United States, I demanded and required said Surveyor to deposit the same in the Bank of Tennessee, for the indemnity of the State against loss from this lawless seizure.

        I herewith send you a statement of the amount and character of the fund surrendered by the Surveyor, as receipted for by the Cashier of the Bank of Tennessee, amounting in the aggregate to $74,460 99, which fund is subject to such order or disposition as the Legislature may see proper to make respecting it. Care should be taken, however, in any disposition that may be made of it, that the Surveyor should be fully indemnified against personal liability or loss.

Respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS.


GOV. HARRIS TO THE GOVERNOR OF ILLINOIS.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, Tenn., April 29, 1861.

To His Excellency, R. Yates, Governor, &c., Springfield Illinois:

        SIR: An armed force stationed at Cairo, Illinois, proceeded on the 26th inst. on the steamer Swallow to meet and seize upon the steamboat C. E. Hillman, owned by citizens of Tennessee, and her cargo, the property of the State of Tennessee and her citizens. I desire to know whether said proceeding was authorized by your Excellency, and to inquire for what purpose and with what object said act was done. Being done on the Mississippi river, your Excellency is of course aware that this seizure is aggressive and hostile. The obstruction of the navigation of the Mississippi river, and the seizure of public and private property by an armed force are violations of the comity of States and a palpable infringement of the Constitution, unauthorized, I trust, by your Excellency or the Federal Government; and before pronouncing thereon, it is due alike to the State of Illinois and the State of Tennessee that I should respectfully call the attention of your Excellency to the


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facts communicated herein, and know if the same were authorized by you, and if authorized, to demand that your Excellency will cause the immediate restoration of said boat, C. E. Hillman, with her cargo to the officers and owners thereof.

        An early reply is respectfully requested.

        

Very respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS,
Governor of Tennessee.


GOV. HARRIS TO THE PRESIDENT.

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, Tenn., April 29, 1861.

To His Excellency, the President of the United States:

        SIR: On the 26th inst. the steamboat C. E. Hillman, on her passage from St. Louis to Nashville, was seized and taken possesion of by an armed force on the steamboat Swallow. This seizure was made on the Mississippi river, a short distance above Cairo, Illinois. The boat Hillman was owned by citizens of Tennessee, and its cargo was the property of this State and her citizens. It is believed that the force employed in this work is a part of the force recently called into service by the proclamation of the President.

        This interruption of the free navigation of the Mississippi river and the seizure of the property belonging to the State of Tennessee and her citizens, is aggressive and hostile, and without commenting upon the character and lawlessness of the outrage, it becomes my imperative duty to inquire by what authority the said acts were committed. I have, therefore, respectfully to request that the President shall inform me whether the same was done by or under instruction of the Federal Government, or is approved by said Government.

        

Very Respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS,
Governor of Tennessee.


        List of money, bonds, and other securities demanded by Isham G. Harris, Governor of the State of Tennessee, and surrendered by Jesse Thomas, Surveyor of the Port of Nashville, Tenn., April 30, 1861.

  • Fall & Cunningham's Check on Planter's Bank for. . . . .$1,134 98
  • A. H. Hicks' check on the Bank of Tennessee, for. . . . .1,375 44
  • Gold (say two thousand dollars). . . . .2,000 00
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  • Sixty-six bonds of the State of Tennessee, bearing interest at 5-1/4 per cent. per annum, and due 25th July, 1861, amounting to. . . . .66,666 66
  • Fall & Cunningham's and others' bonds for. . . . .$533 76
  • Fall & Cunningham's and other bonds. . . . . 608 40
  • Do. do. do.. . . . .709 71--1,851 87
  • A. H. Hicks & Co's and others' bonds for 368 84
  • Do. do. do. 376 80
  • Do do. do. 153 60
  • Do. do. do. 144 96
  • Do. do. do. 387 84--1,432 04
  • Amounting to, in all. . . . .$74,460 90

JNO. A. FISHER,
Cashier Bank of Tennessee.

        Mr. Wood moved that the message from the Governor be referred to the Committee on Federal Relations; which motion was agreed to.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed the following joint resolutions, and they are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate:

        Joint resolution to remove the obligation of secresy, and to publish the proceedings of the Legislature.

        Joint resolution to adjourn on Thursday the 9th inst., till Monday, the 17th of June next.

        Joint resolution, providing for a Bank Congress of the Southern States.

        The House of Representatives has considered:

        Senate Bill No. 6, to regulate the holding of Courts in the State of Tennessee; and, after having reconsidered it, has rejected the same; and it is herewith returned to the Senate.

        Mr. Wood from the Committee on Ways and Means, reported as follows:

        The Committee on Ways and Means to whom was referred House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly, have had the same under consideration, and after making various amendments, recommend its passage.

        All of which is submitted.

EDMUND J. WOOD, Chairman.

May 8th, 1861.
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        Amendments offered by the Committee:

        No. 1, Be it enacted, That the Comptroller issue his warrant to Patrick McCue for five dollars for attending the water closets.

        No. 2. Be it enacted, That the Comptroller issue his warrant to F. Cook, for three dollars for sulphur water furnished the General Assembly.

        No. 3. Be it enacted, That the Comptroller issue his warrant to W. T. Garrett for nine dollars and sixty cents for ice furnished the General Assembly.

        No. 4. Be it enacted, That the Comptroller issue his warrant to A. H. Hicks, for twelve dollars for articles furnished for the use of the General Assembly.

        No. 5. Be it enacted, That the Comptroller issue his warrant to John D. Swan, for forty four dollars for eleven days' service as Doorkeeper of the Senate.

        House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to fill the blank in the 9th section with the word fifty; which was agreed to.

        Mr. Richardson moved to fill the blank in the 3d section with the word thirty; which motion was agreed to.

        The amendments offered by the Committee of Ways and Means, were adopted.

        Mr. Thompson offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the Comptroller issue his warrant to the Military Board of the State of Tennessee for the sum of one thousand dollars, or any sum less that will be necessary to be appropriated to Dr. Rezin Thompson and G. W. Harris, to test fully and fairly the merits of their improvements in gunnery, under their especial supervision.

        Upon the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Hildreth demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .8
  • Noes. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Hunter, Johnson, Minnis, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--8.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Hildreth, Horn, Lane, McClellan, McNeilly, Nash, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--10.

        So the amendment was rejected.

        Mr Santon offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the Treasurer of the State pay out of the Treasury to the Adjutant General of Militia, an annual salary equal to the pay allowed by an act passed 6th of May, 1861, to a Brigadier General, for the time said Adjutant General


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is in actual service, or is actually engaged by order of the Governor as said Adjutant General; the said annual salary to be paid quarterly.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill, as amended, passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .20
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Nash, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--20.

        In the negative:

        None.

        Mr. McNeilly offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No 35,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That five thousand copies of the Constitution of the Confederate States be printed for the use of the members of this General Assembly, and the Secretary of State shall send them by mail to the members, and that the Comptroller issue his warrant on the Treasury to the Secretary of State for an amount sufficient to pay the postage on the same and that the same be printed and distributed pro rata as soon as possible.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Johnson the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 34, authorizing the Bank of Tennessee to issue circulation to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company, and ordered its immediate transmit to the Senate, and the same is herewith transmitted.


        House Resolution No. 34, to authorize the Bank of Tennessee to issue circulation to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company, was taken up.

        Mr. Lane moved to strike out the words "and directed," in the third line of the resolution; which motion was agreed to.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Bumpass demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:


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  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Lane, McClellan, Nash, and Mr. Richardson--7.

        So the resolution as amended was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate adjourned till to-morrow at 10 o'clock A. M.

THURSDAY MORNING, MAY 9, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the reading of the Journal was dispensed with.

        On motion of Mr. Johnson, the vote ordering the transmission of House Resolution No. 34, to authorize the Bank of Tennessee to issue circulation to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company, was reconsidered.

        On motion of Mr. Johnson, the vote adopting the resolution was reconsidered.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to lay the resolution on the table; upon which motion,

        Mr. Stokes demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .11
  • Noes. . . . .9

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, McClellan, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Wood--11.


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        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Mickley, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--9.

        So the resolution was laid on the table.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed the following enrolled joint resolutions and act, viz:

        Joint resolution protesting against the interruption of the free navigation of the Mississippi river;

        Joint resolution giving the banks authority to issue notes of any denomination not less than one dollar;

        An act to prevent the collection of debts owing by citizens of Tennessee to citizens of the non-slaveholding States during hostilities;

        All of which are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 41, directing ten thousand copies of the Constitution of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States to be printed and distributed among the counties, and ordered its immediate transmission to the Senate for concurrence, and the same is herewith transmitted.


        Mr. Payne from the Joint Select Committee to prepare an Address to the people of Tennessee, submitted the following Address:

LEGISLATIVE ADDRESS TO THE PEOPLE OF TENNESSEE.

        Fellow-Citizens: The extraordinary legislation forced upon the General Assembly, by the necessities of the times, makes it not inappropriate that your Representatives should present some of the reasons which have influenced their action.

        The Joint Select Committee, under the direction and with the approval of the Assembly, beg leave to submit the following statement to the calm judgment and consideration of their constituents:

        The present session was called for by the Executive authority to dispose of more important questions than ever had engaged the attention of a Tennessee Legislature; the members of the two Houses could but feel most sensibly the responsibilities of their positions, well knowing that their action would not only affect the present, but the future destinies of the State. They had no interest to subserve apart from those of their constituents,


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and whatever may be the result of their labors, whether for good or evil, it will fall alike upon themselves and those whom they represent.

        The election of a sectional President by an unreasoning appeal to numerical superiority, precipitated a crisis in the Government which many wise men an icipated and patriots would have gladly adjourned to another and far distant period. Several of the slaveholding upon the happening of this event, commenced preparations for leaving a Union which in their judgments, promised to become an instrument of destruction to the constitutional rights of the South. The excitement consequent upon the action of these States produced a necessity for the last extra session of this body, and the proposition for calling a Convention was submitted to the people. It was by them determined that no Convention should be held, thus giving the assurance of a fixed purpose to abide by the Union so long as a hope of safety or protection remained to them. A Peace Congress was called for, and anxious to give every evidence of a sincere desire to settle existing difficulties, prudent and discreet men were sent to confer with delegates from other States. The Congress resulted in a failure, as did the faithful efforts of Southern men in the Congress of the United States. To every proposition a deaf ear was turned by the party in power. These ominous failures to come to an adjustment, while they weakened, did not dispel altogether the hope of a peaceable solution of existing troubles. It was believed that the masses of the Northern people would do justice to the demands of the South, if not prevented by the arts of their politicians. Subsequent acts prove that the masses are, if possible, more bitter in their hostility to the South than their leaders.

        The inaugural address of the newly-elected President, however doubtful in its terms, was charitably construed into a message of peace. It was considered absurd to suppose that any President of a free country would ever venture upon the mad experiment of holding sovereign States together by means of the bayonet. No one not blinded by fanaticism, can fail to recognize the fact that a government based upon the popular will can only be maintained in its integrity by appealing to that powerful and controlling influence. Force, when attempted, changes the whole character of the Government; making it a military despotism, and those that submit become the abject slaves of power. The people of Tennessee have fully understood this important fact, and hence their anxiety to stay the hand of coercion. They well know that the subjugation of the seceded States involved their own destruction, and that, however plausible the pretext, an enforcement of the laws against an unwilling people had been the exercise of tyrants in every age of the world. That the people


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of the South were, many of them, deceived in the pretended peace policy of Lincoln, is not a matter of surprise or astonishment. The duplicity and double-dealing of this miserable tyrant, finds no parallel save in the corrupt governments of the dark ages, and would disgrace the diplomatic policy of a barbarian chieftain. A few facts will suffice to make good our assertions. To Southern Senators that approached him, he verbally construed his own inaugural into a peace document.

        He caused it to be given out that he would abandon Fort Sumter, when at the very time he was privately preparing a powerful armament for its relief.

        Under false pretences, he introduced an officer into Fort Sumter, who took advantage of the privilege to concert a plan of relief with the commandant of that fortress.

        Congress refused to vote a dollar for the prosecution of hostilities against the people of the South; he and his agents got the appropriation by falsehood, pretending that it was needed to pay off the Government debt, and instead of so using it, fails to pay even the maimed and wounded soldier his pension, or the hard-working census-taker his salary, but scatters it among a brutal soldiery whom he has hired to murder Southern freemen and to desecrate Southern soil.

        Congress refused to pass a coercion bill, yet this contemptible usurper proclaims war against the South in defiance of the Constitution in violation of his oath and his oft-repeated and positive pledges to the contrary.

        Congress would not authorize the call for a single soldier. yet, in the face of the laws and the Constitution, this petty tyrant calls for armies of immense magnitude to march against peaceful and unoffending citizens.

        He assured Tennessee members of Congress that his policy would be peaceful; his Premier, W. H. Seward, announced such to be the purpose of his Cabinet on every occasion; and yet, after lulling the people to repose, he impudently called upon the Governor of Tennessee for troops to follow his standard in a war of subjugation against their own native section.

        The Mississippi river is declared to be free by the Constitution of Tennessee, and yet this this vile usurper stations troops at Cairo to obstruct the navigation of this great highway and its tributaries, and these miserable instruments are now engaged in making war upon the commerce of non-seceding States.

        Tennessee, ever loyal to the Constitution, has been an advocate for peace, and has struggled to bring together the broken fragments of the Union, yet in the midst of her well meant efforts, a war is made upon her; every avenue of trade is closed up, and the people are suffering all the privations of a blockade. Not even provisions, demanded by the necessities of the people, are


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allowed to be shipped into the State, and property of private individuals is made subject to piratical and illegal seizure. Boats have been plundered of their cargoes by authority of the Government and when called on for an explanation by the Governor of Tennessee even the honor of a reply is refused.

        The States that desired to live in the Union, and to be on terms of friendship with all, are insultingly told that neutrality is impossible, and that they must aid in this ungodly war of subjugation or else suffer the penalties. Had Tennessee ever desired to remain neutral, the miserable and degrading privilege is denied to her by the tyrants that assume to rule in the name of the Constitution.

        The Confederate States sought for peace, and sent their agents to the Federal capital to consummate that object. They were assured that peace would be made, and while resting under the belief that they were dealing with honorable men, Lincoln and his Cabinet were secretly collecting an immense armament for the relief of Fort Sumter. It is a matter of no importance who fired the first gun in the attack on Fort Sumter, the war commenced when a hostile fleet set sail upon its mission of death.

        Lincoln pretends in his inaugural that his only object is to protect the property of the nation, yet he organizes immense armies all along the lines of the border slave States, commissions them to seize and take the property of private citizens, holds Maryland in subjection by the aid of her treacherous Governor and his armed hirelings, and converts the Federal capital into an entrenched camp, and subjects it to all the rigors of martial law.

        We ask, if a man marked by every attribute that can disgrace a usurping tyrant and a false hearted hypocrite should be permitted to control for a day, or an hour, the destinies of a free people? In this state of affairs the Legislature assembled at Nashville. The Governor had defiantly refused to call out a man to prosecute a war of subjugation, and had also refused to issue a writ of election for members to Congress. We were bound to recognize the fact that war had been already made upon the State, that for all practical purposes Tennessee was out of the Union, and every act of legislation has been based upon that palpable state of affairs. The Legislature endorsed and approved the action of the Executive. He could have pursued no other course without disgrace to himself and dishonor to his State. These resolutions are submitted along with this report.

        Tennessee is unarmed, and the first great object was to organize the military and adopt every means of defence within our power, menaced as our country is by armies of alarming magnitude. Our western borders exposed to attack, with life, liberty and property staked upon the issue, it is no time to think of half-way measures. The money and the blood of Tennessee will be


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called for in no stinted quantities, if it be necessary to protect the priceless heritage of freedom that we possess, and which we hold as a sacred trust for our children. The military bill is also submitted with this address to the judgment of our constituents. Tennessee is now politically isolated from all of her sisters. She has no voice in any of their counsels. She will not disgrace her fair escutcheon by sending delegates to a Government that has made war against her, and where they are compelled to vote and speak with the glittering bayonets of a brutal soldiery gleaming around them. Our proud State will never seek to be represented in the counsels of its enemies and where wild fanaticism holds its infernal orgies over the mutilated and mouldering corpse of a once noble Republic. In the present dangerous attitude, we felt it to be due to ourselves, to the honor and safety of the State, and to the imperious demands of our constituents, that an opportunity should be promptly furnished for cutting loose every real or supposed tie that binds the people to the Lincoln Government, and to enable them by a vote at the ballot box to form other political relations, if it were so desired. In conformity with these obligations of duty, the Legislature has prepared two instruments to be voted upon by the people, on Saturday, the 8th of June.

        Upon the first proposition the people will vote for or against separation from the old Confederacy. By the second proposition you will decide for or against a political union with the Confederate States. Both are submitted along with this address. The proposition for a union adopts the provisional, and not the permanent Constitution of those States; this Constitution is also submitted to the people. The Legislature has done what has already been done by Virginia, and will no doubt be the policy of North Carolina, and in the company of these time honored Commonwealths, Tennessee need entertain no fears for her own safety. If objections are found to the permanent Constitution, they can be removed as a condition of continued Union with those States.

        In submitting these two grave questions to the popular judgment, the Legislature dispensed with all intermediate agencies, preferring to go at once to the great source of all political power-- the people themselves. The delays, embarrassments and expense of a convention are thus avoided. Nothing is left to trickery or political management. You can say whether you desire to separate from the old Government; you can also declare at the ballot box whether you desire to unite the fortunes of the State along with Virginia, North Carolina and Arkansas to the new Confederacy. By two words--"separation" or "no separation," "representation" or "no representation," you will decide the whole question and fix the future destinies of the State. A convention can do no more, though in session for weeks or months. Whatever be your decision it will be conclusive, and from it, there can be no


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appeal. The Legislature has no power to put Tennessee out of the Union, nor to place it among the Confederate States; that body has the authority to order an election, which it has done, and it is to be sincerely hoped that every voter in Tennessee will be found at the polls on the day appointed by the Legislature.

        We remark before passing from this subject, that while differences of opinion exist as to the abstract right of secession, no one denies the right of a people to revolutionize. The right to "change, alter or abolish," their form of government is a principle engrafted in the fundamental laws of the State. Your representatives have therefore steered clear of the mooted question of secession, and submitted a revolutionary document, which, if ratified by the popular vote, will sever the ties that bind Tennessee to her enemies and oppressors, and that, after all, is the object to be attained, by whatever name it may be called.

        The military league which has been formed with the Southern Confederacy is also submitted with this address. It was a measure of safety imperiously demanded by the war that has been upon our State. In accomplishing this object we have fallen back upon the lessons of our ancestors, and regarded the promptings of self preservation in forming alliances when different parties are threatened with a common danger. Our State is un-armed; we must have weapons placed in the hands of our volunteers to defend the freedom of the South. The Confederate States can aid us in this all-important matter. We must have a common head to direct the armies of freedom. Those States furnish in their Chief Magistrate, a soldier who has proven his capacity to lead upon the hardest fought battle fields known to the history of American warfare. Our people must be relieved, too, from the burden of keeping up a separate and distinct military organization. By the terms of this contract, it will be seen that the expenses of the State are to be transferred to the common Confederacy that the South is forming, and will be paid from the fruitful sources of impost duties levied upon commerce when peace is established.

        This league places Tennessee where she deserves to stand--in company with the old States of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, whose histories are redolent with the glories of past struggles for liberty, and whose sons are now prepared to stand upon their ancient battle-fields to emulate the deeds of their ancestors. This alliance places the State, too, in close compact with the younger States of the South, with whom it is indispensably connected by a thousand ties.

        It is gratifying to know the league referred to meets the approval of men entertaining heretofore all shades of opinion. Let it be remembered, that the Legislature, impelled as it was by imperious necessity, in the formation of this alliance, is only the more


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confident in the correctness of its policy by the conscious belief that it has formed for the State no ignoble or degrading association. Whatever may be thought of the action of the States that have left the Union, in regard to their supposed precipitancy, all must admit that their legislative action has been marked by sound conservatism and profound statesmanship. These States have ventured upon no new or untried experiment in the formation of their Government; they have wisely refrained from making a new Constitution, but have piously adopted the one framed by the authors of independence, and under which Tennessee has always abided as a State--some alterations and changes have been made, but only such, as time and experience had suggested as important improvements. It may be truthfully averred that the Constitution of the United States is now the permanent Constitution of the Confederate States; that noble instrument has no existence in any other States or Government. It has been superceded in the North by a military despotism: it no longer shields the people of Tennessee; but this admirable framework of freedom, still regarded as the ark of political safety and strengthened in its massive proportions has been erected upon Southern soil, and under its broad ægis generations of freemen will repose in safety.

