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Annual Report of the Board of Public Charities of North Carolina, 1908:
Electronic Edition.

North Carolina Board of Public Charities


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Source Description:
(title page) Annual Report of the Board of Public Charities of North Carolina, 1908
(caption) Report of the Board of Public Charities for the Year 1908
North Carolina Board of Public Charities
228 p., ill.
Raleigh
E. M. Uzzell & Co., State Printers and Binders
1909

Call number C360 N87p 1908 c.2 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)



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Illustration

EDMUND BURKE HAYWOOD, M. D., LL. D.

FIRST CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES AFTER ITS REORGANIZATION IN 1889.


Page ii

EDMUND BURKE HAYWOOD, M. D., LL. D.

        Edmund Burke Haywood was born at Raleigh, N. C., January 15, 1825; was educated at the University of North Carolina and graduated in the medical course at the University of Pennsylvania. He practiced his profession in his native city and rapidly rose to eminence as a general practitioner and surgeon. Degrees of A. M. and of LL. D. were conferred upon him by his alma mater. Upon the call to arms in 1861 he enlisted as a private in the Raleigh Light Infantry; was chosen surgeon of the company; sent by Governor Ellis to inspect the hospitals on Morris Island; organized the first military hospital in the State; was appointed surgeon of the North Carolina State Troops and in August, 1862, surgeon in the service of the Confederate States. During the battles around Richmond served in Seabrook Hospital. At the end of the war was in charge of Pettigrew Hospital at Raleigh, and after the last soldier was discharged from that hospital he returned to private practice. He served as vice president and president of the State Medical Society and made valuable contributions to medical literature.

        In 1866, upon the reorganization of the State institutions, he was appointed a member of the Board of Directors of the North Carolina Insane Asylum, at that time the only institution for this class in the State. He served as chairman of that board from 1875 to 1889. At his instance a committee was appointed and a site selected for a separate institution for the colored insane at Goldsboro, and in like manner he urged the establishment of the Western Hospital for the white insane.

        He resigned to become Chairman of the Board of Public Charities of the State, being appointed to that office by Governor Daniel G. Fowle. In this wider field his broad sympathies were warmly enlisted and he labored earnestly to lay the foundation for the amelioration of the condition of the prisoner and other wards of the State and for improved administration of the charities and corrections.

        He resigned June 6, 1891, on account of pressing professional duties, and died January 18, 1894. He is survived by his wife, who was Miss Lucy A. Williams of Raleigh, five sons and one daughter.

        "We rejoice with them, for the noble example of his stainless life, as a skillful physician, a faithful public servant, a devoted Christian, a benefactor of his fellowmen, and an ardent patriot, loving and beloved by North Carolina."--Resolutions of respect by the Board of Public Charities, May, 1894.


        Under picture on opposite page read 1889 for 1899.



        

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[Title Page Image]


Page 1

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES
OF
NORTH CAROLINA
1908

RALEIGH
E. M. UZZELL & CO., STATE PRINTERS AND BINDERS
1909


Page 2

MEMBERS OF THE BOARD.

        
WILLIAM A. BLAIR, Chairman Winston-Salem.
CAREY J. HUNTER Raleigh.
A. C. MCALISTER Asheboro.
HENRY C. DOCKERY Rockingham.
JOSEPH G. BROWN Raleigh.
(MISS) DAISY DENSON, Secretary Raleigh.

        OFFICE IN THE CAPITOL.


Page 3

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL.

RALEIGH, N. C., January 5, 1909.

To His Excellency, R. B. GLENN,
Governor of North Carolina.

        SIR:--We have the honor to submit herewith the Annual Report of the Board of Public Charities for the year ending December 31, 1908.

        Your special attention is called to the several recommendations therein, which, in our opinion, require the action of the General Assembly, to whom we earnestly ask that you transmit the same, with your approval.

Respectfully submitted,

WILLIAM A. BLAIR,
Chairman.

CAREY J. HUNTER,
HENRY C. DOCKERY,
JOSEPH G. BROWN,
A. C. MCALISTER,
Commissioners.


Page 5

REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES
FOR THE YEAR 1908.

THE CAPITOL,
RALEIGH, N. C., December 31, 1908.

MR. W. A. BLAIR, Chairman, AND MESSRS. CAREY J. HUNTER,
A. C. MCALISTER, H. C. DOCKERY AND JOSEPH G.
BROWN, Commissioners of Public Charities.

        GENTLEMEN:--I have the honor to present the following report of the condition and management of the charitable and penal institutions of the State for the fiscal year ending November 30, 1908.

        In addition will be found the reports of orphanages, hospitals and other charitable institutions maintained by private benevolence and municipal aid. These are voluntary reports, made by request of the Board of Charities, and included in this public report for the information of our people and to show in a comprehensive way the entire field of charitable endeavor.

        The great number of defective and degenerate persons who burden the State and whose defective organizations can be traced to hereditary causes makes us ask ourselves whether we may not more effectually expend our energies upon preventive measures than upon cure or alleviation. Certainly we should not be satisfied with merely the latter.

        Social workers are emphasizing the necessity of seeking the sources whence flow these streams of fettered souls into our institutions, and there to check the torrent. Prevention is to be the new keynote of philanthropy. That charity is the most perfect charity which does most to eliminate itself, which meets the needs so well as to become unnecessary.


Page 6

        Segregation of the imbecile and epileptic, stricter marriage laws for them, are preventive measures in use in this and other countries. The congenital deaf should be included in these restrictive marriage laws. The epileptic and the imbecile should receive custodial care for life in an epileptic village, where they may live happily and yet entail suffering upon no succeeding generation.

        Again, in the case of the blind, important preventive treatment will save a long lifetime of blindness to the new-born babe. The New York State commission to investigate the condition of the blind in that State found that 26 per cent, or 600, of the blind children of that State were the victims of "ophthalmia neonatorum," "almost none of whom would have lost his sight had simple prophylactic measures been employed." The commission emphasized these two points: "(1) That it is the duty of the State to protect its infant citizen, as a minor, from the danger of blindness with which he is threatened; and (2) that it is the duty of the State to protect itself from the burden of caring for the unnecessarily blind."

        Prof. John E. Ray, of the State School, calls attention to this matter in his biennial report, and says that "at least 15 to 25 per cent (forty to sixty boys and girls) of the students of this school should never have been blind, and would not have been if the proper medical skill and intelligence had been exercised."

        Then there are the cases of border-line or incipient insanity. If they could be taken in time and early diagnosis and care given, what a saving to the taxpayers! It is injurious to the insane person to be cared for by one and then by another set of officials, spending several months in jail before receiving treatment, and losing perhaps the chance of recovery.

        As soon as our State is able, we should have established in connection with one of our great hospitals a psychopathic institute, where there may be research looking into the causes of insanity, where all the physicians connected with the various institutions can spend some time in turn. Dr. Adolph


Page 7

Meyer is in charge of such an institute on Ward's Island, New York, and every one of the sixty doctors in the State institutions have studied and conferred with him and together. Dr. Billings, of the Board of Charities of Illinois, says that "It means better nomenclature of the disease, properly written records, something of prognosis based upon the diagnosis. It means looking into everything connected with psychiatry. A satisfactory clinic would not only teach the doctors in the State service, but those in general practice, who, as a rule, know little about insanity. It means that medical students can gain a knowledge of insanity, and the pupils going out into the State would recognize the disease and its causes. For, as much as we talk about insanity and its causes, we do not know as much about it as we should, and such pupils going out everywhere might be able to stem the tide, for, as you know, insanity is increasing."

        Hydrotherapeutic treatment for the insane is used in many large institutions with great success. Its greatest value is upon its quick use in the early stages of the disease.

        North Carolina has already entered upon the preventive phase of charity. To-night, when the old year dies, every saloon in the State closes its doors and the cause of temperance triumphs. The moral battle which has been waged within our borders means uplift for not only the man who has conquered himself for the sake of the weaker brother, but the ennobling of future generations, and is pertinent to this question of prevention, intemperance being the direct or indirect cause of much of the imbecility, insanity, crime and poverty. If we could see into the future, we doubt not that, this scourge removed, much of the burden of caring for the defective and helpless will be relieved.

        Again, the State, in preparing a training school for delinquent boys, is using a preventive. A countless saving in manhood and priceless souls will result, a lessening of crime and a monetary return, in that possible criminals will become of economic value, constructive instead of destructive, building


Page 8

up the waste places and adding to the strength and beauty of the Commonwealth. In her wise laws for the care of consumptives and the separation of this class from other prisoners and from other inmates in her several institutions she again is keeping in the van with other States. The establishment of the Tuberculosis Sanatorium near Aberdeen was a great preventive step. This disease kills more of mankind probably than any other. It is one of the most pauperizing of all diseases. And yet it is preventable. We have known this since Dr. Koch discovered the tubercle bacillus, in 1882.

        Dr. Theodore Sachs, of Chicago, says that "The life of a tuberculous patient in the incipient stage can be saved at the expense of $150 to $200, and this means not only the return of a breadwinner to a family and prevention of infection in others, but also the gradual creation of an army of cured consumptives, who, by their example of orderly life, cleanly habits and love of pure air, are always great factors in an effective campaign against tuberculosis in any community."

        And Pasteur has said that "It is in the power of man to cause all parasitic (germ) diseases to disappear from the world."

        What an energizing ray of hope penetrates the seeming darkness of the vast problem of the care of our defective, dependent, delinquent classes! And this hope lies in prevention.

        Archbishop Ireland said in his conference sermon that "We must take advantage of all the discoveries in sociology and in industry. Those are two gifts of the Almighty to humanity, and we are serving the Almighty when we make use of those gifts; hence preventive charity is far more valuable than that charity which only relieves. We must relieve, but let us be active in that charity which will prevent evil passion and suffering and which will put humanity on a higher stage."


Page 9

POPULATION OF INSTITUTIONS, APPROPRIATIONS OF 1907-1908 AND
APPROPRIATIONS NEEDED FOR THE BIENNIAL PERIOD 1909-1910.

        The population of the institutions was distributed during the year ending November 30, 1908, as follows:

        
  Total Inmates.
Hospital at Morganton 1,335
Hospital at Raleigh 711
Hospital at Goldsboro 857
Dangerous Insane Department 75
School for the White Blind 182
School for the Colored Blind and Deaf 196
School for the White Deaf and Dumb 284
Soldiers' Home 192
Oxford Orphanage for White Children 369
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children 148
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School 0
North Carolina Tuberculosis Sanatorium 10
Total 4,359
Whole number of insane in charge during the year 2,978

        Present in the institutions November 30, 1908:

        
Hospital at Morganton 1,142
Hospital at Raleigh 502
Hospital at Goldsboro 654
Dangerous Insane Department 61
School for the White Blind 165
School for the Colored Blind and Deaf 99
School for the White Deaf and Dumb 249
Soldiers' Home 134
Oxford Orphanage for White Children 325
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children 142
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School 0
North Carolina Tuberculosis Sanatorium 5
Total 3,478
Insane present in the hospitals November 30, 1908 2,298

        Per capita cost per annum for maintenance during the year 1908:

        
State Hospital at Morganton $152.55
State Hospital at Raleigh 167.25
State Hospital at Goldsboro 122.14
Dangerous Insane Department 93.04
School for White Blind, a little over 200.00


Page 10

Sschool for the Colored Blind and Deaf, approximately $175.00
School for the White Deaf and Dumb 185.00
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School  
North Carolina Tuberculosis Sanatorium  
Soldiers' Home 108.00

        Annual appropriation for pensions, $400,000, and $12,000 paid out for totally blind veterans. Number of pensioners, 15,000.

        The appropriations for maintenance made for the biennial period of 1907-1908 were, for each year, as follows:

        
State Hospital at Morganton $145,000
State Hospital at Raleigh 95,000
State Hospital at Goldsboro 65,000
Dangerous Insane Department 5,000
Schools for White Blind and for Colored Blind and Deaf 60,000
School for White Deaf and Dumb, Morganton 46,000
North Carolina Soldiers' Home 15,000
Oxford Orphanage 10,000
Oxford Orphanage for the Colored 5,000
State Tuberculosis Sanatorium 5,000
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training School 5,000
Elhanan Orphanage 500
Total $456,500

        Increase in maintenance appropriation, $20,500 per annum above previous biennial period.

        Total appropriations for biennial period of 1907-1908 for charitable institutions, including Training School and Tuberculosis Sanatorium:

        
Maintenance $ 913,000.00
Improvements, repairs, additions and equipment 48,800.00
Special for mental defectives 250,000.00
Establishment of Tuberculosis Sanatorium 15,000.00
To liquidate indebtedness 25,138.62
Total $1,251,938.62
Total annual appropriations 625,969.31


Page 11

        Maintenance for the biennial period 1909-1910:

        
    Annual Amount Needed.
State Hospital at Morganton, annually   $175,000.00
State Hospital at Raleigh, for the number now present; more if the epileptics are received   118,250.00
State Hospital at Goldsboro, for 1909 $83,750  
State Hospital at Goldsboro, for 1910 90,000 86,875.00
Dangerous Insane Department   7,500.00
School for the Deaf and Dumb at Morganton   55,000.00
Schools for the White Blind and Colored Blind and Deaf   65,000.00
Soldiers' Home   17,000.00
Oxford Orphanage for White Children   10,000.00
Oxford Orphanage for the Colored   5,000.00
Stonewall Jackson Training School   5,000.00
Tuberculosis Sanatorium   5,000.00
Total   $549,625.00

        The amount asked for exceeds the appropriations of the last period by $93,125 annually. The appropriations to the Stonewall Jackson Training School and to the Tuberculosis Sanatorium should be materially increased above the present appropriations of $5,000 per annum.

        
Special appropriation disbursed by Hospital Commission $125,000.00
Annual for maintenance 549,625.00
Grand total $674,625.00

        

INDEBTEDNESS OF INSTITUTIONS.

The State Hospital at Morganton $20,000.00
The State Hospital at Goldsboro 11,000.00
The State Hospital at Raleigh 89.52
School for the Deaf and Dumb, Morganton 2,292.10
School for the Blind 2,500.00
Total $35,881.62

        The Dangerous Insane Department cost $768.36 more than the appropriation of $5,000, but the expenses of this department are now defrayed out of the prison earnings.

        This general overlapping of maintenance funds seems to show that the causes are similar, namely, the demand for


Page 12

admission and the attempt to meet the demand, and the rise in prices from which the whole country has suffered.

        A comparison of per capitas appears to confirm a part of this conclusion, as there was an increase over the per capita of two years ago, except in the case of the hospital at Raleigh, which has decreased each year for two years, due to the increased facilities and the purchasing of land previously rented, as well as to the increase of population. The Soldiers' Home and the Dangerous Insane Department show about the same per capitas--very low at each.

        The per capitas of our institutions compare well with those of other States, being lower than many. But with higher per capitas institutions can become more efficient, and we should keep in mind that the lowest per capita, unless accompanied with the desired results, would not be meeting the real needs.

INSANE.

        Quoting from the report of the Committee on Insane of the National Conference, Dr. Owen Copp, chairman, says:

        In the formative period of a community the insane, the defective, the poor, the physically ill and the criminal are likely to be found in the same establishment or in close association under the same management. But the growth of a State leads naturally to their separation in institutions under appropriate boards of administration and of supervision. * * * * The complete evolution should be the General Board of Prison Commissioners, the State Board of Health, the State Board of Charity and the State Board of Insanity, with their respective local boards of managers. The relation of the general to the local boards should be grounded on two principles: (1) local executive responsibility; (2) general supervisory review of executive acts, with power of investigation, recommendation and criticism, but no arbitrary authority of control in local matters. The absolute powers of the supervisory board should be limited to general interests and interrelations of multiple local units. The theory of operation presents these supervisory and administrative bodies distinct in function and independent in action, viewing problems of common concern from their different standpoints, but arriving at harmonious conclusions through conference and discussion, or, failing to agree, referring their differences to the final arbiter, the Governor or legislative assembly, representatives of the public. Such supervisory relation preserves individuality and independence, encourages free expression of opinion and


Page 13

comparison of methods and results, stimulates to wholesome rivalry for leadership, and insures protest against pernicious policies potent to recast or defeat them.

        The insane and mentally defective naturally group together under the supervision of the board of insanity, but have divers characteristics requiring subdivision into the feeble-minded, the epileptic, the insane criminal and other insane, each presenting sufficient dissimilarity to warrant a special environment.

        Each institution should have its exclusive district. * * * The extent of such district should be proportionate to its capacity for patients, expanding with its growth to a maximum by readjustment from time to time through the State Board.

        The limit of extension of a hospital is a matter of vital importance, which will elicit a great diversity of opinion. All would desire its limitation within the compass of the individual study and treatment of its patients and within the capacity of a single executive head to conserve efficiency and unity in all departments, both medical and administrative. Such conditions would restrict expansion beyond six to eight hundred. Unfortunately, however, the insistent demands of highest economy far transcend such bounds. The lower maintenance charge of the large institution is evident to the many, whereas the compensations of the small hospital in promoting better treatment of patients and higher medical and scientific attainment are recognized by only a minority.


        There should be a certain policy for the care of the annual increase of the insane. We should have in mind the maximum limit of our hospitals, and when that has been reached a new one should be established. The maximum, so the best authorities say, should not exceed 1,500, and others say that the number should be less to attain the best results.

        The hospital districts should not be immovable, but should be changed from time to time to meet the needs of our rapidly growing population--a growth which is necessarily not uniform in all sections at the same period. The real question is the care of the insane of the whole State in the most economical manner consistent with the best medical results.

        The State Hospital Commission having thoroughly taken up the needs of the hospitals as to adequate room and equipment, we will simply call attention to the general need of increased maintenance funds to meet the increased number


Page 14

now in charge and those to be admitted upon completion of the buildings in course of construction.

DANGEROUS INSANE DEPARTMENT.

        This department, which occupies the western wing of the State's Prison, has outgrown its capacity. Thirteen are now in charge who must occupy prison cells at night. It was but a makeshift to meet urgent need of separating this class from the more tractable insane--a forward step for North Carolina--but the attention of the Legislature is respectfully called to the necessity of soon providing other quarters for this class. The wards are comfortable, but there are no facilities or space for outdoor life or occupation, those active factors in the proper treatment of the insane. The statistics show eight curse out of seventy-five patients during the year, with all the attendant drawbacks. We would recommend that this department and its needs be included in the general appropriation for the adequate provision for our insane, and that the Hospital Commission be requested to take up the question.

MENTAL DEFECTIVES IN HOMES AND JAILS.

        Reports have been received during the year from all jails except three and all County Homes except two, in regard to the mental defectives. The reports not coming promptly gives less value to these statistics, as some of the insane in the jails have doubtless since been transferred to the hospitals and a few from the County Homes. However, it shows about the average number passing through the prisons, those in such condition as to necessitate confinement at the Homes (and who should most emphatically not be there) and a large number who are harmlessly insane or feeble in mind and perhaps can with security be left where they are at present, though there is more or less danger, and our policy should be State care for all the insane.


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        Present at time of report:

        
Insane in jails 26
Insane in County Homes 162
Epileptic 97
Feeble-minded (idiotic, imbecile, senile, etc.) 270
Total 554

        Of these, 26 were confined in jails and 47 in Homes; total, 73.

EPILEPTIC VILLAGE.

        There are ninety-seven epileptics reported in the County Homes. A number of those classed as insane in the jails are insane epileptics. The time will come--perhaps is here--when we should provide for the "care and treatment of epileptics"--not the epileptic who has lost all his opportunity in life for want of this care, and is already a dement and incurable, but for the class who are living in the community handicapped on every side and daily losing ground. The young especially--and this disease begins in early life--should be received and cared for in such a village. There are curse, though it is a disease which is not so well diagnosed and in the study of which many men are spending their lives, still the attacks are arrested and further brain deterioration reduced to the minimum. But to the State it will mean not alone the possible cures, but the cutting off of a large number of this class eventually by segregating such as should not return to the community.

        Such a village should be entirely separated from the hospitals for the insane. In preparing for these classes we must look to future needs. It should be removed from any large city, though accessible to transportation facilities. It should have room to grow and should be developed under its own corps of officers, like such villages as Craig Colony, New York, Epileptic Village of New Jersey and many others.

        The insane epileptic, the unfortunate for whom there is no hope of real improvement, would not properly come under this care; he can be cared for in a colony at the Hospital for the


Page 16

Insane. To so care for him will be a great relief to the institutions which have had to provide for some of this class to the detriment of other patients; so, also, many who are in the County Homes; but this is only custodial. It should be only for the classes who are not susceptible of much improvement, and the State village should give community life to epileptics, but so guarded as to protect them from injury--to alleviate, to teach, to cure, to make happier during their lives, and in so doing to protect the State.

CHILD-CARING INSTITUTIONS.

        There are twenty institutions caring for about 1,700 children. Most of these are in flourishing condition, and the children are properly fed, clothed and educated. The majority are under the control and subject to the inspection of their respective boards of trustees, and they in turn represent churches or fraternal orders, but several are under the sole management of an individual.

        Every institution caring for helpless humanity, whether from defect or from unbalanced mind or from tender years, should be under the supervision of capable boards of trustees or other organizations, and in addition the State should have the right of inspection and visitation. It is a mistake to permit the existence of an institution caring for helpless children to depend upon the life of one person. No such institution should be chartered or allowed to open its doors for the reception of irresponsible waifs, homeless children, except it has satisfied the Board of Public Charities that conditions are fit, and when it has received a certificate from this board granting permission to receive children. Such is the law in New York and elsewhere.

        We are of the opinion that the Legislature should not make appropriations to private institutions, except, perhaps, for some special reasons which might arise, and in no case unless the State has representation on the boards of management and unless the institution is subject to visitation and inspection of the State boards.


Page 17

        Dependent children from other States should not be brought into this State to perhaps become a charge upon North Carolina.

THE SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB.

        The compulsory attendance law has not been enforced, for the lack of room. Sufficient room for 100 additional deaf children is needed.

THE SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND AND DEAF.

        The special session of the Legislature of 1908 passed a compulsory attendance law for the blind, similar to the one enacted affecting the deaf. This has not been enforced. If it should be, there would be sufficient room, but $10,000 additional for maintenance would be necessary. The attention of the General Assembly is called to the overgrown condition of the plant. There is not room for the outdoor life which should be required of the blind children, who are more or less physically weakened by the disinclination to active exertion, superinduced by their affliction. Attention is called by the superintendent to the fact that few are congenitally blind, but have lost their sight from neglect and accident; therefore the weakened physical condition is one that can be much improved.

        The history of institutions that are established near the center of growing cities has been the same, namely, they outgrow the original plans and eventually must be removed to where they can have space for the development of newer ideals. This School was the first charitable institution that the State opened to her afflicted, about the year 1845. The time must soon come when we must follow the story of other States and remove this School to the more open suburb, but near enough to give the pupils the inestimable advantage of the religious and educational opportunities of the city to which they are now much indebted.


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COLORED DEPARTMENT OF THE BLIND AND DEAF.

        Sick wards for the isolation of contagious and infectious diseases are needed at this institution.

SOLDIERS' HOME.

        The veterans are comfortably cared for at the Home. The improvements authorized by the last General Assembly have added much to the comfort of the sick, who form about one-third of the men. The average age is near seventy-five. The line of gray is fast thinning. North Carolina should gladly, will gladly, give them the increased maintenance fund asked for, $17,000 per annum, and $2,000 per year for special improvements.

THE STONEWALL JACKSON TRAINING SCHOOL.

        This institution opens its doors on January 12th next for the reception of boys. Plans for the completed plant are already made, and the school will be developed on these lines symmetrically until it will become one of the best and most useful. The board of directors wisely sent the new superintendent to Glen Mills, Pennsylvania, where is located the model institution of its kind in America, to spend some weeks and thoroughly examine their work. The need now is maintenance sufficient to support the sixty boys who can be received (and many applications are on hand) and funds to quickly erect other cottages. The Board of Charities is constantly receiving applications from parents and friends asking for information as to some place where they may send boys. A number are boarded in other States by their relatives.

THE TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM.

        This newly opened institution deserves the support necessary to enlarge and equip it, so that the many patients who are seeking it may be received, and that it may serve not only to cure the sick, but as an educational factor in our warfare against the great white plague.


Page 19

OXFORD ORPHANAGE FOR WHITE CHILDREN.

        This institution is under the control of the Masons and is well managed and efficient. There are directors appointed on the board of trustees to represent the State. There was an epidemic of scarlet fever in a light form, but no deaths, the children making good recoveries. The present general condition of health is very good. Colonel Hicks says that "the normal Christian home ought to be the best place in the world for the rearing of children." He discourages the breaking-up of homes and the removal of children to institutions unless this course, "after thorough investigation and consideration, seems to be the very best possible solution of the case."

COLORED ORPHANAGE AT OXFORD.

        This institution has been placed under the management of Henry P. Cheatham during the last biennial period. He calls attention to the fact that it is dependent upon the State appropriation for its chief support. It now cares for 142 children. The industrial workshops opened there are worthy of note as the best means of training this class to self-support. The State is represented by three directors on the board of management.

STATE'S PRISON.

        The financial and physical condition of the Prison are excellent. The death rate during the year was low, being 2 1/3 per cent. upon the whole number in charge. Only two deaths from tuberculosis demonstrating the wisdom of outdoor life and the isolation of such prisoners as have contracted the disease.

        According to the present law, the terms of all the directors end simultaneously every four years. The entire Prison régime, from superintendent to guards, is subject to arbitrary change. We therefore recommend that the directors of the State's Prison be appointed in like manner and for similar terms as the directors of the charitable and educational institutions, namely, by appointment of the Governor, by and with the consent and advice of the Senate.


Page 20

        The Constitution, Art. XI, says that "No convict shall be farmed out who has been sentenced on a charge of murder, manslaughter, rape, attempt to arson."

        Again, in section 1357, chapter 24, Vol. I, of the Revisal of 1905 (chapter on county prisons and convicts on public roads), there is the following proviso: "That no person who has been convicted and sentenced on a charge of murder, manslaughter, rape, attempt to commit rape, or arson, shall be assigned to county roads under this chapter."

        As we found that these classes which seemingly are prohibited by the Constitution and the statute are so worked, we deemed it proper to call the attention of the authorities to the matter and to ask for an opinion from the Attorney-General. The directors cheerfully forwarded desired information and signified their intention to abide by the ruling. They reported that at the four railroad camps there were 298 convicts, of whom 192 had been sentenced on these charges.

        There were forty-two escapes during the year, many of which were from the camps and were life prisoners and long-term men. This class of convicts is a desperate one, ready to take desperate chances and tempted to do so by the apparent freedom. Being worked with short-term men, the latter must of necessity be subjected to greater restrictions. Their escape is a menace to the community. It is contrary to the spirit of the law and probably illegal. As this question affects radically present conditions, and as there are other changes desired in regard to prisoners, the authorities did not deem it expedient to precipitate these changes, and so no opinion was rendered by the Attorney-General.

        We feel that it is our duty to bring the subject to the attention of the General Assembly, in order that the law may be understood and obeyed, or, if in the wisdom of the lawmakers the working of such prisoners should be continued, then there should be a constitutional amendment to that effect.


Page 21

COUNTY CONVICT CAMPS.

        There are forty-four camps in thirty-seven counties, the prison population being augmented by prisoners from neighboring counties. Thirty-one have reported, but only twenty-seven give the number confined, as follows:

        
White males 177
Colored males 796
Color not given 100
Colored females 3
Total 1,076

        Twelve of these were boys under sixteen. The three women are employed as cooks in the Guilford camps; Anson, Buncombe, Nash, Randolph, Sampson and Mecklenburg No. 2 not reporting. Bertie reports prisoners quartered at the County Home and working the farm there, not giving data.

        There are over twelve hundred prisoners in the camps, and attention has been called by some of the visitors to the apparent youth of these men. Nine deaths during the year. Comparatively little tuberculosis; one prisoner with the disease was pardoned, another occupies a separate tent at night, and one died. Four counties reported that blacks and whites occupied the same room or tent at night. These were advised of its illegality. Four others reported as follows: "Separate divisions" of the same room; "curtains between"; "same room, different ends"; "yes, with divisions." We do not think that this meets the requirement of the law, which is absolute separation of the races in their sleeping quarters.

        Six counties report no whipping, punishment for infraction of rules, confinement in steel cell and deprivation of tobacco or other privilege. The other camps punish by flogging with the leather strap. No religious services in eight; in others occasional. Guards receive from $20 to $40 per month; supervisors, from $30 to $100. There is no classification of prisoners. Felons, misdemeanors and men working out fines wear the stripes and receive like treatment.


Page 22

        We repeat the same recommendation made three years ago, that these county camps be placed under the supervision of the State Prison Board or some other State board. This will save expense to the taxpayer and, what is of higher importance, better the condition of the prisoners. Every prisoner should have moral and some educational advantages as reformative agencies, so that when returned to the community he may be a help and not a hindrance. Therefore we recommend that any policy which may be agreed upon shall include the appointment of prison chaplains and other means for reformation.

COUNTY PRISONS.

        Reports have been received from all jails except Halifax and Randolph and the new county of Lee, whose jail is in course of construction. A close scrutiny of the tabulated reports of the commissioners and the visitors' reports show these facts:

        1. Bathing facilities range from none at all to hot and cold shower baths. As a rule, new prisoners are admitted without bath or change of clothing, and thus introduce vermin. If a bath were compulsory upon admission and the jail could own a few suits of clothing to be worn while the old clothes were being washed, the difficult problem of keeping the buildings in condition would be nearer a solution.

        2. The old bucket system for the disposition of excreta is in use in sixteen counties. This should be replaced with sewerage and sanitary arrangements.

        3. The daily cleansing of the cells or rooms required by law should be strictly enforced.

        4. Two-thirds of the counties give three daily meals of wholesome prison fare and most of them furnish coffee once a day.

        5. Twenty-nine counties report no religious services; others are ministered to by the local preachers, the King's Daughters and the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. This is a great lack, but is explained in part by the fact that a number of our jails are unoccupied for months at a time.


Page 23

        Present at time of report:

        
White males 163
White females 11
Colored males 365
Colored females 53
Total 592

        Fourteen have died.

        Of the number confined, 19 white and 7 colored were insane, leaving 566 prisoners, most of whom were awaiting trial.

        Counties remodeling old buildings, constructing new ones or contemplating changes have been advised of the legal requirement of the absolute separation of the races, sexes, the tuberculous and the insane.

        New buildings have been completed in Buncombe, Craven, Caswell, Duplin, Rowan and Perquimans; Davidson's has been remodeled; Forsyth has added an extensive concrete annex, up to date in every particular; Yancey and Lee are constructing new buildings; Pasquotank will build or remodel, and Mecklenburg has a modern jail projected.

        New buildings are needed in Burke, Clay, Dare and Davie. New Hanover jail, although enlarged, does not meet the needs, and the officials, in order to prevent sickness from overcrowding, sent a number of persons awaiting trial to be confined at the county camp until the term of court. Beaufort jail, though reported in excellent condition, has been badly overcrowded. Person jail is too small. Lincoln, Rockingham, Transylvania and Tyrrell jails need improvement. Reports from individual counties are included herewith.

COUNTY HOMES FOR THE AGED AND INFIRM.

        The reports of the county commissioners and those of the visitors are included in the annual report. Duplin, Madison, Montgomery, Haywood and Onslow have erected new buildings, those of Onslow and Haywood occupying new farm sites. Tyrrell's has been repaired and improved.


Page 24

        The following Homes need improvement in buildings: Cabarrus, Clay, Dare, Davidson, Davie, Lincoln, Rockingham, Transylvania, Wilkes and Yancey. Some of these counties have expended money on other internal improvements, but will soon improve their Homes.

        Number of inmates at time of report (eight counties not reporting) and cost of caring for the poor were as follows: Cared for in the Homes, 1,336 persons, at a cost of $89,873.93; outdoor relief to 5,426, at a cost of $92,771.93; total, 6,762, at a cost of $182,645.69. This amount in the Homes is exclusive of farm products.

        These figures, compared with those of preceding years, show a much larger increase in the number given outdoor relief than the increase in the Homes. The sum expended for the outdoor relief exceeds the amount for the inmates of Homes. This tendency to outdoor relief should be checked. If the county commissioners would make it a rule to closely scrutinize the poor lists and adopt the policy of giving only temporary relief to persons in their own homes, thus tiding them over distressed circumstances and permitting them to regain the plane of self-support, and requiring all who must receive regular and continued help to go to the Homes, much money would be saved the counties and, what is of great importance, unnecessary dependence and pauperization would be guarded against.

        Number of children in the Homes, 37 white and 20 colored; total, 57. Continued efforts are made to secure homes for normal children elsewhere than in the county institution. Those in charge are, as a rule, either infants or abnormal, physically or mentally.

PRIVATE LICENSED HOSPITALS.