        It is painful to reflect that Tennessee has no representation in any national or confederate council; her gallant soldiers will go forth to battle for a common cause, and but for a short time, at least, their voice cannot be heard, only through the ballot box in June.

        It is submitted that Tennessee has but one of two alternatives-- either to attempt to maintain a distinct and separate nationality, or to unite with the other States of the South. If you decide on the former, provisions should at one be made for new departments of government. A Post Office and a Department of Foreign Affairs will be necessary, besides other arrangements peculiar to a separate nationality. We ask if the people will not be at once crushed by the burthens of taxation? The idea of a Border State Confederacy must abandoned. The free States embraced in this plan are, the first to lead off for Southern subjugation. Through their Governors they have proclaimed that there is no such thing as neutrality, and have already impudently demanded that Kentucky shall take the field against the slaveholding States. With them Tennessee can have no Union. It is to be hoped that a military league that has been already commenced in the South will be promptly formed with the States of Kentucky, Maryland and Missouri. They demand our sympathies and will receive our support if required. Missouri is an unarmed giant, but will respond to the calls of the South as soon as she finds that the other States are ready to come to her aid. Through the action of a treacherous Governor, Maryland has been manacled by the


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chains of the tyrant. The heart of the South is with her, and its sons stand ready to drive the invaders from her soil, and to give to her the rights that traitors and usurpers are seeking to destroy Our noble and gallant neighbor, Kentucky, is an unarmed knight, confronted by the reckless assassin whose dagger is ready to be driven to his heart. The State of Tennessee, the whole South, w ll offer their sons to the gallant State, and who now stand ready to pour out their blood as a rich libation upon the altars of the dark and bloody ground. Let past differences, fellow-citizens, be forgotten in this hour of common danger, and let us work for a united South. Though our enemies are strong, and united in their unholy purposes. yet standing upon our own side, and defending our alters and our friends, the cause is too sacred to be lost. God will prosper the right; that Being who defended the fathers will not desert their children while unitedly battling for the inalienable rights of man.

        When this body met, it determined to sit with closed doors. We are aware that this mode of legislation is objected to by some. it is the first time in the history of the State that the had been adopted, because in that history no case had occurred to call forth its exercise. The proceedings of the convention that framed the Declaration of Independence were in secret. The convention that framed the Constitution of the United States, held its secret sessions, and the Senate of the United States not unfrequently sits with closed doors. Those who have taken occasion to condemn us, may be purer than those who framed the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States; but we very much doubt whether they will have a greater hold up n public confidence. But the reasons for our course are our best justification: the country was excited, and the public demands imperious. We desired to legislate uninfluenced and unretarded by the crowds that would otherwise have attended our deliberations; but still more important than this, the western portion of Tennessee was in an exposed condition, with no military defence whatever; the towns and counties bordering on the Mississippi river were liable to be assailed at any hour by the armed forces collected at Cairo, and we desired that no act of legislation on our part, should form the pretext for such an invasion, so long as it could be avoided. Our fellow-citizens f West Tennessee, and of Arkansas, are laboring night and day to erect batteries on the river to prevent a descent of the enemy. A duty that we owed to them and to the cause of humanity demanded that we should not make our action known till the latest possible moment. If some desired light, while we were at work, we equally desired to save the blood and property of Tennesseans. Our doors have now been thrown open, the Journals will be published--every vote is recorded, and


Page 91

he must be a fault finder indeed who will complain after hearing the reasons that prompted our actions.

        We have briefly touched the principal subjects that engaged the attention of the Legislature. Tennessee has taken her position and has proudly determined to throw her banners to the breeze, and will give her strength to the sacred cause of freedom for the WHITE MAN OF THE SOUTH.

R. G. PAYNE,
Chairman of Joint Select Committee.

EDMUND J. WOOD,

S. S. STANTON,

J. A. MINNIS,

G. GANTT,

W. GUY,

ROBT. B. HURT,

BENJ. J. LEA,

JOSEPH G. PICKETT.


        On motion of Mr. Wood, the address submitted by the Committee was adopted.

        Mr. Minnis moved that ten thousand copies of the address be printed; which motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Bradford presented the following protest, which was ordered to be spread upon the Journal:

PROTEST.

        The Legislative address presented by the Joint Committee of which the undersigned was a member, not having been completed, until this morning precludes the propriety of a formal minority report. A number of the reasons and arguments presented, justifying the action of the present extra session, I heartily approve, and especially the reasons for Sustaining the Governor in his refusal to furnish troops under the proclamation of the President, and those assigned for the adoption of the injunction of secrecy at the commencement of the session. I also cordially endorse those measures which look to resistance to the inhuman, reckless and authorized actual and threatened aggressions of the Executive at Washington.

        But as several of the positions assumed are in conflict with my convictions of duty, and in conflict with my position already taken in this body, I considered it my duty to decline my signature to the address.

        This I regret exceedingly to do, as it is my earnest desire that in the terrible and fearful conflict which seems to be impending, the State of Tennessee should be, as far as possible, united and


Page 92

harmonious, without bickerings and divisions among ourselves, having, as I conceive, enough to do in conflict with enemies. I therefore present this protest.

W. M. BRADFORD.

May 9, 1861.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered Senate amendments to House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly, and concurred in all the amendments and amended amendment for the benefit of the boy Buck, by adding twenty dollars additional for the benefit of the boy George.

        The House has adopted House Resolution No. 42, tendering the thanks of the Legislature to the Presidents of the East Tennessee and Georgia and East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Companies, and the same is herewith transmitted to the Senate for concurrence as ordered by the House.


        House Resolution No. 41, was taken up.

        Mr. Wood offered the following in lieu:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Secretary of State have ten thousand copies of the report and accompanying documents of the Joint Select Committee appointed to prepare an address to the people of Tennessee, printed and distributed among the counties as early as convenient, and that the Comptroller issue his warrant for the payment of the same.

        The resolution in lieu was adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Wood, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has passed on third and last reading, Senate Bill No. 3, to amend the Militia Laws of the State requiring captains to give notice, and amended the same, and the bill and amendments are herewith returned for further action.


        House Message returning House Bill No. 6, to defray the expenses of the Legislature of the State of Tennessee, with an amendment to the Senate amendment for the benefit of the boy Buck, was taken up, and the House amendment to the Senate amendment was concurred in; and,


Page 93

        On motion of Mr. Wood, the bill and amendments were ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House Bill No. 10, to amend sections 2682, 2683, 2684 and 4765 of the Code, and for other purposes, was taken up on third reading.

        The bill being read, Mr. McNeilly moved to postpone further action upon it for the purpose of taking up House message returning Senate Bill No. 3, to amend the Militia Laws of the State requiring captains to give notice, with amendments; which motion prevailed.

        House amendment to insert after the word "captain" in the bill the words or officer in command of the company, was concurred in by the Senate.

        House amendmendment providing that volunteers out of the State, being citizens of the State, shall have the privilege of voting in the election to be held on the 8th of June, was concurred in.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be enrolled.

        The consideration of House Bill No. 10, to amend sections 2682, 2683, 2684 and 4765 of the Code, and for other purposes, was resumed, and the bill passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Nash, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--18.

        In the negative:

        None.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Resolution No. 42, tendering the thanks of the Legislature to the East Tennessee and Georgia and the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Companies was taken up and concurred in, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House for enrollment.

        Senate Resolution No. 34, to authorize Tennessee volunteers to vote wherever stationed within or without the State, was taken up; and,

        Mr. Stanton asked leave to withdraw the same from the calender.

        Mr. Trimble asked and obtained leave to record his vote in the affirmative on the motion to lay on the table House Resolution


Page 94

No. 34, to authorize the Bank of Tennessee to issue circulation to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company.

        Mr. Trimble moved to take the resolution from the table, on which motion,

        Mr. Bumpass demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .9
  • Noes. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Mickley, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Stanton, Thompson, Trimble, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--9.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, McClellan, Nash, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Wood--10.

        So the Senate refused to take the resolution from the table.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the vote ordering the transmission of House Bill No. 10, to the House was reconsidered.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the vote passing the bill was reconsidered.

        The bill was then taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That section 11 of the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, passed 6th, 1861, be so amended as to embrace the word "banks" after the word "individual" in the last clause of said section.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill, as amended, passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Allen, Bradford, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Nash, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--18.

        In the negative:

        None.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        Mr. Stanton asked and obtained leave to change his vote from the affirmative to the negative on all the propositions in relation to the issuance of circulation by the Bank of Tennessee to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:


Page 95

MR. SPEAKER:

        I am directed by the House of Representatives to transmit a message from the Governor, and a resolution in pursurance thereof providing for a Convention of the two Houses, to confirm the appointments of military officers, &c., made by the Governor.


        The message from the Governor was taken up and read, as follows:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, May 9, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate:
and House of Representatives:

        I have nominated, and herewith submit for your confirmation the following gentlemen:

        For Majors General--Gideon J. Pillow and Samuel R. Anderson.

        For Brigadiers General--Felix K. Zollicoffer, Benjamin F. Cheatham, Robert C. Foster 3d, John L. T. Sneed, and Wm. R. Caswell.

        For Adjutant General--Daniel S. Donaldson.

        For Inspector General--Wm. H. Carroll.

        For Quartermaster General--Vernon K. Stevenson.

        For Commissary General--R. G. Fain.

        For Paymaster General--William Williams.

        For Surgeon General--Dr. Paul F. Eve.

        For Assistant Surgeon General--Dr. Joseph C. Newnan and Dr. John D. Winston.

        For Assistant Adjutants General--W. C. Whitthorne, James D. Porter, Hiram S. Bradford, and D. M. Key.

        For Assistant Inspectors General--J. W. Gillespie, James L. Scudder, John C. Brown, and Alexander W. Campbell.

        For Assistant Quartermasters General--Paulding Anderson, George W. Cunningham, S. T. Bicknell, George W. Fisher, Thomas Marshall, Thomas Peters, John G. Finnie, W. P. Davis, and J. H. McMahon.

        For Assistant Commissaries General--Calvin M. Fackler, John M. Brown, Miles M. Draughn, Madison Stratton. James S. Patton, James W. Duncan, W. W. Guy. and P. T Glass.

        For Assistant Paymasters General--Claiborne Deloach, William B. Reese, and Thomas Boyers.

        For Lieutenant Colonel of Artillery--John P. McCown.

        For Military and Financial Board--Neil S. Brown, James E. Baily, and William G. Harding.

        By reference to your act of the 6th May inst., and the army regulations it will be seen that there are additional nominations yet to be submitted, the number of which it is impossible for me to determine until it is ascertained, with at least some degree of certainty,


Page 96

the number of troops that it may be necessary to call into active service, I have therefore nominated the heads of departments with such assistants as I considered necessary to the work of immediate organization, leaving the developments of the future to determine the additional appointments it may be proper to make.

Very respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS.


        House Resolution to provide for a convention of the two Houses of the General Assembly at 12-1/2 o'clock, to confirm the nominations of military officers made by the Governor was taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        On motion of Mr. Richardson, the Senate took a recess of five minutes preparatory to meeting the House of Representatives in Convention, to confirm the appointments of military officers made by the Governor.

        The hour of 12-1/2 o'clock having arrived, the Senate proceeded in a body to the Hall of the House of Representatives.

IN CONVENTION.

        The President took the Chair and called the Convention to order.

        The resolution providing for the Convention was read by the Clerk.

        Representative Pickett moved that the doors of the Hall be closed; which motion failed.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to reconsider the motion to close the doors of the Hall; which motion prevailed.

        The motion to close the doors was then agreed to.

        The message of the Governor was read by the Clerk.

        Mr. Lane moved that the appointments submitted by the Governor in his message be confirmed; which motion was agreed to.

        The object for which the Convention was called being completed, the President declared it dissolved.

        The Senators returned in a body to their Chamber.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has adopted a resolution to change the time of adjournment from 2 o'clock to 4 o'clock P. M., and the same is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.



Page 97

        House Resolution to change the hour of adjournment from 2 to 4 o'clock P. M., was taken up and concurred in by the Senate.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 3 o'clock by the Speaker.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has non-concurred in Senate Resolution No. 32, to have Hardee's Military Tactics stereotyped, and the same is herewith returned to the Senate.

        The House of Representatives has concurred in Senate Resolution No. 34, to print the Constitution of the Confederate States; and the same is herewith returned for enrollment.

        The House has amended and concurred in Senate Resolution No. 29, to authorize the Governor to make military appointments to fill vacancies, and the same is herewith returned for further action of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives has adopted House Resolution No. 3, requesting Judges and Chancellors to suspend their Courts from time to time, and the same is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House of Representatives has laid on the table Senate Resolution No. 25, approving the course of Governor Harris in refusing to call an election for members of Congress, and the same is herewith returned to the Senate.


        House Message returning Senate Resolution No. 29, to authorize the Governor to make military appointments to fill vacancies, with amendments, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the amendments of the House were concurred in and the resolution ordered to be enrolled.


Page 98

        House Resolution No. 3, requesting Judges and Chancellors to suspend their Courts from time to time, was taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        The members of the Committee on Enrolled Bills all being absent, the Speaker appointed Messrs. Lane and Horn to act on said Committee.

        Mr. Lane from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported as correctly enrolled, Senate Resolutions Nos. 29 and 34.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed the following enrolled Joint Resolutions and Acts, and they are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.

        Joint resolution requesting the Judges and Chancellors to postpone their Courts from time to time.

        Joint resolution to authorize the Governor to make appointments to fill vacancies.

        Joint resolution to print the Constitution of the Confederate States.

        An act to amend sections 2682, 2683, 2684, and 4765 of the Code, and for other purposes.

        An act to amend the Militia Law of the State requiring Captains to give notice, and for other purposes.

        An act to defray the expenses of the General Assembly.

        Joint resolution fixing the time of adjournment of the Legislature at 4 o'clock in place of 2 o'clock.


        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the thanks of the Senate were tendered to the Speaker for the able and impartial manner in which he has discharged the duties of his position during the present session.

        The hour of four o'clock having arrived, the Speaker declared the Senate adjourned until 12 o'clock M., on Monday the 17th of June next, in accordance with the joint resolution adopted by both houses.


Page 99

MONDAY, JUNE 17, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Speaker being absent, Mr. Bumpass moved that Mr. Newman take the Chair; which motion prevailed.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 35,):

        Resolved by the Senate, That any newly elected member of this body shall be required to take the following oath before ak ng his seat:

        I,----, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that as a member of this General Assembly, I will in all appointments vote without favor, partiality or prejudice, and that I will not propose or assent to any bill, vote, or resolution which shall appear to me injurious to the people, or consent to any act or thing whatever, that shall have a tendency to lessen or abridge their rights and privileges as declared by the Constitution of this State; and I further more swear that I will support the Constitution of the State of Tennessee.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        The credentials of Washington Barrow, Senator elect from the county of Davidson, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of John Trimble, were presented, and the oath of office was administered to Mr. Barrow by R. L. Crenshaw, Esquire, a Justice of the Peace for Davidson county.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 36,) :

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, be required to prepare and report a bill for the organizing, disciplining and arming the entire military force of the State; said bill to call for the services of all persons between sixteen and fifty-five years of age capable of bearing arms; and also to bring into requisition, as far as possible, all the arms of the State now in possession of private persons.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the vote adopting the resolution was reconsidered.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        Mr. Stanton introduced Senate Bill No. 7, to increase the pay of privates in the Tennessee volunteer troops to fifteen dollars per month which passed its first reading.


Page 100

        Mr. Stanton introduced Senate Bill No. 8, to make the pay of Orderly Sergeants equal to that of Second Lieutenants, which passed its first reading.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.

TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 18, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        Mr. Speaker Stovall in the Chair.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and confirmed.

        Mr. Newman presented a memorial from the field officers and Captains of Col. A. S. Fulton's regiment, stationed at Camp Trousdale, praying that appointments of Regimental Quartermasters and Commissaries be made from the volunteers in the several regiments, which was read and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Peters offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 37,):

        Resolved by the Senate, That the Judiciary Committee be instructed to report a bill suspending the action of the courts in all but criminal cases, so as to arrest the great sacrifice of property by forced levy sales.

        On motion of Mr. Peters, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. McClellan, referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 38,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor be authorized and requested to place at the disposal of the Confederate States, such portions of the volunteer forces of the State of Tennessee as may be deemed prudent and advisable, the same to be mustered into the service of said States; and that in making arrangements therefor, he shall have in view the placing of the defense of the State under the immediate control and direction of the President of the Southren Confederate States.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.


Page 101

        Minnis offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 39,):

        Resolved, That in the opinion of the Senate, under Art. 2, Sec. 26, Constitution of Tennessee, the holding of a military office does not disqualify a member for holding a seat in this body.

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.

        Mr. Hildreth offered the following in lieu of the resolution:

        Resolved by the Senate, That the position now held by T. W. Newman in the militia of the State, does not disqualify him for holding his seat as a member of this body; which was adopted.

        The resolution as amended was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and Senate Resolution No. 38, to transfer volunteer forces to the Confederate States, was taken up and referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 9, to amend an act entitled an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Thompson introduced Senate Bill No. 10, to protect the State of Tennessee against Federal office holders, which passed its first reading.

        Senate Resolution No. 36, directory to the Joint Select Committee on Military officers, was taken up.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the word, "sixteen" was stricken out where it occurs in the resolution, and eighteen inserted, and the words "fifty-five" were stricken out and forty five inserted.

        The resolution as amended was adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and it was ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

SENATE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        Senate Bill No. 7, to increase the pay of privates in the Tennessee volunteer forces to fifteen dollars per month, passed second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Senate Bill No. 8, to make the pay of Orderly Sergeants equal to that of Second Lieutenants, passed second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.


Page 102

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order by the Speaker at 3 o'clock.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 11, to transfer the Hermitage to the Confederate Government, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations.

        Mr. Thompson introduced Senate Bill No. 12, to repeal the 7th section of an act passed May 6th, 1861, entitled an act to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of Independence, and for other purposes, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations.

        Mr. Thompson moved that a committee of three be appointed to wait upon his Excellency, the Governor, and ascertain if he has any communication to make to the General Assembly; which motion was disagreed to.

        Mr. Payne moved that the Senate take a recess for half an hour; which motion failed.

        Mr. Peters moved that the Senate take a recess until 4 o'clock; which was disagreed to.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. DeWolfe, their clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        I am directed to inform the Senate that Ira P. Jones, of Davidson, has been admitted to a seat as a member of the House of Representatives, to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of E. H. East; and that Charles M. Hayes, has been elected first Assistant Clerk; and Natt. G. Atkinson, second Assistant Clerk, to fill the vacancies occasioned by the resignations of John E. Helms and John A. Campbell.

        I herewith transmit House Resolution No. 48, adopted by the House for the action of the Senate.


        House Resolution No. 48, to raise a Joint Select Committee t wait upon his Excellency the Governor, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was laid on the table.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives transmitting a message from his Excellency, the Governor, which was taken up and read, as follows:


Page 103

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, June 18, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate
and House of Representatives:

        Since your adjournment on the 9th of the last month, the people of Tennessee, acting in their sovereign capacity, and in the exercise of an inalienable right, have, in the most solemn and deliberate manner dissolved their connection with the Government of the United States, and by the adoption of the Provisional Constitution of the Confederate States of America, have made Tennessee a member of that Government.

        I pause in the midst of the arduous duties which devolve upon me, to congratulate you and the country upon the near approach to unanimity, and the readiness with which the brave and patriotic people of our proud commonwealth have severed their connection with a Government endeared to them by so many recollections, and to which they had been so long attached, but which has been subverted by gross usurpations and converted into an engine of oppression, destructive of their rights, liberties and equality, and which in the mere wantonness of its boasted power, demands that these inalienable attributes of freemen shall be promptly--nay, basely surrendered or maintained at the point of the bayonet.

        Those who have read and comprehended the patriotic devotion of our people to the eternal principles of justice, equality, and right, their native love of independence, and their chivalrous deeds in defence of those principles, as shown by the whole history of the State, could not have doubted as to the position that Tennessee would occupy upon the presentation of such an issue.

        While it is to me a source of regret that entire unanimity was not attained at the ballot-box, in the decision of the vitally important and exciting questions referred to, I have entire confidence that now the deliberate and impartial judgment of the overwhelming majority of the people of the State having been recorded, the whole people, forgetting these differences of opinion, however earnestly and honestly entertained, will stand together as one man in maintaining the rights, honor and dignity of Tennessee, and in preserving the domestic tranquility of the community. The time for crimination and recrimination has passed; threatened by a common enemy, imperiled by a common danger, bound together by ties which cannot be severed, we are identical in interest, we must be so in action.

        The State of Tennessee, co-operating with her sister States of the South, has been compelled to take up arms in defence of


Page 104

rights she could not surrender. To this war thus forced upon us, there can be but two sides. I cannot believe that there is any portion of our people who will espouse the cause of the enemies of Tennessee, or be indifferent spectators of the contest.

        Impartial history will attest that no free people, jealous of their rights, have been more observant of their constitutional duties, or more loyal to their Government. Exacting no peculiar privileges, they have at all times been ready to acknowledge and maintain the rights of others. In times of common peril they have always stood firm and contributed their full proportion of talent, both to the Cabinet and the field, and now that we have exhausted the last remedy, have made the last appeal to the reason and justice of those who would oppress us, and have been driven to the nenessity of taking our rights into our own hands and defying the power that assails them, there certainly can not be a part of our people who will not spurn the usurper and resist him to the last extremity.

        In the midst of the gloom and privations necessarily incidental to a state of war, let us console ourselves with the reflection that we occupy the same relation to posterity that our fathers of the first revolution occupied to us.

        They enjoyed the glorious privilege of establishing the great principle, which secured to us civil and religious liberty, and political equality; while it is our privilege and solemn duty to maintain and transmit to posterity the same great principle unimpaired.

        The spirit and determination manifested by the people of the whole South, to maintain this principle against the tyranny of usurpation, gives the highest and most cheering assurance that America will still be the abiding place of self-government and free institutions; and proves the truth of the long disputed theory of our fathers, that a brave and enlightened people, educated in the doctrine of individual and State equality, are capable, and of right, ought to govern themselves. In the midst of federal revolution, perfect order has been preserved in our State Government; in the moment of dissolving our former federal fabric, another, new and of perfect and enduring proportions, is reared, leaving us at no time without the full benefit of Government, or the security of laws.

        The new relations which we have assumed, in becoming a part of the Provisional Government of the Confederate States, imposes the necessity of some additional legislation. I cheerfully submit to your consideration all questions pertaining to our federal relations for such legislation as may be necessary to us as a part of that Government.

        There has been, for many years, a statute in the State defining the crime of treason, and prescribing the punishment.


Page 105

        I respectfully recommend that you amend that law to the extent of striking out the words "United States," and insert, in lieu of them, Confederate States.

        Under the provisons of the act of 1852, the principal and interest of the internal improvement bonds of the State are made payable in the city of New York. It will be impossible to pay the interest accruing, at that point, during the continuance of the war.

        I recommend that you so amend the law referred to as to require the payment at the Bank of Tennessee, at Nashville, or at Charleston, or New Orleans, of all sums which may become due from the State to the people of all Governments, which are on terms of peace and friendship with us, who are and were, previous to the commencement of the war, bona fide owners of our bonds, and that you adopt such policy towards the owners and holders of our bonds, who are citizens of States at war with us, as is recognized and justified by the law of nations regulating their intercourse, as belligerents.

        The ordeal through which the country is now passing necessarily prostrates the trade and commerce of the country, and deranges the currency to a greater or less extent. Such legislation as will tend to secure a uniform currency throughout the Confederate States is of the highest importance. I therefore submit the question to your consideration for such action as in your opinion the general welfare demands.

        By the--section of the act of the 6th of May, 1861, it is made the duty of the Governor to issue bonds of the State, for the purpose of raising a fund with which to defray the expenses of the provisional army of the State. In view of the scarcity of a circulating medium, and the probable difficulty of converting any considerable amount of bonds into money in times like the present, I respectfully recommend that you so modify that act as to authorize the issuance of Treasury Notes to the extent of three-fifths of the amount authorized to be issued, in lieu of that amount of said bonds; and that the same, when issued, be made receivable by the State in payment of all taxes or government dues.

        In obedience to your act of 6th May, 1861, I have caused to be organized, armed and equipped, twenty-one regiments of infantry now in the field, ten artillery companies in progress of organization, and a sufficient number of cavalry companies to compose one regiment. The organization of an engineer corps is nearly completed.

        In addition to which, we have three regiments mustered into the service of the Confederate States now in Virginia, and a number of our citizens in the service of that government stationed at Pensacola. For full and accurate information as to the army organization, I refer you to the reports of the proper officers, hereafter to be laid before you, if desired. It is proper to remark, in


Page 106

this connection, that without even a call being made upon them, a much larger number of our patriotic citizens have tendered their services to the State than I have thought proper to accept. Should the necessities of the State at any time require a larger force, I feel assured that our brave and gallant people will rush with alacrity to the field, so as to swell the force to the point of equaling any such necessity.

        I commend those brave and patriotic citizen soldiers to your most favorable consideration, and recommend the adoption of such measures as will most tend to promote their health and comfort while in the field.

        It is proper that I call your attention to the fact that a few days since, Return J. Meigs, Esq., resigned the office of Librarian to the State. The office is now vacant, and the duty of filling it by election devolves upon you.

        I cannot, in justice to my own feelings and sense of duty close this communication without urging upon you, and through you upon those you represent, the importance and propriety of moderation, forbearance, and conciliation in your intercourse with each other, however widely and earnestly you may have differed in your opinions and actions upon the important and exciting questions so recently settled.

        Invoking a continuation of the blessings of the Supreme Ruler of the universe upon our cause, our country, and our people, I submit the matter to your hands.

ISHAM G. HARRIS.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, five hundred copies of the message were ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 10 o'clock.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19th, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        Prayer by the Rev. Jno. B. McFerrin.

        The journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Mr. Wood presented a petition from citizens of Warren county, praying that certain amendments be made to the militia laws of the State, the reading of which, on Mr. Wood's motion, was dispensed


Page 107

with, and the same was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 13, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 14, to confiscate the property and effects of persons residing in the United States of America, and of money and effects claimed by the Government of said United States, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations.

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, fifty copies of the bill were ordered to be printed for the use of the Senate.

        Mr. Peters introduced Senate Bill No. 15, to amend sections 4746, 4747 and 4748 of the Code of Tennessee, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Peters, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Senate Bill No. 10, to protect the State of Tennessee against Federal office-holders, was taken up and passed its second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, was referred to the Committee on Federal Relations.

        Mr. Peters introduced Senate Bill No. 16, to extend the time for perfecting land titles; which passed its first reading.

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, Mr. Barrow was added to the Committee on the Judiciary, to fill the vacancy in the Committee occasioned by the resignation of Mr. Trimble.

        Mr. Lane offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 40,):

        WHEREAS, a revolution now exists in Tennessee, and in certain portions of the State the people are much divided as to the policy and manner adopted by the majority of her citizens dissolving her connection with the United States, and asserting her independent sovereignty, as well also as to the propriety and manner by which she becomes one of the Confederate States, and in view of the fact that many animated, angry and heated discussions are in many places being held by persons acting under a high degree of excitement; therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That a change in our statutes on the subject of treason is deemed unnecessary and unwise by this General Assembly.

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up.

        Mr. Payne asked and obtained leave to withdraw the resolution


Page 108

for amendment, and subsequently returned it with the following which he offered in lieu:

        WHEREAS, the people of Tennessee, by a large majority, have dissolved all further political relations with the Government of the United States, and trusting, as we do, to the patriotism and loyalty of those who cast their votes against such separation that they will submit to the decision and abide the fortunes of their State; therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That we, the members of the General Assembly do earnestly appeal to the good citizens of the State to unite as one man against the common enemy; that we shall continue to trust to their love of country and of their homes rather than to stringent measures of legislation; and therefore, that, in our judgment, neither new enactments for the punishment of treason nor the passage of test oaths to insure a pledge of loyalty from the citizens, are the remedies to be at present applied, but rather a continued reliance upon the patriotism and intelligence of the masses of the people of Tennessee.

        The resolution in lieu was adopted.

        On the adoption of the resolution as amended, Mr. Stokes demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered, and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .21
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--21.

        In the negative:

        None.

        So the resolution was adopted unanimously.

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.


Page 109

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 3 o'clock by the Speaker.

        Mr. Stanton introduced Senate Bill No. 17, to provide for physicians to look after the general health of soldiers, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Peters introduced Senate Resolution No. 41, as follows:

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Military Board be requested, if not incompatible with the public interest, to communicate to the Legislature the nature and extent of the artillery service of the State; the number of cannon on hand, and the number ordered to be brought into service; the quantity ordered by the Board from home manufacturing establishments; the number of artillery companies equipped and mustered into service, and those in prospective formation; the extent of the means to supply that branch of the service with rifled cannon, and the number of manufacturing establishments engaged in making cannon; also, the number of organized flying artillery companies in the field, and in course of preparation, and the progress made in having arms made in the country by private artisans.

        On motion of Mr. Peters, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 18, to obtain supplies for the Provisional Army of Tennessee; which passed its first reading.

        Mr. Stanton presented a memorial from several citizens of Putnam and Cumberland counties, praying that Jno. H. Officer, who lives on the line of said counties, be attached to Putnam county; which was read, and on motion of Mr. Stanton referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. Horn offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 42,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the two Houses meet in Convention in the Representatives' Hall on Thursday, the 20th day of June, 1861, at 11 o'clock A. M., to elect a State Librarian to fill the vacancy occasioned by the resignation of R. J. Meigs.

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the rule was suspended, and the resolution


Page 110

taken up and adopted and ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. McClellan, the Senate adjourned till 10 o'clock to-morrow morning.

THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 20, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Mr. Bradford from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolutions Nos. 40, 41 and 42, as correctly engrossed.

        Mr. Allen asked and obtained leave to record his vote in the affirmative on the adoption of Senate Resolution No. 40.

        Mr. Bumpass introduced Senate Bill No. 19, to regulate the manner of paying the officers and privates of the provisional army of Tennessee, which passed its first reading.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and adopted House Resolution No. 46, requesting Judges not to hold their Courts for the period of twelve months.

        House Resolution No. 47, a resolution of instruction to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        House Resolution No. 51, providing for a Convention of the two Houses to elect a Librarian, and the same is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.


        Mr. Payne from the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations, reported back Senate Bill No. 10, to protect the State of Tennessee against Federal office holders, and recommended its rejection; also Senate Bill No. 11, to transfer the Hermitage to the Confederate States, and asked to be discharged from its further consideration.

        House Resolution No. 46, requesting Judges not to hold their Courts, was taken up and concurred in by the Senate.

        House Resolution No. 47, of instruction to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, was taken up; and,


Page 111

        On motion of Mr. Payne, referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        House Resolution No. 5 1, to hold a Convention of the two Houses to elect a State Librarian, was taken up and adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        Senate Bill No. 11, to transfer the Hermitage to the Confederate States, was taken up on second reading; when,

        Mr. Payne asked and obtained leave to withdraw the same from the calendar.

        Senate Bill No. 16, to extend the time for perfecting land titles, was taken up and passed its second reading.

        Senate Bill No. 18, to obtain supplies for the Provisional Army of Tennessee, passed its second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Bumpass asked and obtained leave of absence for Mr. Peters on account of sickness.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the Senate took a recess of three minutes preparatory to meeting the House of Representatives in Convention to elect a State Librarian.

        The time for which the recess was taken having expired, the Speaker called the Senate to order, and the Senators proceeded in a body to the Hall of the House of Representatives.

IN CONVENTION.

        The President took the Chair and called the Convention to order, and directed the Clerk to read the resolution providing for the assembling of the Convention.

        The President announced that nominations for the office of State Librarian were in order.

        Representative Gantt nominated John E. Hatcher, of the county Davidson.

        Representative Bledsoe nominated B. F. Bentley, of the county of Davidson.

        Representative Lockhart nominated Thomas Askew, of the county of Stewart.

        Representative Woods nominated George A. Lieper, of the county of Davidson.

        Mr. Barrow nominated Benjamin Litton, of the county of Davidson.

        There being no other nominations the Convention proceeded to ballot.

FIRST BALLOT.

        Senators voting for Mr. Hatcher are:


Page 112

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Thompson--8.

        For Mr. Leiper:

        Messrs. Johnson, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Richardson, and Mr. Wood--6.

        For Mr. Bentley:

        Messrs, Hildreth Lane, and Mr. Minnis--3.

        For Mr. Askew:

        Messrs. Hunter, Newman, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--3.

        For Mr. Litton:

        Messrs. Allen and Barrow--2.

        The vote of the House of Representatives was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .14
  • For Mr. Leiper. . . . .9
  • For Mr. Bentley. . . . .10
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .22
  • For Mr. Litton. . . . .2

        The vote of the Convention was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .22
  • For Mr. Leiper. . . . .15
  • For Mr. Bentley. . . . .13
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .25
  • For Mr. Litton. . . . .4

        Mr. Barrow withdrew the name of Mr. Litton.

        There being no election, the Convention proceeded to vote a second time.

SECOND BALLOT.

        Senators voting for Mr. Hatcher are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--9.

        For Mr. Leiper:

        Messrs. Johnson, McNeilly, Payne, and Mr. Wood--4.

        For Mr. Bentley:

        Messrs. Barrow, Hildreth, Lane, and Mr. Minnis--4.

        For Mr. Askew:

        Messrs. Hunter, McClellan, Newman, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--5.

        The vote of the House of Representatives was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .19
  • For Mr. Leiper. . . . .8
  • For Mr. Bentley. . . . .9
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .21

        The vote of the Convention was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .28
  • For Mr. Leiper. . . . .12
  • For Mr. Bentley. . . . .13
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .26

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        There being no election the Convention proceeded to vote a third time.

THIRD BALLOT.

        Senators voting for Mr. Hatcher are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Boyd, Horn, Richardson, Stanton Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--9.

        For Mr. Askew.

        Messrs. Hildreth, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, McClellan, McNeilly Newman, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--10.

        For Mr. Bentley.

        Messrs. Barrow and Minnis.--2.

        For Mr. Leiper.

        Mr. Payne--1.

        The vote of the House of Representatives was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .19
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .55
  • For Mr. Bentley. . . . .6
  • For Mr. Leiper. . . . .7

        The vote of the Convention was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .28
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .35
  • For Mr. Bentley. . . . .8
  • For Mr. Leiper. . . . .8

        Representative Bledsoe withdrew the name of Mr. Bentley.

        Representative Woods withdrew the name of Mr. Leiper.

        There being no election the Convention proceeded to vote a fourth time.

FOURTH BALLOT.

        Senators voting for Mr. Hatcher are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--11.

        For Mr. Askew.

        Messrs. Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--11.

        The vote of the House of Representatives was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .29
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .28

        The vote of the Convention was:

  • For Mr. Hatcher. . . . .40
  • For Mr. Askew. . . . .39

        Mr. Hatcher having received a majority of all the votes cast was declared, duly and constitutionally elected State Librarian.


Page 114

        The business for which the Convention wag called having been accomplished, the President declared it dissolved.

        The Senators returned in a body to their Chamber, and were called to order by the Speaker.

        Senate Bill No. 10, to protect the State of Tennessee against Federal officeholders, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Stokely moved that the report of the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations recommending the rejection of the bill be concurred in, which motion prevailed, and the bill was rejected on its second reading.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 8 o'clock.

FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 21, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Mr. Lane from the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, reported as follows:

        The Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs have had the following Senate Bills under consideration: No. 7, to increase the pay of privates in the Tennessee service to fifteen dollars per month.

        Senate Bill No. 8, to make the pay of Orderly Sergeants equal to that of 2d Lieutenants.

        Senate Bill No. 9, to amend an act passed May 6, 1861.

        Senate Bill No. 13, to amend an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, and also Senate Bill No. 17, to provide for Physicians to look after the general health of soldiers. Your Committee recommend a bill in lieu by the Committee of all said bills except No. 17, which was unanimously rejected by the Committee; they have also considered Senate Resolution No. 38, and recommends its adoption. All of which is respectfully submitted.

J. T. LANE, Chairman.

        Senate Bill No. 19, to regulate the manner of paying the officers and soldiers of the Provisional Army of Tennessee, passed its second reading.


Page 115

        Senate Bill No. 16, to extend the time for perfecting land titles was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Stanton moved fo refer the bill to the Committee on the Judiciary, which motion failed.

        The bill then passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Stokes, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd, Hildreth, Richardson, and Mr. Stokely--4.

        Mr. Stanton asked to be excused from voting on the proposition; which request was granted.

        On motion of Mr. Peters, the rule was suspended and the bill was ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Payne from the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations reported back Senate Bill No. 12, to repeal the 7th section of an act passed May 6th, 1861, entitled an act to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of Independence and for other purposes, with a bill in lieu, entitled a bill to provide for electing delegates to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States of America, and recommended its adoption.

        Senate Bill No. 12, to repeal the 7th section of an act passed May 6th 1861, entitled an act to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of Independence and for other purposes, was taken up on its second reading.

        The bill in lieu offered by the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations was withdrawn by Mr. Payne, by the unanimous consent of the Senate.

        The bill then passed its second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, was referred together with the bill offered in lieu, to the Senators from the Eastern Division of the State.

        Mr. Lane moved that the Senate take a recess until 10 o'clock; which motion prevailed.

        The hour of 10 o'clock having arrived, the Speaker called the Senate to order.

        Mr. Stokely presented the following protest which was ordered to be spread upon the Journal.


Page 116

PROTEST.

        We, the undersigned members of the Senate, being called out of the Senate on particular business at the time of the adoption of House Resolution No. 46, and the ayes and noes not being called on said resolution, and we having no other opportunity to show our dissent from said resolution, except by this our protest. We believe the policy advised by said resolution to be detrimental to the interests, welfare, peace and prosperity of our constituents; for these, and various other reasons, we ask that this our protest may be spread upon the Journal of the Senate.

         June 21, 1861.

D. V. STOKELY,

W. M. BRADFORD.


        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and adopted House Resolution No. 55, "to raise a Joint Committee on the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States of America," and the Speaker has appointed Messrs. Dudley, Williams of Hickman, Jones of Davidson, Gantt, and Mr. Woods the Committee on the part of the House, and the same is transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has also considered and adopted House Resolution No. 50, "a resolution to authorize the Military and Financial Board to appoint persons to settle accounts at Memphis and Knoxville," and the same is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has also had the following Senate Resolutions under consideration:

        Senate Resolution No. 40, in regard to patriotism and loyalty of citizens of Tennessee; which was adopted, and is hereby returned to the Senate for enrollment.

        Senate Resolution No. 41, directory to the Military Board, and laid the same upon the table.

        Senate Resolution No. 42, to provide for a Convention of the two Houses to elect a Librarian; which was laid upon the table.

        The House has passed upon its 3d reading; House bill No. 13, a bill to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts, and the same is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has also passed upon its third reading House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers; and the same is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.



Page 117

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the rule was suspended and House Message transmitting House Resolution No. 55, to raise a joint committee upon the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, was taken up, and the resolution adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the number of said committee on the part of the Senate was fixed at three.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Horn, Barrow, and McNeilly on said committee.

        Mr. Thompson offered Senate Resolution No. 43, as follows:

        Resolved by the Senate, That the members of the House of Representatives be and are hereby invited to attend the flag presentation in the Senate Chamber at 11 o'clock to-day.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        The Clerk was directed to convey the invitation to the House of Representatives.

        House Resolution No. 50, to authorize the Military and Financial Board to appoint persons to settle accounts at Memphis and Knoxville, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        House Bill No. 13, to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers, passed first reading.

        Mr. Payne offered Senate Resolution No. 44, as follows:

        WHEREAS, The defence of the Mississippi Valley against the enemies of the South is of vital importance, and believing that every available means should be adopted to prevent a possible descent upon the Mississippi river; be it therefore

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That we respectfully ask of the Congress of the Confederate States that an appropriation of not less than two hundred and fifty thousand dollars be made to be used in preparing floating defences for said river at as early a day as practicable.