        These institutions are required by law to make semiannual reports to the Board of Charities. The licenses of Broadoaks Sanatorium, Dr. Carroll's and Telfair Institute have been renewed. During the year Dr. B. B. Williams has been


Page 25

licensed to open Williams' Sanatorium at Greensboro and Dr. J. J. McKanna, of Reidsville, has obtained license. The Perfected Liquor Cure Institution at Greensboro has been discontinued. Telfair Institute has been removed from Asheville to commodious new quarters in Greensboro. The institutions in Greensboro were inspected before license was granted.

        These private sanatoria, subject by law to the inspection and regulation of the Board of Public Charities, should be visited at least twice annually, and attention is called to the fact that no funds are appropriated for this purpose.

PRIVATE BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS.

        Questions and letters were mailed to seventy-five private orphanages, hospitals and other benevolent institutions. Many of them have reported, and show a great and growing work in the field of private charity. They embrace orphanages, hospitals for the sick and injured, homes for the aged, rescue homes, associated charities and other organizations for the alleviation of suffering and the uplift of humanity. Reports are included in the general report.

INSPECTIONS AND MEETINGS.

        The Board is in the unfortunate position of having no direct appropriation, and therefore cannot inspect the institutions except at the time of meetings or as opportunity arises to the individual members. Regular semiannual inspections should be made in a systematic way, and can be done with a slight increase of funds and some liberty in expenditure. Three meetings have been held--one at Winston-Salem and two at Raleigh. Inspections have been made of the Hospital at Raleigh, the Dangerous Insane Department, the Penitentiary, the Soldiers' Home, the School for the Blind, the Department for the Colored Blind and Deaf, the Hospital at Goldsboro, the Williams Sanatorium and Telfair Institute at Greensboro, the County Home of Forsyth


Page 26

and the jail of Wayne. In addition have been visited the Odd Fellows' Orphanage and Odd Fellows' Home for the Aged and the City Hospital at Goldsboro and the Rescue Home at Greensboro.

NEW MEMBERS.

        The Board has lost by death two members--Commissioner W. F. Craig, of Marion, and Commissioner E. L. Haughton, of Pollocksville. Governor Glenn appointed Mr. Joseph G. Brown, of Raleigh, and Mr. Henry C. Dockery, of Rockingham, to fill out the unexpired terms.

GENERAL WORK OF THE OFFICE.

        In addition to the collecting of data by sending out blanks and inquiries at stated intervals, the heavy correspondence with the county boards of visitors (voluntary workers), the various reports made to Chairman and Board, and the individual cases of insane, orphans or wayward boys whose friends constantly consult the Secretary of the Board, there is all the other clerical work of the office and a constant call from all parts of the United States for information respecting our laws regarding institutions and sociological questions. This exchange of information from other States is a source of much help in arriving at proper and modern standards of care. Such inquiries are promptly answered. Fuller reports of the work can be found in the quarterly reports made to the Board.

        The Library has acquired by gift a number of valuable books during the past year.

        Special attention has been given to the subject of tuberculosis in county institutions. The blanks sent out to the commissioners and other officials included the law for the separation of the prisoners from other inmates, and the rules for their care, compiled by Dr. Lewis, of the Board of Health.

NATIONAL CONFERENCE OF CHARITIES AND CORRECTIONS.

        This noted body met at Richmond, Va., May 6th to 13th. The Secretary attended as a delegate, duly appointed by Governor


Page 27

R. B. Glenn. Section meetings were held in the mornings, great public sessions in the evenings and institutions were visited in the afternoon. The Penitentiary, the Industrial School for Boys at Laurel and the Hospital for the Colored Insane at Petersburg were visited. The Secretary was honored by being invited, with several other members of the conference, to receive with Governor and Mrs. Swanson at the mansion at a reception tendered the conference. Leave of absence was granted by the Board, the Secretary defraying her own expenses.

BOARDS OF VISITORS.

        Many new members have been added to our list of visitors, and others who will be sadly missed have been called to their reward. The earnest co-operation of these boards in the counties, working without compensation, has resulted in vastly improved conditions and a higher standard of care. We desire to publicly thank them for this efficient service.

        Acknowledgments are due Dr. R. H. Lewis for interest and assistance, to the Governor and the State officials for aid and sympathy. The State owes the Chairman, Commissioner W. A. Blair, a debt of gratitude for his whole-souled interest and prompt attention to the details of the work, and to all the members for their interest in the work, which they receive no monetary consideration. With my personal thanks to the Board,

Respectfully,

DAISY DENSON,
Secretary.


Page 28

STATE INSTITUTIONS.

STATE HOSPITAL AT MORGANTON.

JOHN MCCAMPBELL, M. D., Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

  Men. Women. Total.
Number of inmates at the beginning of the fiscal year 445 655 1,120
Number received during the year 84 131 215
Number discharged or died during the year 81 112 193
Number at the end of the fiscal year 458 684 1,142
Daily average attendance during the year, 416 613 1,029
Average number of officers and employees, about     190

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $ 46,267.99
2. Clothing 16,905.35
3. Subsistence 51,573.43
4. Ordinary repairs 3,939.05
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses 46,323.37
Total $165,009.19

        Ten thousand dollars of the above amount was paid on last year's debt. The appropriation for maintenance was $145,000 per annum. Disbursements were $165,000, of which $10,000 was last year's deficiency, making $155,000 for the current year. Outstanding indebtedness, $20,000. Net value of the farm and dairy products was $24,623.03. Per capita cost of maintenance, $152.55. Appropriation needed for support during the next biennial period, $175,000 annually. Special appropriations for the following purposes will be asked for: For bakeshop, $2,500; for spur track to railroad, $10,000; for colony buildings, $30,000.

        During the biennial period of 1907-1908 the Hospital Commission expended for this institution: For 115 acres of land, $4,500; eight cottages for attendants, $4,800; addition to laundry and repairs, building nurses' home, about $23,000.

        Thirteen hundred and thirty-five patients were treated--an increase of 144 over the whole number of last year.

        Fire protection fairly good, but not as good as it should be.


Page 29

        The general health of the patients has been very good. No epidemic or serious accident. About twenty have escaped, and half of these have been recaptured. Number of deaths, 42. Percentage of mortality upon whole number treated, 3.1. Discharged as improved, 62; as cured, 81. Percentage of cures upon admissions, 37.67. Refused for lack of room, 147. Chronic cases, from 90 to 95 per cent. of the hospital population. Epileptics, 26. As a rule, epileptics are not received. Number of patients from the eastern district, 30. Employed, 525, in the wards, on the farm and grounds, in laundry and sewing room. There are about 500 volumes in the institution library. Dancing, games, walking and riding and baseball for the men during the season are the recreations. Regular religious services. No special facilities for hydrotherapy. Fifteen tuberculosis patients cared for, apart from others. Number of attendants, 37 men, 52 women. The hospital cemetery receives special care. Nine hundred acres. The hospital, equipment, land, etc., is valued at $1,000,000.

JOHN MCCAMPBELL, M. D.,
Superintendent.

STATE HOSPITAL AT RALEIGH.

(Inspected April 8th by Commissioners E. L. Haughton, A. C. McAlister and the Secretary, and found in excellent condition.)

JAMES MCKEE, M. D., Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

  Men. Women. Total.
Number of inmates at the beginning of the fiscal year 244 330 574
Number received during the year 72 65 137
Number discharged or died during the year 93 116 209
Number at the end of the fiscal year 216 286 502
Daily average attendance during the year, 260 319 579
Average number of officers and employees during the year      

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $30,164.12
2. Clothing 6,629.11
3. Subsistence 42,730.46
4. Ordinary repairs 4,322.97
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses 15,322.97
Total $99,211.50

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Extraordinary expenses:  
1. New buildings, land, etc. $71,000.00
2. Permanent improvements to existing buildings, 10,688.09
Total $81,688.09

        The annual appropriation was $95,800. Whole number treated during the year, 711--an increase of 61 over the previous year. Receipts were $109,764.21; disbursements, $109,899.59. Outstanding indebtedness, $89.52. Per capita cost of maintenance, $167.25. Estimated net value of the farm and dairy products, $23,217.86. For maintaining the present number in charge $118,250 annually will be needed, but if the epileptic colony is ready for occupancy this amount will not be sufficient.

        The Hospital Commission has purchased 1,140 2/3 acres adjoining the present grounds, at a cost of $53,500. For carpenter shop, $3,800, and $4,200 for storeroom. It has constructed an annex to the building for males and equipped the same for 100 patients. A colony for 85 females is under process of construction, and it has contracted for buildings for colonies to be erected upon the land recently bought. These colonies for epileptics will be under the charge of the present hospital. There are now 16 epileptics cared for, who will be transferred to these buildings. Epileptics will be received as soon as these structures are completed.

        The general health has been good. No epidemic or serious accident. Some escapes; the majority have been returned to the hospital. We have allowed some to remain at home, as their people asked it.

        Number of deaths, 41. Percentage of mortality upon the whole number treated, 5. Percentage of cures upon admissions, 49 per cent. Discharged as improved, 4. Number of patients refused admission--epileptics, 15; idiots, 3; senility, 7; paralysis, 3; inebriety, 3; no room, 47; total, 78.

        Of the number in charge, 80 per cent. are chronic cases; 3 tuberculosis patients. Provision has not yet been made for the separation of this class. Attendants--male, 19; female, 26. There is a training school in connection with the work. Dancing and song service for recreation. We have no library. Special apparatus for hydrotherapy has not been introduced. Twelve patients from the western district; 16 pay patients; 320 are occupied in garden, laundry, sewing, knitting, fancy work, sweeping and cleaning the wards.

        Acreage, 1,300¾. Estimated value of land, hospital equipment, etc., $418,200.

JAMES MCKEE, M. D.,
Superintendent.


Page 31

STATE HOSPITAL AT GOLDSBORO.

(Inspected October 17th by the Secretary and found in excellent condition.)

W. W. FAISON, M. D., Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

  Men. Women. Total.
Number of inmates at the beginning of the fiscal year 252 377 629
Number received during the year 85 143 228
Number discharged or died during the year 87 116 203
Number at the end of the fiscal year 250 404 654
Daily average attendance during the year,     622
Average number of officers and employees during the year     93

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:    
1. Salaries and wages $21,571.34  
2. Clothing 4,908.02  
3. Subsistence 19,908.59  
4. Ordinary repairs 553.95  
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses, 28,676.51  
Total   $75,692.41
Extraordinary expenses:    
1. New buildings, land, etc. $1,000.00  
2. Permanent improvements to existing buildings 7,646.40  
Total   8,646.40
Grand Total   $84,338.81

        The annual appropriation for support was $65,000. Patients treated during the year, 857--an increase of 58 over the previous year. Receipts have been $83,205.75; disbursements, $82,828.28. The estimated net value of farm and dairy products was $8,540.90. Per capita cost of maintenance, $122.145. Outstanding indebtedness is $11,000, which was borrowed to meet the deficiency in the maintenance fund. The appropriation which will be needed for the support of the institution during the next biennial period will be, for the year 1909, $83,750, and for 1910, $90,000.

        During the two years 1907-1908 the Hospital Commission has expended $24,991.38 for the purchase of land, farm equipment, employees'


Page 32

houses, boiler, electric generator and other much-needed improvements. The Commission has let the contract for the construction of four detached buildings, which will accommodate twenty patients each; two of the buildings to be used for epileptics and two for tubercular patients. It is hoped that these will be completed in six months. The four will cost about $24,000, not including heating and furnishing.

        Fairly good protection against fire, but specially constructed fire escapes are needed.

        The general health has been fair, with no serious accident or epidemic. One escape, not recaptured. Number of deaths, 85. Percentage of mortality upon whole number treated, 9.91. Discharged as improved, 30; as cured, 83. Percentage of cures upon admissions, 36.40. Nine patients have been refused for want of room; one pay patient; 86.85 per cent. are chronic cases. Epileptics, 44. This class is being received at the hospital. All of these epileptics are more or less demented. Thirty-eight tubercular patients. This class is separated from other patients. Three hundred and fourteen are employed on the farm, ward work, sewing room, etc. Dances, concerts and occasional outdoor sports for recreation. Perhaps 10 per cent. can read. Baths are used in treatment of patients. Special care of the hospital cemetery. There are 21 male and 31 female attendants. No training school.

        Acreage, 690; 360 in cultivation and 330 in pasture and wood. The hospital buildings are valued at $277,500; equipment, $250,000, and land, $27,500.

W. W. FAISON, M. D.,
Superintendeni.

HOSPITAL FOR THE DANGEROUS INSANE.

(Inspected April 8th by Commissioners E. L. Haughton and A. C. McAlister and the Secretary, and found in satisfactory condition.)

JAMES R. ROGERS, Medical Superintendent. RALEIGH.

        No alterations or improvements in this department during the year.

        The following is the table of the movement of population for the year 1908:

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of inmates present November 30, 1907 42 14 56
Number received during the year ending November 30, 1908 18 1 19
Whole number treated during the year 60 15 75
Number discharged or died during the year 11 1 12
Discharged as cured     8


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Died     4
Daily average attendance during the year, 48 14 62
Remaining November 30, 1908 47 14 61
Daily average number of officers and employees 6 1 7

        

EXPENDITURES.

1. Salaries and wages $1,922.13
2. Clothing 597.96
3. Subsistence 2,575.22
4. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses 673.05
Total $5,768.36

        Percentage of cures upon admission, 28. They are turned over to the courts when discharged as cured. General health has been good. Escaped, 3; not recaptured. No serious accident or epidemic. Patients have little or no employment. No land. No amusement. None have been refused for want of room, but eleven have been received beyond the capacity of the wards, and they occupy prison cells at night, which is to be deplored. Receipts and disbursements were $5,768.36, paid out of the fund of the State's Prison. No outstanding indebtedness. Percapita cost of maintenance was $93.04. For support during the next biennial period $7,500 annually will be needed. Protection against fire is fairly good. The land and building are the property of the State's Prison.

        The needs of the institution are the same as recommended in former reports.

JAMES R. ROGERS, M. D.,
Medical Director.

(Former reports of the Superintendent of the State's Prison and of the physician in charge deplore that this department should remain a part of the prison. For several years past the annual increase has been about seven, and the capacity of the institution (forty-nine) has long been overtaxed, the additional patients sleeping in prison cells, the number now cared for being eleven. This placing of patients in cells is heartily disapproved by them.)

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB.

PROF. E. McK. GOODWIN, Principal.

        

POPULATION.

  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children on the roll at end of fiscal year 123 112 235
Number received during the year 26 23 49
Whole number during the year 124 113 280

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Discharged 5 2 7
Died     1
Daily average attendance     240
Number at the end of the fiscal year, November 30, 1908     249
Daily average number of officers and employees     60

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $28,349.84
2. Clothing 1,800.00
3. Subsistence (commissary and fuel) 15,176.53
4. Ordinary repairs--no separate account kept.  
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses--no separate account.  
Extraordinary expenses:  
1. New buildings, land, etc  
2. Permanent improvements to existing buildings $4,250.00

        Receipts for the year were: Appropriation for maintenance, $46,000; special, $4,250. Disbursements, $52,540.27. Outstanding indebtedness, $2,292.10. Per capita cost, $185. Earnings were $3,947.83.

        The institution can accommodate 270. The compulsory attendance law has not been enforced, as there is not sufficient room. If it were enforced, more room would be needed for 150 to 200 children. None have been refused. The amount needed for maintenance during the next biennial period will be $55,000 annually. The health of the children has been very good. No serious accident or epidemic. The electric plant, concrete floors and road improvements authorized by the last General Assembly have been completed. We need a new building to accommodate at least 100 children. No changes have occurred in the industrial or literary courses or in the domestic arrangements. We find that practically every scholar becomes self-supporting.

        Of the new pupils admitted, congenitally deaf, 24; others became deaf as follows: unknown, 12; measles and mumps, 1; scarlet fever, 2; rising in the head, 1; meningitis, 1; chicken pox, 1; congestion of the brain, 1; fever, 1; catarrh, 2; rising in the neck, 1; brain fever, 1; cold in the ears, 1. Onset of disease at the age of one year, 2; one and a half, 1; two at 3; one at 3; one at 5; one at 11, and one unknown.

E. MCK. GOODWIN,
Principal.


Page 35

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND AND THE DEAF.

(Inspected by Commissioner Joseph G. Brown and the Secretary, and found satisfactory.)

JOHN E. RAY, A. M., Principal.

Department for White Blind.

        

POPULATION.

  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number on the roll at the beginning of the fiscal year 86 74 160
Number received during the year 21 13 34
Number discharged during the year 9 11 20
Number died 1 1 2
Number at the end of the fiscal year, November 30, 1908 92 73 165
Daily average attendance 80 70 150
Whole number during the year 96 86 182

        The department can accommodate 245 children. None have been refused for want of room. The special session of the Legislature of 1908 passed a compulsory attendance law for the blind children, but this has not yet been enforced. There will be sufficient room when the law is enforced, but the maintenance fund would have to be increased $10,000 annually. The appropriation for maintenance was $60,000 for the two departments, the white blind and the colored blind and deaf. Disbursements were about $62,500. Outstanding indebtedness, approximately $2,500. The amount needed for support for the next biennial period will be $65,000 annually. Per capita cost, a little over $200.

        During the present year the plastering has been renewed. the pipe organ installed, and the fireproof library building is now in process of construction.

        There has been no serious accident or epidemic. Condition of general health very good. No changes have been made in the industrial or literary courses. Scholars, after graduation, become largely self-supporting. About 85 per cent. care for themselves.

        

EXPENDITURES (FOR BOTH DEPARTMENTS).

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $33,070.05
2. Clothing 4,833.57
3. Subsistence 15,505.18
4. Ordinary repairs 4,923.91
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses 16,007.20
Total $74,339.91

Page 36

Extraordinary expenses:  
1. New buildings, land, etc $10,000.00
2. Permanent improvements to existing buildings, Officers and teachers, 58; servants, 37. 2,500.00

Colored Department.

(Inspected in April by Commissioners E. L. Haughton and A. C. McAlister and the Secretary, and found satisfactory.)

        

THE BLIND.

  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children on the roll at end of fiscal year 29 42 71
Number received during the year 12 7 19
Whole number during the year 41 49 90
Discharged 1 7 8
Died      
Daily average attendance 35 40 75
Number at the end of the fiscal year, November 30, 1908 40 42 82

        

THE DEAF.

Number of children on the roll at end of the fiscal year 52 39 91
Received during the fiscal year 5 10 15
Whole number during the year 57 49 106
Discharged 7   7
Died      
Daily average attendance 45 42 87
Number on the roll November 30, 1908 50 49 99

        The colored department can accommodate 220. None have been refused for want of room. No epidemic or serious accident. The general health has been very good. No changes in the literary or industrial courses. Laundry machinery and a story have been added to the girls' building during the year. Per capita cost of this department was $175.

        We get nearly all of our vegetables in season, and much of our milk and some beef and pork from the farm and dairy. Net income from the farm and dairy for the past two years was estimated at more than $1,500.

        No means in this department for the isolation of contagious and infectious diseases. Sick wards seriously needed, and repairs to the buildings.

JOHN E. RAY,
Superintendent.


Page 37

OXFORD ORPHANAGE.

W. J. HICKS, Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children at the beginning of the fiscal year 153 163 316
Number received during the year 32 20 52
Number readmitted   1 1
Discharged 22 22 44
Number on the roll at the end of the fiscal year 163 162 325
Monthly average attendance during the year     314
Average number of officers and employees,     35

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $11,320.80
2. Clothing 764.37
3. Subsistence 8,829.84
4. Ordinary repairs and minor improvements 390.71
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses 5,241.14
Singing class (tours) 1,003.22
Total $27,550.08
Extraordinary expenses:  
Permanent improvements $15,898.43

        

RECEIPTS.

Current or ordinary receipts:  
1. Appropriations and contributions $17,686.20
2. Singing class 7,939.72
3. Shoe shop, sundry sales, etc 1,620.22
Total $27,246.14
Extraordinary receipts:  
Woodworking shop $ 7,766.31
Printing office 5,010.80
Legacies 200.00
Interest and dividends 574.80
Transferred from Colonel Hicks, Superintendent's account 250.00

Page 38

Refund physician's salary $ 62.50
Refund J. W. Rodwell, manager 9.00
Total $13,873.41
Total receipts $41,119.55
Expenditures 43,448.51

        We were able to meet expenses from the funds received, and to make some permanent improvements. It was necessary to suspend work on the new office building, owing to insufficient funds. This new building is far enough under way to be already roofed. A shed was constructed to be used on St. John's Day, the anniversary which we celebrate. This will prove a comfort and convenience to our visitors and will prevent the annual construction of temporary booths.

        The whole number of children cared for during the year was 369; went to their own people, 24; to other approved homes, 13; ran away, 1; died, none. Probably fifteen of this number are self-supporting. Children received not younger than six, seldom over twelve; girls discharged at eighteen and sixteen for boys. Present capacity, 325.

        In October there was an epidemic of scarlet fever in a light form. About ten per cent. of the children had the disease, but very few of them were in bed. The health of the children is now splendid. No deaths during the year.

        Sewerage. Good water from bored well 320 feet deep. As protection against fire, water is pumped to two tanks; in addition there is connection with the Oxford water supply and two fire hydrants in the grounds; these supplied with hose. Easy exits from the buildings. We have the cottage system, somewhat modified. Central sewing room, dining rooms and laundry. In the cottage homes, the school and the various industrial departments much effort is directed toward developing individuality in the children. We believe that we meet with fair success in this important effort. Industrial training in sewing, laundry, printing office, shoe shop, woodwork, dairy and on the farm, also literary course.

        There are now twelve of our children in the colleges and high schools of the State. We place some children in private homes, but endeavor to exercise the greatest care in this responsible, delicate duty. Ten girls and three boys were placed in foster homes last year. We are constantly trying to improve our system of supervision of children placed in homes. We have had a field worker a part of the year, who has aided in this necessary work. We have the co-operation of the Masons in the different localities in looking after the children in private homes under the jurisdiction of their several lodges. We hope to do more efficient and thorough work along this line in the future.

        The true normal Christian home ought to be the best place in the world for rearing children. We hope those interested in the betterment


Page 39

of humanity and the extension of the kingdom of God will enter earnestly into the effort to keep fatherless children with good mothers when this is found to be possible. We discourage the breaking-up of homes and the removal of children to institutions, unless this course, after thorough investigation and consideration, seems to be the best way to deal with the situation.

        The support and the extension of the Oxford Orphan Asylum will necessitate increased voluntary offerings of our people to supplement the regular appropriations. We desire that the good people of North Carolina should have knowledge of this work, and that they estimate it at its real worth. We would not have it overestimated nor underestimated.

W. J. HICKS,
Superintendent.

OXFORD ORPHANAGE FOR THE COLORED.

HENRY P. CHEATHAM, Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children at the beginning of the fiscal year 40 65 105
Number admitted during the year 16 27 43
Number discharged or died during the year 3 3 6
Number at the end of the fiscal year 53 89 142
Daily average attendance during the year, 50 85 135
Average number of officers and employees,     13

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $2,643.00
2. Clothing 1,000.00
3. Subsistence 3,200.00
4. Ordinary repairs 160.00
5. Office, outdoor and domestic expenses 500.00
Total $7,503.00
Extraordinary expenses:  
1. New buildings, land, etc $2,097.75
2. Permanent improvements to existing buildings 200.00
Total $2,297.75

        Capacity of the institution, 150. Both sexes received. Admitted at three years; discharged at seventeen for boys and eighteen for girls. No epidemic or serious accident. Present health of the children is very good. No sewerage; excreta removed daily. No protection


Page 40

against fire. We have one building for boys, one for girls and one for infants. Industrial and literary courses taught. Six in high schools. We do not place in private homes.

        We are fairly well supported. Cost of caring for a child and educating, $70 per annum. Receipts have been $8,791.82, and disbursements were $9,800.75. Outstanding debt on account of new buildings, $1,008.93.

        We have erected and completed the following new buildings: A shoe and harness shop, with new tools, in which a class of eight boys are learning trades; a blacksmith and wood shop, in which a class of ten boys are at work for the public as well as for the home (in these shops first-class workmen are employed as instructors); a three-story granary for farm products; a schoolroom connected with the infant department.

        We shall continue to strive until the institution has reached that position in which it can perform the great mission for which it was founded. Without the most gracious appropriation from our State the home could not possibly exist another year.

HENRY P. CHEATHAM,
Superintendent.

SOLDIERS' HOME.

CAPT. R. H. BROOKS, Superintendent.

        The annual appropriation for support during the last biennial period was $15,000. The special appropriation of $5,000 supplied water for fire protection and added a new dining room and kitchen, with rooms for nurses, to the hospital, with heating apparatus, and roofs upon the cottages. No outstanding indebtedness. While no one has been refused for lack of room, many have had to remain upon the waiting list until rooms could be prepared for them. We will need $17,000 per annum for support and $2,000 annually for improvements.

        The following is the table of the movement of population for 1908:

        
Number on the roll November 30, 1908 128
Admitted during the year 37
Died 29
Discharged 12
Remaining November 30, 1908 134
Whole number cared for during the year 192

        The percentage of mortality is nearly 20 per cent. Average number of patients in the hospital during the year, 32.

        The Home has no regular trained nurse, but there are two white nurses, who are very capable, and the old soldiers get very good attention. There is a special dining room and special diet for the sick. The general health of the veterans has been good. Average age, seventy-five. No special means provided for entertainment and recreation, except innocent games, magazines and papers. Col. Fred. Olds


Page 41

frequently takes the Band of Sunshiners out to sing and recite for them. Religious services by the various denominations.

        The Daughters of the Confederacy have contributed during the year to the payment of a nurse for the hospital, gifts of furniture have been made by that organization, and some memorial beds given by patriotic citizens. The only urgent need of the institution is for an increase in maintenance fund.

B. F. DIXON,
Secretary of Executive Board.

THE NORTH CAROLINA TUBERCULOSIS SANATORIUM.

DR. J. E. BROOKS, Superintendent.

        The Sanatorium is located on the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad, eight miles from Aberdeen. Nine hundred and fifty-one acres, a portion of which is very fertile and will be converted into dairy and poultry farms, milk and eggs being the chief diet of consumptives. Plenty of fresh spring water and sixty horse power in the creek. There are four buildings--one seven-room farm house, one dining room, kitchen and laundry building, one two-story cottage, with capacity for care of thirty-four patients; barns and feed houses. Ten patients have been admitted to the institution; five now in charge. Available beds, 34. One trained nurse and one attendant. Patients who pay are charged $7 per week. Buildings insured. No special fire protection. Expenditures have been a little less than $16,000.

        Remarks.--We now have patients calling and writing from all parts of the State.

JAMES E. BROOKS, M. D.,
Superientendent.

STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL
SCHOOL.

MR. WALTER THOMPSON, Principal.

        (In October, 1907, the organization of the Board of Trustees of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School was effected, with Mr. J. P. Cook, of Concord, as chairman. At a subsequent meeting Mr. Walter Thompson was elected superintendent.)

        This institution has been located three miles from Concord. There are 290 acres. During the past year a deep well has been dug. Two cottage buildings are nearing completion; cost, about $13,000. Sewerage and fire protection in course of construction. Insured. There have been many gifts--none very large; from the King's Daughters, $750. Concord gave the site and $1,000. Receipts during the two years, about $15,500; disbursements, $20,000. A number of applications on file for admission, but the institution has not yet been opened for children. The King's Daughters have pledged $5,000 for the erection of a cottage.

WALTER THOMPSON,
Superintendent.


Page 42

STATE'S PRISON.

J. S. MANN, Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

  Men. Women. Total.
Number of inmates at the beginning of the fiscal year 637 41 678
Number received during the year 133 20 153
Number discharged or died during the year     102
Number at the end of the fiscal year 640 41 681
Average number of officers and employees,     152

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $ 56,470.34
2. Clothing 4,794.96
3. Subsistence 31,982.28
4. Ordinary repairs 1,308.86
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses 50,231.41
Total $144,787.85
Extraordinary expenses:  
1. New buildings, land, etc  
2. Permanent improvements to existing buildings $ 1,885.86

        Receipts for the year, November 30, 1907, to November 30, 1908, were $195,519.21; disbursements, $146,673.71. The amount of money now to the credit of the prison is $84,619.34. The amount of earnings from the camps was $117,236.18. Of this sum, $58,236.18 was cash and $59,000 in railroad bonds.

        No improvements or additions to the buildings. They have been kept in good repair.

        All new prisoners are examined physically. No epidemic, and the general health has been good. Died, 16. Percentage of mortality upon whole number in charge, 2 1/3 per cent. Two deaths from tuberculosis; thirteen cases in charge; they are cared for in special infirmary, separated from other prisoners. Two prisoners received gunshot wounds. Corporal punishment has been administered 293 times. Escaped, 42; recaptured, 19, at an average expense of $33.81. No classification or grading of prisoners. As reward for good conduct the prisoner is given five days per month off his sentence and 50 cents per month in cash, paid upon completion of his term. Other forms of punishment besides flogging, dark cell, deprivation of time allowance and loss of commutation money. Religious services at the prison and farm. Sunday school at the prison. No regular chaplain. No


Page 43

provision for regular services at the camps, though local ministers are invited to hold service. No library nor library fund.

        Prisoners at the camps are confined within the stockade limits on Sunday; chained at night. Blacks and whites confined in the same sleeping apartments at the camps; separated at the farms. They have a variety of good, wholesome food and coffee regularly. The length of time a convict is worked on the railroad building depends upon his general physical condition. If his health breaks down from any cause, or if he becomes enfeebled, he is withdrawn. The physical condition does not necessarily deteriorate after working on the roads several years, if he is given proper attention, fed properly, worked properly, etc., as we endeavor to have done. Boys are not separated from the men. In charge, 7 under sixteen, 85 under twenty-one. Number of prisoners received during the year, November 30, 1907, to November 30, 1908, was 153. Number remaining November 30, 1907--white men, 176; white women, 7; colored men, 461; colored women, 34; total, 678.

        Prisoners in charge November 30, 1908: White males--Central Prison, 25; Farm No. 1, 75; Farm No. 2, 50; Hoskins' Camp, 11; Chaffin's, 13; Busbee's, 8; Cox's, 0. Colored males--Central Prison, 42; Farm No. 1, 84; Farm No. 2, 75; Hoskins' Camp, 64; Chaffin's, 56; Busbee's, 68; Cox's, 69. White females--Central Prison, 8. Colored females--Central Prison, 5; Farm No. 2, 28. Totals--Central Prison, 80; Farm No. 1, 159; Farm No. 2, 153; Hoskins' Camp, 75; Chaffin's, 69; Busbee's, 76; Cox's, 69--681.

        Education of prison population: Good English, 4; collegiate, 1; common school, 1; read and write, 328; read, 35; none, 312; total, 681.

        Age of prisoners in charge: Twelve to fifteen, 6; sixteen to twenty, 101; twenty-one to twenty-nine, 285; thirty to thirty-nine, 172; forty to forty-nine, 67; fifty to fifty-nine, 34; sixty to sixty-nine, 14; seventy and seventy-three, 2.

J. S. MANN,
Superintendent.

BROADOAKS SANATORIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities.)

DR. ISAAC M. TAYLOR, Proprietor. MORGANTON.

        The following table gives the movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1908:

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients remaining January 1, 1908 13 16 29
Admitted during the six months 17 16 33
Whole number treated 30 32 62
Discharged recovered 4 3 7
Discharged improved 10 6 16
Discharged unimproved     12


Page 44

  Men. Women. Total.
Died   2 2
Whole number removed     37
Daily average     26
Patients remaining July 1, 1908 9 16 25
Average number of officers and employees,     16

        Of the number treated during six months, insane, 45; drug habitues and inebriates, 14; other conditions, 3.

        Residences by States--North Carolina, 35; South Carolina, 12; Georgia, 2; Tennessee, 3; Virginia, 4; and one each from Illinois, Florida, West Virginia, New York, Missouri and the District of Columbia. Accommodations for fifty patients.

        Present officers are: Isaac M. Taylor, resident physician in charge; Dr. Louis G. Beall, resident assistant physician; Mrs. Sallie Taylor, matron.

        The matron is directly in charge of the nursing force. She has had about four years' experience in nursing for us. The senior male attendant was for two years at the State Hospital at Morganton. There are three female day nurses and one female night nurse, three male day nurses and one male night nurse. The housekeeper and dining-room attendant are during the day indirectly in charge of some of the patients.

        No epidemic or serious accident.

        City waterworks; connected with city sewerage. There is a hydrant in the yard for protection against fire; nine extinguishers conveniently placed. The kitchen is protected by two fusible extinguishers. There are two 100-foot lines of hose connected, with wrenches and spanners on a hose cart. The night watch is on duty in both wards. The new steam house will take all fires 85 feet away from the building.

        All charges are based on a minimum rate of $15 per week.