        Resolved further, That the Governor be requested to forward a copy of this resolution to the President of the Confederate States, and ask that the same be laid before the Provisional Congress at its next meeting.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        Senate Resolution No. 38, to transfer volunteer forces to the Confederate States, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was recommitted to the Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Payne presented the following communication from his Excellency, the Governor, with the accompanying correspondence:


Page 118

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
June 21,1861.

Hon. ROBERT G. PAYNE, Senate Chamber:

        DEAR SIR: I send herewith a beautiful silk flag, the ensign of the Confederate States. It is the offering of one of Tennessee's fairest and most patriotic daughters, Mrs. Charles E. Dahlgreen, of Mississippi, to her native State.

        Will you do me the favor to present it to the Senate as an appropriate ornament to that Chamber?

        

Very respectfully,

ISHAM G. HARRIS.


NASHVILLE, June 21, 1861.

        DEAR SIR: Having received the accompanying note and flag from my daughter, Mrs. Mary E. Dahlgreen, of Natchez, Mississippi, who, though far away, still retains vivid remembrances of the land of her nativity, I know of no more appropriate mode of fulfilling her wishes than by requesting you to receive the same in the name of the State of Tennessee, and to make such disposition of it as you may deem most suitable and proper.

        

Very respectfully,

MASON VANNOY.

His Excellency, ISHAM G. HARRIS, Governor.

NATCHEZ, MISS., June, 1861.

        A daughter of Tennessee sends this symbol flag of liberty, the work of her own hands, to her native State, with the request that it may be unfurled and kissed by the same free mountain winds that sweep over the grave of JACKSON; and she confidently believes that while Tennessee retains his ashes within her embrace, her sons will ever be ready to strike for their liberties, their firesides and their altars.

MARY E. DAHLGREEN.

MASON VANNOY, Esq., Nashville Tennessee.

        The flag was presented to the Senate by Mr. Payne, and received by Mr. Newman and placed over the Speaker's chair.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Atkinson, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed enrolled resolution providing for a Convention of the two Houses for the Purpose of electing a State Librarian, and the same is


Page 119

herewith transmitted to the Senate for the signature of the Speaker thereof.


        On motion of Mr. Payne, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 3 o'clock by the Speaker.

        Mr. Minnis from the Committee on the Judiciary, reported as follows:

        The Judiciary Committee have had under consideration the petition of John H. Officer and others, for the change of county line, and ask to be discharged from its further consideration.

        They have also had under consideration Senate Resolution No. 37, and ask to be discharged form its further consideration, a House Resolution having already passed both Houses on the same subject.

        They have also had under consideration Senate Bill No. 15, "a bill to amend sections 4746, 4747 and 4748 of the Code of Tennessee," and recommend a bill in lieu; all of which is respectfully submitted.

MINNIS, Chairman.

        Senate Bill No. 15, to amend section 4747 of the Code of Tennessee, was taken up on second reading.

        The bill offered in lieu by the Committee on the Judiciary entitled a bill to repeal section 4747 of the Code of Tennessee, was adopted, and the bill passed its second reading.

        Senate Resolution No. 37, directory to the Committee on the Judiciary, was taken up.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the request of the Committee on the Judiciary to be discharged from its further consideration, was complied with.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the resolution was laid on the table.

        Mr. Payne offered Senate Resolution No. 45, as follows:

        Resolved by the Senate, That a special committee of three be appointed to inquire whether any of the railroad companies of Tennessee, or those running into the State, have in any manner


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obstructed or attempted to obstruct the transportation of goods, wares, merchandize, or provisions into the State of Tennessee; and that said committee report at the earliest practicable period.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 19, to incorporate the Memphis Legion, a volunteer military association in the city of Memphis, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.

SATURDAY MORNING, JUNE 22, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Mr. Barrow presented a petition from the field officers and captains of Col. Palmer's regiment, asking that regimental Quartermasters and Commissaries be appointed from the enlisted men of regiments respectively, which was read; and,

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, was referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Hildreth introduced Senate Bill No. 20, to protect tax collectors, which passed its first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Hildreth, was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        Mr. Bumpass introduced Senate Bill No. 21, to provide for the payment of the Deputy Marshals for taking the last census in Tennessee; which passed its first reading.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and passed on third reading, House Bill No. 23, to incorporate Powell's River Lead Mining Company and for other purposes, and the same is herewith transmitted to the Senate for its action.


        Senate Resolution No. 44, on river defences, was taken up and adopted.


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        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Stanton introduced Senate Bill No. 22, to extend the time for redemption of lands or real estate sold by condemnation until the termination of the war; which passed its first reading.

        Mr. Hildreth from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolution No. 40 as correctly enrolled, and Senate Bill No. 16 as correctly engrossed.

        Mr. Lane, from the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, reported back House Resolution No. 50, to authorize the Military Financial Board to appoint persons to settle accounts at Memphis and Knoxville, with a recommendation that it be adopted.

        House Resolution No. 50 was taken up.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to strike out in the resolution all that portion applying to Knoxville; which motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Stokes offered the following amendment.

        Provided, That the the settlement made by the Commissioner under this resolution shall not be binding until it is approved by the Military and Financial Board; which was adopted.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Newman demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .9

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Minnis, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Boyd, Johnson, Lane, Nash, Newman, Stanton, and Mr. Stokely--9.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        Mr. Payne moved to suspend the rule and return the resolution to the House of Representives for further action; which motion was disagreed to.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Atkinson, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and passed on third reading House Bill No. 18, a bill to suspend and declare vacant the office of Supervisor of Banks, which is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has also had under consideration House Resolutions Nos. 49, 53 and 54; which have been adopted, and are herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.



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        Mr. Barrow offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 46,):

        Be it resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the portion of the Hermitage tract lying to the east of the Nashville and Lebanon Turnpike road, consisting of twenty-five or thirty acres, be sold by the Governor, either at public or private sale, as he may deem best, the proceeds to be deposited in the treasury; Provided, it shall not be sold for a less price per acre than it originally cost the State.

        2d. That due regard be had in said sale to the rights and appurtenances of the church situated on said portion of said tract.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Horn, Minnis, McClellan, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood-- 13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, McNeilly, Nash, Newman, Stanton, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--10.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Bradford moved that the vote refusing to suspend the rule for the purpose of transmitting House Resolution No. 50, to the House of Representatives, be reconsidered; which motion prevailed.

        Mr. Bradford moved to suspend the rule that said resolution be returned to the House of Representatives for further action; which motion was agreed to.

        Senate Resolution No. 45, in relation to the management of Railroad Companies was taken up and adopted.

        Mr. Hildreth asked and obtained leave to record his vote in the affirmative upon the adoption of House Resolution No. 50, and Senate Resolution No. 46.

        Mr. Bradford presented a memorial from the President and Directors of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company, asking an amendment to their charter, so as to authorize and empower each stockholder to cast one vote for each share he may hold of the stock of said Company.


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        Mr. Bradford offered the following Resolution (Senate Resolution No. 47,):

        Resolved, That the memorial of the President and Directors of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company to the present General Assembly be referred to the Committee on Internal Improvements, with instructions to report a bill as early as practicable, embodying the wishes of the memorialists.

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Thompson, the order of business was suspended, and Senate Bill No. 12, to repeal the 7th section of an act passed May 6th 1861, entitled an act to submit to a vote of the people a Declaration of Independence and for other puroses, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Stokes, moved to lay the bill on the table, on which motion,

        Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .23
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McNeilly, Nash, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--23.

        In the negative:

        None.

        So the bill was laid on the table.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the order of business was suspended and Senate Bill No. 7, to increase the pay of privates in the Tennessee volunteer troops to fifteen dollars per month, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Peters moved to strike out "fifteen" wherever it appears in the bill; pending which,

        On motion of Mr. Lane the further consideration of the bill was postponed and made the special order for Friday, the 28th inst., at 11 o'clock A. M.

        Senate Bill No. 15, to repeal section 4747 of the Code of Tennessee, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Bradford asked and obtained leave to withdraw the bill for amendment.

        House Bill No. 49, to tender the Hermitage to the Confederate States for a National Military Academy, was taken up.

        Mr. Lane moved to lay the resolution on the table; which motion was agreed to.

        House Resolution No. 54, to change the coat of arms over the


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chair of the Speaker of the House of Representatives, was taken up and adopted.

        House Resolution No. 53, in regard to the appointment of Quartermasters and Commissaries, was taken up.

        Mr. Bumpass offered the following amendment:

        If any regiment shall fail to furnish itself with a competent Quartermaster and Commissary, then the Governor may appoint them outside of such regiment.

        Pending the question on the amendment,

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the resolution and amendment were referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Atkinson, their clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has passed on third reading House Bill No. 20, to amend the military act, passed May 6th, 1861; also, House Bill No. 22, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and the same are herewith transmitted to the Senate for its action.


HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 18, to suspend and declare vacant the office of Supervisor of Banks, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 20, to amend sections 14 and 16 of an act passed May 6th, 1861, entitled an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 22, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 23, to incorporate Powell's River Lead Mining Company, and for other purposes, passed first reading.

HOUSE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        House Bill No. 13, to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts was taken up on second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokely was referred to the Committee on the Judiciary.

        House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers, passed second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. McClellan, was referred to the Committee on Lunatic Asylum.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, Senate Bill No. 8, to make the pay of Orderly Sergeants the same as Second Lieutenants, was


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made the special order for Friday, the 28th of Jane, at 11 o'clock A. M.

        On motion of Mr. Allen, the Senate adjourned till Monday morning at 10 o'clock.

MONDAY MORNING, JUNE 24,1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of Saturday was read and approved.

        Mr. Payne presented a memorial from citizens of Shelby county, asking the passage of laws for the relief of the debtor class of the community; which was read, and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Payne, Thompson and Richardson on the committee provided for by Senate Resolution No. 45, in relation to the management of railroads.

        Mr. Thompson from the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum, reported back House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of the insane members of the families of volunteers, and recommended its passage with the following amendment: Where it provides for certificates from colonels of regiments, to read: Certificates from the Chairman of the County Court from the county of residence of said volunteers, setting forth that he or they are unable, from indigent circumstances, to support such patients in the Asylum.

        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolutions Nos. 44 and 46 as correctly engrossed.

HOUSE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        House Bill No. 18, to suspend and declare vacant the office of Supervisor of Banks, passed its second reading.

        House Bill 20, to amend sections 14 and 16 of an act passed May 6th, 1861, entitled an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Lane offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That there Shall be no drilling done on the Sabbath.


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On the adoption of which Mr. Thompson demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .12
  • Noes. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Hildreth, Horn, Johnson, Lane, McNeilly, Nash, Newman, Richardson, and Mr. Wood--12.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bumpass, Hunter, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, Payne, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--10.

        So the amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its second reading.

        House Bill No. 22, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, passed its second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, was referred to Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        House Bill No. 23, to incorporate Powell's River Lead Mining Company and for other purposes, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Lane offered an amendment to incorporate the Miners' Bank of Ducktown.

        Mr. Allen moved to strike out in the first section of the amendment the words "and its equivalent;" which motion was agreed to.

        On the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Hildreth demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .14
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, Payne, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--14.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Hildreth, Nash, Newman, Peters, Richardson, Stokely, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--7.

        So the amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Bumpass offered an amendment to amend the Charter of the Bank of Brownsville; which was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Wood, was referred to the Committee on Banks.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk Mr. Atkinson, as follows:


Page 127

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House of Representatives has considered and passed on third reading House Bill No. 24, to provide for the, issuance of Treasury notes; House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes; and House Bill No. 27, to charter an Arms Company, &c., and the same are herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed enrolled joint resolution in relation to test oaths, and for the punishment of treason, and the same is herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.

        The House has considered and rejected Senate Bill No. 16, to extend the time for perfecting land titles, and the same is herewith returned to the Senate.


        Mr. Bradford introduced Senate Bill No. 23, to amend the charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company; which passed its second reading.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 24, in relation to inspectors of boilers and hulls of steamboats; which passed its first reading.

        Mr. Payne introduced Senate Bill No. 25, to authorize volunteers to vote in the election of members to the Provisional Congress; which passed its first reading.

SENATE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        Senate Bill No. 21, to provide for the payment of the Deputy Marshals for taking the last census in Tennessee, passed second reading.

        Senate Bill No. 22, to extend the time for redemption of lands or real estate, sold by condemnation, until the termination of the war; passed second reading.

SENATE BILLS ON THIRD READING.

        Senate Bill No. 15, to repeal section 4747 of the Code of Tennessee, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Minnis offered the following amendment:

        SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That section 4746 of the Code be so amended that the penalty for the offence in said section be the same as prescribed in section 4758 of the Code.

        SEC. 3. Be it further enacted, That section 4748 of the Code be so amended that nothing in said section shall be so construed as to make persons guilty under said section who act in self-defence.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.


Page 128

  • Ayes. . . . .20
  • Noes. . . . .2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Stokely, Thompson, Wood, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--20.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd and Nash--2.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Bill No. 19, to regulate the manner of paying the officers and soldiers of the Provisional Army of Tennessee, was taken up on third reading; when

        Mr. Barrow asked and obtained leave to withdraw the same for examination.

        House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of insane members of the of the families of volunteers, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Bumpass asked and obtained leave to withdraw the bill for amendment.

HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, passed its first reading.

        House Bill No. 24, to provide for the issuance of Treasury notes, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 27, to charter an Arms Company, passed first reading.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 3 o'clock by the Speaker, Mr. Bumpass returned House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers, which was taken up on third reading.


Page 129

        The amendment recommended by the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum was adopted.

        Mr. Bumpass offered the following amendment:

        SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That when the wives or other members of the families of volunteers as aforesaid, have been placed in the Asylum for the Insane, and he shall be indebted to the State for the same, and it appear from the written certificate of the Clerk of the County Court of the county where the parties resided that such volunteer is in indigent circumstances, and unable to pay such indebtedness then the said account shall be cancelled and shall no longer be claimed on the part of the State, either against such volunteer or his securities.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. McNeilly offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That any one of the Tennessee volunteers who may become deranged while in the service, and who has not the pecuniary means to enter the Asylum as a pay patient, shall be received and treated as a pauper patient.

        Which was adopted.

        Mr. Thompson then asked and obtained leave to withdraw the bill for examination.

        Mr. Stokely offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 48,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor is requested to accept volunteers into the service of the State from any portion of the State from which they may tender their services until he receives the number he may desire, and that he shall not draft them out of any portion of the State to make an equal ratio from the different divisions of the State.

        Resolved further, That in the opinion of this General Assembly it is unnecessary to draft any soldiers whatever, and that a full supply of Tennesseans are always ready to defend their homes as volunteers.

        The resolution lies over under the rule.

        Mr. Bumpass offered Senate Resolution No. 49, as follows:

        Resolved, That the Senate hold but one session a day, commencing at 9 o'clock A. M., and adjourn at 2 P M., if the business of the Senate is not disposed of sooner.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.


Page 130

TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 25, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Speaker having been called home by severe sickness in his family,

        Mr. Newman moved that Mr. Lane take the Chair during the absence of the Speaker; which motion prevailed.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Senate Resolution No. 48, requesting the Governor concerning volunteers was taken up.

        Mr. Bradford offered the following resolution in lieu:

        WHEREAS, Various unfounded rumors have been circulated in different sections of the State, to the effect that drafts would be resorted to, for the purpose of calling into requisition the citizen soldiery of the State; therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That no such intention was contemplated in the Army Bill, nor is such a step suggested or contemplated by this General Assembly, as will specifically appear by reference to the first section of the aforesaid Army Bill, which provides for a "volunteer force" only, and it appearing also, that volunteers sufficient for the present service have perhaps already been tendered.

        Resolved, That if an actual invasion of the State is attempted then it will be the duty of the Executive to call out the whole force of the State to resist invasion.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the resolution and the resolution in lieu were referred to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Newman offered the following resolution (Senate resolution No. 50,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the army of Tennessee be immediately placed under the control and management of the President of the Confederate States of America, and shall be subject to his orders and placed at his disposal.

        Resolved, That the Governor immediately transfer all the disposable force of the State to the control of the President of the Confederate States, and shall immediately take such steps to transfer the service as necessary.

        Resolved, That a copy of these resolutions be immediately furnished the Governor of the State.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.


Page 131

        Mr. Hildreth moved to refer the resolutions to the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs; which motion was disagreed to on a division.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the resolution was passed over informally.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and passed on third reading House Bill No. 21, a bill to increase the pay of First Sergeants.

        House Bill No. 25, a bill to suspend the office of Commissioner of Roads.

        House Bill No. 28, a bill to suspend sections 272, 284, 285 and 296 of the Code of Tennessee.

        House Resolution No. 57, directory to the Committee on Finance, which are transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has concurred in Senate Resolution No. 44, on river defences, and the same is transmitted for enrollment.


        Mr. Hildreth, from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Bill No. 15 as correctly engrossed.

        House Resolution No. 57, directory to the Committee on Finane, was taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution Mr. Richardson demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Peters, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Wood--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Newman, Payne, Richardson, and Mr. Thompson--4.

        So the resolution was concurred in.

        On motion of Mr. Hildreth, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 21, to increase the pay of First Sergeants, passed its first reading.

        House Bill No. 25, to suspend the office of Commissioner of Roads, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 28, to suspend sections 272, 284, 285 and 296 of the Code of Tennessee, passed first reading.


Page 132

HOUSE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 24, to provide for the issuance of Treasury Notes, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 27, to charter an Arms Company, passed second reading.

HOUSE BILLS ON THIRD READING.

        House Bill No. 18, to suspend and declare vacant the office of Supervisor of Banks, was taken up on third reading; when,

        Mr. Allen asked and obtained leave to withdraw the same for examiantion.

        House Bill No. 20, to amend sections 14 and 16 of an act passed May 6th, 1861. entitled an act to raise, organise and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Minnis offered the following amendment to the last section:

        Provided, The officer in command shall not deem it absolutely necessary to the service and order the drill on Sunday; which was adopted.

        Mr. Newman offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That all regimental appointments for Quartermaster and Commissary shall be taken from those in the service of the regiment; which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Bumpass offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That when an Adjutant is appointed from the Lieutenants in the line of the regiments, the vacancy so created shall be filled by the election of another Lieutenant of the company from which the Adjutant is taken; which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Barrow offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That a Private Secretary shall be allowed to the Governor, and that his salary shall be--dollars per annum.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the blank in the amendment was filled with the words seven hundred and fifty.

        The amendment as amended was adopted.

        Mr. Richardson moved to reconsider the vote adopting the amendment, which was disagreed to.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .15
  • Noes. . . . .6

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:


Page 133

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Thompson and Mr. Wood--15.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, McClellan, and Stokely.--6.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 22, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, was taken up on third reading,

        Mr. Thompson moved to amend the first section of the bill by inserting after the word "Quartermaster," the word Paymaster, which motion was disagreed to.

        Mr. Hildreth offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That there shall be no action, either by motion or otherwise, against any officer or his securities allowed in any Court in this State for failing to levy an execution which has heretofore, or may hereafter come, to their hands against volunteers for not levying the same upon the property of such volunteer that is exempt by the 17th section of an act passed the 6th day of May, 1861, to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, &c.; which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Hildreth also offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the offer of clerkships shall in all cases be first tendered to the regiment or brigade, as the case may be; and that no appointment shall be made until the same shall have been declined by the respective regiments or brigades; which was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Hildreth, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Nash, and Mr. Stokely--4.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

SENATE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        Senate Bill No. 23, to amend the charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company, passed second reading.


Page 134

        Senate Bill No. 24, in relation to Inspectors of boilers and hulls of steamboats, passed second reading.

        Senate Bill No. 25, to authorize volunteers to vote in the election of members to the Provisional Congress, passed second reading.

SENATE BILLS ON THIRD READING.

        Senate Bill No. 21, to provide for the payment of the Deputy Marshals for taking the last census in Tennessee, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .5

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, McClellan, and Mr. Nash--5.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Bill No. 22, to extend the time for the redemption of lands or real estate, sold by condemnation, until the termination of the war, was taken up on third reading; when

        Mr. Hildreth asked and obtained leave to withdraw the same for examination.

        Mr. Barrow introduced Senate Bill No. 26, for the relief of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company; which was read.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock.

WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 26, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Mr. Hildreth returned Senate Bill No. 22, to extend the time for redemption of lands or real estate, sold by condemnation, until the termination of the war.


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        Mr. Barrow asked and obtained leave to withdraw Senate Bill No. 26, for the relief of the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company, from the calendar.

        Mr. Wood from the Committee on Banks, reported back House Bill No. 23, to incorporate the Powell's River Lead Mining Company and for other purposes, with amendments, and recommended its passage.

AMENDMENTS OFFERED BY THE COMMITTEE.

        Add to the 29th section:

        Provided further, That said bonds after being purchased by said corporation shall not be transferable, until all of the issue of said bank is redeemed, under a penalty of one hundred thousand dollars, for the payment of which the individual property of the stockholders shall be liable.

        SEC. 30. Be it further enacted, That all the privileges and immunities given and granted by the 29th section of this act to the Bank of Brownsville be, and they are hereby granted and extended to the Bank of Athens, under the same provisions and restrictions of said section.

        Mr. Minnis from the Committee on the Judiciary made the following report:

        The Judiciary Committee have had under consideration Senate Bill No. 20, a bill to be entitled an act to protect tax collectors; this bill proposes to give tax collectors power to call out a sufficient number of persons to assist him in the collection of the taxes; it may be that in some few localities the collection of taxes may be resisted; but it is believed this will be the case in very few localities; that the known patriotism and love of country of Tennesseans will secure the prompt collection of all taxes due the State without a resort to force; the committee for these reasons unanimously recommend the rejection of this bill.

        They have also had under consideration House Bill No. 13, a bill to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts; in view of the condition of the country, this Legislature has passed two resolutions requesting Judges not to hold Courts for the trial of civil causes, &c., and these requests have been as far as your committee have been able to learn complied with, but the larger portion of business affecting volunteers would come before Justices of the Peace; in this view, and that civil suits may be suspended during the war, a majority of the committee recommend the passage of this bill.

MINNIS, Chairman.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:


Page 136

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and passed on third reading House Bill No. 29, a bill to submit to the popular vote an Ordinance for the adoption or rejection of the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States; House Bill No, 31, a bill to repeal part of section 3965 of the Code of Tennessee and for other purposes; House Bill No. 35, a bill to extend the time for the redemption of real estate, and they are herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has considered and perfected Senate amendments to House Bill No. 22, and the same is herewith returned to the Senate for its action.


        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Bill No. 21 as correctly engrossed.

HOUSE BILLS ON THIRD READING.

        House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up; when

        Mr. Newman asked and obtained leave to withdraw the same for examination.

        House Bill No. 23, to incorporate the Powell's River Lead Mining Company, and for other purposes, was taken up on third reading.

        The amendments recommended by the Committee on Banks were adopted.

        Mr. Minnis offered the following amendment to section 29 of the bill:

        Provided further, That the Bank of Brownsville shall only issue a circulation of one dollar for each dollar of capital stock paid in in the bonds of the State of the character prescribed in this act.

        Which was adopted.

        Mr. Bradford offered the following amendment:

        SEC. 31. Be it further enacted, That the charter of the Bank of Frankland, passed March 1, 1860, be so amended as to authorize said bank to commence banking operations upon a paid in capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars in specie.

        SEC. 32. Be ti further enacted, That the charter of the Valley Bank of Tennessee, passed March 22, 1860, be also amended as to authorize said bank to commence banking operations on a paid in capital stock of twenty-five thousand dollars in specie.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill, as amended, passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .12
  • Noes. . . . .10

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        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, Newman, Payne, and Mr. Thompson--12.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Hildreth, Johnson, McClellan, McNeilly, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Wood--10.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 24, to provide for the issuance of Treasury notes, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Wood moved to strike out the word "fifty" in the first section of the bill; upon which motion,

        Mr. Bumpass demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .11
  • Noes. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Hildreth, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Peters, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--11.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Payne, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--10.

        So the motion to strike out prevailed.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the blank created by striking out the word "fifty" was filled by inserting five.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .5

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Peters, Richardson, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Bumpass, Hildreth, Payne, and Mr. Stokely --5.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 18, to suspend and declare vacant the office of Supervisor of Banks, was taken up on third reading and rejected.

  • Ayes. . . . .8
  • Noes. . . . .15

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:


Page 138

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bumpass, Lane, Newman, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--8

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--14.

        House Bill No. 27, to charter an Arms Company, was taken up third reading.

        Mr. Barrow offered an amendment to incorporate the American Letter Express Company; which was read.

        Mr. Payne offered an amendment to amend the charter of the Energetic Insurance Company of Nashville, which was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the bill was passed over informally.

        House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up on third reading; when

        Mr. Newman asked and obtained leave to withdraw the same for amendment.

HOUSE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        House Bill No. 13, to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 21, to increase the pay of First Sergeants, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 25, to suspend the office of Commissioner of Roads, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 28, to suspend sections 272, 284, 285 and 296 of the Code of Tennessee, passed second reading.

HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 29, to submit to the popular vote an Ordinance for the adoption or rejection of the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 31, to repeal part of section 3965 of the Code of Tennessee and for other purposes, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 35, to extend the time for the redemption of real estate, passed first reading.

SENATE BILL ON SECOND READING.

        Senate Bill No. 20, to protect tax collectors, was taken up on Second reading.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the recommendation of the Judiciary Committee that the bill be rejected was concurred in, and the bill was rejected on its second reading.


Page 139

SENATE BILLS ON THIRD READING.

        Senate Bill No. 23, to amend the charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Bradford offered the following amendment:

        SEC. 2. Be it further enacted, That the aforesaid East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company is hereby authorized to charge and collect for freight over said road per mile, the same charges which are authorized on the East Tennessee and Georgia Railroad, and no more.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Bill No. 24, in relation to inspectors of boilers and hulls of steamboats, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .19
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, Newman, Peters, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--19.

        In the negative:

        None.

        On motion of Mr. Allen, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Senate Bill No. 25, to authorize volunteers to vote in the election of members to the Provisional Congress, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .1

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Peters, Richardson, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--16.

        In the negative:

        Mr. Boyd 1--.

        Mr. Hildreth was excused from voting upon the proposition.

        House Message returning Senate amendment No. 1 to House Bill No. 22, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, amended, was taken up, and the House amendment to the Senate amendment was concurred in.


Page 140

        On motion of Mr. Boyd, the Senate took a recess until ten minutes before 2 o'clock P. M.

        The time for which the recess was taken having expired, the Speaker called the Senate to order.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and passed on third reading, House Bill No. 34, a bill to defray the expenses of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee; which is herewith transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has concurred and passed on third reading a bill for the relief of creditors of Foreign Insurance Companies.

        House Bill No 39, a bill for the relief of volunteers; which are transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed a joint resolution to authorize the Military and Financial Board to appoint an agent to settle accounts at Memphis.

        A joint resolution relative to the coat of arms over the Speaker's Chair.

        A joint resolution directory to the Committee on Finance.

        A joint resolution in relation to requesting Judges not to hold their courts; which are transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 34, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, passed first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Hildreth, was referred to the Committee on Ways and Means.

        House Bill No. 38, for the relief of the creditors of Foreign Insurance Companies, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 39, for the relief of volunteers, passed first reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, was referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.

        Mr. Barrow returned Senate Bill No. 19, to regulate the manner of paying the officers and soldiers of the provisional army of Tennessee; which was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Payne offered a bill in lieu as follows:

        A bill to regulate and fix the time of paying the Tennessee volunteers:

        Be it enacted by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That hereafter the volunteers and their officers in the provisional army


Page 141

of Tennessee shall be paid once every two months, and that such portion of the laws as requires officers to be paid once a month be repealed, and that hereafter officers and privates be paid alike every two months.

        The bill in lieu was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading:

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .1

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokely, and Mr. Wood--18.

        In the negative:

        Mr. Newman--1.

        On motion of Mr. Bradford the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Newman returned House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes; and the same was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Payne offered an amendment to organize an Ordnance Bureau.

        Mr. Newman, offered the following amendment in lieu:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That the proviso to the 4th section of an act passed May 6th, 1861, be so amended as to allow the Governor to appoint such additional officers of ordnance as may be found absolutely necessary for said service, either to rank as Captains or Lieutenants of Infantry; which was adopted.

        Mr. Newman offered the following in lieu of section eight of the bill.

        Be it further enacted, That there shall be attached to each brigade in the Tennessee Army one Drill Master, with the rank of Captain of Cavalry, who shall be drill instructor for the brigade, as ordered by the Brigadier General in command of the brigade, and such general instructor shall be commissioned by the Governor on the recommendation of the Brigadier General, and shall hold the post as long as deemed necessary by the Brigadier General.

        Be it further enacted, That there shall be commissioned by the Governor one Drill Master for each regiment to be recommended by the Colonels of regiments, who shall hold the rank of First Lieutenants of Cavalry; and such regimental Drill Master shall be subject to the order of the Colonels of regiments, and assigned duty by the Colonel; and said regimental Drill Master shall be retained by the regiment as long as deemed necessary by the Colonel of the regiment to which he is attached.


Page 142

        The amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Payne moved to amend the last section of the bill by striking out the words "Second Lieutenants," and inserting Captains; which was adopted.

        Mr. Newman moved to amend the section by adding the words: and shall be entitled to forage for one horse; which was agreed to.

        Mr. Newman offered the following amendment, to constitute an additional section of the bill.

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That there shall be appointed in accordance with the act of May 6th, 1861, ten regimental musicians, the chief to rank as Sergeant Major, and the other regimental musicians to rank as Sergeants of companies.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Newman offered the following amendment in lieu of the 9th section of the bill:

        Be it further enacted, That the rank of Aids of Major Generals shall be the same as provided by the law for Aids of Major Generals of the army of the Confederate States of America, and the rank of Aids of Brigadier Generals shall be the same as provided by law for the Aids of Brigadier Generals of the Confederate States of America; but nothing herein contained shall be construed to increase the pay over the amount provided in an act passed May 6th, 1861; which was adopted

        The bill as amended was then,

        On motion of Mr. Payne, passed over informally.

        Mr. Boyd presented a memorial from Commissioners appointed by a Convention of the people of East Tennessee, held at Greeneville, on the 17th, 18th 19th and 20th days of June, 1861, which was read as follows:

To the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee:

        The undersigned, memorialists, on behalf of the people of East Tennessee beg leave respectfully to show, that at a convention of delegates, holden at Greeneville, on the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th days of June, instant, in which was represented every county of East Tennessee, excepting the county of Rhea, it was resolved:

        1st. That we do earnestly desire the restoration of peace to our whole country, and most especially that our own section of the State of Tennessee shall not be involved in civil war.

        2d. That the action of the State Legislature in passing the so-called "Declaration of Independence," and in forming the "Military League" with the Confederate States, and in adopting other acts looking to a separation of Tennessee from the Government of the United States, is unconstitutional and illegal, and, therefore, not binding upon us as loyal citizens.

        3d. And it was further resolved, that in order to avert a conflict with our brethren in other parts of the State, and desiring


Page 143

that every constitutional means shall be resorted to for the preservation of peace, we do, therefore, constitute and appoint O. P. Temple. of Knox, John Netherland, of Hawkins and James P. McDowell, of Greene, Commissioners, whose duty it shall be to prepare a memorial and cause the same to be presented to the General Assembly of Tennessee, now in session, asking its consent that the counties composing East Tennessee, and such other counties in Middle Tennessee as desire to co-operate with them, may form and erect a separate State.

        The idea of a separate political existence is not a recent one, but it is not necessary here to restate the geographical, social, economical, and industrial reasons which have often been urged in support of it. The reason which operated upon the convention and seemed to them conclusive, was the action of the two sections, respectively, at the election held on the 8th inst., to determine the future national relations of the State. In that election, the people of East Tennessee, by a majority of nearly twenty thousand votes, decided to adhere to the Federal Union, established prior to the American Revolution, and to which Tennessee was admitted in the year 1796, while the rest of the State is reported to have decided by a majority approaching even more nearly to unanimity, to leave the Federal Union and to join the body politic recently formed under the name of the Confederate States of America. The same diversity of sentiment was exhibited, but less distinctly, at the election on the 9th of February last, when the people of East Tennessee decided by a heavy majority against holding a convention to discuss and determine our Federal relations, overcoming by nearly fourteen thousand the majority in the rest of the State in favor of such convention.

        This hopeless and irreconcilable difference of opinion and purpose, leaves no alternative but a separation of the two sections of the State; or it is not to be presumed that either would, for a moment, think of subjugating the other, or of coercing it into a political condition repugnant alike to its interest and to its honor. Certainly the people of East Tennessee entertain no such purpose towards the rest of the State. And the avowals of their western brethren, in connection with their recent political action, have been too numerous and explicit to leave us in any doubt as to their views.

        It remains, therefore, that measures be adopted to effect a separation, amicably, honorably, and magnanimously, by a settlement of boundaries, so as to divide East Tennessee, and any contiguous counties or districts which may desire to adhere to her, from the rest of the State, and by a fair, just and equitable division of the public property and the common liabilities. It has occurred to the undersigned, as the best method of accomplishing this most desirable end, that your body should take immediate action in the


Page 144

premises, by giving a formal assent to the proposed separation, pursuant to the provisions of section 3, article 4, of the Constitution of the United States; and by convoking a convention representing the sovereign power of the people of the respective divisions of Tennessee, with plenary authority to so amend the Constitution of the State as to carry into effect the change contemplated.

        With a view to such action, or to action leading to the same result, the undersigned ask permission to confer with your body, either in general session or through a committee appointed for this purpose, so as to consider and determine the details more satisfactory than could otherwise be done.

        Awaiting a response to this memorial, the undersigned beg to add assurances of every endeavor on their part, not only to preserve the peaceful relations heretofore subsisting between the people in the two portions of the State, but to remove, as far as possible, all causes of disturbance in the future, so that each may be left free to follow its chosen path of prosperity and honor, unembarrassed by any collision with the other.

O. P. TEMPLE,

JOHN NETHERLAND,

JAS. P. McDOWELL.


        Mr. Wood offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 51,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That a Joint Select Committee of five upon the part of the Senate and on the part of the House, be appointed, consisting of members from the eastern division of the State, to take into consideration the memorial received from the convention held at Greeneville on the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th of June, 1861.

        On motion of Mr. Wood, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up.

        Mr. McClellan moved to strike out the words "consisting of members from the eastern division of the State;" which motion prevailed.

        The resolution as amended was adopted.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Stokes, Peters, McClellan, Boyd and Minnis on the part of the Senate, on the Committee provided for by the resolution.

        On motion of Mr. Wood, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the Senate adjourned till to-morrow morning at 9 o'clock A. M.


Page 145

THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 27, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Mr. Minnis asked to be excused from serving on the Joint Select Committee to whom was referred the memorial of the Commissioners appointed by the Greeneville Convention; which request was granted.

        The Speaker (Mr. Richardson in the Chair) appointed Mr. Lane to fill the vacancy.

        Mr. Wood asked and obtained leave of absence for Mr. Nash for the remainder of the session, on account of illness in his family.

        Mr. Thompson from the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum, reported back House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers, with amendments, and recommended the rejection of Senate amendments A and B, and the adoption of an amendment submitted by the committee.

AMENDMENT OFFERED BY THE COMMITTEE.

        Be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall be so construed as to cause any of the present patients of the Asylum to be discharged, in order to give place to any of the above patients, as provided in this act.

        Mr. Payne moved to suspend the order of business, in order to take up House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes; which motion prevailed, and the bill was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That section 25 of the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, be so amended as to provide that when horses belonging to volunteers in the cavalry service shall die, or may have died from ordinary diseases, and it shall be made clearly to appear by proof that said death was not produced on account of any neglect on the part of the owner; that in such case he shall be paid the appraised value of his horse, deducting the amount he is entitled to receive or has received for the services of the horse.

        On the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Payne demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .11
  • Noes. . . . .11

Page 146

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--11.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bradford, Horn, Lane, Minnis, McClellan, Newman, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--11.

        So the amendment was rejected.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That when bonds have been taken by competent authority, and submitted to the Military Board for approval, said Board shall be authorized and empowered to receive other proof than the oath of securities as now required, and may act on the same; and if such outside proof of solvency be sufficient, may approve such bonds without the affidavits of securities to such official bonds.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Newman offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the Governor shall cause to be mustered into the service of the State so much of the reserve corps of the State as he may deem proper; but until called from their homes, said reserve shall not be entitled to any pay.

        Be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the Governor to arm and equip said reserve so mustered in as rapidly as it can be done.

        Be it further enacted, That there may be organized in the State a force of minute men, which the Governor is authorized to receive in regiments, battalions, or companies, to be subject to the call of the Governor, for a term of service not longer than ninety days; said force to furnish their own weapons, and be entitled to such pay as is now provided by law for the provisional army, during the time they may be engaged in actual service.

        Which was rejected.

        Mr. Barrow offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the Military and Financial Board is authorized to loan from military fund the sum of thirty thousand dollars for two years, to any person or persons who will agree and give security to manufacture the Enfield musket, or such other arms as may be directed by said board; the sum to be secured by mortgage on real estate to bear six per cent. interest, and to be appropriated to no other purpose than the purchasing of machinery for the manufacture of guns.

        On the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Bradford, demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .20
  • Noes. . . . .1

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:


Page 147

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Wood--20.

        In the negative:

        Mr. Bradford--1.

        So the amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That the Major General in command shall be allowed to appoint a Military Secretary, to be appointed from the army, who shall receive compensation at the rate of seven hundred and fifty dollars per annum.

        Which amendment was rejected.

        Mr. Hildreth moved to strike out all of the first section of the bill with the exception of the enacting clause; which motion was disagreed to.

        The bill, as amended, passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Thompson and Mr. Wood--18.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Hildreth, and Mr. Stokely--4.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolution No. 51, and Senate Bills Nos. 19, 23, 24 and 25 as correctly engrossed.

        Mr. McClellan from the Committee on Military Affairs, reported back House Bill No. 39, for the relief of volunteers, and recommended its passage.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Atkinson, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and passed on third reading House Bill No. 41, a bill to abate suits of aliens, and House Bill No. 36, a bill to authorize the Banks of Tennessee to pay out the Treasury notes of the Confederate States, and for other purposes, which are transmitted for the action of the Senate. The House has considered Senate amendments to House Bill No. 20, and concurred in Nos. 1, 2, and 4; No. 3 amended and concurred in;


Page 148

No. 5 concurred in, which is transmitted for further action of the Senate.


HOUSE BILLS ON THIRD READING.

        House Bill No. 13, to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. McClellan offered the following proviso to the first section of the bill, viz:

        Provided, That nothing in this act shall be so construed as to prevent the Justices of the Peace from holding their monthly and quarterly courts; which was adopted.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That the remedy by motion against a sheriff, constable, or coroner is hereby abolished, but this section shall not affect the liability of those officers and their securities upon their bonds, and the common law remedy upon the same, provided that the benefits of this section shall not extend to officers in cases in which the money has been collected; which was adopted.

        Mr. Richardson offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That this act shall take effect from and after its passage; which was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .5

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Nash, Minnis, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Hildreth, McClellan, and Mr. Stokely --5.

        On motion of Mr. Minnis, the rule was suspended, and the bill was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        Mr. Newman offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 52,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Quartermaster's Department immediately make arrangements with the various railroad companies in the State to pass the soldiers of the Tennessee Army, who are sent home on furlough on account of sickness, free, both going home and returning to their respective camps.

        Resolved, That the Quartermaster General be immediately furnished with a copy of this resolution.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.


Page 149

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 3 o'clock by the Speaker, and resumed the consideration of House Bills on third reading.

        House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of the insane members of the families of volunteers, was taken up on third reading.

        The question being upon the amendment offered by the Committee on the Lunatic Asylum,

        Mr. Bumpass moved to lay the same on the table, upon which motion he demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .6
  • Noes. . . . .15

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Lane, Payne, and Mr. Stokely--6.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Peters; Richardson, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--15.

        So the motion to lay on the table failed.

        The question recurring upon the adoption of the amendment, the same was adopted.

        Mr. Thompson moved to strike out Senate amendment No. 1; which motion was disagreed to.