        Most cases coming to our care may be placed in one of the following classes: (a) Mild mental diseases, nervous diseases not confining patients to bed or room, convalescent cases, senile cases. (b) Mental cases, somewhat disturbed, needing constant attention of nurse, acute melancholia, neurasthenia, the feeble, those confined to bed. (c) The most troublesome and disturbed mental cases, drug habits, inebriety.

        Charges--for Class A, $15 to $20 per week; for Class B, $20 to $25 per week; for Class C, $25 per week, upward. Extra charges for surgical operations, severe and prolonged illness, extra nursing and consultations.

        We have completed the new wing and are just finishing a steam house and cold-storage plant; have renovated the hot water, heating and plumbing, and are about to complete the therapeutic baths. Our place is advancing in development and usefulness each year.

ISAAC M. TAYLOR, M. D.,
Superintendent and Resident Physician.


Page 45

Report December 31, 1908.

        Dr. Isaac M. Taylor, president, and associated with him as partner and resident physician is Dr. Louis G. Beall. Mrs. Sallie C. Taylor, matron.

        The following is a table of the movement of population for six months ending December 31, 1908:

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients remaining July 1, 1908, 9 16 25
Admitted during six months 27 14 41
Discharged cured 4 5 9
Discharged improved 13 9 22
Discharged not improved 7 3 10
Died 2 1 3
Daily average number of patients     26
Daily number of officers and employees     19

        Of the 66 patients in charge during this period, 49 were insane, 9 were inebriates and drug habitues and the others suffering from nervous conditions.

        Residence States were as follows: North Carolina, 42, representing 26 counties; Virginia, 5; South Carolina, 11; and one each from West Virginia, Tennessee, Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Massachusetts and District of Columbia.

        Present capacity, 50. Male and female departments are wholly separate. Four attendants of each sex; a night attendant of each sex.

        No serious illness, accident or epidemic.

        All charges are based on a minimum rate of $15 per week; for drug cases and inebriates, $25 per week.

        The alterations and additions reported in progress in July have been completed. The most important are the addition of bath apparatus for hydrotherapy and the removal of the heating boilers to a central point eighty feet from the building, minimizing the danger from fire; a cold-storage room, which will add to the comfort of the patients. The plumbing has been thoroughly overhauled.

ISAAC M. TAYLOR, M. D.,
Superintendent.

DR. CARROLL'S SANITARIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities.)

DR. ROBERT S. CARROLL, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        The following table gives the movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1908:

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients, remaining January 1, 1908 7 6 13
Number present July 1, 1908 7 8 15


Page 46

  Men. Women. Total.
Number admitted 18 8 26
Discharged recovered 7 3 10
Discharged improved 8 1 9
Died      
Whole number removed     24
Daily average number of patients     13
Average number of officers and employees,     21

        Of this number of patients, insane, 10; drug habitues, 6; nervous, 10.

        Residence by States--North Carolina, 6; South Carolina, 3; Georgia, 4; New York; 3; Ohio, 3; Pennsylvania, 2; Kentucky, 2; and one each from Tennessee, Virginia and Wisconsin.

        On August 1st, Oak Lodge, a beautiful 25-room building on the Highland Home property, will be opened. This will increase the capacity from 18 to 30 patients and give an ideal home for patients of this class. It is a three-story frame-and-stone building; four bath rooms, six protected rooms, sixty feet protected porch and three other porches, with steam heat, hot and cold water in all rooms except protected rooms; a large club room, with pianola and billiard table. It nestles under the trees and is really inviting in its peaceful and quiet situation. This is the first of a series of four buildings which we hope to erect in the development of the ideal Highland Home Sanitarium. For several months we have been unable to accommodate the patients who have applied, and now have several on the waiting list. But we think that Oak Lodge will not only increase our efficiency and simplify our work, but will provide quarters for outside patients which are probably not surpassed in the South.

        Present officers are: Robert S. Carroll, M. D., president; William L. Dunn, M. D., vice-president; R. Pettus, G. N., superintendent of nurses. Miss Pettus, the chief nurse, is a graduate of the Government Hospital, Wasington, D. C. There are nine female and four male attendants.

        There has been no epidemic or serious accident. Good fire protection. Rate of charges, $25 to $75 per week.

        There is a training school for nurses and attendants in connection with the sanitarium. The degree of trained nurse is given after three years of study, training and practical experience, provided the work done has been satisfactory. There is a second course of two years open to male students, which offers the degree of trained attendant. A post-graduate course of one year is offered graduates of other training schools. This includes instruction in hydrotherapy, massage, hygiene, nursing of nervous and mental diseases, and hospital housekeeping.

ROBERT S. CARROLL, M. D.,
President.


Page 47

PERFECTED LIQUOR CURE INSTITUTION.

        This institution, which was under the charge of Dr. J. B. Gunter, at Greensboro, has been discontinued.

TELFAIR SANITARIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities.)

W. C. ASHWORTH, M. D., President. ASHEVILLE.

        This institution, for the treatment of inebriates, was opened April 20, 1907. After August 1st the sanitarium at Asheville will be closed and the new and up-to-date building in Greensboro will be ready for patients.

        The following is the table of the movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1908:

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients present January 1, 1908 3 3 6
Number admitted in the six months 20 6 26
Discharged recovered 6 3 9
Died (apoplexy) 1   1
Whole number removed     22
Remaining July 1, 1908 2 2 4
Daily average number of patients 4 2 6
Average number of officers and employees,     4

        Male and female departments wholly separated; one attendant of each sex.

        Officers are: W. C. Ashworth, M. D., president; J. M. Millikan, vice-president.

        No epidemic or serious accident.

        Residence States--North Carolina, Virginia, New Jersey, South Carolina, Colorado, Florida, Oklahoma, Tennessee.

        Fire escapes.

        Rates of charges, $25 to $50 per week.

        The new sanitarium in Greensboro will contain about thirty rooms. The departments for men and women are entirely separate. City sewerage. Adequate fire protection. It is well located, in Glenwood Park, private and free from noise and excitement incident to city life.

        W. C. ASHWORTH, M. D.,
President.


Page 48

TELFAIR SANITARIUM, GREENSBORO, N. C.
December 31, 1908.

(Inspected by the Secretary of the Board of Public Charities, August 8, 1908, and found satisfactory.)

        The Telfair Sanitarium was moved from Asheville on August 1st. Dr. W. C. Ashworth is president and J. M. Millikan is vice-president. Capacity of the hospital is 30. Male and female departments wholly separate. One attendant for each sex. There is no trained nurse. Charges, $15 to $50 per week. No epidemic or serious accident.

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients present July 1, 1908 22 8 30
Admitted during six months 20 6 26
Died      
Daily average number of patients     8
Daily average number of officers and employees     3

        Patients received from North Carolina, Virginia, New Jersey, Georgia, South Carolina and Tennessee. Those from this State were from Cabarrus, Stanly and Guilford counties.

WILLIAMS' PRIVATE SANATORIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities. Inspected August 8th by the Secretary and found satisfactory.)

DR. B. B. WILLIAMS, Superintendent. GREENSBORO.

        Williams' Private Sanatorium is located at 1020 West Market Street, Greensboro. The building is steam heated, electric lights, airy rooms, baths and all conveniences. Alcoholism, morphine and other drug addictions treated. This institution was opened for patients on April 13, 1908. Dr. B. B. Williams, president; Mr. John R. Robinson, manager.

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients present July 1, 1908,     5
Present during the six months ending December 31, 1908 38 3 41
Discharged cured 35 2 37
Died      
Daily average number of patients     3
Daily average number of employees     3

        Capacity of the sanatorium, 12 beds. Male and female departments are not wholly separated. One attendant for each sex. One trained nurse. No accident or epidemic.


Page 49

        Residence States: North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Virginia, Tennessee. Twelve counties of North Carolina. Rates of charges: Alcoholism, $100; drug addictions, $125; neurasthenia and rheumatism, $30 per week.

B. B. WILLIAMS, M. D.,
President.

THE McKANNA THREE-DAY LIQUOR CURE HOSPITAL.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities.)

DR. J. J. McKANNA, President. REIDSVILLE.

        This institution, for the care of inebriates, was opened June 1, 1906. Officers in charge are: Dr. J. J. McKanna, President, and Dr. J. W. McGehee, M. D.

        The following is the table of the movement of population during the six months ending July 1, 1908:

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number present January 1, 1908 25   25
Number received during six months to July 1st 76   76
Discharged cured     76
Died      
Remaining July 1, 1908      
Daily average number of patients 2.5   2.5
Average number of officers and employees,     5
Capacity of the institution     70

        Male and female departments wholly separated. Three male and two female attendants. No accident or epidemic.

        Residence States: North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia and Florida.

        Rates of charges, $100 for treatment. No changes or improvements. Several stairways, in case of fire.

J. J. McKANNA, M. D.,
President.

Report for December 31, 1908.

        Dr. J. W. McGehee is physician and Mr. George A. Hughes is manager.

        
Number present July 1st.  
Number received during the six months 90
Discharged cured 90
Died  
Average number of patients daily 1
Average number of employees 5

        Capacity of the institution, 60. Attendants, two men and one woman. No epidemic or serious accident. Terms, $100 for cure.

        Patients from Tennessee, South Carolina, North Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Virginia.

J. J. McKANNA, M. D.,
President.


Page 50

CONDITION OF COUNTY HOMES AND JAILS.

(Visitors' Reports.)

        The condition of Home buildings have been classed as follows:

        No County Homes in Bladen, Carteret, Currituck, Graham, Mitchell and Polk.

        New--Anson, Buncombe, Burke, Brunswick, Harnett, Forsyth, Onslow, Duplin, Montgomery, Madison and Haywood.

        Fair--Clay, Davidson, Jones, Lincoln, Robeson, Rutherford, Stokes, Transylvania, Warren and Wayne.

        Inferior--Cabarrus, Dare and Rockingham.

        Good--Alamance, Beaufort, Caldwell, Camden, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Chowan, Cleveland, Durham, Gaston, Gates, Granville, Greene, Henderson, Hertford, Iredell, Jackson, Johnston, Martin, Moore, New Hanover, Pamlico, Perquimans, Pitt, Richmond, Rowan, Sampson, Stanly, Tyrrell, Vance, Wake, Washington and Wayne.

MANAGEMENT OF HOMES.

        Good--Anson, Beaufort, Buncombe, Brunswick, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Camden, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Cherokee, Chowan, Clay, Cleveland, Davidson, Davie, Duplin, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Gaston, Gates, Granville, Greene, Harnett, Haywood, Henderson, Hertford, Iredell, Jackson, Johnston, Lenoir, Lincoln, Macon, Martin, Montgomery, Moore, New Hanover, Pasquotank, Pitt, Richmond, Robeson, Rockingham, Rowan, Rutherford, Sampson, Stanly, Stokes, Transylvania, Tyrrell, Vance, Wake, Warren, Washington, Wayne and Wilkes.

        Fair--Alamance, Dare, Jones, Person and Yancey.

CONDITION OF JAILS.

        New--Buncombe, Rowan, Forsyth, Duplin and Perquimans.

        Good--Alamance, Bladen, Brunswick, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Camden, Carteret, Caswell, Chatham, Cherokee, Chowan, Cleveland, Edgecombe, Gaston, Granville, Greene, Harnett, Haywood, Henderson, Hertford, Iredell, Jackson, Johnston, Jones, Macon, Moore, Pitt, Richmond, Robeson, Rutherford, Sampson, Stanly, Vance, Wake, Washington and Wayne.

        Fair--Anson, Catawba, Davidson (remodeling), Lincoln, Mecklenburg (to build), New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, Person, Transylvania and Yancey (building).

        Inferior--Burke, Clay, Dare, Davie, Rockingham, Tyrrell and Beaufort (too small).


Page 51

MANAGEMENT OF JAILS.

        Good--Alamance, Bladen, Brunswick, Buncombe, Burke, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Camden, Carteret, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Cherokee, Chowan, Cleveland, Davidson, Davie, Duplin, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Gaston, Gates, Granville, Greene, Halifax, Harnett, Haywood, Henderson, Hertford, Iredell, Jackson, Jones, Johnston, Lenoir, Lincoln, Macon, Martin, Montgomery, Moore, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, Person, Pitt, Richmond, Rockingham, Rutherford, Sampson, Stanly, Stokes, Transylvania, Vance, Wake, Washington and Wilkes.

        Fair--Anson, Clay, Dare, Mecklenburg, Rowan, Tyrrell and Wayne.


Page 52

COUNTY BOARDS OF VISITORS. 1908.

        
Alamance Rev. J. W. Holt Burlington.
  J. A. Turrentine Burlington.
  P. H. Fleming Burlington.
Alexander    
Alleghany    
Anson Dr. J. H. Bennett Wadesboro.
  Dr. J. M. Boyette Wadesboro.
  Mrs. W. J. Huntley Wadesboro.
Ashe    
Beaufort Dr. J. M. Gallagher Washington.
  Mrs. C. M. Brown Washington.
Bertie J. H. Matthews Windsor
  Mrs. Frank D. Winston Windsor.
  Miss Alice B. Outlaw Windsor.
Bladen Mrs. William Whitted Elizabethtown.
  Mrs. John A. McDowell Elizabethtown.
Brunswick George F. Drew Southport.
  Dr. Arthur Dosher Southport
Buncombe L. M. Stevens, M. D. Asheville.
  Mrs. William Turner Asheville.
  Mrs. A. Ramseur Asheville.
Burke Robert T. Claywell Morganton.
Cabarrus J. M. Hendrix Concord.
  G. Ed. Kestler Concord.
  Mrs. G. T. Crowell Concord.
Caldwell C. L. Wilson, M. D. Lenoir.
  J. W. Curtis Lenoir
  J. L Nelson Lenoir.
Camden T. B. Bouslall Belcross.
  George H. Riggs South Mills.
Carteret Mrs. W. H. Hendricks Beaufort.
  Mrs. H. H. Willis Beaufort.
Caswell Dr. S. A. Malloy Yanceyville.
Catawba Rev. M. A. Abernethy Newton.
Chatham George Pilkington Pittsboro.
  James L. Griffin Pittsboro.


Page 53

  Mrs. H. A. London Pittsboro.
  Mrs. Frank C. Poe Pittsboro.
Cherokee Mrs. R. H. Hyatt Murphy.
Chowan Rev. Robert B. Drane Edenton.
  W. B. Shepard Edenton.
  Benj. L. Evans Cisco.
  Mrs. W. D. Pruden Edenton.
Clay Prof. L. F. Shuford Hayesville.
Cleveland S. C. Hendricks Belwood.
Columbus Jackson Greer Whiteville.
  Rev. Chas. C. Smith Whiteville.
  Mrs. J. J. Williamson Whiteville.
Craven Harold Whitehurst New Bern.
  S. M. Brinson New Bern.
Cumberland Rev. J. J. Hall Fayetteville.
  Rev. W. M. Fairley Fayetteville.
Currituck    
Dare Charles L. Mann East Lake.
Davidson James Smith Lexington.
  Mrs. Charles A. Hunt, Sr. Lexington.
Davie F. M. Allen Mocksville.
  Mrs. A. M. Nail Mocksville.
Duplin A. P. Farrior Kenansville.
  D. L. Carlton Kenansville.
  J. A. Powell Kenansville.
  Mrs. A. P. Farrior Kenansville.
Durham Rev. E. R. Leyburn Durham.
Edgecombe James R. Gaskill Tarboro.
Forsyth Rev. Edward S. Crosland Winston-Salem.
  W. P. Hill Winston-Salem.
  H. W. Foltz Winston-Salem.
  Mrs. H. W. Foltz Winston-Salem.
  Mrs. Henry E. Fries Winston-Salem.
Franklin M. S. Davis Louisburg.
  Frank B. McKinne Louisburg.
Gaston Prof. J. P. Reid Gastonia.
Gates Martin Kellogg Gatesville.
Graham W. H. Garrison Yellow Creek.
  W. M. Taylor Robbinsville.


Page 54

Granville D. N. Hunt Oxford.
  Rev. W. S. Hester Oxford.
Greene L. V. Morrill Snow Hill.
  James L. Suggs Snow Hill.
  Miss Iola Exum Snow Hill.
Guilford A. M. Scales Greensboro.
  Rev. Melton Clark Greensboro.
  R. C. Hood Greensboro.
  Mrs. W. H. Osborn Greensboro.
Halifax Rev. George M. Tolson Weldon.
  Dr. D. B. Zollicoffer Weldon.
  S. D. Hancock Weldon.
Harnett Dr. J. H. Withers Lillington.
  C. M. McArtan Lillington.
  H. T. Faucett Summerville.
Haywood Mrs. M. J. Branner Waynesville.
  Mrs. M. M. Stringfield Waynesville.
Henderson Dr. J. G. Waldrop Hendersonville.
  Thos. J. Rickman Hendersonville.
  Rev. J. S. Jones Hendersonville.
  Mrs. Lila R. Barnwell Hendersonville.
Hertford John A. Northcott Winton.
  George V. Cowper Winton.
  John E. Vann Winton.
  W. P. Shaw Winton.
Hyde Greely Bruin Swan Quarter.
  S. S. Mann Swan Quarter.
Iredell L. Harrill, M. D. Statesville.
  Mrs. A. L. Coble Statesville.
  Mrs. D. A. Miller Statesville.
Jackson Robert L. Madison Painter.
  Rev. A. W. Davis Webster.
  W. D. Frizell Webster.
  Lee T. Wild Webster.
Johnston Rev. J. H. Shore Smithfield.
  Dr. Thel Hooks Smithfield.
  J. D. Spiers Smithfield.
  Mrs. W. S. Stevens Smithfield.
  Miss Flossie Abell Smithfield.


Page 55

Jones Julian K. Warren Trenton.
  C. C. May Trenton.
  F. W. Foscue Trenton.
Lenoir Rev. John H. Griffith Kinston.
  George V. Cooper, Jr Kinston.
  J. R. Rountree Kinston.
  Miss May Oettinger Kinston.
  Mrs. C. B. Woodley Kinston.
Lincoln Miss Kate Shipp Lincolnton.
  Mrs. R. S. Rienhardt Lincolnton.
Macon Rev. J. A. Deal Franklin.
  Dr. Higgins Franklin.
  R. F. Jarrett Franklin.
  Mrs. John C. Wright Franklin.
  Mrs. L. M. Rankin Franklin.
  Mrs. Ethel Deal Johnston Franklin.
Madison G. H. Roberts Marshall.
  Levi Hamlin Briggsville.
  Rev. L. J. Bailey Marshall.
Martin Wilson G. Lamb Williamston.
  Dr. W. E. Warren Williamston.
  Miss Hattie K. Thrower Williamston.
McDowell Dr. B. L. Ashworth Marion.
  J. M. Houck Marion.
  Mrs. E. H. Dysart Marion.
  Mrs. E. A. Thomas Marion.
  Miss Maggie Hudgings Marion.
Mecklenburg John McDowell Charlotte.
  Rev. Francis M. Osborne Charlotte.
  F. S. Neal Charlotte.
Mitchell    
Montgomery R. T. Poole Troy.
Moore John Campbell Carthage.
  George Humber Carthage.
Nash J. B. Boddie Nashville.
  W. H. Proctor Nashville.
  Dr. Jas. P. Battle Nashville.
New Hanover A. G. Hankins Wilmington.
  J. T. Kerr Wilmington.
  R. M. Wescott Wilmington.


Page 56

Northampton J. S. Grant Jackson.
  Paul J. Long Jackson.
Onslow G. H. Simmons Catherine Lake.
Orange Dr. C. D. Jones Hillsboro.
Pamlico Z. V. Rawls Pamlico.
  W. T. Mayo Mesic.
Pasquotank Rev. E. W. Stone Elizabeth City.
Pender    
Perquimans Dr. T. P. McMullan Hertford.
  B. S. Lassiter Hertford.
Person J. A. Hornaday Roxboro.
  J. A. Long, Jr. Roxboro.
Pitt J. W. Smith Greenville.
  E. W. Braxton Greenville.
  R. N. Nichols Greenville.
Polk T. C. Croker Columbus.
Randolph John T. Brittain Asheboro.
Richmond Robert A. Johnson Rockingham.
  J. S. Ledbetter Rockingham.
Robeson J. M. McNeill Lumberton.
Rockingham Ira R. Humphreys Wentworth.
  William Cummings Reidsville.
  Mrs. N. R. Reid Reidsville.
Rowan Rev. F. J. Murdoch Salisbury.
  H. T. Trantham Salisbury.
  James D. Heilig Salisbury.
Rutherford Dr. T. B. Twitty Rutherfordton.
  Dr. E. B. Harris Rutherfordton.
  W. A. Thompson Rutherfordton.
  Mrs. S. E. Wolfe Rutherfordton.
  Mrs. A. L. Grayson Rutherfordton.
Sampson Rev. T. M. Lee Clinton.
  F. B. Johnson Clinton.
  Mrs. T. L. Hubbard Clinton.
Scotland Mrs. Walter McEachin Laurinburg.
  Miss Effie McRae Laurinburg.
Stanly R. E. Austin Albemarle.
Stokes M. T. Chilton Danbury.
  Mrs. R. H. R. Blair Danbury.
Surry Dr. John R. Woltz Dobson.


Page 57

Swain    
Transylvania Rev. Chalmers D. Chapman Brevard.
  Rev. Robert G. Tuttle Brevard.
  Rev. W. P. Chedester Brevard.
Tyrrell J. C. Meekins, Sr. Columbia.
  T. L. Jones Columbia.
Union A. J. Brooks Monroe.
  J. D. Rast Monroe.
Vance Dr. F. R. Harris Henderson.
Wake John A. Mills Raleigh.
  I. C. Blair Raleigh.
  Mrs. E. E. Moffitt Raleigh
  Mrs. I. C. Blair Raleigh.
Warren P. H. Allen Warrenton.
  H. J. White Warrenton.
  H. B. Hunter Warrenton.
  Mrs. Henry A. Boyd Warrenton.
  Mrs. J. B. W. Jones Warrenton.
Washington Col. W. F. Beasley Plymouth.
  W. Fletcher Ausbon Plymouth.
Watauga Dr. J. M. Hodges Boone.
  J. F. Church Foscue.
Wayne M. L. Lee Goldsboro.
  Rev. F. W. Farries Goldsboro.
  Mrs. W. R. Hollowell Goldsboro.
  Miss Mary C. Borden Goldsboro.
Wilkes Dr. John Q. Myers North Wilkesboro.
  Rev. Z. Paris North Wilkesboro.
  Mrs. W. F. Troyden North Wilkesboro.
Wilson Rev. T. A. Cheatham Wilson.
  Mrs. Alice Wright Wilson.
Yadkin R. C. Puryear Yadkinville.
  Miss Julia Holt Yadkinville.
Yancey Dr. H. B. Robertson Burnsville.
  J. J. Ferguson Swiss.


Page 58

ORPHANAGES AND CHILD-CARING INSTITUTIONS.

        
Name. Location. Number Present November 1, 1908. Whole Number During Year 1908.
Alexander Home Charlotte 14 20
Baptist Orphanage Thomasville 373 409
Buncombe County Children's Home Asheville 13 36
Christian Orphanage Elon College 26 26
Crittenton Home Charlotte 9 18
Elhanan Institute* Marion 130 130
Eliada Orphanage Asheville 16 16
Faith Cottage Asheville 1 11
Lindley Training School Asheville 14 21
Methodist Orphanage Raleigh 131 131
Nazareth Orphans' Home Crescent 19 19
North Carolina Children's Home Society Greensboro 13 99
Odd Fellows' Orphan Home Goldsboro 121 132
Oxford Orphanage for Whites Oxford 325 368
Presbyterian Orphans' Home Barium Springs 175 211
Rest Cottage Greensboro 5 16
Roman Catholic Orphanage for Boys Raleigh 48 55
Sacred Heart Orphanage Belmont (Gaston County) 21 32
Thompson Orphanage and Training School Charlotte 60 88
ORPHANAGES FOR THE COLORED.
Oxford Orphanage for the Colored Oxford 142 148
Colored Orphan Home of Western Carolina Winston-Salem 30 30
Southern Orphanage and Industrial Training School Sanford 13 18
Total   1,569 1,904

        *Report not received.



Page 59

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE.

M. L. KESLER, Superintendent. THOMASVILLE.

        This orphanage is supported and controlled by the Baptist denomination of the State. It is directly under a board of trustees.

        
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 346
Number admitted during the year, to October 31, 1908 63
Whole number in charge 409
Become self-supporting 35
Died 1
Placed in families (except those returning to relatives)  
Remaining October 31, 1908:  
Boys, 183; girls, 190; total 373

        Children not under 5 nor over 12 years old are taken, and both sexes are received. Present capacity, 385. Health of the children is good. Sewerage. Cottage system. No regular protection against fire; hand buckets. Literary and industrial courses taught. Special attention paid to developing individuality. Seven now in colleges or high schools. We do not place out children. We are well supported in caring for them. Improvements during the year have been a library building and a new infirmary, costing $12,000.

        
Total receipts for the year were $59,811.38
Disbursements 59,811.38

        Indebtedness, $3,520. This was report at end of fiscal year June 25, 1908.

        Actual cost of maintaining and instructing 360 children for the year:

        
Food, fuel, clothing, etc $13,188.04
Salaries 7,727.50
Laundry expenses 452.29
Telephone rent 68.40
Pastor's salary 150.00
Shoe-shop account 2,250.72
Farm products consumed (estimated) 3,587.97
Medicine and medical attendance 445.76
Postage, traveling expenses, schoolbooks, etc 865.76
Contributions in kind 1,894.58
Total cost $30,631.02
Actual cost, per capita, per month $7.08

M. L. KESLER,
Superintendent.


Page 60

PRESBYTERIAN ORPHANS' HOME.

REV. JOHN WAKEFIELD, Superintendent. BARIUM SPRINGS.

        This orphanage is under the control of the Presbyterian Synod of North Carolina.

        
Number children admitted during year 63
Placed in families  
Become self-supporting 36
Whole number in charge during the year 211
Died  
Remaining October 31, 1908 175

        Children of both sexes are received. Those of foreign birth or parentage are taken if parents were residents of the State at the time of their death. Illegitimate children are not received if the mother is living. Fatherless children from 6 to 18 are received. Capacity of the institution, 180. There have been seven cases of scarlet fever; present health good. Excreta removed weekly. No special protection against fire. Literary and industrial courses taught. We do not place children in homes. We have the cottage system. Special attention paid to developing individuality. We are fairly well supported. Receipts and disbursements were $23,500.

        We are now contemplating adding water and sewerage system, electric lights and a printing plant to publish a weekly paper.

JOHN WAKEFIELD,
Superintendent.

THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING INSTITUTION.

REV. WALTER J. SMITH, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        This orphanage is under the control of the Protestant Episcopal Church of North Carolina. Present buildings will accommodate 72.

        
  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children remaining October 31, 1907 29 40 69
Number admitted during the year ending October 31, 1908 13 6 19
Placed in families and returned to friends     21
Self-supporting     2
Dismissed     1
Remaining October 31, 1908 29 31 60

        Admitted at 3 years of age; boys discharged at 15 and girls from 16 to 18. Both sexes and foreign-born admitted. There has been an epidemic of malaria. Present health is good. Sewerage and surface


Page 61

closets. Two-inch pipes in the buildings and fire plugs within a square and a half. The children are housed in two large buildings. One pupil in college. We have placed a few in private homes, but do not like to do it. Yes, we are well supported in caring for the children. Receipts, $7,032.82; disbursements, $7,669.81. A new corn crib has been built by our own force. Water pipes have been extended to the stock shed. Literary course and training in farm and domestic work.

WALTER J. SMITH,
Superintendent.

METHODIST ORPHANAGE.

REV. JOHN N. COLE, Superintendent. RALEIGH.

        This institution is maintained and controlled by the North Carolina Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

        
Number children admitted during year ending October 31, 1908 30
Whole number in charge 131
Become self-supporting 3
Died 1
Remaining October 31, 1908 131

        Both sexes received. Admitted from 6 to 12 years of age and discharged at 18. Capacity of the orphanage is 200. No serious accident or epidemic; present health of the children is good. One large building at present, but working towards the cottage system. No children are placed out until they finish the course. Institution has sewerage; no special fire protection. Literary course and sewing, etc., taught. We are well supported in caring for the children. Receipts and disbursements $23,000.

JOHN N. COLE,
Superintendent.

SACRED HEART ORPHANAGE.

RT. REV. LEO HAID, Superintendent. BELMONT.

        The Roman Catholic Orphanage for girls is located at Belmont, Gaston County. It is under the control of St. Mary's Catholic Church, with Mother Mary Teresa in charge.

        
Number remaining October 31, 1907 25
Number admitted during the fiscal year 7
Whole number in charge during the year 32
Remaining October 31, 1908 21

        Girls are received without restriction as to age. Present capacity 30. No accident or serious illness; present health of the children is excellent. One large building. No special protection against fire.


Page 62

Industrial courses taught. Receipts, $265; disbursements, $2,000. One child placed in private home. Added a classroom during the year. There is a system of oversight of children placed out. We are not well supported in the care of the children.

MOTHER MARY TERESA,
Directress.

ROMAN CATHOLIC ORPHANAGE FOR BOYS.

FATHER THOMAS F. PRICE, Supt. NAZARETH (near Raleigh).

        This institution was opened in 1899 with four children in charge. It is beautifully situated three miles from the city and seventy-five feet above the Capitol grounds. It is under the control of the Roman Catholic Church.

        
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 40
Admitted during the fiscal year 15
Placed in families 3
Become self-supporting 4
Remaining October 31, 1908 48
Died  

        Age of admission 4 and of discharge 16. Only boys taken. Capacity, 60. No epidemic or serious accident; general health of the children good. No sewerage. Fire extinguishers. One building for the children. Special attention paid to individuality. Both industrial and literary courses taught. None in colleges or high schools. Three children placed out in 1907. All of our support is in the form of donations. After children are placed out we see that they are well cared for and lose none of their moral training.

THOMAS P. HAYDEN,
Chaplain.

THE CHRISTIAN ORPHANAGE.

REV. JAMES L. FOSTER, Superintendent. ELON COLLEGE.

        This institution is under the control of the Southern Christian Convention.

        
  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 7 9 16
Number admitted during the year 7 3 10
Total in charge     26
Placed in families      
Become self-supporting      
Died      
Remaining October 31, 1908     26


Page 63

        Children of both sexes and foreign-born received. May not be received under 5; discharged at 18. No epidemic or serious accident; present health of children is good. No sewerage; excreta removed and composted. We are planning to develop a cottage system; at present one building. We are developing the family idea. Children attend the district graded school. Work on the farm. Receipts and disbursements about $3,000. Some farm buildings have been added. With farm products we do well for support of the children.

        Our work has done well during the past year. Good health, good crops, a very reasonable financial support, with many donations in kind.

JAMES L. FOSTER,
Superintendent.

ODD FELLOWS' ORPHAN HOME.

J. F. BRINSON, Superintendent. GOLDSBORO.

        The Home is located on a twenty-acre plat of land at Goldsboro. The first building was opened in 1892. It is maintained and controlled by the Odd Fellows of the State.

        
  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 50 48 98
Number admitted to end of fiscal year (April)     34
Placed in families      
Died      
Become self-supporting     9
Remaining October 31, 1908     121

        Age of admission 5 to 15. Discharged at 17 and 18. Both sexes received. Capacity for 140. Fevers for nearly three months, but present health good. Sewerage. Fire extinguishers and fire escapes and city fire department.

        The children attend the graded school of the town. They work on the farm and do the work of the house.

        Much is done to develop individuality. Two in colleges. An annex to the dining-room and dormitories were added during the year. Receipts, $13,598.15; disbursements, $8,626.89. We are well supported in caring for the children. We employ a music teacher, who teaches in the afternoons. The boys are helping in the printing of the "North Carolina Odd Fellow."

        When the new Jacobi Memorial Building is completed and an adequate steam-heating plant and laundry added, the present plant, including the Home for Aged Odd Fellows, will be valued at about $125,000.

J. F. BRINSON,
Superintendent.


Page 64

NORTH CAROLINA CHILDREN'S HOME SOCIETY.

W. B. STREETER, Superintendent. GREENSBORO.

        This society receives children of both sexes from one day to 15 years old, and places them in private families. It is supported entirely by voluntary contributions.

        
Number children on hand October 31, 1907 13
Received during the year 86
Whole number in charge 99
Placed in families 86
Remaining October 31, 1908 13

        We have the cottage system in its fullest sense, the family home, and the capacity is unlimited. In all 309 have been so placed. We are well supported in the care of the children. Strict oversight is kept of the children until of age. Receipts and for the year, about $8,000. Experience has taught that the actual cost of caring for a destitute child during his minority on the Children's Home Society plan, is about $100.

W. B. STREETER,
Superintendent.

BUNCOMBE COUNTY CHILDREN'S HOME.

        This is a county institution controlled and supported by Buncombe County. The commissioners appoint a board of managers and they in turn employ a competent man and woman to take charge of the Home. Mr. J. P. Howatt is the present chairman of the board.

        
  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 13 4 17
Number admitted during the fiscal year, . . . . . . 36
Placed in families . . . . . . 23
Died . . . . . . . . .
Remaining October 31, 1908 3 10 13

        Both sexes are received. Capacity, 25. No serious accident or epidemic; present health of the children is good. Cared for in one building. Sewerage and city water; these have been added during the past year. Children are placed out, and they are under care and oversight after being placed in families.

J. P. HOWATT,
Chairman.


Page 65

NAZARETH ORPHANS' HOME.

REV. J. M. LYERLY, Pres. Board of Managers. CRESCENT.

        This orphanage is under the control of the Reformed Church in the United States.

        
  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 6 6 12
Number admitted during the fiscal year, 2 5 7
Died      
Self-supporting      
Remaining October 31, 1908     19

        Children of both sexes received. Admitted at 4 years and discharged at 18. Capacity, 50. Health of the children good. No sewerage. No special protection against fire. Cottage system. Special attention to developing individuality. Industrial and literary courses taught. Seventeen in the academy. We place children in private homes. None now placed. Receipts, $3,000; expenditures, $2,500. The plant has been enlarged by the addition of seven acres of land and a two-story building, with outbuildings. We are well supported in providing for the children.

J. M. LYERLY,
President.

ALEXANDER HOME.

MRS. C. M. CARSON, President. CHARLOTTE.

        This institution is under the control of the Presbyterian churches of the city. In 1895 the present home was given by Mr. R. B. Alexander. It is supported by voluntary contributions from the Sunday-schools and from private individuals. In charge, 20. Only one death has occurred since the opening of the Home. Children are received at 4 years of age, though some exceptions. Both sexes received. We try to secure homes for them. Capacity 25 or 30. There has been an epidemic of whooping-cough; health at present is very good. City fire department. Sewerage. Though housed in one building, the number is limited. Children attend the city graded schools. We place out children when we can find good homes. We are moderately well supported. About $1,500 was expended on improvements during the past year. Children are too widely scattered to continue personal oversight, but we keep in touch through correspondence.

MRS. C. M. CARSON,
President.


Page 66

LINDLEY TRAINING SCHOOL.

MISS ISABEL R. WHALLON, Matron. ASHEVILLE.

        This institution is a rescue home for girls. It was opened about thirteen years ago, and is interdenominational, supported by voluntary contributions. It is five miles from the city with a farm of 28 acres. A farmer and his wife occupy a cottage on the place and cultivate the land. A matron and assistant have control of the institution. When possible, the girl seeking admission pays from $5 to $10 per month. In addition, they must assist in the housework. Every girl must make voluntary application and must agree to obey the rules. We prefer that they should remain two years. When they have no friends to care for them, we place them in service in good homes.

        
Number of girls in the Home at last report 11
Number of children 11
Number of girls received during the year 13
Number of infants 10
Number now present:  
Girls 13
Children 14

        Receipts, $4,927.72; expenditures, $2,012.42.

        One-half are reclaimed.

MRS. M. E. HILLIARD,
Acting President.

REST COTTAGE.

MISS WINFRED R. COX, Matron. GREENSBORO.

        Our rescue home is supported by contributions from individuals from various parts of the country. We have no board or persons to look to.

        
  Children. Women.
Number persons remaining October 31, 1907 4 8
Number admitted during the year 12 17
Placed in families   15
Died 3  
Remaining October 31, 1908 5 9

        Children received over 2 years old. Any age for wayward girls. Capacity, 25. No serious accident or epidemic; health good. No sewerage; city scavenger. Insurance. Personal care. Industrial and literary courses taught. Receive no compensation from people. Oversight of those who are placed out. About 70 per cent reform. Receipts, $644.47; disbursements, $585.09.

WINFRED R. COX,
Matron.


Page 67

FAITH COTTAGE.

LUCIUS B. COMPTON, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        Faith Cottage is a rescue home, located at 53 Atkinson Street, Asheville. It is a two-story building of seventeen rooms. The Home was opened June 2, 1903. It is supported by free-will offerings, a faith work, and is not controlled by any church or organization.

        
  Women. Infants.
Number of inmates remaining October 31, 1907 6 2
Whole number in charge during the year 22 9
Placed in families 5  
Died   2
Remaining October 31, 1908 3 1

        Present capacity of the institution, 16. There have been cases of scarlet fever and typhoid fever; present health good. Sewerage. Taught industrial work. One girl in a Bible school. Receipts were $854.26; disbursements, $770.89. Nearly all make professions, but just how many really reform would be impossible to tell. Condition for admission is a willingness to forsake former life. Discharged when fit to take position or return to friends, or when unwilling to comply with the rules.

ROSE FAIRLEE,
Secretary.

CRITTENTON HOME.

MRS. M. C. CARTER, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        This rescue home was opened June 27, 1905. It is under the management of a board composed of members from each Protestant church. Girls who have left the right path and truly wish to reform are received. No slum cases are admitted.

        
  Women. Infants.
Whole number in charge during year 37 18
Number remaining October 27, 1907 11 9
Placed in families 3  
Died    

        Capacity, 25 girls and for infants. No serious accident or epidemic; health very good. Sewerage. City fire department. Industrial course taught. We are well supported. No additions this year. Expenses, $150 per month. Ninety-five per cent reform.

MRS. M. C. CARTER,
Superintendent.


Page 68

ORPHAN HOME AND SCHOOL.

IRA E. COWLING, Superintendent. DEWDROP.

        The Christian Orphans' Home and School of Dewdrop, North Carolina, has been consolidated with the Southeastern Christian Orphans' Home at Baldwin, Georgia, and removed to the latter place.

IRA E. COWLING,
Superintendent.

ELIADA ORPHANAGE.

LUCIUS B. COMPTON, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        The orphanage was opened in June, 1906. It is not controlled by any organization or church.

        
  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 6 7 13
Whole number in charge during year     16
Placed in families      
Become self-supporting      
Died      
Remaining October 31, 1908     16

        No age limit for admission; discharged at 21. Present capacity of the institution, 40. Whooping-cough during the year. Present health is good. Cottages. The building has two proches all the way around it and is easily accessible with ladders in case of fire. No sewerage. Industrial and literary courses taught. None in colleges or high schools yet. We are well supported in the care of the children. Receipts, $2,538.46; disbursements, $2,342.19. Preparations are now being made for heating and water supply.

ROSE FAIRLEE,
Secretary.

SOUTHERN ORPHANGE AND INDUSTRIAL TRAINING
SCHOOL FOR COLORED YOUTH.

W. H. QUICK, Superintendent. SANFORD.

        This institution was chartered in 1905. It is not controlled by any church or organization. Now in charge, 13 children; 15 have been placed in families. Children from 5 to 12 years received. Both sexes. General health has been good. Town sanitary system in force. A new schoolroom has been built. Receipts about $50; disbursements, $250. We are not well supported in the care of the children. We need the aid of money to enable us to pay teacher, support, feed and clothe the children.

W. H. QUICK,
Superintendent.


Page 69

COLORED ORPHAN HOME OF WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA.

REV. J. PERRY, Superintendent. WINSTON-SALEM.

        The Colored Orphan Home is located near Winston-Salem. It is governed by a board of trustees appointed by the churches.

        
  Boys. Girls.
Number children remaining October 31, 1907 15 13
Whole number during the year   30
Died   1

        Children who are orphans received from 2 years up and discharged at 21. The Home has six rooms. No accident or serious epidemic; present health good. No sewerage; excreta hauled off. Receipts, $628.93; disbursements, $444.45. In some things we are well supported. No additions or improvements.

J. PERRY,
Superintendent.

CATHERINE KENNEDY HOME.

MRS. ROGER MOORE, President. WILMINGTON.

        The Benevolent Society, which was chartered over fifty years ago, has established this Home for old ladies who have had advantages in times past and who are unable to make a living. We have two methods of caring for them. Some pay $100 admission, which gives them food and shelter for life, they supplying other needs. In the annex they pay no admission fee, but pay $12 per month.

        
Number of inmates in the Home October 31, 1907 10
Admitted during the year 2
Died 1
Number remaining October 31, 1908 11
Receipts for the year were $1,046.00
Disbursements 1,077.95

        The Home is maintained by interest on investment mainly. Good sewerage and water supply. Insured. It is undenominational.

        We have five names now on our waiting list.

MRS. ROGER MOORE,
President L. B. Society.

THE SALEM HOME.

MRS. M. E. VOGLER, President. WINSTON-SALEM.

        This institution was founded in 1887. It is located on South Main Street, Salem. It is a comfortable home for old ladies. No condition for admission; any needy woman or child who has no one to help her.


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Number in charge October 31, 1908 8
Admitted during the year 9
Died 1
Number remaining October 31, 1908 16

        Receipts and disbursements for the fiscal year, about $600.

MRS. M. E. VOGLER,
President.

ST. LUKE'S HOME.

ST. LUKE'S CIRCLE OF KING'S DAUGHTERS. RALEIGH.

        This Home for old ladies was established in 1895. It is maintained through the efforts of the Circle and the assistance of friends. It is a comfortable refuge for old ladies who are reduced in circumstances. No admission fees.

        
Number in the Home October 31, 1907 10
Since admitted, to October 31, 1908 2
Died 1
Number remaining October 31, 1908 11

        City fire department for protection against fire. Good sewerage and water supply.

        
Receipts for the fiscal year $1,604.14
Disbursements 1,514.62

MRS B. F. DIXON,
Leader of St. Luke's Circle.

ODD FELLOWS' HOME.

J. F. BRINSON, Superintendent. GOLDSBORO.

        This institution was opened during the past year and is located about one hundred and fifty yards to the north of the main building of the Orphanage. It is an imposing two-story structure with ample double porches on each side, and is called the "Home for the Aged and Infirm." There are as yet only three old persons in the Home. The building is well located, has sewerage and steam heat and is comfortable and homelike.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

REV. R. S. STEPHENSON, Superintendent. RALEIGH.

        This organization is composed of the subscribers to the fund for care of the poor of the city. Its object is to join the charitable forces


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of the city in a united effort to help the poor by upholding the family. Proper investigation of all cases coming before it is one of its governing principles. "Knowledge is the foundation of all intelligent and effective aid." "Intelligent giving and intelligent withholding are alike true charity."

        
Times help has been extended 1,495
Times applicants have been refused 195
Visits 1,900
Funerals 10
Persons sent home 32
Times secondhand clothing has been sent out from the office 1,004
Employment found for 71
Baskets of food given out on Thanksgiving Day 350
Homes found for helpless children 8

        The children of the graded schools always help with the Thanksgiving offering.

        Subscriptions during twelve months, $2,171.56. Cost of groceries and wood furnished the needy, $1,104.88. Other items, drugs, nurse furnished the sick, coffins, board and lodging, etc.

R. S. STEPHENSON,
Superintendent.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MRS. F. P. WILD, Secretary. ASHEVILLE.

        This society was organized in 1884 as the Flower Mission and is known as the "Flower Mission and Associated Charities." The following figures are given for the period from November to April: Helped 140, refused 29. We have a district nurse, and invalid food is provided when necessary. Some transportation. A small sum is charged for clothing. Street begging has been eliminated to a great extent. We have an annual meeting and publish items in the daily papers. We are well supported. We have an office and secretary. Friendly Visitors also. We hold regular and frequent meetings of the committee. We are trying to help people to help themselves. We secure work for applicants whenever possible. Little work this winter and the demand for aid has been great.

MRS. F. P. WILD,
Secretary.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MISS ANNIE GROGAN, Secretary. WINSTON-SALEM.

        This association for the help and uplift of the poor was organized in March, 1905. Mrs. W. B. Taylor is president. We hold monthly


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meetings of the board and an annual meeting, when the officers are elected. Wonders have been accomplished in preventing house-to-house begging. Funds are raised by members of the board soliciting citizens for subscriptions.

        
Number of families aided during the fiscal year 552
Number of persons refused help 152
Receipts for the year $1,134.17
Disbursements 1,173.31
Balance from 1907 167.00

        We have $150 as a nurse fund. We are well supported by the public. The daily papers publish reports. No office. Visitors appointed at the monthly meetings.

ANNIE GROGAN,
Secretary.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MISS CARRIE L. PRICE, Secretary. WILMINGTON.

        This association was organized in October, 1893. It is under a board of eighteen directors, the ministers of the churches, three physicians, five business men and one of the county commissioners. It is supported by $1,500 per annum from the county, and contributions from the churches and from individuals. Besides the board of directors, there are twelve ladies who have charge of the districts and twelve Visitors.

        
Number of families aided during the year 120
Receipts $2,391.52
Disbursements 2,501.06

        Fresh-air outings are given by the churches and different organizations. There is a district nurse for the city, but not supported by this organization. Street begging has been almost abolished. We have an annual public meeting and a report is published. The public is informed of the work through the press. The secretary has charge of the office, which is open from 9 to 2 P. M.

CARRIE L. PRICE,
Secretary.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MRS. R. D. BLACKNALL, Secretary. DURHAM.

        This association was organized in October, 1903. The administration is vested in a committee of ministers and laymen. The office work is done by the secretary, who receives donations, hears, investigates and deals with applicants, and keeps a record and account of the business, being directly responsible to and in communication


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with the committee. By agreement of the Ministers' Association, all churches care for their own needy members, and this class of applicants is brought at once to the notice of the pastors for relief. This office deals with emergency cases and those who are without resources. Relief is given on a basis of need, not personal character, and in the most practical way.

        
Number of families aided during the fiscal year 61
Refused help 15
Receipts $513.50
Disbursements 510.82

        No fresh-air outings or district nurse. We are only fairly well supported outside of the churches. No annual public meeting. Supported by pledges given by the city churches, the city and individuals. Statements published in the daily press.

        The secretary is in the office from 10 to 12 daily except Sundays. Regular meetings of the committee. The authorized supplies are food, fuel and medicine, issued only by printed order slips signed by the secretary. Secondhand clothing given out without order. Other appeals are referred to the committee.

MRS. R. D. BLACKNALL,
Secretary.


Page 74

PRIVATE HOSPITALS.

        
NAME. LOCATION. Whole Number Treated During 1908. Charity Patients, 1908.
Asheville Mission Hospital Asheville 606 390
Atlantic Coast Line Rocky Mount    
Biggs Sanatorium Greensboro    
Billingsley Hospital Statesville    
Charlotte Sanatorium Charlotte (not open)    
Central Carolina Hospital Sanford    
Clarence Barker Memorial Asheville 202 67
Cragmont Sanatorium Black Mountain (private)    
Dr. Long's Sanitarium Statesville (private, some free work).    
Davidson Hospital Davidson    
Goldsboro Hospital Goldsboro    
Good Samaritan (colored) Charlotte 300 160
Highsmith Hospital Company Fayetteville (private)    
Junior Order High Point    
James Walker Memorial Hospital Wilmington 1,458 684
Leonard Medical School Hospital (col.) Raleigh 126 110
Lincoln Hospital (colored) Durham    
Mercy General Hospital Charlotte 215 40
Pickford Sanitarium (colored) Southern Pines 34 9
Pittman Hospital Tarboro    
Presbyterian Hospital Charlotte 1,050 50
Rex Hospital Raleigh    
Rutherford Hospital Rutherfordton (private) 548 35
St. Agnes' Hospital (colored) Raleigh 210 much charity.
St. Leo's Hospital Greensboro 673 80
St. Luke's Hospital Company Fayetteville (private) 185 10
St. Peter's Hospital Charlotte    
Salisbury Hospital Salisbury    
Sanitarium Kinston    
Scotland Laurinburg    
Slater Hospital (colored) Winston-Salem 57 28
S. R. Fowle Memorial Hospital Washington   40
Stewart Sanatorium New Bern    
Thermal Belt Sanitarium Tryon (private)    
Twin-City Hospital Winston-Salem 365 139
Watts Hospital Durham 446 141
Wilson Sanatorium Wilson (private) 404  
Winyah Sanatorium Asheville (private)    


Page 75

ASHEVILLE MISSION HOSPITAL.

MISS MARY PERKINS LAXTON, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        This hospital was organized in 1885. It is located on Charlotte and Woodfin streets. It is under a board of twelve managers.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 21
Number of patients admitted during the year 585
Whole number treated during the year 606
Died 34
Discharged 552
Remaining October 31, 1908 26

        Available beds, 60. Nurses, 18. Charity patients, 390. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $5 and $7 per week in the wards; rooms, $10 and $25 per week. Buncombe County and the city of Asheville each give $1,500 per year to aid in its support. Good sewerage and fire protection. Insured. No endowment fund. Some improvements during the year. No insane or inebriates treated.

MARY P. LAXTON,
Superintendent.

WATTS' HOSPITAL.

MISS MARY L. WYCHE, Superintendent. DURHAM.

        This hospital was a gift to Durham by Mr. George Watts. Durham gives $2,400 per year for its support and it has an endowment which yields $1,300 per annum.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1908 15
Number admitted during the year 431
Whole number treated 446
Died 29
Discharged 417
Number remaining October 31, 1908 15

        Available beds, 35. Nurses, 12. Charity patients, 141. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $6 to $18 per week. Buildings insured. Sewerage.

        
Expenditures $10,419.30
Disbursements 10,306.24

        No improvements to this building, but a large new hospital is in course of construction.

MARY L. WYCHE,
Superintendent.


Page 76

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL.

MISS ELLA H. MACNICHOLS, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 25
Admitted during the present fiscal year 1,025
Died 27
Number remaining October 31, 1908 23

        Available beds, 40. Nurses, 20. There is a training school for nurses in connection with the hospital. Charity patients, 50. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $10 to $20 per week. Good fire protection. Insured. Sewerage. No municipal or county funds received. No endowment. Expenditures $16,900 and receipts $16,780. The hospital building has been thoroughly remodeled and refurnished in the past six months. No inebriates or insane treated. Charity patients are partly supported by the Presbyterian Church of Charlotte.

ELLA H. MACNICHOLS,
Superintendent.

S. R. FOWLE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

MISS JULIA A. SMITH, Superintendent. WASHINGTON.

        This hospital was established in 1904. It is under the management of a board of directors. Available beds, 30. Nurses, 5. Number of charity patients during the year, 40. Schedule of charges: $10 and $15 per week. Fire protection. Buildings insured. Sewerage.

JULIA A. SMITH,
Superintendent.

REX HOSPITAL.

HON. RICHARD H. BATTLE, President. RALEIGH.

        On the 12th day of January, 1909, the cornerstone of the new and enlarged Rex Hospital was laid by the Grand Lodge of Masons of North Carolina. John Rex, a native of Pennsylvania, and one of the earliest settlers in Raleigh, died on the 29th of January, 1839, aged seventy-four. He died a bachelor and left his entire estate in North Carolina first to pay his debts, then to provide for the manumission of his slaves, seventeen in number, and their removal under the auspices of the African Colonization Society and their establishment in a colony in Africa, and the residue of his estate to be turned over to trustees for the establishment of a hospital, "for the sick and afflicted poor of the city of Raleigh."

        The General Assembly of 1840-41 chartered a corporation under the name of the Trustees of Rex Hospital, which is managed by five citizens. These citizens are nominated by the commissioners or aldermen of the city for appointment by the Supreme Court of the State.


Page 77

        The executors of John Rex turned over to the trustees twenty-one acres of land and $9,602.06. This fund was invested and in April, 1861, it amounted to $35,262.14. Most of the bonds in which this sum was invested became worthless as a result of the war. But by 1893 the solvent securities had again increased to about $30,000, and the trustees bought a building which had been used for the care of patients and which was supported by the two Episcopal churches. This was enlarged and opened on May 1, 1894. The city contributing to its support.

        The new building in course of construction will cost $50,000. It is on the pavilion plan. It will accommodate sixty patients and fourteen nurses and will be thoroughly up to date in equipment.

        The city appropriates $2,000 per annum.

        
Number of patients in charge October 31, 1907 12
Admitted during the present fiscal year 340
Died 19
Discharged 321
Number remaining October 31, 1908 12

ELLA J. HARRIS,
Matron.

ST. LEO'S HOSPITAL.

SISTER VERONICA, Superintendent, GREENSBORO.

        This hospital is modern and up to date in its building and equipment. It was opened for patients in 1906.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 42
Number admitted during the present fiscal year 631
Whole number treated 673
Died 41
Discharged 590
Remaining October 31, 1908 42

        Available beds, 100. Nurses, 29. Charity patients, 80. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $1.50 to $3.50 per day. The county pays $5 per week for patients sent by it. Good sewerage and fire protection. Insured. No inebriates or insane treated. The institution has no endowment fund.

SISTER VERONICA,
Superintendent.

PITTMAN HOSPITAL.

MISS M. T. SHACKLEFORD, Superintendent. TARBORO.

        This hospital is under the management of a board of directors. The county appropriates $1,000 per annum. Available beds, 25.


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Nurses, 6. Schedule of charges: $7 to $25 per week. Fire protection and sewerage. Buildings insured. Some endowment fund. Some improvements during the year.

M. T. SHACKLEFORD,
Superintendent.

TWIN-CITY HOSPITAL.

MISS L. EUGENIA HENDERSON, Supt. WINSTON-SALEM.

        The hospital receives aid from the city. It has an endowment fund of $10,000. Its regular income is $2,200, which is supplemented by money received from pay patients and contributions. Expenditures for the year were $6,995.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 7
Number admitted during the year 358
Whole number treated during the year 365
Died 30
Discharged 327
Number remaining October 31, 1908 8

        Number of available beds, 30. Eight nurses in training. Charity patients, 139. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $10, $12.50, $15 and $18 per week. Repairs since the last report, $500.52. No insane or inebriates treated. We are greatly in need of a larger plant embracing an obstetric ward and a free dispensary.

MRS. WILLIAM BARRET TAYLOR,
Secretary.

JAMES WALKER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

DR. RALPH B. SEEM, Superintendent. WILMINGTON.

        This institution was established in 1902 and is under the control of a board of managers. It receives $4,800 from the city and $7,200 from the county--$12,000 annually. No case of insanity, contagious disease or simple alcoholism is admitted. Chronic and incurable cases admitted temporarily only.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 49
Admitted during the year 1,021
Whole number treated during the year 1,458
Died 117
Discharged 823
Number remaining October 31, 1908 47

        Available beds, 85. Nurses, 16. Charity patients, 684. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $20, $15, $10, $9 and $7 per week. There is good fire protection. Insurance. Sewerage. No endowment fund.


Page 79

Improvements have been: addition to the heating plant, skylight in the operating room, provision made for increased supply of hot water.

        Receipts were $25,130.26; disbursements, $25,156.97; deficit $26.71.

RALPH B. SEEM, M. D.,
Superintendent.

CRAGMONT SANATORIUM.

DR. I. J. ARCHER, Superintendent. BLACK MOUNTAIN.

        This is a private sanatorium. Available beds, 25. Nurses, 2. No charity patients. Schedule of charges: $20 to $35. Good fire protection. Buildings insured. Sewerage. No inebriates or insane treated. For care and treatment of diseases of the lungs and throat.

I. J. ARCHER, M. D.,
Superintendent.

ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL.

DR. J. H. MARSH, Superintendent. FAYETTEVILLE.

        This is a private hospital, with Dr. J. H. Marsh superintendent and Miss E. M. Hartman superintendent of nurses.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 11
Admitted during the fiscal year 174
Died 3
Discharged 171
Number remaining October 31, 1908 6

        Available beds, 24. Nurses, 6. Charity patients, 10. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $10 to $20 per week. Sewerage. Fire protection.

J. H. MARSH, M. D.,
Superintendent.

DR. LONG'S SANITARIUM.

DR. HENRY LONG, Superintendent. STATESVILLE.

        This is a private institution, located on North Center Street. No funds from any source whatever except from pay patients. It is a strictly private institution, though we do a great deal of free work.

ANNIE FERGUSON,
Superintendent of Nurses.

CHARLOTTE SANATORIUM.

MISS E. E. CHERRYMAN, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        This sanatorium is under the control of the Charlotte Sanatorium Company. It is located on Seventh and Church streets. It is a private


Page 80

institution and does not receive funds from county or city. It has not yet been opened for patients. Available beds will be 60. Nurses, 20. Schedule of charges, from $1.50 to $5 per day. Sewerage and fire protection. It is for those who need rest and treatment in a southern climate. One thousand feet above sea-level in the Piedmont region; health conditions are admirable, never extremes of heat or cold.

MISS E. E. CHERRYMAN,
Superintendent.

WILSON SANATORIUM.

MISS CLEONE HOBBS. Superintendent. WILSON.

        This hospital is a private enterprise controlled by Drs. C. E. Moore and E. T. Dickenson. The following is the table of the movement of population for the fiscal year:

        
Number of patients remaining at the end of fiscal year 12
Number admitted during the present year 392
Whole number treated 404
Died 13
Discharged 378
Number remaining October 31, 1908 13

        Available beds, 25. Nurses, 12. No charity patients. Schedule of charges: $14 to $21 per week. Hose and extinguishers on each floor as fire protection. Sewerage. Insured. No changes. No inebriates or insane treated.

C. E. MOORE, M. D.,
Superintendent.

RUTHERFORD HOSPITAL.

MISS PEARL WETMORE, Head Nurse. RUTHERFORDTON.

        This is a private hospital which was opened October 9, 1906. There was such need for those unable to pay for treatment that the authorities now pay $500 per year for charity patients.

        
Number patients remaining October 31, 1907 14
Admitted during the present fiscal year 300
Whole number treated during the year, including outside patients 548
Died (7 medical and accident cases, 4 dying within twenty-four hours of admission) 21
Discharged 276
Number remaining October 31, 1908 17

        Available beds, 35. Nurses, 7. Charity patients, 35, and a number who were able to pay only a small part of the regular charges. Schedule of charges: $10 per week in the ward and $15 per week in the


Page 81

rooms. Good sewerage and fire protection. Insured. No endowment fund. Steam laundry, hydraulic ram and new waterworks, and sun parlor have been added during the year. Have instituted a training school for nurses, two-year course. No insane or inebriates treated.

HENRY NORRIS, M. D.,
President.

THE THERMAL BELT SANITARIUM.

DR. W. R. ENGEL, Physician in Charge. TRYON.

        This is a private hospital for the treatment of medical and surgical tubercular diseases. The altitude is 1,200 feet; fine scenery; fine all-the-year-round climate. Successful treatment of tubercular cases. Available beds, 24. Nurses, 3. Schedule of charges: $25 per week. Good fire protection. Sewerage. Insured. Only tuberculosis treated.

E. R. ENGEL, M. D.,
President.

CLARENCE BARKER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

MISS MARY TRISE, Superintendent. BILTMORE.

        This is a memorial hospital and is under the direction of All Souls Church and the vestry, with such other persons as they may associate with them. It has a $20,000 endowment; nothing from public funds.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 6
Admitted during the present year 196
Whole number treated during the year 202
Died 7
Discharged 195
Number remaining October 31, 1908 7

        Available beds, 16. Nurses, 7. About one-third of those treated were charity patients. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $8 to $25 per week. There is fire protection. Sewerage. Buildings insured. No insane or inebriates treated. Receipts were $11,336.22 and disbursements $11,208.61.

REV. RODNEY R. SWOPE, D.D.,
President of Hospital and Dispensary.


Page 82

MERCY GENERAL HOSPITAL.

SISTER M. DOLORES, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        This hospital receives no public funds for support. It is under the control of Rev. Father Joseph, O. S. B.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 14
Number admitted during the year 201
Died 11
Discharged 192
Number remaining October 31, 1908 12

        Available beds, 22. Nurses, 6. Charity patients during the year, 40. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $10 per week in the wards; rooms, $10 to $20. Fire protection. Insured. Sewerage. No endowment fund. No insane or inebriates treated. New side porch and entrance, the opening under the building has been bricked up, which makes it warmer, and the house has been painted inside and out.

SISTER M. DOLORES,
Superintendent.


Page 83

INSTITUTIONS EXCLUSIVELY FOR THE COLORED.

LEONARD MEDICAL SCHOOL HOSPITAL, SHAW UNIVERSITY.

ALICE M. EMERSON, Superintendent. RALEIGH.

        This institution was erected in 1885. It is open during the session of the school from October to May 1st.

        
Number admitted during the school year 126
Died 3
Discharged 123

        Available beds, 23. Nurses, 3. Charity patients, 110. Charges for pay patients, $1.50 to $3 per week. Connection with the city mains and city fire department. Buildings insured. Sewerage. No endowment fund.

        Receipts, $85.50 from pay patients, $227.29 from gifts; total, $312.79. Expenses approximately $2,000, paid from Shaw University funds. No changes. No inebriates or insane treated.

        A new hospital with endowment fund is needed.

ALICE M. EMERSON,
Superintendent.

SLATER HOSPITAL.

A. J. BROWN, Superintendent. WINSTON-SALEM.

        The cities of Winston and Salem, respectively, give $300 and $100 annually to the hospital without conditions.

        
  Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 1 2 3
Admitted during the present fiscal year, 34 20 54
Whole number treated during the year, 35 22 57
Died 6 1 7
Discharged 25 19 44
Number remaining October 31, 1908 4 2 6

        Available beds, 24. Nurses, 4. Charity patients, 28. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $3 per week for the general ward and from $4 to $6 for private wards. Buildings insured; no special fire protection. Sewerage. No endowment fund. Expenditures, $811.82; receipts, $816.19. No alterations or improvements during the year. No inebriates or insane treated.


Page 84

        The death rate among the male patients was due to the number of injured men who have been received, some dying a few hours after reaching the hospital.

A. J. BROWN,
Superintendent.

GOOD SAMARITAN HOSPITAL.

MRS. ANNA ROBERTSON, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        The hospital is under a board of managers appointed by the Bishop of the Episcopal Church of the North Carolina Diocese. No county or municipal funds received, except pay per day for patients who may be sent by them. Others pay what they can. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $1.25 per day. Charity patients, 160.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 12
Admitted during the year 204
Whole number treated during the year, including outside patients 300
Died 18
Discharged 179
Number remaining October 31, 1908 5

        Available beds, 20. Nurses, 4. City fire department, also buckets in the hospital. Sewerage. Insured. No endowment fund. No insane or inebriates treated. Expenditures, $3,021.51; receipts, $3,051.37.

MRS. JOHN WILKES,
President Board of Managers.

PICKFORD SANITARIUM.

DR. L. A. SCRUGGS, Superintendent. SOUTHERN PINES.

        This institution is for colored consumptives and is open from November to May. It is maintained by voluntary contributions chiefly, partly by pay patients. It was chartered in 1896. It is controlled by a board of trustees, of whom Dr. James McKee, Raleigh, is the president. There are both white and colored trustees, the superintendent being colored. No county or State funds received.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 6
Number admitted during the year 28
Whole number treated during the year 34
Died 2
Discharged 29
Number remaining October 31, 1908 3

        Available beds, 24. One nurse. Charity patients, 9. (All are more or less charity patients.) Schedule of charges: $15 per month. No


Page 85

special fire protection, which is much needed. Receipts have been $614 and expenditures the same. There are three neat buildings on four acres of land, original cost, $10,000. No debts on the property. Funds for repairs urgently needed. We need endowment. Three thousand six hundred dollars will endow a bed perpetually; $180 will support one patient one year; $15 will support one patient one month.

L. A. SCRUGGS, M. D.,
Superintendent.

ST. AGNES HOSPITAL AND TRAINING SCHOOL FOR NURSES.

MRS. A. B. HUNTER, Superintendent. RALEIGH.

        St. Agnes Hospital and Training School for Nurses was organized in 1896. Mrs. A. B. Hunter, superintendent; Dr. Hubert A. Royster, surgeon in charge; Mrs. Catharine P. Hayden, resident physician. The institution is maintained in connection with St. Augustine's School for the Colored Race, under the charge of the Protestant Episcopal Church and controlled by a board of managers. It receives $5 a week for patients sent in by the city physician, mayor or chief of police. The fiscal year ends May 1st.

        
Number of patients remaining October 31, 1907 19
Number admitted during the year 191
Discharged 191
Births 10
Died 20
Remaining May 1, 1908 9
Number of dispensary visits 476
Operations 93

        Available beds, 24. Nurses, 21. Schedule of charges for pay patients: $5 per week in the wards; $7 per week for private room. Fire protection. Insured. Sewerage. No endowment. Expenditures, $3,389.32; receipts, $3,887.20. No insane or inebriates treated. No alterations to the old building. The new hospital building, which has cost about $20,000, is nearing completion.

MRS. A. B. HUNTER,
Superintendent.


Page 86

COUNTY HOMES.

ALAMANCE.