        Mr. Thompson moved to strike out amendment No. 2; which motion was disagreed to.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .2

Page 150

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Stokes, Stokely and Mr. Wood--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford and Horn--2.

        Messrs. Peters, Richardson and Thompson were excused from voting on the bill.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 21, to increase the pay of First Sergeants, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson. Lane, Mickley, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Hildreth, and Mr. Stokley--4.

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House Bill No. 25, to suspend the office of Commissioner of Roads, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Newman, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Wood--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Hildreth, McClellan, McNeilly, and Mr. Payne--4.

        On motion of Mr. Allen, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House Bill No. 27, to charter an Arms Company, was taken up on third reading.

        The amendment heretofore offered by Mr. Barrow to charter American Letter Express Company was adopted.

        Mr. Minnis offered an amendment to charter the Athens Express Company; which was adopted.

        Mr. Barrow offered an amendment to incorporate the Nashville Gun Factory; which was adopted.


Page 151

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That all laws and parts of laws requiring Insurance Companies in Tennessee to deposit State bonds or other securities with the Comptroller of the State, as collateral security, be, and the same are hereby repealed.

        Which amendment was rejected.

        The bill, as amended, passed its third reading.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 28, to suspend sections 272, 284, 285, and 296 of the Code of Tennessee; passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .19
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Hildreth, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood --19.

        In the negative:

        None.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has concurred in Senate Resolution No. 51, in relation to appointing a Joint Select Committee upon the memorial of the Commissioners appointed by the Greeneville Convention. The House has concurred in Senate amendment to House Bill No. 24, a bill to provide for the issuance of Treasury notes.

        The House has failed to concur in Senate amendments to House Bill No. 23, a bill to incorporate Powell's River Lead Mining Company, and for other purposes, and it is recommitted for further consideration of the Senate. The House has concurred in Senate amendments to House Bill No. 13, a bill to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts. I am directed to transmit three petitions in relation to employing free negroes for the use of the army.

        The House has amended and concurred in Senate Resolution No. 52, directory to the Quartermaster General.

        The House has considered Senate amendments to House Bill No. 16, a bill to amend the act to raise, organize, and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, and concurred in amendments Nos. 3, 4 and 7, and failed to concur in Nos. 1, 2, 5 and 6, and it is, transmitted for the further consideration of the Senate.


Page 152

        The House has rejected Senate Bill No. 15, a bill to repeal section 4747 of the Code of Tennessee.

        The House has tabled Senate Bill No. 21, a bill to provide for the payment of Deputy Marshals for taking the last census of Tennessee.


        Mr. Wood from the Committee on Ways and Means, to whom was referred House Bill No. 34, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, reported the same back with a recommendation that it pass.

HOUSE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        House Bill No. 29, to submit to the popular vote an Ordinance for the adoption or rejection of the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 31, to repeal part of Section 3965 of the Code of Tennessee, and for other purposes, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 34, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 35, to extend the time for redemption of real estate, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 38, for the relief of the creditors of foreign insurance companies, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 39, for the relief of volunteers, passed second reading.

HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 30, to authorize the Banks of Tennessee to pay out the Treasury notes of the Confederate States, and for other purposes, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 41, to abate suits of aliens, passed first reading.

SENATE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        Senate Bill No. 13, to amend an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up on second reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, was laid on the table.

        Senate Bill No. 17, to provide for physicians to look after the general health of soldiers, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Bradford moved to indefinitely postpone the bill; which motion prevailed.

SENATE BILL ON THIRD READING.

        Senate Bill No. 22 to extend the time for redemption of lands


Page 153

or real estate, sold by condemnation, until the termination of the war, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Stokely moved to lay the bill on the table; which motion prevailed.

HOUSE MESSAGES.

        House Message returning Senate Bill No. 20, to amend sections 14 and 16 of an act passed May 6th, 1861, entitled an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, with sundry amendments of the Senate non-concurred in, was taken up.

        Senate amendments Nos. 1 and 2, forbidding drilling on the Sabbath, except when absolutely necessary, were taken up.

        Mr. Newman moved to insist upon the amendments; which motion prevailed, on a division.

        House amendment to Senate amendment No. 3 to said bill was taken up.

        Mr. Newman moved to non-concur in the House amendment to the Senate amendment; which motion prevailed.

        Mr. Peters moved to reconsider the vote non-concurring in House amendment to Senate amendment No. 3 to said bill; on which motion,

        Mr. Wood demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .12
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Hildreth, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, McClellan, Payne, Peters, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--12.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Bumpass, Lane, Mickley, Newman, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--7.

        So the motion to reconsider prevailed.

        The question recurring upon the motion to non-concur in the amendment, the same was disagreed to, and the Senate concurred in said amendment.

        Senate amendment No. 4, non-concurred in by the House of Representatives, was taken up.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to insist on the amendment which motion was disagreed to; and the Senate receded from the amendment.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule, was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Message returning Senate amendments to House Bill No. 23, to incorporate Powell's River Lead Mining Company, and for other purposes, was taken up, and the several amendments


Page 154

non-concurred in by the House, were receded from by the Senate.

        House Message returning Senate amendments to House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, was taken up, and the Senate receded from amendments Nos. 2 and 3, non-concurred in by the House.

        Senate amendment No. 5, in relation to the appointment of regimental musicians, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate insisted upon said amendment.

        Senate amendment No. 6, in relation to the rank and pay of Chaplains, was taken up.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to insist upon the amendment, upon which motion,

        Mr. Hildreth demanded the ayes and noes, which were taken and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .11
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Lane, Mickley, McClellan, Newman, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--11.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Hildreth, Hunter, Johnson, Peters, Richardson, and Mr. Stokely--7.

        So the motion to insist prevailed.

        On motion of Mr. Hildreth, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House message returning Senate Resolution No. 52, directory to the Quartermaster General, with an amendment, was taken up, and the Senate concurred in the amendment of the House.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate adjourned until to-morrow morning at 8 o'clock A. M.


Page 155

FRIDAY MORNING, JUNE 28th, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

        Mr. Bumpass asked and obtained leave of absence for Mr. Minnis, on account of sickness in his family.

        Mr. Stokely asked and obtained leave of absence for Mr. Hildreth for the remainder of the session.

        Mr. Payne from the Joint Select Committee on Federal Relations, reported back Senate Bill No. 14. to confiscate the property and effects of persons residing in the United States of America, and of moneys and effects claimed by the Government of said United States, and asked to be excused from its further consideration.

        Mr. Wood from the Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, reported as follows:

        The Joint Select Committee on Military Affairs, to whom was referred Senate Bills Nos. 18 and 19, and Senate Resolutions Nos. 38, 47, and 48, and House Resolution No. 53, have had the same under consideration, and, as they have been suspended by the passage of other bills and resolutions, the committee asked to be discharged from the further consideration of the same.

ED. J. WOOD, Chairman pro tem.


RESOLUTIONS LYING OVER.

        Senate Resolution No. 38, to transfer the volunteer forces of Tennessee to the Confederate States, was taken up.

        Mr. Payne moved to amend the resolution by inserting after the word "State," in the seventh line, the words subject to the rules and regulations adopted by the Confederate authorities for the government of the Confederate army; which motion prevailed.

        Mr. Payne moved to strike out the words "such portions of" in the third line: which motion was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the words "as may be deemed prudent and advisable," were stricken out.

        The resolution as amended was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the vote receding from Senate amendments to House Bill No. 23, to incorporate the Powell's River Lead Mining Company, and for other purposes, was reconsidered.


Page 156

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate agreed to insist on its amendments to said bill.

        Senate Resolution No. 48, declaring against the policy of drafting soldiers, was taken up.

        The resolution in lieu offered by Mr. Bradford, was variously amended by him and adopted; and the resolution as amended was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Bradford, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

HOUSE BILLS ON THIRD READING.

        House Bill No. 29, to submit to the popular vote an Ordinance for the adoption or rejection of the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .17
  • Noes. . . . .2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McClellan, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--17.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford and Boyd--2.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House Bill No. 31, to repeal part of section 3965 of the Code of Tennessee, and for other purposes, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Horn offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That all military companies that have been formed for the purpose of drilling, and have elected their officers shall be exempt from attending the militia muster of this State: Provided such companies drill at least once a week and tender their services to the Governor as part of the reserve corps, or to the county commander of the Home Guard of Minute Men, and hold themselves in readiness at all times to assist the Home Guard of Minute Men in the discharge of their duties.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .17
  • Noes. . . . .2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McClellan, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--17.


Page 157

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford and Boyd--2.

        On motion of Mr. Horn, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, the Senate took a recess for forty-five minutes.

        The time for which the recess was taken having expired, the Speaker called the Senate to order, and the consideration of House Bills on third reading was resumed.

        House Bill No. 35, to extend the time for the redemption of real estate, passed third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bradford, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Newman, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--13.

        Those voting in the negative:

        Messrs. Barrow, Boyd, Horn, and Mr. McNeilly--4.

        Mr. Johnson entered a motion to reconsider the vote passing the bill on its third reading.

        House Bill No. 39, for the relief of volunteers, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Stanton offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That if the Confederate Congress should fail to increase the pay of privates in the volunteer ranks, the State of Tennessee will upon her part pay all volunteer privates from this State who are citizens thereof the sum of four dollars per month additional to the amount already allowed them, and contemplated to be paid by the said Confederacy, so that they shall each receive in all fifteen dollars per month, and the Governor of this State is hereby ordered to issue script of suitable amount due in 24 months after the termination of the war now waging between the Northern and Southern States, bearing interest, however, from the date of issuance at 8 per cent. per annum until paid, and the credit of the State is hereby pledged and bound for the payment of the same.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That when any mess of volunteers shall keep a servant to wait upon the members of the mess, such servant shall be allowed to draw one ration.

        Which was adopted.

        Mr. Newman offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the Adjutants of regiments may be


Page 158

selected from the private soldiers in the line of the service, as well as from the officers in the service.

        Which was adopted.

        The question recurring upon the passage of the bill as amended upon its third reading.

        Mr. Stokely demanded a division of the question, and the ayes and noes upon the original bill as it came from the House of Representatives, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .15
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--15.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--4.

        So the original bill was adopted by the Senate.

        The question recurring upon the passage of the amendment of Mr. Stanton,

        Mr. Bumpass demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .2

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Bradford, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--16.

        These voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Boyd and McClellan--2.

        So the amendment was passed.

        Mr. Allen was excused from voting upon the passage of the amendment.

        The question recurring upon the passage of the bill as amended on its third reading, resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .16
  • Noes. . . . .5

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--16.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, McClellan, Peters, and Mr. Stokely--5.

        So the bill passed its' third reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, was ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives for further action.


Page 159

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and passed on third reading House Bill No. 45, a bill to charter Letter Express Company, and House Bill No. 42, a bill to incorporate the Confederate Paper Mill's Company, which are transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has also considered and adopted House Resolution No. 64, a resolution relative to the Inspectors of the Penitentiary, and House Resolution No. 59, a resolution instructive to our delegates in the Southern Congress; also a memorial relative to the Penitentiary, which are transmitted for the consideration of the Senate.

        The House has also considered and adopted House Resolution No. 60, a resolution to adjourn sine die, which is transmitted for the consideration of the Senate.

        The House has considered Senate amendments to House Bill No. 16, a bill to amend an act to raise, organize, and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, and recedes from its other action on amendment No. 5, but insists on its other action on amendment No. 6.

        The House has concurred and adopted House Resolution No. 66, a resolution to appoint an agent to proceed to Knoxville and other places to settle accounts.

        House Resolution No. 68, a resolution directory to Committee on Federal Relations, and the same are transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House refuses to concur in Senate amendments to House Bill No. 23, in relation to incorporating the Miners' Bank of Duckton, and ask a Committee of Conference.


        Mr. Bumpass moved that a Committee on the part of the Senate be appointed to act in conjunction with the Committee of Conference appointed by the House of Representatives, on Senate amendments to House Bill No. 23, to incorporate Powell's River Lead Mining Company, and for other purposes; which motion prevailed.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Bumpass and Bradford on the part of the Senate on said committee.

        On motion of Mr. Richardson, the Senate took a recess until 2 o'clock P. M.


Page 160

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at 2 o'clock by the Speaker.

        Mr. Mickley from the Committee on Enrolled Bills reported Senate Resolution No. 48, as correctly engrossed and Senate Resolutions Nos. 51 and 52 as correctly enrolled.

        House Bill No. 36, to authorize the Bank of Tennessee to pay out the treasury notes of the Confederate States, and for other purposes was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the four first words "at their first meeting," of the 7th section, eleventh line of an act passed February 27, 1856, chapter 210, be, and the same are hereby repealed.

        Which amendment was adopted.

        The bill, as amended, passed its second reading.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 53,):

        WHEREAS, It is understood that the authorities of the United States Government have assumed the right to control shipments upon the Louisville and Nashville Railroad; and believing such assumption of authority is not only inimical to the interests of Tennessee, but an unwarrantable assumption on the part of that Government; be it therefore

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That in the event the Government of the United States shall continue to prosecute its tyrannical claim to exercise authority over the shipments upon said Louisville and Nashville Railroad, that the Governor, in connection with the Military Board of the State, be authorized and requested to take charge of the Tennessee portions of the lines of road leading to the city of Louisville, and to make all such orders and impose such restrictions upon the shipments upon said roads as, in their judgment, may best comport with the honor an interest of Tennessee and of all Confederate States, and to prevent the transportation of all contraband articles on said roads.

        Be it further resolved, That the Governor of this State be requested to furnish copies of these resolutions to the Governor of Kentucky and the President of the Louisville and Nashville Railroad.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the


Page 161

resolutions ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        On motion of Mr. Wood, the order of business was suspended, and House Resolution No. 60, to adjourn sine die on Monday, the 1st day of July, was taken up and concurred in.

        Mr. Stokely moved to suspend the rule and order the return of the resolution to the House of Representatives for enrollment; which motion was disagreed to, and the resolution lies over.

        House Bill No. 36, for the relief of the creditors of foreign insurance companies, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Newman offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the Treasurer of the State may purchase a safe for the office of the Treasury Department of the State, and the Comptroller shall issue his warrant on the Treasury for the payment of the same.

        Which was adopted.

        The bill, as amended, passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .19
  • Noes. . . . .00

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, Minnis, McClellan, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Thompson--19.

        In the negative:

        None.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        Senate Bill No. 7, to increase the pay of privates in the Tennessee volunteer troops to $15 per month was taken up on third reading.

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, the bill was laid on the table.

        Senate Bill No. 8, to make the pay of Orderly Sergeants equal to that of Second Lieutenants, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Stokes moved to lay the bill on the table; which motion prevailed.

        Senate Bill No. 19 to incorporate the Memphis Legion, a volunteer military association in the city of Memphis, was taken up on second reading.

        Mr. Newman moved to lay the bill on the table; which motion was agreed to.

        Senate Bill No. 14, to confiscate the property and effects of persons residing in the United States of America, and of moneys and effects claimed by the Government of said United States, was taken up on second reading.

        On the passage of the bill, Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which were taken and resulted:


Page 162

  • Ayes. . . . .11
  • Noes. . . . .9

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Horn, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--11.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Boyd, Bradford, Bumpass, McClellan, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--9.

        So the bill passed its second reading.

        Senate Bill No. 18, to obtain supplies for the provisional army of Tennessee, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Payne, moved to insert in the first section of the bill, after "agent," the words "or agents;" which was agreed to.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the bill was further amended by striking out in the 4th section the words "shall receive the compensation allowed a Brigadier General," and inserting the words "shall be allowed two per cent. upon the loans obtained."

        The bill as amended was rejected.

  • Ayes. . . . .10
  • Noes. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bumpass, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--10.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bradford, Horn, McClellan, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--10.

        House Resolution No. 47, directory to the Committee on Military Affairs, was taken up.

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the resolution was laid on the table.

        House Resolution No. 53, in relation to Quartermaster and Commissary appointments, was taken up.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the resolution was laid on the table.

        House Resolution No. 59, a resolution of instruction to our delegates to the Southern Congress, was taken up and adopted; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stokely, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House Resolution No. 64, relative to the Inspectors of the Penitentiary, was taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.


Page 163

HOUSE BILLS ON FIRST READING.

        House Bill No. 42, to incorporate the Confederacy Paper Mill Company, passed first reading.

        House Bill No. 43, to charter a Letter Express Company, passed first reading.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has concurred in Senate amendments Nos. 2, 3 and 4 to House Bill No. 19, a bill for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers, and refuses to concur in amendment No. 1, and refers the same to the Senate for further action.


        Mr. Bradford from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Resolution No. 48, as correctly engrossed.

        House Message returning House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, with its refusal to recede from its non-concurrence in Senate amendment No. 6, was taken up.

        Mr. Richardson moved that the Senate recede from the amendment; upon which resolution,

        Mr. Newman demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .7
  • Noes. . . . .10

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Johnson, McClellan, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--7.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, and Mr. Wood--10.

        So the Senate refused to recede from its amendment.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the Senate agreed to ask a Committee of Conference to arrange the disagreement between the two Houses in regard to the amendment.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Newman, Bradford, and Bumpass on said committee.

        House Resolution No. 66, to appoint an agent to proceed to Knoxville and other places, and settle accounts, was taken up.

        Mr. Bumpass moved to lay the resolution on the table; upon which motion,

        Mr. Boyd demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .5
  • Noes. . . . .13

Page 164

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, McNeilly, Newman, and Mr. Peters --5.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Barrow, Boyd, Horn, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McClellan, Payne, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, Thompson, and Mr. Wood--13.

        So the motion to lay on the table failed.

        Mr. Stokely moved to strike out the words "and other places where necessary," which motion was disagreed to.

        Mr. Richardson moved to strike out the proviso to the resolution; which motion prevailed.

        The question recurring upon the adoption of the resolution as amended,

        Mr. Newman demanded the ayes and noes, which were taken and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .6
  • Noes. . . . .14

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, McClellan, Richardson, Stanton and Mr. Thompson--6.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Mr. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Woods--14.

        So the resolution was rejected.

        House Resolution No. 68, directory to the Committee on Federal Relations, was read and non-concurred in by the Senate.

        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 54,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the agent heretofore directed to be appointed to settle with the authorities of Memphis, be authorized to settle with Chas. Jones, a mechanic, for building an arsenal: Provided said arsenal shall appear to be in possession of the State, and that the amount agreed to be allowed by such agent shall be sanctioned by the Military and Financial Board.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the resolution taken up and rejected by the Senate.

        House message non-concurring in Senate amendment No. 1. to House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of the insane members of the families of volunteers, was taken up.

        Mr. Bumpass moved that the Senate insist on the amendment; which motion was agreed to.

        Mr. Newman from the Committee of Conference on Senate amendment No. 6 to House Bill No. 16, to amend the act to raise,


Page 165

organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes, reported as follows:

        The Committee of Conference appointed to take into consideration the question of disagreement in regard to the rank of Chaplains recommend that the Senate recede from its amendment, and insert the following: That Chaplains shall rank as Second Lieutenants of Infantry, and be entitled to an officer's tent and forage for one horse.

        On motion of Mr. Peters, the report of the Committee was concurred in.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the report of the Committee of Conference was ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives for their action.

        On motion of Mr. Richardson, the Senate adjourned until tomorrow morning at 8 o'clock.

SATURDAY MORNING, JUNE 29,1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        The Journal of yesterday was read and approved.

HOUSE BILLS ON SECOND READING.

        House Bill No. 42, to incorporate the Confederate Paper Mill Company, passed second reading.

        House Bill No. 43, to charter a Letter Express Company, was taken up on second reading.

        On motion of Mr. Barrow the bill was laid on the table.

HOUSE BILL ON THIRD READING.

        House Bill No. 36, to authorize the banks of Tennessee to pay out the Treasury Notes of the Confederate States, and for other purposes, was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Barrow offered an amendment to authorize the Governor to issue to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company $480,000 in Treasury notes of the State, in lieu of the bonds held and to be drawn by said railroad company under the internal improvement


Page 166

laws of the State; the Railroad Company to meet the interest on the Treasury notes, in the same manner that the interest on bonds of the State loaned to internal improvement companies, is met.

        On the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .8

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Lane, McClellan, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--8.