        The Home is about a mile from Graham and Burlington. In charge, 20. One colored male, epileptic idiot. He is confined. One other epileptic inmate. Meat, vegetables, etc., at cost of $1.50 per capita weekly. Superintendent is Simeon Thompson, Burlington; $25 per month and support of family. He is a new man recently put in charge. Physician is Dr. H. M. Montgomery, Burlington; salary $150 as county physician. Three admitted in six months and four deaths. Kitchen in fair condition. Wheat, corn and garden crops raised. Religious services by different denominations. One colored girl ten or twelve years old. Outdoor relief to 71 at an average of $1.54 per month. General impression of the management not very favorable.

REV. J. M. HOLT,

J. A. TURRENTINE,

P. H. FLEMING.

Received March 12, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged as to buildings. Now in charge, 17. Two idiotic, one colored boy and one colored girl. The boy is confined. Died, 3. No other children, except the idiotic girl mentioned. She is 12 or 14 years old. Premises and building in good condition. General impression is favorable. Outdoor relief to 64 at an average of $1.58 per month.

REV. J. M. HOLT,

J. A. TURRENTINE,

P. H. FLEMING.

Received September 28, 1908.

ANSON.

        The following is taken from the grand jury report:

        "We find the County Home in good condition, with few exceptions. The premises clean and well kept, the rooms and bedding clean, the inmates comfortably clothed and saying that they are well fed and well treated."

        Buildings in need of some minor repairs.

MRS. W. J. HUNTLEY.

Received September 26, 1908.

BEAUFORT.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. It is in fine condition.

DR. J. M. GALLAGHER.

Received June 4, 1908.


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BLADEN.

        At present there are no poor in the County Home, but cared for outside. The building is a quarter of a mile from the courthouse. Two frame buildings, four rooms; ventilated by windows and doors. Open fires. Spring. No keeper at present.

MRS. WILLIAM WHITTED,

MRS. JOHN MCDOWELL.

Received September 28, 1908.

BUNCOMBE.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Can accommodate 200. Now in charge, 52. Ten are helpless. Four white women insane; 5 epileptics. Plenty of everything is grown on the farm and average weekly cost is $1.50. Superintendent and his wife get $100 per month for their services. Physician is Dr. Daniel Sevier; salary $100 per month. Kitchen clean. Religious services Sunday afternoons by the Baptist denomination. One white and two colored children. Maintenance of the Home, including Superintendent's salary, $5,610.53 for the year. Repairs and improvements, $3,393.93. Outdoor relief, $2,536.72.

MRS. WILLIAM TURNER,

MRS. A. RAMSEUR.

Received October 2, 1908.

BRUNSWICK.

        The Home is two and a half miles from the county seat. Two frame buildings; ventilated by windows and doors. Cistern and well. Stoves. Now in charge, 8. Two white females insane. Three epileptic. None confined. Sufficient amount of food. J. W. Wescott, Southport, is Superintendent. Receives $30 per month. J. Arthur Dosher, M. D., is physician; salary, $125 per annum. Died, 1, eighty years old. Sick well cared for. Premises and kitchen in very good condition. Five acres in cultivation; hogs, chickens and cow. Garden vegetables and potatoes used for the Home. Regular religious services. No children. Some outdoor relief.

        Remarks.--The County Home would be a credit to any county.

J. ARTHUR DOSHER, M. D.

Received May 15, 1908.

BURKE.

        The building is new and comfortable. Now in charge, 28. Two insane epileptics. None confined. Plenty of good, wholesome food. The Superintendent receives $5.25 per capita and the proceeds of the farm. He is a good man for the place. Physician is Dr. J. L. Laxton,


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Morganton; paid $3 per visit. Admitted in six months, 2. No deaths. The sick are well cared for. Have a nurse when necessary. One hundred and one acres, generally very poor land; 25 or 30 in cultivation. Corn, wheat and vegetables raised. Religious services monthly. Three idiot children, one white and two colored. Outdoor relief to 20 at $3 per month each. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--We are proud of our County Home and the way it is managed. It is in fine shape and well kept.

ROBERT T. CLAYWELL.

Received March 26, 1908.

        The inmates are mostly epileptics, paralytics and idiots. Three of the latter--altogether the most helpless set of mortals to be found, according to number. The inmates are well cared for and the Home is in fine sanitary condition. Rooms are clean, beds and bedding and nice iron bedsteads. All precautions have been taken to prevent epileptics from falling into the fire, by iron bars properly placed in front of fireplaces. Grove and grounds are kept clean and some of the women raise flowers which look quite showy along the borders and seem to give much pleasure in the looking after them. The keeper is the right man in the right place. Good, pure well water.

J. L. LAXTON, M. D.,
Superintendent of Health of Burke County.

CABARRUS.

        The Home is four miles from the county seat. Seven frame buildings of two, three, four and five rooms; ventilated by windows and doors. No protection against fire. Can accommodate 30; in charge, 28. Insane, 1 white male and 1 white female; confined, 1; epileptic, 1. All the food they need. Cost about $65 per annum. Superintendent is John W. Cook, Concord; salary, $540 per annum and board. He is a satisfactory officer. Physician is Dr. R. S. Young; paid $2.50 per visit. The sick are well cared for. Kitchen is fair for the building. New buildings needed for the inmates. One hundred and sixty acres of good land; 100 cultivated. Mules, cattle and hogs. Corn, wheat, potatoes, oats and vegetables raised for the use of the Home. Shaded. Religious services every two months. One child has spinal trouble. Outdoor relief to 60 at an average of $1.50 per month. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--We recommend that the county erect new buildings with proper fire protection and new sanitary equipment.

J. M. HENDRIX,

G. ED. KESTLER.

Received June 15, 1908.


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CALDWELL.

        The Home is three miles from the county seat. Four two-room frame buildings; ventilated by windows, doors and open fireplaces. No special fire protection. Screen over the open fireplace to prevent accident to the mentally defective. Spring water. Can accommodate 14; now in charge, 7. Five white mentally defective, though none are confined. No epileptics. Unlimited quantity of food, and variety. Average weekly cost of maintenance, $1.50. Superintendent is paid $6 per month per capita. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. C. L. Wilson, Lenoir; salary about $150 per year. In six months, 1 death, blood poison. Sick are well cared for. The premises are clean and the Home is beautifully located; houses are practically new. Kitchen good. Thirty acres of poor land, needs improving; 15 in cultivation. One horse. Corn and vegetables used by the keeper. Some shade; not well shaded. No regular appointments for religious services. One child just entered a few weeks ago with its mother; had nowhere else to go. Outdoor relief to fifty at from $1 to $5 per month. General impression is favorable.

J. W. CURTIS,

DR. C. L. WILSON.

Received June 29, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 6; died, 1. The child previously reported has been taken by relatives.

C. L. WILSON, M. D.

Received September 28, 1908.

CAMDEN.

        The buildings, etc., are as heretofore reported. Now in charge, one white and one colored female. No children. Deaths during six months, 1. The Home is about two miles and a half from churches. No outdoor relief at present.

        Remarks.--Camden County for the last two years has not been taxed for the poor or prisoners to any extent. Large special taxes have been made for the cause of education.

GEORGE H. RIGGS.

Received May 1, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. Not more than three persons in the Home at any one time. At present one white woman, who visits friends a part of the time. The keeper lives on the premises free of rent and farms rented land.

GEORGE H. RIGGS.

Received October 9, 1908.


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CASWELL.

        The Home is as previously reported. Now in charge, 18. None insane or epiletpic. The Superintendent is E. B. Booker, Yanceyville; salary, $150 per annum. He is a satisfactory officer. Dr. S. A. Malloy is the physician. In charge September 1, 20; since admitted, 1; died, 1; discharged, 2. The sick are well cared for. Premises in good condition. Kitchen good. Occasional religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to 80 or 90, from 75 cents to $1. General impression is favorable.

S. A. MALLOY.

Received March 7, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as previously reported as to buildings. Now confined, 17. No insane; no epileptic. Substantial food. Cost $3 per week per capita. Superintendent is E. B. Booker, Yanceyville. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. S. A. Malloy. Died, 1. Sick are well cared for. Buildings have been repaired during the year. Shaded. No children. Outdoor relief to 80. General impression of the management is favorable.

S. A. MALLOY, M. D.

Received September 4, 1908.

CATAWBA.

        Five good cottage buildings for the inmates, with good brick chimneys and open fireplaces and one large two-story house for the keeper. Ventilated by windows and doors. Well and pump. Can accommodate from 25 to 40. Now in charge, 19. None insane; four or five weakminded. One epileptic confined. Good, wholesome food. Superintendent is Robert Hoke, Conover; salary is $350 and board of family. He is a satisfactory officer. Physician is Dr. J. H. West. Died, 1. Everything is neat and in good condition. House nicely painted. Kitchen very good. Two hundred acres of medium land; 75 or 100 cultivated. Crops are wheat, corn, a little cotton and vegetables. Not very well shaded. Only one little deformed colored child.

        Remarks.--I hold services for the inmates of the Home once a month. I think from all I can learn that the county cares for the poor on an average or better than a great many other counties in the State.

REV. M. A. ABERNETHY.

Received September 21, 1908.

CHATHAM.

        The Home is well situated three and a half miles from the county seat. Seven frame buildings, 16 × 30 feet, two rooms each. Well


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water. Open fires and stoves. Now in care of the Home, 30. Helpless, 2. Insane, 1 colored male. Seven epileptics. Ample supply of plain food, at per capita of $1.25 per week. Superintendent is W. H. Ward, Pittsboro; receives $300 per year and board of family. Dr. Taylor, Bynum, is the physician; salary, $10 per month. No deaths, 3 discharged. Premises in fairly good condition. Buildings in good repair. Brick buildings would be better than the present frame houses. Five hundred and fifty-three acres of average land; 125 in cultivation. Three mules, 16 cattle and 25 hogs. Religious services in a small chapel built for the purpose. No children. Two inmates locked up for disobedience. Outdoor relief to 100 at a cost of $2,000 per year.

MRS. HENRY A. LONDON.

Received April 24, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 34. Four white insane. One negro, violent, has fits and is confined. Eight epileptics. Died, 5. No children. Premises neatly kept and buildings in good repair. Outdoor relief to 100 at an average of $20; total, $2,000. General impression is favorable.

MRS H. A. LONDON.

Received September 30, 1908.

CHEROKEE.

        The Home is three miles from Murphy. Two frame buildings, four rooms in one and two in the other. Both painted and in good condition. Windows and doors. Good well. Open fireplaces. Now in charge, 3 whites--2 white women who can work and 1 white man who is unable to work. One of the women insane. None confined. No epileptics. They are fed good, common farm diet. Superintendent is Silas Anderson, Murphy. He receives $5 per month each from the county. He is satisfactory. In charge during six months, 6. No deaths. None sick. Premises in good condition, houses and yard clean. Four hundred and two acres, 35 in cultivation. Crops are corn, cane, tobacco and vegetables used at the Home. Not shaded. Occasional religious services. No children. No outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

MRS. R. H. HYATT.

Received October 8, 1908.

CHOWAN.

        The Home is as heretofore as to buildings. Now in charge, 5. Insane, 3 colored women. Epileptic, 1. None confined. The Superintendent is M. Minton Harrell, Edenton. Physician is H. M. S. Cason, M. D., Edenton. Admitted in six months, 2. Died, 2--one


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from consumption. Sick well cared for. Premises in good condition. No children. Eleven receive outdoor relief at $2.18 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

REV. ROBERT B. DRANE.

Received March 28, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the buildings, etc. Now in charge, 5. Three colored insane women, but not confined. No deaths in the six months. No children. Mild confinement for an hour or so of an obstreperous idiot. Outdoor relief to 12 at $2.25 per month.

        Remarks.--The general appearance of the Home is attractive and very creditable to the county. The weakmindedness of the majority of the inmates renders their care not an easy task. I am sure that the keeper and his wife do good and faithful service by them all.

REV. R. B. DRANE, D. D.

Received December 26, 1908.

CLAY.

        The Home is about two and a half miles from the county seat. One large building with six rooms; ventilated by windows and doors. No fire protection. Spring and well. Open fires. One inmate in charge. No insane or epileptic. Good country produce--all that they want to eat. Superintendent is Oscar Scroggs, Hayesville; gets $6 per month each and rent of farm. Dr. P. B. Killian is county physician; salary, $25 per month. Only one inmate in six months. The Home is on a reasonably good farm and big grounds under good cultivation. Kitchen in very good condition. Twenty to 35 acres cultivated. No children. No religious services. General impression is very favorable.

        There are seven persons who receive outdoor relief, staying with their own people.

L. F. SHUFORD.

Received May 15, 1908.

CLEVELAND.

        The Home is three miles from the county seat. Three buildings. Main building is brick; others frame. Brick building has 18 rooms. It is ventilated by windows, doors and transoms. Well. Open fires. Can accommodate 40. Now in charge, 11 white and 8 colored. Insane, 1 white woman; epileptic, 1 white woman and 1 colored boy. None confined. Bread, meat, milk, butter and vegetables, as much as they want. Average cost $3 per month, with the produce of farm additional. Superintendent receives $35 per month in cash. Physician is Dr. T. E. McBrayer, Shelby; salary, $30 per month. No deaths. Sick well cared for; no special attendant. Some of the


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inmates could make quilts at little expense. The Home is on the public highway, conveniently arranged and in good repair. Kitchen in good condition. Two hundred and fifty acres good land; 125 in cultivation. Horses, cows, etc. Crops are corn, wheat, oats, molasses, for the use of the Home. Cotton, the money crop, goes to the treasury. Not much shade. Religious services once a month. No children. Some outdoor relief. The general impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--The Home is kept as nicely as it can be for the amount spent for the same. It could be made a more desirable place by the use of more means.

GEORGE DOVER.

Received September 10, 1908.

DARE.

        The Home is two miles from Manteo. Two frame buildings, four rooms each. Pump. Stove. Can accommodate 8. None in charge, nor have there been any inmates for some time. Superintendent gets $10 per month. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--It is good and well kept as far as I can find out.

CHARLES L. MANN.

Received March 17, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Can accommodate 8. None now in charge. General impression is favorable. No outdoor relief.

CHARLES L. MANN.

Received September 16, 1908.

DAVIDSON.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Now in charge, 21. Two insane, 1 white and 1 black. Confined, 1. Epileptics, 2. As much food as they want. Keeper receives 15 cents per capita per day and the use of the farm. Andrew Crotts, Lexington, is Superintendent. He is a good officer. Drs. Hill & Hill, Lexington, physicians; salary, $100 per annum. In charge, September 1, 1907, 24; since admitted, 1; died, 4. The sick are cared for by the keeper's family. Premises neat and in fairly good condition. The kitchen is good, clean and very nice. Six or 7 acres in cultivation. Corn, cotton and oats raised. Outdoor relief to 70 at $2 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

JAMES SMITH.

Received April 13, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Now in charge, 24. Three insane, 2 white and 1 colored. Two epileptics. The keeper is paid


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$4.50 per month each and the use of the farm. He is satisfactory. Admitted during six months, 3. Died, 1; left, 1. No provision for religious services. One feebleminded colored boy. Outdoor relief to 60 at $2.50 per month.

        Remarks.--The county commissioners are considering putting up new and better buildings.

JAMES SMITH.

Received October 19, 1908.

DAVIE.

        The Home has one brick building with three large rooms and three small log houses. Situated in a grove of beautiful oaks. Windows. Open fires. Well water. In charge, 8. None insane, but one epileptic. Two very small children, one black and one white. Plenty of plain food is allowed. The Superintendent bears a good name. Physician is M. D. Kimbrough, M. D., Mocksville. Most of the rooms were clean, but some of the buildings need repairs. No provision for religious services.

        Remarks.--I talked with all the poor, and they were cheerful and seemed contented. I always carry them a treat and they love to see me come. One idiotic colored man insists upon shaking my hand every time, and I never refuse. The inmates all love the Superintendent's wife.

MRS. A. M. NAIL.

Received April 13, 1908.

DUPLIN.

        The new Home is about one mile from the county seat. Two brick buildings, tin covered. One is 16 × 70 feet and one 16 × 54, with an ell 50 feet long. Eight rooms in the building for whites and five or six in that for the blacks. Ventilated by windows and doors. Pumps. Stoves. Can accommodate fifteen or more. Now in charge, 5--3 whites and 2 blacks. Superintendent lives in the same building with the whites. Two black epileptics--one old and of little mind, the other deformed. All the food they want. Costs about $60 per month, including salary of the Superintendent, who gets $22.50 and board. D. C. Uzzell, Kenansville, is Superintendent. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. A. Ferrell; salary, $100 per year. Admitted during six months, 3. Died, 2. All new brick buildings and kitchen is good. Sixty-five acres of fair land; 15 in cultivation. Corn and vegetables raised for the Home. Little shade yet. Occasional religious services. No children. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--The present Home has just been purchased and new buildings put up. The commissioners intend to make it a model Home


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for the poor. It has not been completed long enough to do much as yet. We have a list of poor who take an allowance and remain with relatives.

A. P. FARRIOR.

Received June 24, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        Nothing new to report in regard to the Home since the last report.

A. P. FARRIOR.

Received September 26, 1908.

EDGECOMBE.

        The Home is as heretofore as to buildings. Now in charge, 37. Insane, 1 colored woman, not confined. Three epileptics. Per capita cost of maintenance per week, $2.10. Superintendent is W. T. Graham, Tarboro; salary, $37.50 per month and board. He is a satisfactory officer. Physician is W. J. Thigpen, Tarboro;; $50 as County Superintendent of Health. Number in charge September 1, 31; since admitted to March 1, 18. Four deaths and three have left the Home. The houses are well arranged and well kept, situated in a large oak grove. Kitchen in good order. Four hundred and fifty-five acres piny woodland; 70 in cultivation. Mules, cows and hogs. Grain and vegetables raised and used for the Home. Occasional religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to 125 at $1 per month. General impression is favorable.

JAMES R. GASKILL.

Received March 23, 1908.

FORSYTH.

        The Home is a modern, up-to-date building, located three miles from the county seat. One building 100 × 150 feet. Brick with metal roof and broad piazzas; 44 living rooms. Windows on weights, and transoms over all the doors. Fire extinguishers and good water pressure from a large tank. Fine well of drinking-water pumped to all the floors by electric motor. Steam heated, radiators in all the rooms. Can accommodate 75; now in charge, 47. Two bedridden; 19 mentally defective. Of these 4 insane are confined. Included in the 19 are 2 epileptics. Good food. Enough is raised on the farm to supply the table. County pays other expenses. C. C. Flynt is Superintendent; salary, $600 per year, with board and rooms for self and family. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. S. F. Pfohl, Winston-Salem; salary, $600 for all county work. Admitted in six months, 18 whites and 20 colored. Died, 4--one from consumption. Competent sick nurse employed at $600 per year, with board and lodging. Very few are intelligent enough to make anything and most of them too


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feeble to work. Grounds and buildings are well arranged and everything is neat and in good condition. Two hundred and fifty acres of good land; 100 in cultivation. Five mules, 4 cows and 14 hogs. Wheat, corn, oats and potatoes raised for use of the Home. Extra grain is sold. The Home is new and the trees are too small yet to furnish shade. The pastors of the city churches alternate and give one service a month to the Home. Three children, too small to be taken from their mother. Outdoor relief to two persons, $3 per month to one and $5 to the other. General impression of the management very good.

EDWARD S. CROSLAND,

H. W. FOLTZ,

W. P. HILL.

Received June 20, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 50. Insane, 5 white, 2 colored. Confined, 4. Epileptic, 1. Died during six months, 6. Discharged, 15. Two children. Outdoor relief to 5.

        Remarks.--We urge the purchase of 200 feet of hose for fire protection. Good water pressure and hydrants, also fire extinguishers, but no hose.

GASTON.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 14. Six helpless. One white male insane and confined. One epileptic. All they want of bread, meat, vegetables, molasses, butter, milk and coffee. Cost about $1,75 per week. Died, 2. Kitchen in good condition. Preaching once a month by the Presbyterian minister. No children. Outdoor relief to 66 at a cost of $1,500 per year. General impression is favorable. Other items unchanged.

J. P. REID.

Received September 26, 1908.

GRAHAM.

        (No Home.)

GATES.

        There are three buildings. Those for the inmates are all new and well kept. Pump and well. Stoves and open fires. Can accommodate fifteen or twenty. Now in charge, 6. Insane, 1 colored woman and 2 colored boys. Good and wholesome food. The keeper is Mrs. M. E. Riddick. She is satisfactory. The physician is Dr. George D. Williams, Gatesville. Fees for visits. In charge September 1, 5; since


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admitted to March 1, 3; died, 2. Sick well cared for. Kitchen in good condition. Thirty acres; 15 in cultivation. A horse, hogs and cows, etc. Crops are corn, cotton, peanuts and potatoes. Shaded. Ashes used for improving the land. No provision for religious services. No children. No punishment. Outdoor relief to 4 at $2.50 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

MARTIN KELLOGG.

Received March 6, 1908.

GRANVILLE.

        The Home is one mile from the county seat. Three brick buildings about 18 × 30 feet. Superintendent's residence is a frame building of five rooms, a nice home. Four frame buildings, 10 rooms. A chapel. Ventilated by windows and doors. Well. Open fires. Can accommodate 30. In charge, 19. Insane or idiotic, 5--3 white and 2 colored females. Epileptics, 2. Sufficient amount of meat, bread, cabbage, peas, beans, salad, flour, sugar, coffee. Cost per week, $2.50 per capita. Superintendent is W. S. Daniel, Oxford, R. F. D. No. 6; receives $35 per month and board of family. He is a new man and is all right. Physician is Dr. S. D. Booth; salary, $30 per month. In charge September 1, 16; since admitted to March 1, 3. No deaths. The sick are well cared for. Some of the inmates like to knit. We have a fine location, good and comfortable buildings and the inmates are well cared for. Good dining rooms; kitchen in good condition. About 500 acres, mostly sandy land; 75 acres open, 40 to 50 in cultivation. Corn, peas, vegetables, etc. Used for the Home. The Home is in a nice oak grove. Ashes and manure used in improving the lands. A good chapel and occasional preaching. One boy. No punishment. Outdoor relief to 100 at $1 per month. General impression of the management favorable. The Superintendent is sober, faithful and industrious.

D. N. HUNT.

Received March 6, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 20. Five insane--1 white and 4 colored women. None confined. Two epileptics. Died, 1; discharged, 2. The Home is located in a beautiful grove and we hope to make it a model Home. Regular religious services. No children. No outdoor relief.

        Remarks.--I have visited and personally inspected the County Home. I find things in good condition. Our unfortunates are well cared for and have plenty to eat. We have an excellent Superintendent and he and his able assistant, his wife, give all of their time to the inmates.

D. N. HUNT.

Received September 23, 1908.


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GREENE.

        The buildings, etc., are as heretofore reported. Now in charge, 5. Helpless, 3; insane, 1. None confined. Superintendent is Mrs. Ida Dail, Snow Hill. She receives $9 per month for each inmate and the use of the farm. She is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. W. B. Murphy, Snow Hill. He receives $15 per month for county institutions. Died, 1. Kitchen good. One hundred and thirty acres; 20 cleared and in cultivation. Crops are corn and cotton. Shaded. Occasional religious services. No children. General impression is favorable. Some outdoor relief. Mrs. Dail, the keeper, is kind and attentive to the inmates.

L. V. MORRILL.

Received August 4, 1908.

HARNETT.

        The Home is a mile and a half from the county seat. It is entirely new. One frame building, one story, three rooms for inmates and five for the Superintendent, and one with two rooms for other inmates. Ventilated by windows and doors. No special fire protection. Well. Open fires Can accommodate 14. Now in charge, 4. One epileptic. Bread. meat, vegetables, coffee and other food from the keeper's table; all fed alike. County pays the keeper 30 cents per day for each inmate. Superintendent is M. R. Morgan, Lillington. He is a satisfactory officer. Dr. J. W. Halford, Chalybeate, is county physician; paid by regular fees. No deaths. Sick well cared for. It is a pleasant country home surrounded by a farm and is on the public road. One hundred and twenty acres; 25 in cultivation. Corn and cotton are the crops. The farm is rented by the keeper. Kitchen fairly clean and well kept. Young shade trees. No provision for religious services. One child three years old with the mother. Outdoor relief to 35 to 40 at from $1 to $5 per month. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--One hundred and twenty-five acres were recently purchased by the county and a new and comfortable Home erected thereon. The keeper rents the farm from the county and occupies a part of the building, as it is not all needed by the poor. Inmates appear contented and say that they are well cared for.

DR. J. H. WITHERS,

C. MCARTAN.

H. T. FAUCETTE.

Received August 4, 1908.


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HAYWOOD.

        The county has recently purchased a farm with comfortable buildings situated six miles from Waynesville and has removed the inmates to the new Home. Occasional religious services. Two children. Other items as previously reported.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received May 1, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The poor are now cared for on the new farm in three frame buildings. The county will soon erect new buildings with steam heat and modern improvements. Water from spring. Stoves and fireplaces. Now in charge, 14. One white insane. One epileptic. All the food needed, cooked palatably and in a clean kitchen. Cost of maintenance, $6 per month each. Superintendent is R. C. Moody, Waynesville, R. F. D. Physician paid fees for services. One hundred acres good land. Cost to the county of new Home, $10,000. Crops are corn, wheat, oats and vegetables. Shaded. Outdoor relief to 5.

        Remarks.--I visited the County Home and found the inmates well pleased with the new Home. It is a desirable location. The present keeper and wife seem very kind to the inmates. Had prayer service, reading and singing, which they much enjoyed.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received November 11, 1908.

HENDERSON.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 4 whites. None insane or epileptic. No children. No deaths during the six months. Ample amount of food at $2.50 per week. Sick well cared for. Buildings in good repair. Kitchen clean and neat. About 100 acres fairly good land; 25 in cultivation. Outdoor relief to 40 at $3 per month.

        Remarks.--I find things fairly comfortable and clean.

MRS. LILA R. BARNWELL.

Received March 19, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as previously reported. Now in charge, 3. No children. Outdoor relief to 36 at an average of $3 per month.

        Remarks.--Inmates are all in good health. Dr. Waldrop and I think the conditions there are favorable.

MRS. LILA R. BARNWELL.

Received September 16, 1908.

HERTFORD.

        The Home is situated about half a mile from the village of Union and seven miles from the county seat. One house for the Superintendent,


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with kitchen and outhouses and four cottages of two rooms each for the inmates; all frame. Each room has three windows and a door. Pump. No special protection against fire. Open fires. Brick chimney in each room. Can accommodate 16. Now in charge, 7. Confined, 1 insane epileptic. Such food as is usually grown on a farm. Expense of the County Home for the last year in excess of farm, $352.28. Superintendent is M. M. Brown, R. F. D., Ahoskie. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. H. Mitchell; salary, $75 per annum. Died, 1. One returned to native county. Sick well cared for. Some work a little in the garden. Premises in good condition, neat and well kept. Kitchen fairly good. Sixty-eight acres; 20 in cultivation. Horse, cow and hogs. Crops are corn, cotton, peanuts and vegetables. Only a few shade trees. Occasional prayer meetings held. No children. Outdoor relief to 16 at $2 per month each. General impression of the management is favorable.

        Remarks.--We have one man, an epileptic, who is at times violent and dangerous, and it becomes necessary to chain him. We recommend that the State take charge of him.

W. P. SHAW,

JOHN A. NORTHCOTT,

JOHN E. VANN.

Received August 27, 1908.

IREDELL.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. In charge, 29. One harmless white insane person, confined; runs away. One epileptic. Weekly per capita cost of maintenance outside of farm products, $1. Superintendent is W. C. Perry, Barium Springs; receives $30 per month and board of family of five. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. M. R. Adams, Statesville; pay, $20 per month. Died, 6 in the past year. Sick well cared for. A good colored nurse. Some of the inmates could make baskets, mats, etc. Some of the women could quilt if they had the materials, but most of them do not want to work. The Home is located on a high hill, well drained, light soil, kept clean and in good condition. Plain houses; no porches. Kitchen small; large range. It is neat and orderly. Two hundred and twenty-five acres; land medium quality; 50 acres cultivated. Mules, cows and pigs. Crops are corn, wheat, oats and vegetables for the use of the Home. Religious services occasionally in the open air. One colored boy there temporarily while getting well. As soon as he recovers work will be found for him. Outdoor relief to 75. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--What is most needed at the Home is a chapel where services can be held. A large dining room has been recently built. It is divided in the center by a curtain, and the whites are on one


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side and the negroes on the other. Some of the commissioners and other people are anxious to move the Home nearer the county seat and have an up-to-date building erected.

MRS. D. A. MILLER,

MRS. A. L. COBLE.

Received May 13, 1908.

JACKSON.

        The situation of the Home is good, one mile from the county seat. Two frame buildings, five rooms in each; ventilated by windows. Open fires. Spring. Can accommodate 10. Now in charge, 3. One white insane man. One epileptic. All the food they want, such as is raised on the farm. Weekly per capita cost, $2.25. R. L. Knight is Superintendent. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. A. A. Nichols, Painter; salary, $50 per annum. During six months, 5 in charge. One insane person removed and one death. The sick are well cared for. The premises are well arranged and in good condition. Kitchen good. One hundred acres good bottom-land and upland. Two horses and cattle. Corn, wheat, oats, clover, potatoes, tobacco and garden vegetables. Some shade. Clover turned under to improve the land. No children. No provision for religious services. Outdoor relief to 8 at a cost of $3.25 each. General impression is favorable.

REV. A. W. DAVIS.

Received April 28, 1908.

JONES.

        The Home is in the woods two miles from the county seat. One frame building of eight rooms, pantry and hall; one log building with two rooms. Ventilated by windows. No fire protection. Open well. Fireplaces. Can accommodate 20 or more. Now in charge, 2. No insane or epileptic. No Superintendent. Physician is Dr. W. W. Early, Trenton; salary, $50 per year for one visit per month; other visits extra pay. Died, 2. There is no attendant. Those sick are cared for by the other inmates. Premises in fair condition. The house is new. Kitchen in fair condition. One acre used as a vegetable garden. Shaded. Preachers go out to see the inmates several times a year. No children. Some outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--The County Home is in fair condition. The inmates are treated fairly well. Every Christmas the ladies of the town go out and carry them nice things to eat, clothes, etc. They also have some preacher to attend on this day.

JULIAN K. WARREN.

Received September 8, 1908.


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JOHNSTON.

        The County Home is five miles from the county seat. Six frame buildings; ventilated by windows and doors. Well. Open fires and stoves. Can accommodate 40. Now in charge, 22. Seven helpless. Two white men and three white women insane and three of these confined. Two epileptics. G. M. Hinton, Smithfield, R. F. D., is Superintendent. He receives $5.25 per month for each inmate and $10.50 for each insane person. Physician is Dr. L. D. Wharton, Smithfield; salary, $175 per annum. One admitted and one died during the six months. Premises in good condition. Two hundred acres of fairly good land; 40 in cultivation. Corn, cotton, tobacco and vegetables raised for the support of the inmates. Shaded. Occasional religious services. One four-year-old child with her mother. General impression of the management is favorable.

MRS. W. S. STEVENS.

Received November 13, 1908.

LENOIR.

        The Home is one mile from the county seat. Five frame buildings; ventilated by weighted windows. Pump. Wood heaters. Can accommodate 30. Now in charge, 20. One white female insane. None confined. One colored epileptic. All they desire of good wholesome food; fair variety. Cost per capita weekly, $1.25. Superintendent is Mrs. Agnes Lee, Kinston; paid $15 per month and her husband receives $12 per month. County physician is Dr. Pridgen; fees per visit. Admitted during six months, 20; died, 2. Inmates and matron care for the sick. Premises neat and in good condition. Kitchen exceptionally neat. Forty-two acres poor sandy land; 30 in cultivation. Hogs, cow and chickens. Vegetables, corn and peas raised. Fine young grove. No religious services as yet, but will be from this time. No children. No outdoor relief.

        Remarks.--Two of the committee visited the home on September 10 and were very agreeably surprised to find everything done decently and in order. It is the committee's intention to create ways and means of brightening and cheering the lives of the inmates.

REV. JOHN H. GRIFFITH,
Chairman.

Received September 12, 1908.

LINCOLN.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. In charge, 18. All imbecile. One confined. Three epileptics. Good food at a cost of $1.25 per week. Superintendent is M. L. Heavener; remuneration, $3.50 per


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capita and rent of the land. He is satisfactory. Doctor receives $12.50 per month, furnishing medicine. No deaths and no admissions. Occasional religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to 33 at a cost of $1.54 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

        Remarks.--No general improvement. County commissioners do not see the way to sell and buy another site, but would pay the keeper more if they could.

R. Z. JOHNSTON, Chairman;

D. T. JOHNSON,

MISS KATE SHIPP,

MRS. R. S. REINHARDT.

Received March 6, 1908.

MACON.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Now in charge, 7. No insane; one epileptic. No children. Superintendent receives $6 per month for each inmate and the use of the farm. Physician is Dr. F. L. Siler; salary, $100 per year. No deaths. Number in charge during six months, 8. Kitchen good. General impression is favorable. Other items as previously reported.

        Remarks.--The keeper receives $6 per month for each person and what he can make on the farm, which is very little--from $125 to $130 per year. The system is at fault. Manager should receive a salary and the products of the farm belong to the Home. A very detailed specification of his duties should be given the manager and this should be a part of his contract. Until some arrangement of this kind is made things must continue about as they are now.

REV. J. A. DEAL,

W. H. HIGGINS,

R. F. JARRETT.

Received April 9, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as previously reported. Now in charge, 9. One epileptic; two partially insane. Superintendent is James N. McConnell, Franklin. He receives $6 per month for each inmate and proceeds of the farm. Physician is Dr. W. A. Rogers, Franklin. No deaths. Outdoor relief to 20 at $2 per month. General impression is favorable.

REV. J. A. DEAL,

MRS. J. C. WRIGHT.

Received September 12, 1908.

MARTIN.

        The condition of the Home for the Aged and Infirm is the same as formerly reported.

WILLIAM E. WARREN, M. D.

Received September 8, 1908.


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MONTGOMERY.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Practically no change.

R. T. POOLE.

Received May 27, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is two miles from the county seat. Four old buildings as heretofore reported and three new buildings now nearing completion. A modern brick building with twelve rooms and two smaller ones with four rooms each. Windows and doors for ventilation. Well. Buckets for protection against fire. Heaters. Can accommodate 30. Now in charge, 9. Insane white men, 2; no epileptics. Sufficient amount of food at a per capita cost of $8 per month. Present Superintendent is W. C. Hurley, Troy. The plan of keeping the Home will be changed on October 1st. Physician is Dr. J. B. Shamburger. He receives $25 annually. Admitted in six months, 2; died, 2. Sick are well cared for. Premises in excellent condition. Kitchen neatly kept. Seventy-six acres of fair land; 5 in cultivation. Shaded. Occasional religious services. One infant. No system of outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--The new building is not yet occupied; will be in thirty days. We have a Home which is a credit to our county.

R. T. POOLE.

Received September 8, 1908.

MOORE.

        The Home is situated two miles from the county seat. Six frame buildings 16 × 40 feet, one story. Two rooms and closets to each building; two doors; the windows with glass, and open fireplaces. No special fire protection, but these buildings are 80 feet apart. Well and spring. Now in charge, 9. Insane, 2. Confined, 1. As much plain, wholesome food as they want. Samuel D. Stuart is Superintendent; receives $8 per month per capita and use of the farm. The physician is Dr. Gilbert McLeod, Carthage; fee, $1.50 per visit. No deaths. Sick well cared for. Kitchen clean and comfortable. One hundred and sixty acres; quality below the average of farm land. Two-horse farm. Horses, cows, hogs and chickens. Crops are grain, potatoes, vegetables. No children. No provision for religious services. Outdoor relief to 71 at a cost of $2.75 per month.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received March 26, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is as previously reported. Now in charge, 13. Two insane, one white and one colored woman. One confined. No children.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received September 19, 1908.


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NEW HANOVER.

        The Home is unchanged as to buildings. Water supply from cisterns. Forty or fifty can be comfortably cared for. Now in charge, 15. No insane or helpless. Four epileptics, two white and two colored. Furnished as much bread, meat and vegetables as they want. Cost, $1 per week outside of farm products. J. R. Hardee is Superintendent; salary, $100 per month. He is a satisfactory officer. Physician is Dr. W. J. McMillan. During six months, died, 2. Attendant for very sick patients. Premises neat and clean. One hundred acres in cultivation. Corn, peas, potatoes and general truck raised. Religious services regularly. One child. Some outdoor relief.

        Remarks.--I am glad to report a very favorable condition of affairs at the Home. The Superintendent is a good manager and an experienced farmer and under his management the farm is coming to a higher state of fertility and crops are looking well. He has increased the area of cultivation. Has some fine stock, hogs and poultry.

A. G. HANKINS.

Received June 3, 1908.

ONSLOW.

        This county has had no County Home until now. A building is in course of construction.

G. H. SIMMONS.

Received April 2, 1908.

PAMLICO.

        The Home is located on the courthouse square. Two frame buildings 90 × 24 and 32 × 24. Four rooms for the colored and eleven rooms in the building for whites. Ventilated by windows and doors. Well. Wood stoves. Can accommodate 25. Now in charge, 9. No insane. One eplieptic. Good, wholesome food. Cost about $2 per week. Superintendent is George N. Reed, Bayboro; salary, $9 per month. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. D. A. Dees; paid by the visit. One death. Sick well cared for. Some of the inmates might do light cobbling. Premises in fair condition. Kitchen fair. Two acres; raise only vegetables. Shaded. Inmates go to church in the town. No children. Outdoor relief to 17 at about $3 per month. General impression is favorable.

Received September 11, 1908.

PERSON.

        The County Home is two and a half miles from the county seat. Three frame buildings. Ventilated by windows and doors. No


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special fire protection. Well and spring. Open fires. Can accommodate 25. Now in charge, 6. No insane. One epileptic occasionally confined. Ordinary farm fare, as much as an average person needs. Cost from $1 to $1.25 per week. Superintendent is Sam Morris, Roxboro; salary, $20 per month and board of family. He is satisfactory. Dr. W. A. Bradsher is physician, Roxboro. Paid in fees. In charge September 1, 1907, 9. Since admitted, 2. Died 3, 2 from old age and 1 had fits and was burned. Two were able to leave the Home. Sick well cared for; and attendant necessary. The premises in general are reasonably neat and clean and in good condition. Kitchen fairly clean. Three hundred and eight acres of very fertile farm land. Crops are corn, tobacco and vegetables; part sold for use of the Home and part used by inmates. Shaded. No children. One whipped to compel obedience. Outdoor relief to fifty or sixty at average of $1.50 per month. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--The County Home is self-supporting. Some years an excess is made on the farm.

N. C. NEWBOLD.

Received July 18, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is located on a good farm of 308 acres of fine tobacco land and is self-sustaining. There are ten good-size rooms for the use of the inmates. They seem to be kept neat, clean and well ventilated. Five inmates, and two of these can do some work. One negro girl and one white man insane. Ordinary plain diet at a cost of about $2 per week. Superintendent is S. M. Morris, Roxboro; salary, $20 per month and house and board of family. There were 18 inmates March 1, and two since admitted. One old lady has died and 14 have left Dr. W. A. Bradsher, Roxboro, is physician; he receives $2.50 per month for one visit and regular fees in case of sickness. Church near. I think that the Home is about as well kept as any I have ever visited.

REV. J. A. HORNADAY.

Received November 13, 1908.

PERQUIMANS.

        The Home is three miles from the county seat. There are three frame buildings for inmates, one store and barns. Ventilated by windows and doors. Three wells and one pump. Heaters. Can accommodate 15. Now in charge, 8. One white man insane. Two epileptics. None confined. Plain ample food. Cost about $2 per week. Superintendent is F. Stallings, Winfall; salary, $250, farm and store. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. S. F. McMullan, Hertford; $200 per annum. No deaths. Sick well cared for. Five could do light work, basketry and chaircaning. Kitchen good. One


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hundred acres, 3 cows and 2 horses. Crops are cotton, corn, potatoes and peanuts. Shaded. Church very near. No children. Outdoor relief to 50 at $5 per month. General impression is favorable.

B. S. LASSITER.

Received September 8, 1908.

PITT.

        The Home is five miles from the county seat. The buildings are frame. Can accommodate 30. Now in charge, 22. Ventilated by windows and doors. Pump and well. Open fires and stoves. Helpless, 7. Four insane and three of these epileptic. One confined. All they want to eat. Arden Tucker is Superintendent; salary, $300. Physician is Dr. Joseph E. Nobles, Greenville; salary, $300. Number in charge September 1, 1907, 20; since admitted, 6; died, 5; discharged 1--had escaped from the State Prison. The sick are well cared for. Premises neat, in good condition and well cared for. Kitchen excellent. One hundred and eighty-seven acres; 25 in cultivation. Two horses, one cow and hogs. Corn, potatoes, peanuts, peas and abundance of garden vegetables raised. Shaded. Provision for religious services, a chapel. No children. Outdoor relief to a number at $2.50 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

J. W. SMITH,

ROBERT N. NICHOLS.

Received July 7, 1908.

RICHMOND.

        The Home is about two and a half miles from the county seat. Eight two-room and one five-room frame dwellings. Ventilated by windows and doors. Two wells. Ladders and buckets for protection against fire. Open fireplaces and plenty of pine wood. Can accommodate 25. Now in charge, 22. No insane; but one white man, two white women and one colored woman weakminded. Two colored epileptics. None confined. All they can eat of good, wholesome food, with variety of vegetables. Superintendent is James W. O'Brien, Rockingham; salary, $200 per year and board for self and family of five. Physician is Dr. N. C. Hunter, Rockingham; salary, $200 per year. Admitted during six months, 5; died, 8. Sick well cared for. The four who are able to work are pleasantly employed gardening. The premises are well arranged and neatly kept. The Home is on an elevated site and can be seen for miles. One hundred and thirty-two acres average land; 60 in cultivation. One horse, one mule, two cows. Wheat, oats, corn, peas, potatoes and vegetables used for the Home. Shaded. Orchards. The Methodist, Baptist and Presbyterian preachers average monthly preaching on Sunday afternoon. No


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children. Average of $1 per month to 100 in their own homes. General impression of the management is favorable and the occupants seem contented.

J. S. LEDBETTER,

R. A. JOHNSON.

Received January 2, 1909.

ROBESON.

        The Home consists of four frame houses for the inmates, two rooms each, with three windows and a door. Pump. Open fires. Now in charge, 10. Two blind, two insane, 1 idiot, one epileptic. Good food. Dr. H. T. Pope, Lumberton, is the physician. Eight or ten acres in cultivation. Crops are oats, corn and potatoes. Other items previously reported.

J. P. MCNEILL.

Received April 24, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged. Now in charge, 9. Insane, one white and one Indian. Idiotic, one black. One epileptic. Superintendent is W. G. Reynolds, Lumberton; he receives $7.50 per month for each inmate. No deaths.

J. P. MCNEILL.

Received October 17, 1908.

ROCKINGHAM.

        The buildings, etc., of the Home as previously reported. Now in charge, 38. Two insane white women. Average weekly cost of maintenance, $7. Superintendent receives $25 per month and board of family. He is a satisfactory officer. Dr. Samuel Ellington is the physician; salary, $100 per annum. Number in charge September 1, 38; admitted to March 1, 6. Died, 2. Some of the inmates come and go, spending the winter in the Home and leaving in the spring. Sick inmates have special attention and are well cared for. About ten to fifteen help on the farm and garden. The women like to knit. The location of the Home is fine. Kitchen clean, but premises are not well arranged. Three hundred acres of fair farm land; 75 in cultivation. Crops are corn and wheat, used for the Home. No provision for religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to twelve or fifteen at an average of $3 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

        Remarks.--We need a new County Home all in one building; at present the buildings are small and scattered over two acres of ground and difficult to heat in winter. The Superintendent is a good man who does all in his power for the comfort of the inmates.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS,

WILLIAM CUMMINGS.

Received March 4, 1908.
Page 109

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged. One idiot. Admitted during six months, 7; died, 5. Sick well cared for. Other items as reported.

IRA HUMPHREYS.

Received September 4, 1908.

ROWAN.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings, etc. Now in charge, 7 white and 3 colored. No insane or epileptics. Sufficient amount of food. Mrs. Patterson is the Superintendent. She is satisfactory. The physician is Dr. I. H. Foust. Admitted during six months, 7. Discharged, 6. Died, 1. Sick well cared for. Premises and kitchen in good condition and repair. No provision for religious services. No children. Some outdoor relief. General impression of the management is favorable.

REV. F. J. MURDOCH.

Received May 15, 1908.

RUTHERFORD.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 36. Four insane and confined. Two epileptics. Good food and plenty of it. Superintendent is Henry Jones, Rutherfordton; salary, $500 per annum. Physician is Dr. E. B. Harris; $2 per visit. Died, 2, during six months. The sick are well cared for. Kitchen in good condition. Shaded. Religious services. Several small children. No outdoor relief. General impression of the management is favorable. Other items previously reported.

E. B. HARRIS, M. D.,

T. B. TWITTY, M. D.

Received June 8, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged. Now in charge, 37. Helpless, 6. Insane, 5. None confined. Two epileptics. Food good. Superintendent is satisfactory. Died, 2. Five children. No outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

E. B. HARRIS, M. D.,

T. B. TWITTY, M. D.

Received October 3, 1908.

SAMPSON.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report.

MRS. T. L. HUBBARD,

REV. T. M. LEE.

Received March 12, 1908.


Page 110

STANLY.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 12. One helpless. Four idiots. One epileptic. All they want of good, substantial food. Superintendent is W. J. Underwood, Albemarle; receives $20 per month and board of family. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. N. Anderson; pay $1.50 per visit. Three deaths from pneumonia during six months. Sick are cared for by the family of the keeper. Premises neat; buildings comparatively new and fairly well ventilated. Crops are corn, wheat, oats, rye and garden vegetables. Regular religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to 40 at $2.50 per capita per month. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--We think that our Home will compare favorably with others in the State. We hope to see it in better shape and nearer self-sustaining. A chapel is soon to be built on the premises and the ministers of the various denominations will hold regular services.

S. H. MILTON.

Received May 1, 1908.

STOKES.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 16. Three weakminded, two white women and one colored male. Confined, 1. Epileptic, 1. Inmates are not allowanced as to food, but have as much as they want of meat, bread, vegetables and some milk and butter and coffee. The Superintendent receives $5 per month for each inmate. He has the use of the farm and pays the county $100 per year. Superintendent is W. R. Stephens, Meadows. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. Walter Neal, Meadows; salary, $100 for jail and Home. Number in charge September 1, 17. Since admitted, 5. Died, 3. Discharged, 4. None able to work, except two, who can assist some. Kitchen in very good condition. One child, whose mother was burnt and she sent her child to the Home. General impression of the management is favorable. Other items as previously reported.

        Remarks.--I talked with the inmates of the Home for some time and they all told me that they were satisfied with their treatment. That the keeper and his wife are very kind to them, always treated them well and that they had no complaint to make.

N. O. PETREE.

Received March 16, 1908.

TRANSYLVANIA.

        The Home is in a fine location, two miles from the county seat. Two frame buildings 14 × 24 feet; two rooms in each with a door and two windows to each room. Spring. Open fires. No special fire protection.


Page 111

Can accommodate 8. Now in charge, 5; three of whom are feebleminded, one a boy fourteen years old. Plain food in sufficient quantity. Keeper is William P. McGaha; salary, $6 per capita per month and the use of the farm. He is considered satisfactory. Physician is Dr. Goode Cheatham; salary, $50. Admitted during six months, 2; died, 1. The buildings have received a new coat of whitewash inside and out and are in fairly good condition. The keeper's house, just above them, is new. No Home kitchen; the room occupied by the old couple and the feebleminded boy is used also for cooking. Twenty acres, 12 under cultivation. Two horses, cow and oxen. Vegetables and grain raised and used for the Home. Very slightly shaded; might be improved in this respect. Occasional religious services. Outdoor relief to 20 at $3.50 per month. So far as we could judge, the general impression of the management is favorable.

        Remarks.--We visited the County Home, inspected the houses and saw all the inmates. The houses have lately been whitewashed inside and out and look neat.

REV. CHALMERS D. CHAPMAN,

REV. ROBERT G. TUTTLE.

Received April 15, 1908.

TYRRELL.

        The buildings are now undergoing repairs and everything about the Home and little farm is neat and clean. The kitchen has been thoroughly repaired with decided improvement. In charge, two; one white girl has epileptic fits and her mind is impaired. The two inmates are fed from the keeper's table. Cost, $2.50 per week. Superintendent is W. H. Gurkin, Columbia; receives $2.50 per week for each inmate and the use of the farm. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. L. Spruill; $1 per visit. Well cared for when sick. Truck, corn, melons and vegetables raised for the use of the keeper. Not much shade. No children. No religious services. Outdoor relief to 9 at $2.50 per month.

        Remarks.--Under the management of our efficient board of county commissioners much needed repairs are now being made to the Home. I visited the Home yesterday and was favorably impressed with the work, which is now nearing completion.

J. C. MEEKINS, SR.

Received March 7, 1908.

VANCE.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 13. Three insane. None confined or epileptic. Superintendent is


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satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. H. Tucker, Henderson. Admitted, 2; discharged, 1. No deaths. No children. Other items as heretofore reported. General impression is favorable.

DR. F. R. HARRIS.

Received March 30, 1908.

WAKE.

        The Home is unchanged as to buildings. Can accommodate 90 to 100. Now in charge, 83. Helpless, 7. Insane, 11 whites and 21 colored. Confined, 2. Epileptics, 8. Plenty of good food, with variety in diet. Superintendent is a satisfactory officer. County physician is Dr. J. W. McGee, Jr., Raleigh. Admitted in six months, 18. Died, 16. Discharged, 2. Ten are able to assist in the farm work. Buildings and grounds in good condition. Kitchen good. Six hundred and ninety-nine acres; 150 in cultivation. Corn, cotton, oats, potatoes and vegetables in abundance. Shaded. Regular religious services in the chapel. One child three years old. Some outdoor relief to 126 at a cost of $1 per month each. General impression is favorable.

I. C. BLAIR, Chairman;

JOHN A. MILLS.

Received October 8, 1908.

WARREN.

        The buildings at the Home are unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 20. Two insane, but not confined. A sufficient amount of food at a cost of $2 per week. Superintendent is J. S. Davis, Warrenton; pay $7 per month for each inmate and use of the farm. He is a satisfactory officer. Physician is Dr. M. P. Perry; salary, $20 per month. Admitted in six months, 7. Died, 5; one of consumption. Sick well cared for. Premises in good condition. Kitchen good. No children. Outdoor relief to 60 at a cost of $1.47 per month. General impression is favorable.

P. H. ALLEN, Chairman;

R. A. BOYD,

J. A. HUDGINS.

Received March 28, 1908.

WASHINGTON.

        The County Home is in its usual good condition. Now in charge, 2 colored males. For its size it is the best in Eastern Carolina.

W. F. BEASLEY.

Received May 27, 1908.

WAYNE.

        There has been no change in the Home since the last report.

M. L. LEE.

Received March 20, 1908.


Page 113

WILKES.

        The Home is on a farm two miles from the county seat. Six or seven log houses, 12 × 14 feet each and one frame building, all poorly ventilated. Two to four rooms to each building. No protection against fire. Well. Open fires. Ten to fifteen can be comfortably accommodated. Now in charge, 17. Able to do light work, 2. Helpless, 8. Four whites insane; three confined. Four epileptics. Three regular meals of good, wholesome food, well prepared. Superintendent is Rev. J. N. Brooks, North Wilkesboro; receives 14 cents per day each and use of the farm. He is a satisfactory officer. Physician is Dr. John Q. Myers; salary, $37.50 per year. Number in charge September 1, 12; since admitted, 5. No deaths. Sick are well cared for by the Superintendent and family. The premises and buildings dilapidated and old-time looking. Kitchen good. One hundred acres of poor and not very productive land. No stock and not much cultivated. Crops are corn and vegetables used for the inmates. Shaded. Religious services every fifth Sunday. No children. No outdoor relief. General impression of the management favorable. Needs new buildings and improvement of the farm.

JOHN Q. MYERS, M. D.

Received March 21, 1908.

YANCEY.

        The Home is on Jack's Creek, six miles from the county seat. One frame building, 40 × 20, one story, and kitchen, 20 × 16; four rooms, besides kitchen. No protection against fire. Spring. Open fires. None can be kept as they should be; five now in charge. The keeper and family live in the same building and nurse the poor when sick. Of the five, one is a white insane woman, and there are two children, a clubfoot girl and a boy, illegitimate. Superintendent is William Roland, Willhite; paid $6.25 per month for each; he is satisfactory. No county physician at present; physician paid by the visit. The building is dilapidated and on a very poor farm of 25 acres. Not a good garden on the land; not shaded. No religious services. Outdoor relief to ten or twelve, at $3 per month.

        Remarks.--The Home is a disgrace to our county. I earnestly hope that we may soon be better prepared to care for our unfortunates. It is as well kept, I judge, as the meager remuneration will allow.

W. B. ROBERTSON, M. D.

Received July 8, 1908.


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COUNTY PRISONS.

ALAMANCE.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Free of vermin. Religious services but seldom. Now in charge, 6 colored males. During six months, 25 colored and 11 white; total, 36. No deaths.

J. M. HOLT,

J. A. TURRENTINE,

P. H. FLEMING.

Received March 11, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now confined, 18; 7 white, 11 colored. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

REV. J. M. HOLT,

J. A. TURRENTINE,

P. H. FLEMING.

Received September 28, 1908.

ANSON.

        The prison is built of wood and brick and is not fireproof. It is 40 × 60 feet. City water. Cage is 30 × 18, and now holds 11 prisoners. Windows barred and has fly screens. Well ventilated. Stove. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Water in the cells. Plenty of substantial food. Sewerage. No provision for bathing. Cage has vermin. No religious services. Now confined, 11 negro males, 3 white males; one insane and awaiting room at the hospital. One prisoner died in the last six months from gunshot wounds.

        Remarks.--The jail, with a little care, could be kept more cleanly.

DR. J. M. BOYETTE.

Received September 2, 1908.

BEAUFORT.

        The prison is unchanged as to building. It is in fine condition--clean cots, new clothes and whitewash in plenty, but everything badly overcrowded. Forty-two prisoners, two of whom are women. One of the women is insane.

DR. J. M. GALLAGHER.

Received June 4, 1908.


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BLADEN.

        The prison is built of brick. Fireproof. Force pump. Building is 30 × 35 feet, two stories and six cells. Windows on weights. Special ventilation. Furnace. Sufficient amount of bedding and no suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Drinking-water twice daily. Plenty of food. Coffee. Buckets for bathing. Pipe. Free of vermin. Occasional religious services. Now confined, 7 colored males. No deaths. Some religious books and reading matter. General impression is favorable.

MRS. WILLIAM WHITTED,

MRS. JOHN MCDOWELL.

Received September 28, 1908.

BUNCOMBE.

        The new prison is built of brick, iron and concrete. It is fireproof. High pressure water system. Five stories. Rooms vary in size; no evidence of crowding. One sash to the windows opens. Steam heated. Mattress and two quilts or blankets. Second floor for females. Water all the time. As much food as desired. There are concrete floors and walls with plenty of water for cleanliness. Bath tubs. Closet in every cell. Free of vermin. Salvation Army has regular services. Now confined, 7 white males, 1 white female, 6 colored males and 2 colored females; total, 16. No death in jail in three years. Testaments. General impression is very favorable.

M. L. STEVENS, M. D.

Received August 21, 1908.

BRUNSWICK.

        The jail is built of brick. It is fireproof. Two stories. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Plenty of fresh water. Cleansed by hose. Basins in cells. Free of vermin. Occasional religious services. Now confined, 1 white male. Died, 1, paralysis. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--All prisoners are well cared for and the jail is a very good one.

J. ARTHUR DOSHER, M. D.

Received May 15, 1908.

BURKE.

        There has been no change in the jail building. Sexes separated. Fresh water three times daily. No warm drink. Required to wash. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined, 3 colored and 2 white males. No deaths. General impression of the management is favorable.

        Remarks.--The same old jail, but hope to report a new one next fall or that this one has been remodeled.

ROBERT T. CLAYWELL.

Received March 26, 1908.


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CABARRUS.

        The prison is built of brick. City water and fire department. It is 50 × 50 feet, two stories and six cells. Generally two prisoners to a cell. Ventilated by windows, barred. Steam heat. No suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Drinking-water three times daily. Two meals per day. No coffee. Water and lime used for cleanliness of jail. Sewerage. No vermin. Religious services every third Sunday. Now confined, 4 colored males, 1 white male and 1 white female. The two latter serving sentence, others awaiting trial. Confined during six months, 70; white males, 25; colored males, 41; white females, 2; colored females, 2. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--Prisoners seem to be contented and cared for as well as circumstances will permit.

JOHN M. HENDRIX,

G. ED. KESTLER.

Received June 15, 1908.

CALDWELL.

        The prison is built of brick and steel and is fireproof. Tank of water. Built on modern plans. Two stories and eight cells. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. Sufficient amount of bedding. Sexes separated. Drinking-water as required. Food not limited, coffee. Painting and disinfectants to preserve cleanliness. Bath tub; not required to bathe. Sewerage. Free of vermin. Occasional religious services. Now confined, 2 white males awaiting trial. No deaths. Never overcrowded. General impression is favorable.

J. W. CURTIS,

DR. C. L. WILSON.

Received June 29, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        Prison as previously reported. None now confined. Impression is favorable.

C. L. WILSON, M. D.

Received September 28, 1908.

CAMDEN.

        The prison building is as heretofore reported. No prisoners in our jail.

        Remarks.--I think that Camden is an exception to the rule, or rather what is generally seen in the various prisons. With rare exception do we burden the jailer with the care of prisoners more than three months duty in the year. The door of the county prison stands ajar most of the time. No intoxicating liquors sold here for sometime and the prospects are that it will be quite a time before any will be legally sold.

GEO. H. RIGGS.

Received May 1, 1908.
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SECOND REPORT.

        The county prison is at present unoccupied. No change since the last report. We simply need a prison as a scarecrow to evildoers.

GEO. H. RIGGS.

Received October 9, 1908.

CARTERET.

        The prison is built of brick. Fireproof. City fire department near. It is 60 × 16 feet, with four rooms 14 × 16 feet. From one to four prisoners to a cell. Windows barred. Ventilated otherwise than by windows. Stoves. No suffering in cold weather, sufficient amount of bedding. Sexes separated. Drinking-water three times a day. Good meals and warm coffee when desired. Tubs are provided and prisoners are required to take a full bath once a week. Rooms scoured and lime used. Excreta carted away. Free of vermin. No punishment. No intoxicating liquors. No religious service regularly. Only one colored male now confined. No deaths during the six months. General impression is favorable.

MRS. W. H. HENDRICKS.

Received March 4, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Now confined, 2 colored males. No deaths. Occasional religious services.

        Remarks.--New bedding is to be purchased for the next prisoners. Those now confined will soon be out. The Charity and Help Department of the Epworth League of the Methodist Church is assisting us in the work.

MRS. W. H. HENDRICKS,

MRS. H. H. WILLIS.

Received September 12, 1908.

CASWELL.

        The prison is built of brick and concrete. Fireproof. Waterworks in the building. Two stories, six cells. Ventilated by windows and otherwise. Stoves. No suffering from cold. East end for females, west end for males. Fresh drinking-water twice a day. Coffee and three good meals. The jail is cleansed by means of hose attached to the pump. Bath basin. Required to wash. Sewerage. Free of vermin. No religious services. Confined, 3 colored males awaiting trial. None confined for sentences. No deaths. General impression of management is favorable.

S. A. MALLOY, M. D.

Received March 7, 1908.
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SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is built of brick and cement. Waterworks. Ventilated by windows and doors. Stoves. Sewerage. Drinking-water as desired. Sufficient food. Free of vermin. No religious services. No deaths. Now confined, 2. General impression is favorable.

S. A. MALLOY, M. D.

Received September 4, 1908.

CATAWBA.

        The prison is built of brick, about 20 × 40 feet and two stories. There is a tank and pump and will soon have waterworks. Windows barred. Sexes separated. Sewerage. Occasional religious services. No deaths.

        Remarks.--I think that our jailer is a very good man, and he looks after the prisoners all right.

REV. M. A. ABERNETHY.

Received September 21, 1908.

CHATHAM.

        The prison is unchanged as to building. Sufficient amount of bedding. Sexes separate. Ample supply of plain food, coffee. Provision for bathing. Lime and water used for cleansing the jail. Excreta carried out and buried; lime used freely. No vermin. No religious services. Now confined, 2 black males; during six months, 3. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--Would recommend that sewer pipes be placed from the jail to the creek, 200 yards off, which would improve the sanitary condition of the jail very much.

G. R. PILKINGTON,

MRS. HENRY A. LONDON.

Received April 24, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is as last reported. Now confined, 5 colored males and 2 white; total, 7. General impression is fair.

MRS. H. A. LONDON.

Received September 30, 1908.

CHEROKEE.

        The jail is built of brick. Well with a pump. One story with three cells. Windows barred. Ventilated by windows. States. Some suffering in cold weather. None now confined.

MRS. R. H. HYATT.

Received October 8, 1908.


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CHOWAN.

        The prison is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Waterworks. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined, 19 colored males, 2 colored females. During six months 27, five of these white. One colored male died of pneumonia. General impression of the management is favorable.

REV. ROBERT B. DRANE.

Received March 28, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the building. Now confined, 3 colored males, 1 colored female. Confined during six months 22, colored. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--Prohibition in Edenton has much relieved the county jail.

REV. ROBERT B. DRANE, D. D.

Received December 26, 1908.

CLAY.

        The jail is a log building of two rooms. Shutters to the windows. Heated by stoves. Not comfortable in cold weather. Only one room used for prisoners. Drinking-water as needed. Plenty of food and coffee. No provision for bathing. No special means for cleansing the jail. Bad arrangement for removal of excreta. No prisoners at present. Two white Federal prisoners recently released. No deaths. As to the jailer's part impression of management is favorable. No improvements have been made in the building.

L. F. SHUFORD.

Received May 15, 1908.

CLEVELAND.

        The prison is built of brick and steel and is considered fireproof. Tank of water. Building is 20 × 60 feet. Two stories, six cells. Windows barred. Steam heated. All the bedding necessary. Sexes separated. Drinking-water as needed. Sufficient amount of food. No warm drink. Free of vermin. Disinfectants used. Sewerage. Occasional religious services. General impression of the management is favorable. Now confined, 11 colored males, 1 white male; 1 colored female. No deaths.

        Remarks.--The county prison is in good hands and the prisoners are well kept.

S. C. HENDRICKS.

Received September 10, 1908.


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DARE.

        The jail building is inferior. Needs much improvement. Seldom or never have any prisoners confined therein. Management fair. All the fresh water and food desired. Stove and sufficient bedding.

        Remarks.--The jail is not fit to confine men in.

CHARLES L. MANN.

Received March 17, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The jail building is as heretofore reported. It is not safe and a few days ago the sheriff took prisoners to Pasquotank jail for safekeeping. Two made their escape last week. Surely needs repairs.

CHARLES L. MANN.

Received September 16, 1908.

DAVIDSON.

        The jail is as heretofore reported. Drinking-water as wanted and required to bathe. No punishment. Now confined, 1 insane pauper. During six months, 47. No deaths.

JAMES SMITH.

Received April 13, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The jail is being remodeled and enlarged. No prisoners now confined.

JAMES SMITH.

Received October 19, 1908.

DAVIE.

        The jail is unchanged since the last report. No prisoners now in charge.

        Remarks.--We need a new prison badly; I think I could break out of this one, myself.

MRS. A. M. NAIL.

Received April 13, 1908.

DUPLIN.

        The new jail building is built of brick with steel cells and is fireproof; 24 × 36 feet, two stories; nine rooms, with corridors. Three steel cells 5 × 8; two cells 8 × 8 and four rooms 10 × 10 feet. Windows screened with wire. No ventilation except windows and doors. Coal stove. Sufficient amount of bedding for comfort. We have not had a woman since the jail was remodeled, but ample arrangement for the separation of the sexes. Drinking-water several times a day. Waterworks. Prisoners wash at will. Sufficient amount of food and


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warm drink to the old or sick. Sewerage. Have had some vermin, but cells were fumigated and cleansed. Religious services at intervals. Now confined, 4 colored males; 1 white male insane epileptic has been in jail two years. Confined during six months, 6 colored males and 1 white. No deaths.

A. P. FARRIOR.

Received June 24, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        Nothing new to report in regard to the jail. No deaths. None now confined.

A. P. FARRIOR.

Received September 26, 1908.

EDGECOMBE.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Brick, one story, four cells. Ventilated by windows only. Stoves. No suffering from the cold. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Waterworks in the cells. Meat and bread and vegetables, with coffee in the morning. Every possible means used to preserve the cleanliness of the jail. Sewerage. No vermin. No religious services. Now confined, 3 males, serving sentences of three, four and six months, and 3 awaiting trial. During six months were confined 85. No deaths.

JAS. R. GASKILL.

Received March 23, 1908.

FORSYTH.