        So the amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That the bonds already in the hands of said Nashville and Northwestern Railroad Company, amounting to about one hundred and forty thousand dollars shall be given up and cancelled when the same amount of Treasury notes is delivered to said company, and the balance of said bonds shall also be delivered up and cancelled as the Treasury notes are issued; which amendment was adopted.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That the provisions of the foregoing section shall be extended to the Louisville, Clarksville and Memphis Railroad Company to the extent of thirty thousand dollars, in Treasury notes as aforesaid, for the purpose of finishing and completing the bridge on said railroad across Tennessee river, the loan to be made subject to all the conditions, limitations and restrictions as provided in the loan to the Nashville and Northwestern Railroad.

        On the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .12
  • Noes. . . . .9

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Payne, Peters, Stanton, and Mr. Thompson --12.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Lane, McClellan, Newman, Richardson, Stokes, Stokely, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--9.

        So the amendment was adopted.


Page 167

        Mr. Bradford offered the following amendment:

        Be it further enacted, That Treasury notes may be issued upon the same terms and conditions to any railroad company in the State which may hold bonds of the State or bonds endorsed by the State.

        On the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Bradford demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .8
  • Noes. . . . .13

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Bumpass, Hunter, McClellan, Newman, Peters, Stanton, and Mr. Stokely--8.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Horn, Johnson, Lane, Mickley, McNeilly, Payne, Richardson, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        So the amendment was rejected.

        Pending the further consideration of the bill,

        On motion of Mr. Stokes, the Senate took a recess for twenty minutes.

        The time for which the recess was taken having expired, the Speaker called the Senate to order, and the consideration of House Bill No. 36, to authorize the banks of Tennessee to pay out the Treasury notes of the Confederate States, and for other purposes, on its third reading, was resumed.

        Mr. Payne offered an amendment to section 7 of the bill, as follows:

        After the words "at the discretion of the Comptroller of the State" insert, and it shall be the duty of the various railroad companies to pay the interest required of them into the hands of the Treasurer.

        Which was adopted.

        Mr. Payne moved to strike out the word "if," in the second line of the seventh section, and insert the word unless; which was agreed to.

        Mr. Payne moved to strike out in the 7th section of the bill the words "on the 15th day of April, 1861," and to insert the words, at the time of the passage of this act; which motion prevailed.

        Mr. Payne moved to strike out all of the fifth line of the seventh section, and portions of 4th and 6th lines, commencing with the word "the," in the 4th line, and ending in the 6th line, with the word "South;" which motion prevailed.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the words "since the commencement of hostilities shall be bona fide evidence that it was done to evade this act" were stricken out where they appear in the 8th section, and the words after the passage of this act shall be void, were inserted.


Page 168

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the words "on the 15th day of April, 1861," wherever they occur in the bill, were stricken out, and the words, at the passage of this act, were inserted.

        Mr. Payne offered the following amendment:

        SEC.--. Be it further enacted, That so much of the free banking law as requires the free banks to keep their bonds deposited at par at the New York prices be repealed, and that said banks be allowed to issue dollar for dollar for bonds so deposited; and that for all war bonds issued by the State of Tennessee, and bought by said banks, they shall have the same privileges as to the amount of issue upon them as the other banks have by law; and in all other respects said banks shall be placed upon an equality with the other banks of the State as far as these war bonds are concerned.

        On the adoption of the amendment, Mr. Bradford demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .14
  • Noes. . . . .4

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--14.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Lane, and Mr. McClellan--4.

        So the amendment was adopted.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading.

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .8

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Lane, McClellan, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--8.

        Mr. McNeilly moved to suspend the rule, and transmit the bill to the House of Representatives for its further action; upon which motion,

        Mr. Bradford demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .13
  • Noes. . . . .8

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly,


Page 169

Newman, Payne, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--13.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Lane, McClellan, Richardson, Stokes, and Mr. Stokely--8.

        Two-thirds not voting in the affirmative, the motion was lost.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. DeWolf, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        I herewith transmit a message from His Excellency, the Governor, and am instructed to ask a Convention of the two House to-day at half past 11 o'clock, to take into consideration its contents.


        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the message was taken up, and the Senate acceded to the request of the House of Representatives to meet them in Convention at eleven and a half o'clock.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate took a recess of five minutes preparatory to meeting the House of Representatives in Convention, to take into consideration the message of His Excellency, the Governor.

        The time for which the recess was taken having expired, and the hour of eleven and a half o'clock having arrived, the Senators proceeded in a body to the Hall of the House of Representatives.

IN CONVENTION.

        The Speaker of the Senate took the Chair and called the Convention to order.

        Representative Dudley moved that the Convention go into secret session; which motion was agreed to, and the galleries and lobby closed, and the doors closed.

        The message of the Governor was read as follows:

EXECUTIVE DEPARTMENT,
Nashville, June 28, 1861.

Gentlemen of the Senate
and House of Representatives:

        I herewith transmit for your confirmation the nominations which I have made since your adjournment on the 9th of May, under the provisions of the act of May 6, 1861, as follows:

    Assistant Commissaries General.

  • May 17. Frank W. Green,
  • " John R. Woods,
  • " Daniel F. Cocke,
  • May 17. T. C. Ramsey,
  • " G. W. Mences,
  • " Samuel E. Barber,
    Page 170

  • May 17. O. B. Caldwell,
  • " Lee M. Gardner,
  • " William C. Bryan,
  • " Jerome Ridley,
  • " Wm. H. Slover,
  • " R. H. Williamson,
  • " John D. Allen,
  • " Albert G. Ewing,
  • May 22. J. W. Bennett,
  • " George D. Martin,
  • June 6. Wm. B. Deery,
  • " 14. Benj. L. Wilkes,
  • " 18. M. M. Henkle, Jr,
  • " 28. Felix Abby,
  • " W. F. Collins,
  • " James Glascock,
  • " W. J. Woods.

    Assistant Quartermasters General.

  • May 17. Jesse B. Clements,
  • (vice Paulding Anderson, declined.)
  • May 17. E. Foster Cheatham,
  • " James Glover,
  • May 17. Jno. W. Eleridge,
  • " Jno. S. Bransford,
  • " John L. Sehon,
  • " John S Hill,
  • " A. L. McClellan,
  • " Nathan Adams,
  • " H. T. Massengale,
  • " John W. Gorham,
  • May 22. Isaac Saffarans,
  • May 24. Ben. P. Roy,
  • May 30. Moses Crues,
  • June 8. Owen H. Edwards,
  • June 14. R. M. Mason,
  • June 18. John Marshall, Jr,
  • June 21. James A, Wiggs,
  • " S. H. Ransom,
  • " Ben. J. Lea,
  • June 21. S. L Finley,
  • " Y. S. Patton,
  • " 28. Watt W. Floyd,
  • " Gilbert R. Campbell,
  • " Landon G. Oglesby,
  • " J. E Rice,
  • " R. P. Crockett,
  • " L. F. Cabler,
  • " John F. Davis,
  • " A. W. Vick,
  • " E. A. Hornbeak,
  • " Jno. McLaughlin.

    Artillery Corps.

  • May 17. John P. McCown, Colonel.
  • " Milton A. Haynes, Lieutenant Colonel.
  • " Alexander P. Stewart, Major.
  • " Arthur M. Rutledge, Sr. Captain, 1.
  • " James H Wilson, Jr. Captain, 2.
  • " Marshall J. Polk, Captain, 3.
  • " Reuben R. Ross, Captain, 4.
  • " William H. Jackson, Captain, 5.
  • " Andrew Jackson, Captain, 6.
  • " Smith P. Bankhead, Captain, 7.
  • May 22, William Miller, Captain, 8.
  • " Fred Krone, Captain, 9.
  • " Fred Werner, Captain 10.

    Ordnance Bureau.

  • June 15, Moses H. Whright, Senior Captain.
  • May 13, G. H. Monsarat, Captain.
  • " 22, Wm. Richardson Hunt, Captain.
    Page 171

  • May 28, Nathaniel P. Chambliss, Captain.
  • " 25, C. P. Sengstack, Lieutenant.
  • June 28, Geo. Grader, Lieutenant.

    Assistant Adjutant General.

  • May 15, Pollok B. Lee,
  • June 7, Gustavus A. Henry, Jr.

    Assistant Inspector General.

  • May 16. Henry W. Wall, (vice John C. Brown, declined.)
  • " Jo. G. Pickett,
  • " C. H. Williams.

    Engineer Corps.

  • " B. R. Johnson, Colonel,
  • " Achilles Bowen, Major,
  • " W. D. Pickett, Senior Captain,
  • " Montgomery Lynch, Captain,
  • " Charles C. Rogers, Captain,
  • " Thomas L. Estill, Captain,
  • " J. A. Haydon, Captain,
  • " J. G. Mann, Lieutenant,
  • " E. W. Rucker, Lieutenant,
  • " Felix R. R. Smith, Lieutenant,
  • " Menefee Houston, Lieutenant.

    Surgeon General.

  • May 10, Dr. B. W. Avent (vice Paul F. Eve, declined).

    Regimental Assistants.

  • May 10, Dr. Emmett Woodard, Surgeon, 1.
  • " 10, Richard Butt, Assistant, 1.
  • " 17, Samuel H. Stout, Surgeon, 2.
  • " 24, W. T. Perry, Assistant, 2.
  • " 17, William Nichol, Surgeon, 3.
  • " 17, J. R. Buist, Assistant, 3.
  • " 23, W. S. Bell, Surgeon, 4.
  • " 23, Junius Williams, Surgeon, 5.
  • " 23, L. P. Yandell, Assistant, 4.
  • " 25, R. R. Dashiel, Assistant, 6.
  • " 25, John S. Fenner, Assistant, 5.
  • " 27, R. T. Clark, Surgeon, 7.
  • " 27, F. F. Porter, Assistant, 6.
  • " 27, J. M. Keller, Surgeon, 8.
  • " 27, Charles McCormack, Assistant, 7.
  • " 28, G. L. Robertson, Surgeon, 9.
  • " 28, J. L. Fite, Assistant, 8.
  • " 28, D. F. Wright, Surgeon, 10.
  • " 28, James B. Murfree, Assistant, 9.
    Page 172

  • May 28, John L. Baird, Assistant, 10.
  • " 31, J. W. Gray, Surgeon, 11.
  • June 6, S. W. Caldwell, Surgeon, 12.
  • " 6, S. P. McGee, Assistant, 11.
  • " 6, W. E. Rogers, Surgeon, 13.
  • " 6, F. A. Kyle, Assistant, 12.
  • " 8, J. M. Larkins, Surgeon, 14.
  • " 8, W. B. Maney, Assistant, 13.
  • " 8, J. F. Johnson, Surgeon, 15.
  • " 8, J. D. Martin, Assistant, 14.
  • " 11, Francis Rice, Surgeon, 16.
  • " 11, R. W. Mitchell, Assistant, 15.
  • " 11, A. H. Voorhies, Assistant, 16.
  • " 11, George Blackie, Surgeon, 17.
  • " 12, W. C. Cavanagh, Surgeon, 18.
  • June 12, J. T. Reed, Surgeon, 19.
  • " 12, C. K. Mauzy, Assistant, 17.
  • " 12, J. T. Marable, Surgeon, 20.
  • " 12, Geo. W. Conway, Surgeon. 21.
  • " 12, A. B. Pulliam, Assistant, 18.
  • " 13, Jas. E. Dulaney, Surgeon, 22.
  • " 13, S. Al. Carson. Assistant, 19.
  • " 14, James A. Forbes, Surgeon 23.
  • " 14, B. F. Dickinson, Assistant, 20.
  • " 14, W. M. Gentry, Surgeon, 24.
  • " 22, H. W. Whitfield, Assistant, 21.
  • " 17, Jno. W. Franklin, Surgeon, 25.
  • " 20, J. H. Morton, Assistant, 22.
  • " 20, John Patterson, Surgeon, 26.
  • " 20, Isaac McGowan. Assistant, 23.
  • " 20, Josephus Robertson, Surgeon, 27.
  • " 38, L. P. Green, Assistant 24.
  • " 28, Gustavus B. Thornton, Assistant, 25.

        All of which nominations are respectfully submitted.

ISHAM G. HARRIS.

        Mr. Newman asked a division of the question of confirmation upon the appointments in the several departments of the service, and moved that the list in the medical departments be first taken up; which motion was agreed to, and the list of Surgeons and Assistant Surgeons was taken up and read.

        Mr. Payne moved to confirm the appointments as read; which motion was agreed to.

        The list of Assistant Commissaries General was read and confirmed.

        The list of Assistant Quartermasters General was read and confirmed.

        The list of appointments in the Artillery Corps was read.

        Mr. Whitthorne demanded a division.


Page 173

        The appointments were confirmed, with the exception of Milton A. Haynes, Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery.

        Mr. Whitthorne moved that the confirmation of Lieutenant-Colonel Milton A. Haynes be postponed, and that a committee be appointed to examine into his habits which motion was disagreed to.

        Representative Cheatham moved that the Convention adjourn until 2 o'clock; which motion failed.

        Mr. Payne moved that the nominations in the Engineer, Ordnance, Adjutant General's, and Inspector General's departments be confirmed; which was agreed to, and the nominations were confirmed.

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the nomination of Milton A. Haynes, as Lieutenant-Colonel of Artillery, was confirmed.

        The Convention having completed the business for which it was called, the President declared it dissolved.

        The Senators returned to their Chamber, and were called to order by the Speaker.

        Mr. Barrow moved that the vote passing House Bill No. 26, to authorize the Banks of this State to pay out the Treasury notes, of the Confederate States, and for other purposes, on its third reading, be reconsidered, and then moved to lay that motion on the table; which latter motion was agreed to, and the motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

        The bill was then ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 41, to abate suits of aliens was taken up and passed its second reading.

        Senate Bill No. 14, to confiscate the property and effects of persons residing in the United States of America, and moneys and effects claimed by the Government of said United States, was taken up on third reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, was laid on the table.

        Mr. Johnson withdrew his motion to reconsider the vote passing House Bill No. 35, to extend the time for the redemption of real estate, on its third reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the bill was ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and adopted House Resolution No. 67, a resolution to print the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, and the act submitting, the same to the popular vote, and it is transmitted for the action of the Senate.


Page 174

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed an act to submit to the popular vote the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States; an act to increase the pay of First Sergeants; an act relative to insurance companies; an act to suspend sections 272, 284, 285, and 296 of the Code of Tennessee; an act to suspend the office of Commissioner of Roads; an act to regulate proceedings in Magistrates' Courts; an act to amend the act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force; a resolution relative to the Inspectors of the Penitentiary; which are transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed joint resolutions on river defences; joint resolution directory to the Quartermaster General; joint resolution to appoint a Joint Select Committee on the Memorial of the Commissioners of the Greeneville Convention; and they returned for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


        House Resolution No. 67, to print the Permanent Constitution of the Confederate States, was taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Peters, the Senate took a recess until half-past two o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        The Senate was called to order at half-past 2 o'clock by the Speaker.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by their Clerk, Mr. Atkinson, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has considered and adopted House Resolution No. 69, a resolution to furnish members of the General Assembly with the army regulations; which is transmitted for the action of the Senate. The House has concurred in the report of the Committee of Conference on House Bill No. 16. The House refuses to concur in the report of the Committee of Conference on House Bill No. 23, in relation to the Ducktown Bank. The House amends and non-concurs in Senate amendment No. 1 to House Bill No. 39, a bill for the relief of volunteers, and concurs in Senate amendments Nos. 2 and 3. The House insists on its action


Page 175

on House Bill No. 19, a bill for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers. The House has amended and passed Senate Bill No. 19, a bill to regulate the manner of paying the officers and soldiers of the Tennessee army. The House has passed Senate Bill No. 23, a bill to amend the charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company. The House has rejected Senate Bill No. 24, a bill relative to the inspectors of boilers and hulls of steamboats. The House has adopted Senate Resolution No. 28, a resolution to transfer volunteer forces to the Confederate States. The House has adopted Senate Resolution No. 48, a resolution directing against the policy of drafting soldiers. The House, has tabled Senate Bill No. 25, a bill to authorize volunteers to vote in the election of members to the Provisional Congress.

        I am directed to transmit a memorial from Camp Trousdale in relation to raising the pay of Sergeant Majors; which is transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        The House has considered and adopted House Resolution No. 70, a resolution concerning the location of the permanent seat of Government of the Confederate States of America; it and the accompanying memorial is herewith transmitted.


        Mr. Bradford, from the Committee on Ways and Means, reported back House Bill No. 34, to defray the expenses of the General Assembly of Tennessee, and recommend its passage with sundry amendments.

        The bill was taken up, and the amendments offered by the Committee of Ways and Means were adopted, and the bill passed on its third reading:

  • Ayes. . . . .18
  • Noes. . . . .1

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Boyd, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McClellan, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stanton, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--18.

        In the negative:

        Mr. Bradford--1.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        Mr. Newman offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 55,):

        Be it resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor of the State shall rank and grade the officers appointed under the act raising a provisional army for the State of Tennessee, in the same way and according to the same grade and rank as provided by law for officers in the service of the Confederate States.


Page 176

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. DeWolfe, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        I am directed to transmit the report of the Joint Select Committee on the memorial of the Commissioners appointed by the Greeneville Convention.

        The report of the Joint Select Committee appointed to take into consideration the memorial of the Commissioners appointed by the Greeneville Convention was taken up and read, as follows:

        The Committee to which was referred the memorial of O. P. Temple, John Netherland and James P. McDowell, on behalf of themselves and certain citizens of East Tennessee composing the Greeneville Convention, respectfully submit the following report:

        The Committee are not satisfied that the citizens, seeking by their memorial to have East Tennessee erected into a new State, represent the sentiment of the people of East Tennessee. They are not aware that the important subject of the memorial has been canvassed in the State except in the Greeneville Convention. That convention, as they are informed, was composed of delegates to the Knoxville Convention, which met on the 30th of May last. These delegates were consequently chosen before the vote on the 8th of June, and without reference to the particular result of that vote. There is nothing whatever to show that they were selected with the view to the formation of East Tennessee into a new State, or that the wish of the counties which they assume to represent on that question was ascertained. Nor, indeed, does it appear that said delegates were chosen upon a full expression of public opinion. The grounds upon which the memorialists mainly rest the application is the vote of the 8th of June, which, as the memorial assumes, exhibits an irreconcilable diversity of sentiment between East Tennessee and Middle and West Tennessee. The vote occurred, as already stated, subsequent to the appointment of delegates who composed the Greeneville Convention, and hence could not have an element in the sentiment which appointed them.

        In addition to this, as the question affects the whole State, we remark, that nothing whatever of the sentiment of West and Middle Tennessee is known on the grave question presented in the memorial. In many portions of the State it is not even yet known that memorialists desire to create a new State out of East


Page 177

Tennessee. The fact is communicated to the General Assembly in session, and with no opportunity whatever of comparing views with their constituents on so important question. Besides, without a full expression of sentiment to the contrary, the Committee would be inclined to the opinion that our brethren of East Tennessee would acquiesce in the result of the vote on the 8th of June. Every presumption is in favor of acquiescence. They are our fellow-citizens, identified with us by the closest ties of kindred and interest. We have been long accustomed to regard them as brothers. In the many contests in the State, at the ballot box, the will of a majority has been uniformly acquiesced in by the minority. Many are the instances in which East Tennessee had a large majority in favor of the prevailing policy. Such was the case in February last. Whilst, in numerous instances, its favorite policy has been lost. Yet the people of the entire State have invariably acquiesced. We are not prepared to believe that a contrary result will follow now.

        If however, there exists in the breasts of a majority of the citizens of East Tennessee a desire to form themselves into a separate State, and we are mistaken in our conclusions, we submit that the question can be better disposed of by our successors, who will assemble in a few months fresh from the people. In the meantime, over the entire State the question can be discussed, and a full expression of sentiment elicited. This will enable members to act in accordance with the known wishes of their constituents.

        If, the memorial did not preclude us from doing so, by asking the appointment of Commissioners to confer with Messrs. Temple, Netherland and McDowell, on the single question of erecting East Tennessee into a new State, we would recommend the appointment of Commissioners to confer with these gentlemen on the subject of the grievances complained of by the citizens composing the Greeneville Convention. The careful reading of the memorial, however, we regret to say, forbids us from so doing.

        We decline to discuss the policy proposed by the memorial, as well as other questions raised by it.

        We earnestly hope that all causes of irritation between citizens of the different portions of the State may soon be removed, and that we may, as heretofore, continue brethren in feeling, alike zealous to maintain the honor and promote the prosperity and general welfare of the whole State. In conclusion, under the circumstances, in our judgment, the General Assembly should at this time take no action on the subject of the memorial.

Respectfully submitted,

STOKES, Chairman Senate Committee,

GANTT, Chairman House Committee.



Page 178

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the report of the committee was adopted unanimously, and the committee discharged.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. Atkinson, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has concurred in Senate amendments to House Bill No. 34, in relation to defraying the expenses of the General Assembly.

        The House has tabled Senate Resolution No. 53, in relation to the Louisville and Nashville Railroad; it has also tabled Senate Bill No. 21, a bill to provide for the payment of the Deputy Marshals for taking the last census of Tennessee.


        House Resolution No. 69, to furnish members of the General Assembly with the Army Regulations was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, laid on the table.

        House Resolution No. 70, in relation to the location of the Capital of the Confederate States was taken up.

        On the adoption of the resolution, Mr. Bradford demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .12
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly Newman, Peters, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--12.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Bumpass, Lane, McClellan, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--7.

        So the resolution was adopted.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended and the resolution ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House message returning Senate Bill No. 19, to regulate the manner of paying the officers and soldiers of the provisional army of Tennessee, with House amendments, was taken up.

        House amendment No. 1, to authorize the Governor to call into service a portion of the reserve force of the State, was taken up.

        Mr. Payne moved to concur in said amendment; upon which motion,

        Mr. Stokely demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .15
  • Noes. . . . .3

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Lane,


Page 179

Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Peters, Richardson, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--15.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, and Mr. McClellan--3.

        So the amendment was concurred in.

        House amendment No. 2, to authorize the Governor to accept the services of organized companies of minute men, was taken up and concurred in.

        House amendment No. 3, to authorize the Commissary General to appoint a Board of Survey, was taken up and non-concurred in by the Senate.

        Mr. Peters moved to reconsider the vote non-concurring in the amendment; upon which motion he demanded the ayes and noes, which were ordered and resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .10
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley McNeilly, Newman, Stokes, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--10.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Horn, Lane, McClellan, Peters, and Mr. Richardson--7.

        So the motion to reconsider prevailed.

        The question recurring upon the motion to concur in the amendment resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .10
  • Noes. . . . .7

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--10.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Horn, Lane, McClellan, Peters, and Mr. Richardson--7.

        So the amendment was concurred in.

        House message non-concurring in Senate amendments to House Bill No. 23, to incorporate the Powell's River Lead Mining Company was taken up, and the Senate receded from all its amendments to said bill.

        On motion of Mr. Lane, the rule was suspended, and the bill was ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        House message non-concurring in Senate amendment No. 1 to House Bill No. 19, for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers, was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the Senate receded from its said amendment to said bill.


Page 180

        House message non-concurring in Senate amendment No. 1, to House Bill No. 29, for the relief of volunteers, was taken up, and the Senate receded from the amendment.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for enrollment.

        On motion of Mr. Richardson, the Senate adjourned until Monday morning at 8 o'clock.

MONDAY MORNING, JULY 1, 1861.

        The Senate met pursuant to adjournment.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed the following enrolled acts and resolutions:

        An act for the manufacture of fire arms, gunpowder, &c.

        An act to repeal part of section 3965 of the Code of Tennessee.

        An act to amend sections 14 and 16, of an act passed May 6, 1861, entitled an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes.

        An act for the relief of volunteers.

        An act to incorporate Powell's River Lead Mining Company, and for other purposes.

        An act for the benefit of insane members of the families of volunteers.

        An act to amend an act to raise, organize and equip a provisional force, and for other purposes.

        An act to extend the time for redemption of real estate.

        An act to authorize the issuance of Treasury notes.

        Joint resolution relative to printing the Permanent Constitution.

        Joint resolution concurring in the location of the permanent seat of government of the Confederate States.

        Joint resolution to adjourn.

        Joint resolution of instruction to our Delegates to the Southern Congress.


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        An act for defraying the expenses of the General Assembly.

        And they are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


        The House has considered and adopted House Resolution No. 71, a resolution directory to the Governor, and it is transmitted for the action of the Senate.

        House Resolution No. 71, directory to the Governor, was taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the order of business was suspended and House Bill No. 42, to incorporate the Confederate Paper Mills Company, was taken up on third reading.

        On motion of Mr. Allen, the bill was amended by allowing the Company to issue bonds bearing eight per cent. interest.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading; and,

        On motion of Mr. Bumpass, the rule was suspended, and the bill ordered to be returned to the House of Representatives for further action.

        House Bill No. 41, to abate suits of aliens; was taken up on third reading.

        Mr. Bradford moved to lay the bill on the table; upon which motion,

        Mr. McClellan demanded the ayes and noes, which resulted:

  • Ayes. . . . .6
  • Noes. . . . .12

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, McClellan, Richardson, Stanton, and Mr. Stokes--6.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Horn, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Payne, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--12.

        Mr. Payne moved to amend the bill by inserting the words except Kentucky, Missouri and Maryland, after the word "America," in the 6th line of the 1st section; which was agreed to.

        The bill as amended passed its third reading,

  • Ayes. . . . .12
  • Noes. . . . .6

        Senators voting in the affirmative are:

        Messrs. Allen, Barrow, Bumpass, Hunter, Johnson, Mickley, McNeilly, Newman, Payne, Stanton, Thompson, and Mr. Speaker Stovall--12.

        Those voting in the negative are:

        Messrs. Bradford, Boyd, Horn, McClelian, Richardson, and Mr. Stokes--6.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Barrow and Thompson on the


Page 182

Joint Select Committee provided for by the Joint Resolution in relation to the permanent location of the Capital of the Confederate States.

        Mr. Stanton offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 56,):

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the Governor of the State is hereby authorized to receive into the military service Capt. Q. C. Sanders' company of cavalry, which is now ready for the service, with double barrelled shot guns.

        On motion of Mr. Stanton, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be engrossed and transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        Mr. Newman moved that a Committee of three be appointed to act in connection with such number as the House of Representatives may appoint to wait upon the Governor, and ascertain whether he has any further communication to make to this session of the General Assembly; which motion was agreed to.

        The Speaker appointed Messrs. Newman, Richardson, and McClellan on said Committee.

        Mr. Payne offered Senate Resolution No. 57, as follows:

        WHEREAS, The approaching election in August for Governor, members of the General Assembly, and deputies to the Provisional Congress is a matter of deep interest to the people of Tennessee, and especially so to the volunteer soldiery of the State, and in which election they shall, if possible, be allowed to participate; therefore,

        Resolved by the General Assembly of the State of Tennessee, That the officers in command of the volunteer forces in this State be, and they are hereby requested, if consistent with the public safety, to give furloughs to such volunteers as may be enabled to vote, so as to enable them to attend the election in their respective counties, and also to furnish them such other facilities in going and returning therefrom as may be consistent with the rules of the service.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted, and ordered to be transmitted to the House of Representatives.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has concurred in Senate Resolution No. 56, and it is transmitted to the Senate.


Page 183

        The Speaker of the House has signed an act to incorporate the Confederate Paper Mill Company.

        An act to abate suits of aliens.

        An act to amend the charter of the East Tennessee and Virginia Railroad Company.

        Joint resolution to accept the mounted company of Capt. Biffle.

        Joint resolution directory to the Governor.

        Joint resolution declaring against drafting soldiers.

        An act to regulate the manner of paying the officers and soldiers of the Provisional Army of Tennessee.

        Joint resolution to transfer the forces to the Confederate States.

        And they are transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.

        The House has adopted House Resolution No. 63, and House Resolution No. 75, and they are transmitted for the action of the Senate.


        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 58,):

        Resolved by the Senate, That the thanks of this body are hereby tendered to the Speaker, for the able, faithful and impartial manner in which he has discharged the duties of his office.

        On motion of Mr. Payne, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and adopted unanimously.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives by Mr. DeWolfe, their Clerk, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has concurred in Senate amendments Nos. 1 and 6, and non-concurred in Nos. 2, 4, 8, 9 and 10 to House Bill No. 36, to authorize the Banks of Tennessee to pay out the Treasury notes of the Confederate States, and for other purposes; and the bill and amendments are herewith returned to the Senate for further action.


        House Message returning House Bill No. 36, to allow the Banks of Tennessee to pay out the Treasury notes of the Confederate States, with sundry amendments non-concurred in by the House, was taken up, and the Senate receded from all of its amendments to said bill which were non-concurred in by House, and the bill was ordered to be returned to the House for enrollment.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has concurred in Senate Resolution, No. 56, a resolution


Page 184

directory to the Governor, and it is herewith transmitted to the Senate for enrollment.

        The House has adopted Senate Resolution No. 57, in favor of allowing volunteers to vote, and the same is herewith returned to the Senate for enrollment.


        Mr. Payne offered the following resolution (Senate Resolution No. 59,):

        Resolved by the Senate, That the thanks of this body are hereby tendered to the clerks, reporters, and other officers of this body for the efficiency and faithfulness with which they have discharged their respective duties.

        On motion of Mr. Newman, the rule was suspended, and the resolution taken up and unanimously adopted.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER

        I herewith transmit a resolution inviting the Senate to attend the presentation of a flag in the Hall of Representatives.


        On motion of Mr. Payne, the resolution was taken up, and the Senate accepted the invitation of the House of Representatives.

        House Resolution No. 37, directory to the Surgeon General and his Assistants was taken up; and,

        On motion of Mr. Newman, was laid on the table.

        House Resolution No. 75, resolution of thanks to Patton Robertson, was taken up and adopted unanimously.

        On motion of Mr. McNeilly, the rule was suspended, and the resolution ordered to be returned for enrollment.

        On motion of Mr. Peters, the Senate took a recess until 3 o'clock P. M.

AFTERNOON SESSION.

        Mr. Newman, from the committee appointed to wait upon His Excellency, the Governor, reported that the committee had discharged the duty assigned them, and that the Governor had stated that he had no further communication to make to this General Assembly.


Page 185

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The Speaker of the House of Representatives has signed enrolled act to authorize the Banks of Tennessee to pay out the Treasury notes of the Confederate States, and for other purposes. Also enrolled resolution authorizing the Governor to receive into the service the cavalry company of Q. C. Sanders; enrolled resolution in favor of allowing volunteers to vote, and enrolled resolution voting thanks of the General Assembly to Patton Robertson, and the same are herewith transmitted for the signature of the Speaker of the Senate.


        Mr. Bradford from the Committee on Enrolled Bills, reported Senate Bills Nos. 19 and 23, and Senate Resolutions Nos. 55, 56 and 57 as correctly enrolled.

        A message was received from the House of Representatives, as follows:

MR. SPEAKER:

        The House has disposed of all the business before it, and is now ready to adjourn sine die.


        Ordered, That a message be sent to the House of Representatives, informing them that the Senate has transacted all the business before it, and is ready to adjourn sine die.

        Mr. Thompson moved that the Senate now adjourn sine die; which motion prevailed.

        Previous to the adjournment, the Speaker addressed the Senate as follows:

Gentleman of the Senate:

        My last official duty is at hand. Before I perform it, permit me to return my heartfelt thanks for the flattering terms of the resolution in which you express your approbation of my course as the presiding officer of this body. Next to the consciousness of having sought to discharge the duties incumbent upon me, without partiality or prejudice, and to the best of my ability, do I esteem the generous judgment which you have passed upon me. In the performance of my duties, I have endeavored to comply strictly with the rules adopted for the government of the Senate, and if, at any time, I have departed from them, I beg you to be assured that it was wholly unintentional--an error of the head and not of the heart. And now, gentlemen, tendering you


Page 186

my gratitude, I wish you, one and all, peace and prosperity, and a happy return to the bosom of your families and friends.

        I now pronounce the Senate adjourned sine die.

B. L. STOVALL,
Speaker of the Senate.

JNO. McCLARIN, Clerk of the Senate.


Page 187

INDEX
TO
SENATE JOURNAL


Page 189

INDEX.

    A.

  • ALLEN, V. S., Senator from Gibson, Carroll and Dyer . . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 24, 110, 125, 125, 132, 139, 150, 158, 162, 181.

    B.

  • BARROW, WASHINGTON, Senator from Davidson, is qualified. . . . .99
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 107, 111, 117, 120, 122, 128, 131, 132, 134, 135, 138, 140, 146, 150, 151, 165, 173, 181.
  • BRADFORD, W. M., Senator from Hawkins, Hancock and Jefferson. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 14, 17, 22, 25, 36, 46, 57, 59, 60, 66, 69, 70, 73, 107, 110, 122, 123, 126, 127, 130, 136,139,140,141, 146, 152, 156, 163, 167, 168, 175, 178, 181, 185.
  • BOYD, JAMES S., Senator from Knox and Roane. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 4, 20, 32, 68, 140, 142, 163.
    Page 190

  • BUMPASS, R. W., Senator from Madison, Haywood, Lauderdale and Tipton. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 5, 13, 17, 20, 25, 27, 28, 30, 33, 55, 59, 70, 74, 80, 81, 82, 93, 94, 96, 97, 98, 100, 101, 110, 111, 114, 119, 120, 121, 124, 126, 128, 129, 132, 134, 137,149, 150, 153, 154, 155, 156, 158, 159, 163, 164, 169, 173, 176,178, 179, 181.

    H.

  • HILDRETH, REESE T., Senator from Overton, Fentress, Morgan and Scott. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 22, 28, 40, 63, 69, 70, 101, 120, 121, 122, 126, 131, 133, 134, 139, 140, 147, 154.
  • HORN, JUDSON, Senator from Stewart, Robertson and Montgomery. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 22, 30, 31, 35, 48, 60, 65, 98, 109, 111, 150, 156, 157.
  • HUNTER, R. W., Senator from Giles, Wayne and Lawrence
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3.

    J.

  • JOHNSON, JAMES M., Senator from Marshall and Bedford. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 81, 82, 157, 173.

    L.

  • LANE, JAS. T., Senator from Meigs, McMinn, Polk and Monroe. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 18, 30, 42, 49, 55, 56, 71, 73, 76, 81, 96, 97, 98, 107, 108, 114, 115, 121, 123, 124, 125, 126, 145, 173, 179.

Page 191

    M.

  • MICKLEY, JAMES E., Senator from Benton, Humphreys, Perry, Decatur and Henderson. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 17, 18, 21, 23, 27, 35, 43, 125, 136, 147, 160.
  • MINNIS, JNO. A., Senator from Rhea, Bledsoe, Bradley, Hamilton and Marion. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 4, 15, 18, 21, 26, 27, 28, 31, 32, 33, 40, 42, 45, 46, 48, 57, 59, 61, 62, 65, 73, 75. 76, 93, 97, 101, 119, 127, 128, 132, 133, 135, 135, 136, 137, 145, 150.
  • MCCLELLAN, GEO. R., Senator from Johnson, Carter, Washington and Sullivan. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 21, 26, 75, 76, 100, 110, 124, 144, 147, 148, 162, 181.
  • MCNEILLY, THOMAS, Senator from Maury, Lewis, Hickman and Dickson. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 41, 72, 81, 82, 93, 129, 168, 175, 176, 178, 184.

    N.

  • NASH, M. V., Senator from Claiborne, Grainger, Anderson and Campbell. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 72.
  • NEWMAN, TAZ. W., Senator from Franklin and Lincoln. Resigns the Speakership. . . . . 96
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 5, 13, 15, 20, 33, 36, 60, 61, 100, 118, 121, 130, 132, 136, 141, 142,146, 148, 149, 153, 155, 157, 161, 163, 164, 165, 172, 175, 178, 182, 184.

    P.

  • PAYNE, ROBERT G., Senator from Shelby and Fayette. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 4, 5,14, 17, 18, 20, 21, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28; 30, 31, 34, 35, 37, 38, 39,
    Page 192

    40, 41, 46, 48, 49, 51, 52, 53, 54, 57, 58, 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, 68, 69, 71, 82, 83, 94, 99, 100, 101, 102, 106, 107, 109, 110, 111, 115, 117, 118,119, 120, 121, 124, 126, 127, 138, 140, 141, 142, 145, 146, 147, 148, 151, 155, 157, 160, 162, 164, 166, 167, 168, 172, 173, 178, 180, 181, 182, 183, 184.

  • PETERS, GEORGE B., Senator from Hardeman, McNairy and Hardin. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 35, 41 42, 53, 100, 102, 107, 109, 123, 153, 165, 174, 179, 184.,

    R.

  • RICHARDSON, JOHN W., Senator from Rutherford and Williamson. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 19, 31, 39, 46, 51, 56, 65, 66, 80, 96, 131, 132, 145, 148, 159, 163, 164, 165, 180.

    S.

  • STANTON, S. S., Senator from Jackson, White and Macon. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions., &c., 14, 15, 19, 22, 34, 28, 32, 35, 49, 54, 57, 70,74, 80, 93, 94, 99, 100, 101, 109, 115, 121, 123, 124, 157, 158, 169, 173, 182.
  • STOKES, JORDAN, Senator from Wilson and DeKalb. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 33, 39, 43, 48, 49, 50, 54, 82, 107, 108, 115, 121, 123, 157, 161, 167.
  • STOKELY, D. V., Senator from Greene, Cocke, Sevier, and Blount. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 14, 16, 20, 21, 26, 28, 31, 35, 38, 44, 45, 51, 56, 62, 63, 108, 111, 114, 115, 117, 123, 124, 128, 129, 130, 138, 144, 153, 155, 156, 158, 161, 162. 164, 166, 178.
  • STOVALL, B. L., Senator from Henry, Weakley and Obion, is elected Speaker. . . . . 37
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 17, 22, 28, 37, 44.

Page 193

    T.

  • THOMPSON, JAS. L., Senator from Smith and Sumner. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 14, 15, 25, 26, 33, 37, 40, 44, 46, 55, 59, 75, 80, 101, 102, 107, 123, 126, 129, 133, 145, 149, 164, 181, 185.
  • TRIMBLE, JOHN, Senator from Davidson. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 18, 24, 28, 32, 55, 58, 03, 94.

    W.

  • WOOD, ED. J., Senator from Coffee, Grundy, VanBuren, Cannon, and Warren. . . . .
    Bills, Resolutions, Petitions, Motions, &c., 3, 22, 26, 30, 34, 48, 56, 79, 92, 93, 106, 126, 135, 137, 144, 145, 152, 153, 155, 161.


Page 194

MISCELLANEOUS.

  • Proclamation of the Governor convening the Legislature. . . . . 4
  • Messages from the Governor. . . . .5, 19, 23, 67, 76, 95, 103 169
  • Secret Session. . . . .13

    DOORKEEPER--

  • Resignation of. . . . .22
  • Election of. . . . .22

    HILLIARD, H W., Commissioner from the Confederate States of America--

  • Joint Select Committee appointed to confer with. . . . .25
  • Addresses the General Assembly. . . . .30

    PROTESTS--

  • Of Mr. Richardson and others, against the adoption of Senate Resolution No. 20. . . . .46
  • Of W. M. Bradford against the ratification of the Military League. . . . .69
  • Of W. M. Bradford against the Legislative address to the people. . . . .91
  • Of Messrs. Stokely and Bradford against the adoption of House Resolution No. 40. . . . .116
  • Military League between the State of Tennessee and the Confederate States of America. . . . .67
  • Legislative Address to the people of Tennessee. . . . .83

    CONVENTION OF THE TWO HOUSES--

  • To hear the address of Hon. H. W. Hilliard. . . . .30
  • To confirm appointments of Military officers made by the Governor. . . . .96
    Page 195

  • To elect a State Librarian. . . . .111
  • To confirm appointments of military officers. . . . .169
  • Presentation of flag to the Senate. . . . .118
  • Memorial of the Commissioners appointed by the Greeneville Convention. . . . .142
  • Report of the Committee appointed on the memorial of the Commissioners of the Greeneville Convention. . . . .176

    COMMITTEES OF CONFERENCE--

  • On Senate amendments to House Bill No. 23. . . . .159
  • On Senate amendments to House Bill No 16. . . . .163
  • Report of the Committee to whom was referred the memorial of the Commissioners appointed by the Greeneville Convention. . . . .176


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