        The jail is built of brick 30 × 50 feet. A new concrete annex the same size is to be built at once. City fire departments and hydrants on three sides. Three stories and five cells in the present building; new building will have 24. Windows and doors. Steam heat. No suffering from cold. Sleep in hammocks and have two to four blankets. Women have beds. Sexes separated. Drinking-water all the time. Food good; two meals; no coffee or warm drink. Scoured and disinfected. Bathtubs in each room and required to bathe. Sewerage. Free of vermin. Religious services every Thursday and occasionally on Sunday. Now confined, 20; 1 white male and 3 females serving sentence. Four from the convict camp sick or unable to work, the remaining awaiting trial. Average number confined, about 30. They are changing all the time. Four-fifths of the prisoners are colored. Two deaths--one blood poison and one from heart failure. No Federal prisoner. General impression of the management is quite favorable.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND,

W. P. HILL.

H. W. FOLTZ.

Received June 20, 1908.
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SECOND REPORT.

        The new annex to the jail is built of concrete and is fireproof. It is 23 × 60 feet. Three stories and basement with 32 cells. Four can be placed in the new cells. Ventilators in the roof and walls of the annex. Steam heated. Bathtub in each department. Required to bathe once a week. Free of vermin, but hard to keep it so. Now confined, 1 white male, 16 colored males, 6 colored females; total, 23. Other items as reported.

        Remarks.--The jailer would like to have half a dozen cheap suits so he can have new prisoners cleansed before admission to cells.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND,

W. P. HILL,

H. W. FOLTZ.

Received December 16, 1908.

GASTON.

        The prison is built of brick and concrete. Well on the premises. Building is 40 × 50 feet, two stories. Seven rooms. Sashes of windows on hinges and open when the weather permits. Windows barred. Sufficient bedding. No suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Drinking-water several times daily. All they want to eat. Coffee or tea. Tubs and basins, required to bathe. Disinfectants and scouring. Sewerage. Religious services. Now confined, 2 white males, 2 black males. No deaths. Impression of management is very favorable.

        Remarks.--Commissioners require county physician to submit monthly written reports of convict camps, jail and Home, covering general conditions of each; treatment of inmates, food served, sanitation, stock, etc. These reports have served to keep up very closely with the above-named places and have been of great benefit.

J. P. REID.

Received September 26, 1908.

GATES.

        The prison is as heretofore reported as to building. Fresh drinking-water twice a day and two good meals. Water and basins for bathing; prisoners required to wash. The jail is swept and scoured. Excreta removed in buckets. Free of vermin. No intoxicating liquors allowed. No religious services. One white male and 4 colored. Confined during six months, 1 white and 6 colored. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

MARTIN KELLOGG.

Received March 6, 1908.


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GRANVILLE.

        The jail is built of brick. Cement floors. Fireproof. Protected from fire by waterworks and fire department. The building is 30 × 60 feet, two stories; 5 cells 8 × 10; 4 to 6 to a cell. Ventilated otherwise than by windows. Stove. No suffering from cold. One mattress and several blankets to each prisoner. Sexes separated. Drinking-water all the time. Two meals a day. The jail is disinfected. Free of vermin. Sufficient arrangements for bathing, and prisoners are required to wash. Sewerage. No religious services. Now confined, 2 white and 1 colored male. During six months, 28 colored and 2 whites. No deaths. General impression of the management is favorable.

D. N. HUNT.

Received March 6, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The jail is as heretofore reported as to buildings. No religious services, but will try to look after this matter. Now confined, 2 colored males. No deaths. Other items as previously reported.

        Remarks.--I have visited and inspected our county jail. It is in good condition and well kept. The prisoners say that they have plenty to eat. The jailer is a clever, sober man and attentive to his business.

D. N. HUNT.

Received September 23, 1908.

GREENE.

        The prison is unchanged as to buildings. No religious services. Confined from September 1, 1907, to August 1, 1908, 10. Of these one colored male insane. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--All prisoners, so far as I can learn, have been kindly treated and properly cared for.

L. V. MORRILL.

Received August 4, 1908.

HARNETT.

        The prison is brick and cement. It is fireproof. A reservoir is in the upper story. Size of building is 40 × 50 feet. Two stories, twelve cells. Barred windows with wire screens. Ventilated by windows. Furnace. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. The tank is filled with water daily. Prisoners are fed from jailer's table. Waterworks. Sewerage. Free of vermin. Scrubbed and cleansed. No religious services. Now confined, 1


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colored male for ninety days; 5 colored males awaiting trial. During six months were confined 3 white insane males and 12 colored males; total, 15. General impression is favorable. No deaths.

        Remarks.--Our jail is a new brick building with steel cells, doors, etc. Prisoners have use of a large room during the day. Each cell has a window 5 × 2½ feet in the end and is well ventilated. The jail is connected with the courtroom by a closed bridge to prevent escape of prisoners.

DR. J. H. WITHERS,

C. MCARTAN,

H. T. FAUCETTE.

Received August 14, 1908.

HAYWOOD.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Regular religious services. Now confined, 7--1 black and 1 white for burglary, and 5 white males insane.

        Remarks.--The county physician and I have interviewed the county commissioners in regard to the removal of the insane from the jail to some place or building where they may have more sunshine and more pleasant environments.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received May 1, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is two stories and has eleven rooms and cells. Windows can be raised or lowered from the top. Seven windows in the main room, with iron gratings. Bath rooms. Disinfectants freely used. Sewerage. All the food they need.

        Remarks.--When this report was made out there was not a single prisoner in the jail--the first time that this has been the case in making my reports.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received November 11, 1908.

HENDERSON.

        The prison is as heretofore reported as to buildings. It is kept as clean as possible. No deaths. None now confined.

        Remarks--It gives me great pleasure to report that there are no prisoners in our jail at present. At the last criminal court the judge complimented the county on the small number of cases on the docket.

MRS. LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received March 19, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. It is steam heated. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Water


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all the time. Abundant amount of food. Coffee for breakfast. Tubs. Required to bathe. The prison is kept as clean as possible. Now confined: 4 white males, 1 white female, 6 colored males, 2 colored females; total, 15. No deaths.

        Remarks.--The reason there are so many in jail is that it is just before court. Most of them are confined for minor offenses.

MRS. LILA R. BARNWELL.

Received September 16, 1908.

HERTFORD.

        The jail is built of brick and cement and is fireproof. Well and pump. The building is 32 × 32 feet and one story high. Three cells and one room. Room is used for females, but seldom have female prisoners. Ventilation from top and by window. Wire screens at the windows. Furnace. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. Fresh water twice daily. Sufficient amount of food. The prison is scoured and disinfected. Sewerage. Bowls for bathing. Free of vermin. Seldom any religious services. No deaths. None now confined. General impression is favorable.

W. P. SHAW,

JOHN A. NORTHCOTT,

JOHN E. VANN.

Received August 27, 1908.

IREDELL.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. It is not fireproof, but there is a system of waterworks and the city fire department. Sufficient amount of bedding. Fresh water as needed. Two meals, with coffee. Scrubbing and disinfectants used to cleanse the building. Required to bathe. Sewerage. No vermin. Occasional religious services. Confined: 8 colored males and 4 whites. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

MRS. A. L. COBLE.

Received May 13, 1908.

JACKSON.

        The building is brick and is fireproof. Waterworks. The jail is two stories high, 24 × 26 feet and 8 cells. Ventilated otherwise than by window. Stove. No suffering from cold; sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Drinking-water in the jail. Good food and coffee. Bathtub, and required to bathe. No vermin. Sewerage. No religious services. Now confined, 6 white males. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

REV. A. W. DAVIS.

Received April 28, 1908.


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JONES.

        The prison is brick and cement with steel cells; fireproof; 27 × 35 feet. Three cells and one room. Windows barred. Stoves. Three blankets and a mattress to each prisoner. Sexes separated. Drinking-water twice a day. Meat and meal. Jail is scoured. Basins. Not required to wash. Free of vermin. None now confined. One hanged. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--The jail is a very nice brick building with cement floors. No one has been confined in jail since last term of court.

JULIAN K. WARREN.

Received September 8, 1908.

JOHNSTON.

        The prison is built of brick. Two stories. Six cells, 8 × 10 feet. Ventilated by windows. Stove. As much bedding as desired. Sexes separated. Fresh drinking-water as needed. Disinfectants. Excreta removed in buckets. Free of vermin. Religious services frequently. No deaths.

        Remarks.--The jail is well kept. The prisoners are furnished comfortable bedding, plenty of plain food, and the sanitary conditions are looked after.

MRS. W. S. STEVENS.

Received November 13, 1908.

LENOIR.

        The prison is built of brick. Supposed to be fire-proof. Fire department near. Building is 40 × 50 feet; 2 stories, 7 cells. Windows not obstructed. Ventilated by windows and otherwise. Steam heat. Separate apartments for the sexes and for juvenile prisoners. Water-works in every room. Sewerage. Two meals a day; all they will eat. Coffee to the feeble. Two bathtubs, one for each sex. Required to bathe. No religious services. No deaths. It is a modern jail. The impression of the management is pleasantly favorable. Now confined: 2 white and 11 colored males.

        Remarks.--A committee of two inspected the jail this morning and were favorably impressed with what was seen and the courtesy extended by the deputy sheriff.

REV. JOHN H. GRIFFITH.

Received September 18, 1908.

LINCOLN.

        The prison is as heretofore reported as to building, etc. No suffering from cold. Sexes in separate rooms. Fresh drinking-water three


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or four times a day. Good food. Coffee twice a day. The building is whitewashed several times a year. Towel baths. Excreta removed in buckets. Free of vermin. Occasional religious services. Now confined: 1 white and 1 colored male. During six months, 16--white, 8; black, 8. No deaths. General impression of the management favorable.

        Remarks.--Glad to see a nice record kept by the jailer. Management fairly good. The jail is not safe, but the jailer seems to keep all in good order.

REV. R. Z. JOHNSTON, Chairman;

D. T. JOHNSON,

MISS KATE SHIPP,

MRS. R. S. REINHARDT.

Received March 6, 1908.

MACON.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Now confined, 1 colored male. No vermin. No deaths. Not overcrowded. Confined during six months, 26--one of these a white insane woman. General impression of the management is good.

REV. J. A. DEAL,

MISS JULIA MCDOWELL,

MRS. L. M. RANKIN,

R. F. JARRETT.

Received April 9, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is unchanged. Some fleas in evidence; spraying with disinfectants. No religious services. Now confined: 1 white and 1 colored male. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

REV. J. A. DEAL,

MRS. J. C. WRIGHT.

Received September 12, 1908.

MARTIN.

        The jail is built of brick and is fireproof. Two stories, 8 cells. Three prisoners can be easily placed in each cell. Windows can be closed. Ventilated by windows and otherwise. Stoves. Quilts, mattresses and blankets. Sexes separated. Drinking-water three or four times daily. Amount of food allowed by law. Coffee. Kept clean by scrubbing and sweeping. Provision for bathing. Free of vermin. Occasional religious services. None now confined. General impression is favorable.

WILLIAM E. WARREN, M. D.

Received September 8, 1908.


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MECKLENBURG.

        The prison is unchanged as to building since the last report. Now confined: 2 white males, 14 negro males and 4 negro females; total, 20. All city water needed, but prisoners are not required to bathe. Sewerage. The prison is not free of vermin, and the means used for the cleansing of the jail are inadequate. No intoxicating liquors allowed. Religious services on Sundays. Corn bread and pork. No warm drink and no vegetables. Number in charge during six months: 74 white males, 12 white females; total white, 86; 300 colored males, 43 colored females; total black, 343; grand total, 429.

        Remarks.--The furnace does not supply sufficient heat between 2 and 5 A. M. to keep the prisoners comfortable. The supply of blankets for the negroes is inadequate--only twenty-four much used blankets for forty men. The food is not what it ought to be; plentiful, but poorly prepared and monotonous; weeks and months pass and no vegetable is served.

REV. FRANCIS M. OSBORNE.

Received March 19, 1908.

MONTGOMERY.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Four negro men awaiting trial.

R. T. POOLE.

Received September 8, 1908.

MOORE.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Sexes separated. No suffering from cold. Fresh water three times daily. All the food they want. Bathtubs. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined, 14 colored males. During six months, 71. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received March 26, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is as previously reported. Now confined, 1 white male, insane.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received September 19, 1908.

NEW HANOVER.

        The prison is unchanged since the autumn report. Hot and cold shower baths, and prisoners are required to bathe. Free of vermin. Religious services. Now confined: 9 white males, 42 colored males,


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4 colored females; total, 55--8 of these for murder and others for different offenses. All awaiting court; some have been confined since September 26, 1907. Besides the 55 now in jail, 30 males have been sent to the convict camp and 2 women to the County Home--all colored but 1 male; these prisoners awaiting trial, but sent to the camp because of the crowded condition of the jail building. Confined during six months, 348; of these 300 were colored. No deaths in jail, but one prisoner removed to the hospital, died there. General impression of the management of the jail is very favorable.

        Remarks.--The jail was taxed to its utmost capacity on account of the lapse of one term of court, thereby overcrowding; but the jailer is a good and efficient officer and has kept the premises in good condition.

A. G. HANKINS.

Received March 1, 1908.

ONSLOW.

        The prison is as heretofore reported as to buildings. No punishment. Now confined, 1 white male, epileptic. During six months, 3 white and 7 colored. No deaths. General impression of the management is favorable.

G. H. SIMMONS.

Received April 2, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Now confined, 1 colored male. One death since March 1. Free of vermin. No religious services. General impression of management is favorable.

G. H. SIMMONS.

Received September 8, 1908.

PAMLICO.

        The prison is built of brick, 30 × 30 feet. Two stories, four rooms. Windows not obstructed. Ventilated by windows. Wood stove. Sufficient bedding. Drinking-water as needed. Sufficient amount of food. No provision for bathing. Excreta removed in buckets. No religious services. Now confined, 3 colored males. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

W. T. MAYO.

Received September 11, 1908.

PERSON.

        The prison is brick and steel; fireproof; 30 × 25 feet. One story with six rooms and cells. Windows barred. Ventilated by windows.


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Stoves. No suffering in cold weather. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Drinking-water three times daily. Three meals and coffee. Swept, and lime used. Tubs and bowls; required to wash. Sewerage. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined: 2 white males and 2 colored males awaiting trial. During six months: 2 whites (insane), and 5 colored male prisoners. No deaths. General impression is favorable.

N. C. NEWBOLD.

Received July 18, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is only one story 25 × 30 feet. It is entirely too small for the demands made upon it at times. Three rooms and three cells. The rooms are 10 × 10 feet; cells 6 × 8. The number of prisoners placed in each room and cell depends, of course, upon the number of prisoners held. At present only four--2 colored males; 1 white female; 1 white male, insane. The windows barred. Heated by stoves and comfortable. Sewerage. Plenty of plain food. Drinking-water three times daily. No provision for religious services regularly. Upon the whole, I am satisfied that the prison is well kept as possible under the circumstances.

REV. J. A. HORNADAY.

Received November 13, 1908.

PERQUIMANS.

        The old jail has been condemned and demolished. A good new jail is being built.

B. S. LASSITER.

Received September 8, 1908.

PITT.

        The prison is built of brick, with steel cells 22 × 44 feet, and two stories. Two cells 16 × 16, two 8 × 12, two 6 × 12. Windows barred. No other ventilation except by windows and doors. Stoves. All necessary bedding. Sexes separated. Water in each cell. Sufficient amount of food. Scoured. Bathtubs. Basins in each cell. Sewerage. Free of vermin. Now confined: 9 colored males; 1 white man, insane and epileptic; 1 colored woman, insane. The man has been confined since March, 1906. No deaths.

        Remarks.--The jail is very well equipped. Fitted with electric lights, waterworks and sewerage. Separate bathtubs for white and colored. It is well heated and ventilated. It is seldom ever crowded.

J. W. SMITH,

ROBERT N. NICHOLS.

Received July 7, 1908.


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RICHMOND.

        The prison is built of brick with wooden floors; 40 feet square; two stories; four steel cells. Windows barred. City waterworks. Furnace, hot air. Races and sexes separated. Meat, bread, vegetables, altogether sufficient. Cleansed with soap and hot and cold water. Porcelain bathtub, city water, and required to use it. Sewerage. Sheriff is forced occasionally to whip a hard case to stop loud cursing and indecent language. The white and colored preachers of the town give them some attention. Now confined, 22 negroes, to be tried next week. One death during the six months; heart failure. Impression of the management is quite favorable. No suggestions except we will try to have more cells added for white men and women; all prisoners at present are negroes.

J. S. LEDBETTER,

R. S. JOHNSON.

Received January 2, 1909.

ROBESON.

        The jail is a brick building; fireproof; 60 × 60 feet; two stories; 16 rooms and cells. Cells are 7 × 7½. Wire screens over the windows. Steam heated. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. City fire department. Two meals a day. Drinking-water three times daily. Tub; required to wash. Disinfectants used for cleansing the jail. No vermin. No regular religious services. Two Indians, 2 whites and 10 colored prisoners. Usually the largest number at a time is 30. One death. Books and Bibles furnished. General impression is favorable.

J. P. MCNEILL.

Received April 25, 1908.

ROCKINGHAM.

        The jail is unchanged. Heated by stove. No suffering in winter. Fresh water three times daily. Poor facilities for bathing--one large pan for all the prisoners. Sewerage. Free of vermin. No punishment. No religious services. No prisoners sentenced to jail. All go to the roads or are hired out on farms. No deaths. The management is as good as it can be with the present building.

        Remarks.--We will have to build a new jail soon. Our county has just finished a new courthouse and will proceed with the jail in the near future, I think. Our present building does not meet the requirements of law.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS,

WILLIAM CUMMINGS.

Received March 4, 1908.
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SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is unchanged. None now confined. We keep no prisoners for punishment; the jail is used for prisoners unable to give bond and awaiting trial. No deaths. Management favorable.

        Remarks.--We must have a new jail as soon as the courthouse is paid for. The next board of commissioners are expected to build a jail.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received September 4, 1908.

ROWAN.

        The new jail is built of brick, steel and cement. Two stories. Two rooms with 8 cells each and one room with 3 cells. Cells 7½ feet square. Steam-heated; air vents. No suffering from cold. Sufficient food. We found one female prisoner in the room with three cells. City water in each room. Coffee on Sunday. Disinfectants used. Bathtub in each room. Not compelled to bathe, but allowed to do so. Vermin are constantly brought in by hoboes who remain but one night. No provision for religious services. Now in charge: 7 white males, 2 colored males and 1 colored female. Three deaths in six months; one man died from effects of liquor and exposure to cold, one shot by deputy sheriff whom he had cut with a knife, one put in jail while delirious from pneumonia.

        Remarks.--This is a new jail, which does not in our judgment comply with the law, which we think requires five distinct rooms; nor have rooms been provided for consumptives, as a statute passed since the contract for the jail was made requires. The solicitor called the attention of the grand jury to it. The grand jury reported that it was not in accordance with the law, but county commissioners continued to build it as contracted for.

F. J. MURDOCH,

H. T. TRANTHAM,

JAMES D. HEILIG.

Received May 15, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The jail is as previously reported. Now confined: 7 white males, 1 white female; 13 colored males, 3 colored females; total, 24. One white female, 1 white male and 1 colored male insane. White and black females in the same apartment, different cells. Insane in same apartments, different cells, with other prisoners. The jail is uncleanly and vermin are there that could be exterminated. This new jail cost about $1,000 per cell for each of 19 cells and was constructed without regard to the Attorney-General's opinion that section 1336 requires five distinct rooms for prisoners.

REV. F. J. MURDOCH.

Received September 10, 1908.


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RUTHERFORD.

        The prison is as heretofore reported. Fresh drinking-water three times daily. Coffee. Washed and swept. No provision for bathing. Excreta removed. Free of vermin. No punishment. Now confined, 2 white males. No deaths. General impression of the management is favorable.

DR. E. B. HARRIS,

DR. T. B. TWITTY.

Received June 8, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is unchanged. No suffering from cold, sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Plenty of food and drinking-water often. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined: 3 whites and 4 blacks. No deaths. General impression is favorable. The town works its prisoners on a chain gang and houses them in the jail at night.

E. B. HARRIS, M. D.,

T. B. TWITTY, M. D.

Received October 3, 1908.

SAMPSON.

        The jail is unchanged since the last report. Now confined, 1 colored male.

MRS. T. L. HUBBARD,

REV. T. M. LEE.

Received March 12, 1908.

STANLY.

        The prison is as heretofore reported as to building. Sufficient amount of bedding. No suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Drinking-water as needed. Sufficient amount of food. Required to bathe. Sewer pipe for removing excreta. No vermin. No prisoners now confined. General impression is favorable.

R. E. AUSTIN.

Received May 1, 1908.

STOKES.

        The jail is as heretofore reported as to buildings, etc. Now confined: 3 colored and 1 white male, awaiting trial. During six months, 7. One white insane man, sent to the hospital. Not allowanced as to food. Coffee once a day. Tubs, and prisoners required to wash. Lime, water, broom and soap for cleansing the jail. Fresh water as wanted. Occasional religious services. No deaths. Record kept. General impression of management is fairly good.

N. O. PETREE.

Received March 16, 1908.


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TRANSYLVANIA.

        The prison is rough stone with plaster surface. It is not fireproof. Fire department near-by. The building is 30 × 38, two stories; four rooms, 14 feet square. Iron grating at the windows; no other ventilation. Small stove in one cell; fireplaces in two rooms and the other warmed by flue from below. Mattresses and ample covering, placed on the floor. Sexes separated. Water as often as called for. Sufficient quantity of food, warm drink. Cells swept daily. No provision for bathing. Required to wash. No vermin. No intoxicating liquor. Closets in each cell disinfected once a week. Occasional religious services. Now confined, 2 white males; terms two years and six months. During six months, 16, one of these a white insane woman since removed to the hospital. No deaths. Bibles.

        Remarks.--We visited the prison and the jailer showed us all courtesy and willingly answered inquiries. It is an old stone building kept in passable repair. A new building would be a great improvement, though it may not be feasible at present, but it should be built in time. Strict sanitation should be enforced, as the cells seemed damp and lacking in sunlight, expecially those in the rear. They are all in the second story; the jailer and family occupy the lower story.

REV. CHALMERS D. CHAPMAN, Chairman;

REV. ROBERT G. TUTTLE,

REV. WILLIAM P. CHEDESTER.

Received April 15, 1908.

TYRRELL.

        The jail is as heretofore reported as to building. None confined. No provision for bathing. Excreta carried out in tubs. No vermin. No deaths. No record. General impression is unfavorable.

        Remarks.--My impression is that the management is very poor. No special care seems to be paid to the whole matter.

J. C. MEEKINS, SR.

Received March 7, 1908.

VANCE.

        The prison building is as heretofore reported. Ventilator, besides windows. No suffering from cold. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined: 11 colored prisoners, 1 female. No deaths. General impression of the management is favorable.

DR. F. R. HARRIS.

Received March 30, 1908.


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WAKE.

        The prison is unchanged since last report as to buildings. Sufficient amount of bedding. Sexes entirely separated. Sufficient amount of food; no warm drink. Water, soap and lime used for cleansing the jail. Not absolutely free of vermin. No punishment. Religious services. Now confined: 9 white males, 12 colored males and 1 colored female; total, 22. Confined during six months: 130 white, 319 colored; total, 449. No deaths. Not overcrowded. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--We again recommend that the sheriff have the windows cleansed of paint so that there may be no obstruction to the sunlight; sunlight is wholesome in the broadest sense.

I. C. BLAIR, Chairman;

JOHN A. MILLS.

Received October 8, 1908.

WARREN.

        The prison building is as heretofore reported. Stoves. Sufficient amount of bedding. Fresh drinking-water as needed. Sufficient amount of food, coffee. Provision for bathing. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined, 4. During six months, 14, two of whom were insane. No deaths. General impression of the management is favorable.

P. H. ALLEN, Chairman;

R. B. BOYD,

J. A. HUDGINS.

Received March 28, 1908.

WASHINGTON.

        The jail is in its usual good condition. Now confined: 2 colored and 1 white male.

W. F. BEASLEY.

Received May 27, 1908.

WAYNE.

        There has been no change in the prison since the last report.

M. L. LEE.

Received March 20, 1908.


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WILKES.

        The prison is built of brick; not fireproof; 30 × 40 feet; two stories, four rooms 12 × 12. Windows, closed shutters over the glass. No suffering in cold weather. Bunk with blankets. Sexes separated. Drinking-water as wanted. Two meals, coffee once a day. Disinfectants and scouring. Basin for bathing. Sewerage. Free of vermin. No religious services. Now confined: 2 colored and 6 whites. No deaths. Poor record kept. Impression of the general management is favorable.

JOHN Q. MYERS, M. D.

Received March 21, 1908.


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COUNTY CAMPS.

ALAMANCE.

        The camp is as heretofore reported. No female prisoners. Three meals and coffee three times daily in the winter. Drinking-water as wanted. Required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed once a year. Soap, water and disinfectants used to keep the camp clean. Free of vermin. Straw in the mattresses changed three or four times a year. Some prisoners whipped, for profanity and refusal to work, by the overseer. The sick are well cared for in the stockade by attendants. No death. None known to have tuberculosis. The county physician makes an occasional inspection. Work ten hours. Two employees. Superintendent $35 and guard $30. Very rarely have any religious services. In the camp-house and stockade on Sunday. Chained together at night. Boys and men together; one boy at present. Now confined: 2 white and 9 colored; total, 11.

REV. J. M. HOLT,

J. A. TURRENTINE,

P. H. FLEMING.

Received March 11, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The camp is as reported heretofore. Now confined: 2 white and 7 black males. Superintendent is paid $50 per month and guards $35. No deaths. No tuberculosis.

REV. J. M. HOLT,

J. A. TURRENTINE,

P. H. FLEMING.

Received September 28, 1908.

ANSON

        The following is taken from the grand jury report:

        "The chain gang is in good condition, beds and bedding clean. The convicts say that they are well treated, and receive good fare. Our committee examined a regular meal which was being prepared for them and found it composed of good and wholesome food."

MRS. W. J. HUNTLEY.

Received September 26, 1908.

CABARRUS.

        The camp is a frame building 18 × 70 feet; 1 story. White and blacks in the same building, separated by wire. No special means for extinguishing fire. Good ventilation. Four coal stoves. No suffering


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from cold. Five blankets each. No women. Three-quarters pound of meat each day, coffee in the morning. Drinking-water as needed. Bathe weekly. Blankets washed every three months. Excreta removed. Very little and very moderate punishment. The sick are well cared for by the county physician in the camp. No deaths. No tuberculosis. County physician makes a monthly inspection. Work from sun to sun, with an hour and a half to two hours for dinner. Three guards and a supervisor. Supervisor receives $70 per month and guards $1.50 per day. No religious services. Chained together at night. Boys are kept in camp. Now in charge: 9 white males and 28 colored; total, 37. Three of the colored for murder, sentences five to eight years; 1 white male for murder, eight months.

        Remarks.--We find the camp in good condition, well kept, well managed, prisoners have plenty of food, raiment and shelter. We find the gang doing splendid work in building good roads in our county.

J. M. HENDRIX,

G. ED. KESTLER.

Received June 15, 1908.

COLUMBUS.

        The county camp is a canvas tent. Races separated in sleeping quarters. Stoves. No suffering in cold weather. Sufficient amount of bedding. No female prisoners. All the food they want. Three meals a day. Required to bathe. The camp is moved frequently. Blankets washed as needed. Free of vermin. Punishment has been inflicted. Sick well cared for in the camp by county physician. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly inspection of the camp by county physician. Worked from seven to six hours. Superintendent and two guards; salary, $80 to superintendent, $40 to guards. Religious services. In camp on Sundays. Chained together at night. No boys.

JACKSON GREER.

Received August 10, 1908.

DAVIDSON.

        The camp is a frame building, 18 × 36 feet. One story, three rooms. Whites and colored separated at night. Buckets for extinguishing fire. Heaters. No suffering from cold. No women. All the food they want. Three meals per day; no warm drink. Required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed once a month. Building scalded and scoured. Excreta hauled away. Free of vermin. Straw in the mattresses changed once a month. Punishment inflicted upon one--flogging for disobedience. County physician cares for prisoners. No deaths; no tuberculosis. Worked ten hours per day. One superintendent and one guard. Superintendent receives $60 per month and guard $40. No religious services. Kept in stockade on Sunday.


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Chained together at night. No boys. Now in charge: 15 colored males, 2 white; total, 17. Terms, 2½ years, 2 years, and fifteen for two to six months.

JAMES SMITH.

Received April 13, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since last report. Prisoners are whipped for disobedience, etc. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Now confined: 8 colored males and 1 white male.

JAMES SMITH.

Received October 19, 1908.

EDGECOMBE.

        Tents are used for the prisoners at the camp. Now confined, 39 colored males. Died, 1 from pneumonia. The sick are cared for at the hospital. Whites and blacks are separated at night. No special protection against fire. Heaters. No suffering from cold. No female prisoners. All the food they want. Three meals per day. Water as needed. Required to bathe. Blankets washed twice a month. Excreta removed daily and buried. Free of vermin. New mattresses as needed. No punishment. County physician makes monthly inspection. Worked ten hours. Four employees. No religious services. In camp on Sunday. Chained together at night. Boys at one end of same tent with the men.

JAMES R. GASKILL.

Received March 23, 1908.

FORSYTH.

        Temporary movable camp. Frame, metal roof. One 16 × 60 and one 16 × 90 feet. White and colored separated at night. Water buckets for extinguishing fire. The larger building has windows and ventilators also. Coal stoves. All the heat necessary in cold weather. A straw mattress for two and from two to four blankets for each man. No females. All the food they want. Three meals; coffee for breakfast. Swept every day. Scoured when needed and disinfected. Excreta removed to a third of a mile away to sink. Free of vermin. Straw changed in the mattresses every four weeks. Strapping for every one who breaks prison rules, by superintendent of the camp. The sick are well cared for. Attended by the county physician, and removed to the jail or hospital if needed. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Physician visits the camp weekly. Work from sun to sun. Twenty employees; salaries from $20 to $75 per month. Regular religious services once a month. Prisoners are kept on the camp grounds on Sunday. Prisoners are fastened by a short chain to a long chain. In case of fire or alarm, the unlocking of one end releases


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them from the building, but they are chained so they cannot escape. Boys confined with the men. Now confined: 16 white males, 64 colored males, 3 of whom are under sixteen.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND,

W. P. HILL,

W. H. FOLTZ.

Received June 20, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the buildings and management of camp since last report. Now in charge: white males, 16; colored males, 82; total, 98. Six of the colored are under sixteen. Prisoners are sent out from the Recorder's Court and from the Superior Court, and camp officials have only the names and length of sentence.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND,

W. P. HILL,

W. H. FOLTZ.

Received December 16, 1908.

GASTON.

CAMP No. 1.

        The camp is built of wood, with heavily barred windows and doors. It is 65 × 30 feet; three rooms. Races separated. Spring water. Ventilators at top of building. Large wood or coal heater. Sufficient bedding. No female prisoners. Three meals daily and occasionally coffee. Water-boys supply drinking-water constantly. Required to bathe. Blankets washed weekly. Camp is scoured and disinfected. Excreta hauled off and buried. Free of vermin. Straw in the ticks changed as needed. Corporal punishment in moderation, a few lashes inflicted upon several, administered by the superintendent. The sick are well cared for. One death, blood poisoning from thoracic abscess. One suspected case of tuberculosis, a trusty, kept in separate tent. County physician makes an inspection nearly every week. Worked from sun to sun. Superintendent and four guards; salaries, $35 to $90. Religious services. In camp on Sunday. Prisoners chained at night to a long rod running through the building. Boys confined with men. Confined: 20 black males, 13 whites.

CAMP No. 2.

        Frame building 55 × 30 feet. Races separated at night. Well. Confined: 18 colored males, 2 of whom are under sixteen; 16 whites. Other items similar to Camp No. 1.

J. P. REID.

Received September 26, 1908.


Page 141

GRANVILLE.

        The camp has two frame buildings, 14 × 15 feet, and one steel cage, 9 × 18 × 7 feet. Whites and blacks separated at night. Spring water. Heaters. Ventilation by windows. No suffering from cold. A mattress and four double blankets to four men. No women. All the food they want. Three meals; no warm drink. Required to bathe. Blankets washed about once a month. Camp is scoured and lime used. Excreta carried off. Free of vermin. New mattresses once in three months. Punished by whipping. Small whip used. The sick are well cared for. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Hours of work, from sun to sun. Three employees. Superintendent receives $60 per month, two guards $32.50. No religious services. Locked in cage on Sunday. Prisoners are not chained together at night. Some wear chains all the time. Boys confined with the men. Now confined: 10 colored males, 2 under sixteen, and 4 white males; total, 14.

        Remarks.--We have ordered another steel cage and will soon have more room for prisoners.

D. N. HUNT.

Received September 23, 1908.

HAYWOOD.

        The camp is a frame building, one story. Whites and blacks are in separate rooms. Stoves. No suffering in cold weather. Sufficient bedding. Plenty of food. Drinking-water as needed. Required to bathe. Free of vermin. No severe punishment. Sick reasonably well cared for. County physician makes monthly inspection. Work eight hours per day. Occasional religious services. Prisoners are kept in and around camp on Sunday. I think the convicts are treated kindly.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received May 1, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The camp is a frame building with three medium-size rooms. Whites and blacks confined in the same room. Running water near. Stoves and open fireplaces. Ventilated by windows and doors. Sufficient bedding. Three daily meals and coffee. Straw frequently changed in the mattress. Whipping has been inflicted once for laziness. No deaths; no tuberculosis. Boys confined with men. Occasional religious services.

        Remarks.--I wish that the convicts might have religious instruction and preaching more frequently.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received November 11, 1908.


Page 142

HENDERSON.

        The prisoners at the camp are housed in tents at present. Whites and blacks are not confined together at night. Ample supply of food. Three meals and coffee twice a day. Drinking-water as wanted. Required to bathe. Blankets washed frequently. No punishment. The sick are well cared for in a separate building. No deaths. Monthly inspection made of the camp by the county physician. Worked ten hours. Two employees at $30 per month. Prisoners chained together at night. No boys in charge.

        Remarks.--Most of the prisoners now in charge are for minor offenses. They are well cared for and kindly treated.

LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received March 19, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The camp is as heretofore reported as to tents, etc. Sufficient bedding. Stoves. No suffering from cold. All the food they want. Three meals; coffee twice a day. Drinking-water as needed. Change clothes and bathe twice a week. Blankets washed frequently. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Worked ten hours. No boys. Confined: 5 colored and 1 white male.

        Remarks.--The camp was never in better condition. Three convicts belonging to this county. The others hired from another county. They are well cared for and humanely treated.

MRS. LILA R. BARNWELL.

Received September 16, 1908.

IREDELL.

        The camp is a portable frame building, 40 × 18 feet, divided into two rooms. Whites and blacks are separated at night. Good ventilation. Stoves. No suffering in cold weather. Blankets and straw ticks. No female prisoners. Ample supply of food. Three meals a day and coffee for breakfast. Drinking-water as needed. Required to bathe. Soap, water and disinfectants used. Free of vermin except when brought in by new prisoners. Excreta removed. Corporal punishment inflicted for refusal to work and for assault. Straw in the mattresses changed and blankets washed as needed. Sick are attended by the county physician. If very ill they are brought into the county jail. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly inspection made by the county physician. Worked ten hours. Four employees. Superintendent receives $45, guards $30. Religious services. At the camp on Sunday. Chained together at night. There has been but one boy on the chain gang, and he had the liberty of the camp.

MRS. A. L. COBLE.

Received May 13, 1908.


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MECKLENBURG.

        The two camps of Mecklenburg are frame buildings, 18 × 90 feet. three rooms. Races separated. Ventilated by windows and doors. Stoves. Buckets for extinguishing fire. No suffering in cold weather. Sufficient bedding. Women in separate apartments. Three meals a day, no warm drink. Drinking-water as wanted. Required to bathe. Blankets washed weekly. Soap and disinfectants for cleansing the camps. Excreta hauled away. Free of vermin. Straw in mattresses changed as needed. Punishment inflicted upon some of the prisoners. Sick cared for by the county physician. No tuberculosis. Monthly inspection made of the sanitary condition of the camp. Worked from sun to sun. Five employees. Salaries vary from $45 to $100 per month. Religious services. Kept in camp on Sunday. Chained to a guy-rod at night.

        Remarks.--The prisoners are well cared for and the camps are in good condition.

JOHN C. MCDOWELL.

Received June 10, 1908.

MOORE.

        The camp is built of wood, 20 × 40 feet; one story, two rooms. White and colored prisoners separated. No special means of protection against fire. Wood heaters. Ventilated by windows. No suffering from the cold. No female prisoners. All the food they want. Three meals a day. Drinking-water as wanted. Required to bathe. Blankets washed once a month. Building washed and scoured. Excreta removed to a sink. Free of vermin. Straw in the mattresses changed twice a year. Some punishment, by the superintendent. The sick are well cared for at the camp or jail. No deaths. No tuberculosis. County physician makes monthly inspection. Worked from sun to sun. Three employees. Supervisor receives $40 and guards $30. Religious services. In camp on Sunday. Chained together at night. Boys with the men. Now confined: 17 colored males, 2 of whom are under sixteen.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received March 26, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since above report. Now in charge, 12 colored males.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received September 19, 1908.

NASH.

        The camp is a frame building, 82 × 18 feet; one story, three rooms. White and colored prisoners are separated at night. Water barrels


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for extinguishing fire. Stoves; no suffering in cold weather. Cots and blankets. Three meals per day, not allowanced. No coffee or warm drink. Drinking-water as needed. Required to bathe. Blankets washed once a month. Disinfectants. Excreta removed. Free of vermin. Flogging inflicted upon two prisoners; very seldom resorted to. The sick are cared for in camp by the county physician. One death from pneumonia. None known to have tuberculosis. The physician does not make a monthly inspection of the sanitary condition of the camp. Hours of work, from sun to sun. Eight employees. Religious services. In the stockade on Sunday. No boys. Three women, one of whom is white. Cook and seamstress. Twenty-eight males; of these two are white.

J. B. BODDIE.

Received June 3, 1908.

PERSON.

        The camp is usually in a house rented near the work to be done on the roads. Quarters are comfortable. Whites and blacks are confined in the same room. No special protection against fire. Ventilated by doors and windows. No suffering in cold weather. No female prisoners. As much food as desired. Three meals, and coffee occasionally. Drinking-water as needed. The camp is kept as clean as possible. Excreta removed. Free of vermin. Straw in ticks changed as needed. No corporal punishment. Deprivations for disobedience. We care for the sick as well as we can. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Physician comes sometimes for inspection. Work all day except in bad weather. Three employees; $67.50 and $20. Seldom have religious services. In camp on Sunday. Chained together at night. Boys confined with men. Now in charge, 2 colored males.

N. C. NEWBOLD.

Received July 18, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        The camp in the winter months is located on the premises of the County Home. A one-story building with two rooms 16 × 20 feet for the prisoners and one room 16 × 12 for the guard. We have now in course of construction a portable structure which will be 6 × 18 feet and divided into two rooms, one for white prisoners and one for blacks. Anti-germ disinfectants are used in the camp and every precaution is taken to preserve cleanliness. There are only two colored convicts now working the roads. They are well fed and well cared for as far as I can learn. Three meals a day and coffee for breakfast. R. A. Spencer, Roxboro, is superintendent; his salary is $65 per month. Guard receives $25. Prisoners are kept in the camp on Sunday. At night they are chained each to a log. No special provision for religious services.

REV. J. A. HORNADAY.

Received November 13, 1908.


Page 145

PITT.

        The camp has a tent 18 × 40 feet and a cook room 10 × 12. There is only one room for prisoners, but a division in the room for the blacks and whites. Buckets for fire protection. Stoves and heaters. No suffering in cold weather. Sufficient bedding and food. Three meals a day; no coffee or warm drink. No female prisoners. Drinking-water as needed. Washed, scrubbed and lime used. Excreta removed daily. Whipped for disobedience, by the superintendent. Sick are well cared for; nursed at the camp. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Physician makes a monthly inspection and report. Worked from sunrise to sunset. One guard for each ten prisoners. Supervisor and guards cost $1,200 per annum. No religious services. Chained together at night. Boys with the men.

J. W. SMITH,

ROBERT N. NICHOLS.

Received July 7, 1908.

ROCKINGHAM.

        The convicts are housed in army tents. White and colored prisoners are confined in the same room. No special means of extinguishing fire. Stoves. No suffering from cold. All the bedding they want. No female prisoners. Three meals a day and coffee. Not allowanced. Drinking-water at all times. Required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed once a month. Straw in the mattresses changed twice a year. Free of vermin. No punishment inflicted. The sick are well cared for at the camp by the county physician. No deaths. No prisoners known to have tuberculosis. Hours of work, 7:30 to 5. Fourteen employees. Salary of the superintendent $60; guards, $25. No religious services. Prisoners are chained together at night. Boys confined with the men. There are 45 prisoners in the camp, about one-half of whom are white men. They are sent from the counties of Caswell, Stokes, Surry and Rockingham.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received March 4, 1908.

SECOND REPORT.

        Four large army tents. White and colored confined in the same room. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Punished for trying to escape. Whipped. Sick well cared for. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Boys are trusties and carry water. There are at present fifty prisoners sentenced from Rockingham, Stokes, Surry and Caswell. Rockingham County pays the court costs of prisoners for their work.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received September 4, 1908.


Page 146

ROWAN.

        The camps are as heretofore reported as to buildings. Prisoners required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed twice a year. Excreta removed 100 yards. Free of vermin. Straw in mattresses changed once in two months. A dozen have been whipped for cursing, fighting, not working. Slight cases of sickness kept in camp; serious cases sent to jail. No deaths; no known cases of tuberculosis. County physician does not make a monthly inspection of the sanitary condition of the camp. Worked about ten hours. Five employees. Supervisors paid $60; guards, $30, $40 and $50; at the other camp, $60, $45, and three at $35. No religious services lately. In camp on Sunday. Chained together at night. Boys confined with the men. In Camp No. 1, 5 white males and 17 colored, one of the colored under sixteen. At Camp No. 2, 2 white and 26 colored males.

        Remarks.--We found these camps in good condition. The prisoners are well fed and not overworked and the supervisors able to control them with discipline less harsh than heretofore. We were struck by the great number of young convicts. Perhaps nine-tenths were under twenty-five years old.

REV. F. J. MURDOCH,

H. T. TRANTHAM,

JAMES D. HEILIG.

Received May 15, 1908.

SECOND REPORT, CAMP NUMBER ONE.

        The white and colored prisoners are not confined in the same room at night. No special protection against fire. Windows and doors afford ventilation. Three stoves. No suffering from cold. A straw tick for two and a blanket for each. No female prisoners. Five pounds of meat per week and all they want of other things. Coffee once a day. Three meals in the week and two on Sunday. Fresh drinking-water as often as wanted. Required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed twice a year. Germo-insecticide is used and camp swept three times a day. Water-closet 100 yards from tent. Free of vermin. Straw in the mattresses has been changed four times this year. Eight or ten have been whipped (for fighting and not working), by the superintendent. Sick are well cared for--in camp unless very sick, when they are taken to the jail. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly inspection and report made to the commissioners by the superintendent of health. Work from sun to sun, with an hour for dinner. Six employees. Supervisor receives $65 per month; four guards, $35, and the blacksmith $2 a day. Occasional religious services. In hot weather prisoners are allowed outside in the shade on Sundays; in cold weather remain in the tent. Prisoners chained together at night. Two boys, kept with the men. Number now in charge: 3 white males, 32 colored; two of the colored claim to be under sixteen, but do not look it.

REV. F. J. MURDOCH.

Received September 19, 1908.
Page 147

CAMP NUMBER TWO.

        The white and colored prisoners are separated at night. Ventilated by windows. Three stoves. No suffering from cold. Three blankets each. One female prisoner; washes and patches. Five pounds of meat weekly, other food as much as they want. Three meals, coffee once a day; on Sunday two meals. Drinking-water as wanted. Required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed once a month. Germoinsecticide used. Water-closet 200 yards from tent. Free of vermin. Straw in the ticks changed once every one to two months. Half a dozen have been whipped (for fighting, cursing, not working), by the superintendent, by authority of commissioners. The sick are well cared for--at the camp unless very sick, and then in jail. No deaths. One prisoner is suspected of having tuberculosis. He is confined in the same room with other prisoners. County physician makes monthly report. Work from sun to sun, with an hour at dinner at this season; more in the summer. Six employees. Supervisor gets $60 per month, assistant $50, one guard $40, one $35 and the man in charge of black-smithing $50. Occasional religious services. Kept in the shade on Sundays when warm enough, otherwise in tents. Chained together at night. No boys. Number in charge: 10 white males, 26 colored males, 1 colored female; total, 37.

        Remarks.--We think that the convicts are better treated than formerly. Much better than five years ago. We all observe that the negro convicts are younger than they used to be. One only appeared to be over 25. The majority seemed to be over rather than under 21. We think that they get tired of being sent to the gang, and quit their meanness.

REV. F. J. MURDOCH.

SAMPSON.

        Tents are used for the road force. White and colored in the same tent. Stoves. No suffering from cold. One mattress and two blankets. No female prisoners. Three meals a day; drinking-water as wanted. Required to bathe. The tents are moved from place to place as the men work. Free of vermin. Mattresses used. One white man lashed for running away, by the superintendent. There has been no serious sickness since the camp was started. No deaths. No tuberculosis. County physician makes a monthly inspection. Work from sun to sun. Three employees. Superintendent is paid $50 and guards $25. No religious services. Kept in camp on Sunday. Prisoners chained together at night. Boys in the same tent with adults.

MRS. T. L. HUBBARD,

REV. T. M. LEE.

Received March 12, 1908.


Page 148

WAYNE.

        There has been no change in the camp since the last report.

M. L. LEE.

Received March 20, 1908.

HOUSE OF CORRECTION--GUILFORD COUNTY.

        Women and children are confined at the House of Correction.

        The building is built of wood and is two stories, 40 × 60 feet, with eight large rooms. Rooms 18 × 20 feet. Ventilated by windows. Heated by hot air. Well water. Three meals. Coffee if they want it. Drinking-water as wanted. Free of vermin. Required to bathe. Excreta removed and buried. The sick are well cared for in a separate room, with physician and attendant. There is a small farming tract attached, and prisoners work this. The women sew, cook and wash. Supervisor receives $50 and guard $30 per month. Religious services on Sunday. Now confined: 1 white woman, 2 white boys; 3 colored women and 12 colored boys.

G. F. HACKETT,
Superintendent.

Received September 19, 1908.


Page 149

TABULATED REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.


Page 150

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.

Homes. Number of Inmates. Insane. Feeble-minded. Epileptic Insane Confined. Children. Building.
White. Black. Total. White. Black. White. Black.
Alamance 8 10 18 0 0 7 1 0 0 1 frame.
Alexander 13 2 15 3 0 2 2 1 1 0 frame.
Alleghany 3 0 3 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 frame.
Anson 15 9 24 2 0 4 1 0 0 0 frame and brick.
Ashe 12 1 13 0 0 5 2 0 2 1 frame.
Beaufort 7 9 16 0 0 3 0 0 2 0 frame.
Bertie* 3 1 4 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 frame.
Bladen Home not in use                    
Brunswick 9 0 9 2 0 2 2 0 0 0 frame.
Buncombe 44 8 52 5 0 12 4 4 1 0 brick.
Burke ---- ---- 30 0 0 3 2 0 0 2 ----
Cabarrus 16 9 25 1 1 5 1 1 0 1 frame.
Caldwell 6 0 6 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 frame.
Camden 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Carteret No Home                    
Caswell ---- ---- 17 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ----
Catawba 13 6 19 1 0 1 0 0 0 1 frame (new).
Chatham 16 15 31 3 5 10 3 2 0 0 frame.
Cherokee ---- ---- 3 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 ----
Chowan 5 1 6 0 3 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Clay 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Cleveland 11 8 19 0 0 3 2 0 0 0 brick.
Columbus 10 3 13 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 frame.
Craven 2 12 14 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 frame.
Cumberland 10 3 13 2 2 1 1 4 0 0 frame.
Currituck No Home                    
Dare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Davidson 21 5 26 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 brick and frame.
Davie 2 5 7 1 0 2 1 1 0 0 brick.
Duplin 6 1 7 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 brick.
Durham 17 11 28 8 4 ---- 1 4 0 1 brick and wood.

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 151

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Fire Protection. Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Ventilation. Food. Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908. Homes
wells. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 6 Alamance
none, well. no. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 3 Alexander
none. no. open fires. spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 1 Alleghany
none. yes. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 8 Anson
none. no. open fires. spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 1 Ashe
none. yes. open fires, heaters. well. windows and doors. good. 6 Beaufort
wells, spring. no. open fires. well and spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 2 Bertie*
              Bladen
buckets. yes. stoves. well, cisterns. windows and doors. good. 0 Brunswick
hose. yes. steam heat. pipe line from river. windows, doors and ventilators. good. 7 Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Burke
none. no. stoves, grates. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 9 Cabarrus
none. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 1 Caldwell
none. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 0 Camden
              Carteret
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 1 Caswell
buckets. to be insur'd. open fires. well and spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 3 Catawba
buckets. no. open fires. well and spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 5 Chatham
              Cherokee
none. yes. open fires. heaters. pump. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Chowan
none. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 0 Clay
wells. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 6 Cleveland
buckets. yes. heaters. well, pump. windows and doors. good. 5 Columbus
pump. yes. open fires. pump. windows and doors. sufficient. 12 Craven
none. yes. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. good. 5 Cumberland
              Currituck
buckets. yes. stoves. well, cistern. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Dare
none. no. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 1 Davidson
well. no. stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 2 Davie
none. no. stoves. pump. windows and doors. all they want. 1 Duplin
buckets. yes. stoves, open fires. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Durham

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 152

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Homes. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in the Same Room with Other Inmates? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services?
Alamance yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Alexander yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Alleghany yes. no. yes. no. no.
Anson yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Ashe yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Beaufort yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Bertie* yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Bladen ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Brunswick yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Buncombe yes. no. yes. locked up. yes.
Burke ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus yes. no. yes. children. yes.
Caldwell yes. ---- yes. no. no.
Camden yes. no. yes. no. church near.
Carteret ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Caswell ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Catawba yes. no. yes. no. once a month.
Chatham yes. no. yes. locked in cell. regular.
Cherokee ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Chowan not always. no. yes. no. no.
Clay yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Cleveland yes. no. yes. no. chapel near.
Columbus no. no. yes. no. yes.
Craven yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Cumberland yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Currituck ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Dare ---- none. ---- no. when there are inmates.
Davidson no. no. yes. no. no.
Davie no. no. yes. no. no.
Duplin yes. none. yes. no. occasional.
Durham sometimes. no. yes. no. twice a month.

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 153

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspections? Is a Record Kept of Inmates? Average Monthly Per Capita. Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm Products. Number Receiving Outdoor Relief. Monthly Per Capita. Annual Cost of This Class. Total Annual Amount. Homes.
yes. yes. $ 5.50 $ 1,373.63 62 $ 1.50 $1,265.44 $2,639.07 Alamance
yes. yes. 5.00 630.00 15 1.50 270.00 900.00 Alexander
---- no. 5.00 180.00 6 5.00 360.00 540.00 Alleghany
yes. no. 4.00 1,200.00 90 3.50 1,000.00 2,200.00 Anson
not regularly. yes. 5.70 900.00 18 2.00 300.00 1,200.00 Ashe
no. no. 8.00 1,500.00 100 2.00 2,000.00 3,500.00 Beaufort
yes. yes. ---- ---- 47 1.33 1/3 752.00 752.00 Bertie*
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Bladen
yes. yes. 6.00 780.00 23 2.00 552.00 1,332.00 Brunswick
yes. yes. 6.00 5,610.53 45 3.00 2,536.72 8,147.25 Buncombe
---- ---- ---- 1,500.00 20 3.00 720.00 2,220.00 Burke
yes. yes. 6.00 850.00 50 1.50 1,000.00 1,850.00 Cabarrus
yes. yes. 6.00 500.00 50 1.50 1,000.00 1,500.00 Caldwell
yes. no. 8.00 100.00 ---- ---- ---- 100.00 Camden
---- ---- ---- ---- 45 2.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 Carteret
---- ---- ---- 612.00 80 1.50 1,200.00 1,812.00 Caswell
visits Home weekly. yes. 6 to 8.00 370.00 63 1.54 1,165.34 1,535.34 Catawba
yes. yes. 5.00 2,000.00 90 1.50 2,000.00 4,000.00 Chatham
---- ---- ---- 225.00 ---- ---- ---- 225.00 Cherokee
yes. yes. 8.00 600.00 11 2.45 ---- 924.00 Chowan
yes. yes. 5.00 60.00 6 5.00 520.00 580.00 Clay
yes. yes. 2.50 570.00 100 2.50 2,500.00 3,070.00 Cleveland
visits monthly. yes. 6.00 1,000.00 50 3.00 1,500.00 2,500.00 Columbus
yes. yes. 5.00 840.00 great many. ---- ---- 840.00 Craven
yes. yes. 4.50 1,664.36 82 2.00 1,952.07 3,616.43 Cumberland
---- ---- ---- ---- 25 4.00 1,200.00 1,200.00 Currituck
---- ---- 8.00 96.00 5 10 and 5.00 250.00 346.00 Dare
yes. yes. 4.50 1,100.00 60 2.50 1,800.00 2,900.00 Davidson
no. oral report. 3 to 4.00 450.00 45 1.50 800.00 1,250.00 Davie
yes. no. 5 to 6.00 420.00 114 2.00 2,400.00 2,820.00 Duplin
yes. yes. 5.00 3,000.00 110 2.00 3,000.00 6,000.00 Durham

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 154

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Homes. Number of Inmates. Insane. Feeble-minded. Epileptic Insane Confined. Children. Building
White. Black. Total. White. Black. White. Black.
Edgecombe 12 21 33 1 0 8 2 1 0 0 frame.
Forsyth 24 20 44 3 1 20 2 4 0 0 brick.
Franklin 11 14 25 0 1 9 1 0 0 0 frame.
Gaston 10 4 14 1 0 9 1 1 0 0 brick.
Gates 2 4 6 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 frame.
Graham No Home                    
Granville 10 12 22 2 5 0 1 0 0 2 brick and wood.
Greene 4 0 4 1 0 2 1 0 0 0 frame.
Guilford 15 20 35 1 1 6 3 2 1 0 brick.
Halifax 12 22 34 0 1 10 4 0 0 1 frame.
Harnett ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Haywood 14 0 14 1 0 3 1 ---- ---- ---- frame.
Henderson 5 0 5 1 0 1 0 1 0 0 frame.
Hertford 3 4 7 0 0 2 1 1 0 0 frame.
Hyde 4 2 6 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell 14 11 25 3 0 11 ---- 3 0 1 frame.
Jackson 5 0 5 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 frame.
Johnston 17 4 21 5 0 7 2 3 1 0 frame.
Jones 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Lee No Home                    
Lenoir 12 7 19 0 1 0 1 0 0 0 frame.
Lincoln 13 5 18 2 1 3 0 1 0 0 frame.
McDowell 7 3 10 1 0 4 1 0 1 0 frame.
Macon 7 0 7 0 0 5 0 0 0 0 frame.
Madison 19 0 19 0 0 4 0 0 1 0 frame.
Martin ---- ---- 8 1 0 0 2 0 ---- ---- frame.
Mecklenburg 30 26 56 2 4 40 2 4 1 0 brick.
Mitchell*                      
Montgomery 6 4 10 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 brick.
Moore 7 6 13 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 frame.
Nash 13 7 20 2 0 4 1 0 3 1 frame.

        *No Home. One white male boarded in private family.



Page 155

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Fire Protection. Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Ventilation. Food. Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908. Homes.
none. yes. open fires, heaters. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 11 Edgecombe
tank extinguishers. ---- steam heat. well. windows, doors and transoms. sufficient. 4 Forsyth
water. no. stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 11 Franklin
buckets. yes. steam. well. windows, doors and transoms. sufficient. 6 Gaston
well. yes. stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 2 Gates
              Graham
none. yes. open fires. well. windows and doors. sufficient. ---- Granville
buckets. yes. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 3 Greene
well, barrels. yes. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 12 Guilford
none. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 12 Halifax
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Harnett
none. no. open fires, stoves. spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Haywood
none. yes. open fires. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 1 Henderson
wells. yes. open fires. well, pump. windows and doors. sufficient. 1 Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Hyde
well, spring. no. open fires, stoves. well, spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 2 Iredell
spring. no. open fires. spring. windows and doors. sufficients. 1 Jackson
well. yes. stoves. wells. windows and doors. good. 4 Johnston
none. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 2 Jones
              Lee
buckets. yes. open fires. pump. windows and doors. sufficient. 6 Lenoir
none. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 2 Lincoln
none. yes. open fires. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 McDowell
buckets. yes. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. good. 0 Macon
none. yes. hot air. tanks. windows and doors. good. 0 Madison
none. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Martin
none. yes. steam heat. well, spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 12 Mecklenburg
              Mitchell*
(new). not yet. ---- well. windows and doors. good. 1 Montgomery
none. no. open fires. well, spring. windows and doors. good. 2 Moore
none. yes. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 2 Nash

        *No Home. One white male boarded in private family.



Page 156

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Homes. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in the Same Room with Other Inmates? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services?
Edgecombe yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Forsyth no. no. yes. no. yes.
Franklin yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Gaston yes. no. yes. no. regular services.
Gates no. no. yes. no. no.
Graham ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Granville yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Greene yes. no. yes. no. no.
Guilford not always. not as a rule. yes. mild punishment. yes.
Halifax nearly all. no. yes. no. occasional.
Harnett ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Haywood yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Henderson yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Hertford no. no. yes. no. occasional.
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Jackson yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Johnston no. no. yes. no. yes.
Jones yes. no. yes. no. no.
Lee ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Lenoir no. no. yes. no. yes.
Lincoln yes. no. yes. no. yes.
McDowell no. no. yes. no. occasional.
Macon no. no. yes. no. no.
Madison yes. no. yes. no. no.
Martin yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Mecklenburg no. no. yes. confinement. no.
Mitchell* ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Montgomery sometimes. no. yes. very little. occasional.
Moore no. no. yes. no. no.
Nash yes. no. yes. no. no.

        *No Home. One white male boarded in private family.



Page 157

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspections? Is a Record Kept of Inmates? Average Monthly Per Capita. Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm Products. Number Receiving Outdoor Relief. Monthly Per Capita. Annual Cost of This Class. Total Annual Amount. Homes.
yes. yes. $ 8.00 $ 2,300.00 100 $ 1.00 $1,200.00 $3,500.00 Edgecombe
yes. yes. ---- 2,000.00 7 ---- 400.00 2,400.00 Forsyth
yes. yes. 6.50 1,000.00 73 4.00 2,504.00 3,504.00 Franklin
yes. yes. 6.50 1,000.00 65 1.90 1,500.00 2,500.00 Gaston
no. no. 8.00 500.00 4 2.50 125.00 625.00 Gates
---- ---- ---- ---- 8 5.00 444.00 444.00 Graham
when sent for. yes. 4.50 1,800.00 100 1.25 1,500.00 3,300.00 Granville
yes. yes. 9.00 500.00 44 2.00 1,000.00 1,500.00 Greene
visits Home as needed. yes. 5.00 1,493.00 75 2.00 1,500.00 2,993.00 Guilford
yes. yes. 6.00 2,300.00 ---- ---- ---- 2,300.00 Halifax
---- ---- 9.00 432.00 35 2.50 1,050.00 1,482.00 Harnett
yes. yes. 6.00 1,008.00 7 3.00 240.00 1,248.00 Haywood
yes. yes. 10.00 600.00 36 3.50 1,200.00 1,800.00 Henderson
yes. we will. 4.25 350.00 16 2.00 400.00 750.00 Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Hyde
---- ---- 5.00 1,500.00 65 1.00 800.00 2,300.00 Iredell
yes. yes. 15.00 600.00 20 5.00 150.00 750.00 Jackson
yes. yes. 6.00 1,500.00 115 1.25 1,600.00 3,100.00 Johnston
yes. yes. 8.00 350.00 11 2.25 350.00 700.00 Jones
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Lee
occasional. yes. 8.00 720.00 18 2.00 400.00 1,120.00 Lenoir
yes. yes. 6.90 1,116.00 35 1.47 618.00 1,734.00 Lincoln
no. yes. 6.50 250.00 23 1.50 450.00 700.00 McDowell
no. yes. 6.50 600.00 19 2.25 550.00 1,150.00 Macon
yes. no. 5.25 1,000.00 20 2.00 480.00 1,480.00 Madison
yes. no. 15.00 1,200.00 100 2.75 4,000.00 5,200.00 Martin
yes. yes. 5.00 3,000.00 6 2.50 300.00 3,300.00 Mecklenburg
---- ---- 9.00 204.00 2 4.00 96.00 300.00 Mitchell*
sees well after things frequently visits. yes. 8.50 1,100.00 50 2.00 1,200.00 2,300.00 Montgomery
  no. 8.50 1,200.00 41 3.10 1,500.00 2,700.00 Moore
yes. yes. 4.00 1,200.00 66 ---- 400.00 1,600.00 Nash

        *No Home. One white male boarded in private family.



Page 158

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Homes. Number of Inmates. Insane. Feeble-minded. Epileptic Insane Confined. Children. Building
White. Black. Total. White. Black. White. Black.
New Hanover 6 11 17 6 0 12 4 0 0 0 brick.
Northampton 8 26 34 1 1 4 4 0 0 1 frame.
Onslow Building a Home.                    
Orange 12 3 15 0 0 8 0 0 0 0 brick.
Pamlico 5 4 9 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 frame.
Pasquotank 10 9 19 0 1 6 3 1 0 0 frame.
Pender 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Perquimans 3 6 9 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 ----
Person 5 2 7 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 brick.
Pitt 16 8 24 1 0 6 3 1 0 0 frame.
Polk 4 0 4 0 0 2 0 0 1 0 frame.
Randolph 18 5 23 6 0 11 3 0 0 2 frame.
Richmond 14 7 21 0 0 4 2 0 0 0 frame.
Robeson 8 ---- 8 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Rockingham 25 9 34 4 1 5 0 4 1 1 brick.
Rowan 8 8 16 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 frame.
Rutherford 27 10 37 3 3 5 2 sometimes. 5 2 frame.
Sampson 10 5 15 0 0 3 0 0 0 0 frame.
Scotland 1 1 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Stanly 9 1 10 0 0 8 1 0 0 0 frame.
Stokes 14 4 18 1 0 6 2 0 0 0 frame.
Surry* 16 1 17 0 0 6 0 1 2 0 frame.
Swain 2 0 2 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 ----
Transylvania 11 0 11 2 0 8 2 1 6 0 frame.
Tyrrell 1 1 2 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 frame.
Union 19 12 31 3 1 8 4 3 1 0 brick.
Vance 7 7 14 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame.
Wake 38 44 82 11 21 6 8 2 1 1 frame.
Warren ---- ---- 16 0 1 0 1 1 0 0 ----
Washington 0 1 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 frame.
Watauga 9 1 10 1 0 1 1 1 1 0 frame.

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 159

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Fire Protection. Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Ventilation. Food. Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908. Homes
fire extinguisher. yes. steam. cistern. transoms, doors and windows. sufficient. 2 New Hanover
buckets. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. good. 2 Northampton
              Onslow
buckets. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. good. 4 Orange
buckets, barrels. ---- stove. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 1 Pamlico
buckets. yes. stoves. well, pump. windows and doors. good. 5 Pasquotank
well. yes. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 0 Pender
well. ---- stove. well. windows and doors. good. 1 Perquimans
well. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 0 Person
buckets. ---- open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 6 Pitt
buckets. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. good. 0 Polk
none. no. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. abundant. 0 Randolph
buckets. yes. open fires. good water. windows and doors. good. 6 Richmond
buckets. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 1 Robeson
none. yes. open fires. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 10 Rockingham
well and barrels. yes. open fires, stoves. well. windows, transoms, doors. sufficient. 3 Rowan
none. no. stoves. wells. windows and doors. ---- 0 Rutherford
none. no. stoves, open fires. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 5 Sampson
wells. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. good. 4 Scotland
buckets. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 4 Stanly
none. no. open fires. spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 2 Stokes
none. no. open fires. spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 2 Surry*
none. no. open fires. excellent. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Swain
none. no. open fires. spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Transylvania
buckets. no. wood heaters. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Tyrrell
fire company. yes. open fires. city water. windows and doors. sufficient. 5 Union
well. no. open fires. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Vance
buckets. yes. open fires. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 28 Wake
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 5 Warren
none. yes. open fires. pump. windows and doors. sufficient. 4 Washington
none. no. open fires, stoves. springs. windows and doors. sufficient. 0 Watauga

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 160

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Homes. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in the Same Room with Other Inmates? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services?
New Hanover yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Northampton yes. no. yes. no. no.
Onslow ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Orange yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Pamlico ---- ---- yes. no. yes.
Pasquotank when required. no. fairly well. no. yes.
Pender yes. ---- yes. no. yes
Perquimans ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Person no. no. yes. no. yes.
Pitt no. no. yes. no. yes.
Polk yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Randolph yes. no. yes. no. no.
Richmond yes. yes. yes. no. occasional.
Robeson yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Rockingham no. no. yes. no. no.
Rowan yes. no. yes. no. yes, chapel.
Rutherford ---- no. yes. no. ----
Sampson yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Scotland yes. ---- yes. no. ----
Stanly yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Stokes yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Surry* services afterwards. no. yes. yes, licks with small switch. yes.
Swain yes. no. yes. no. no.
Transylvania yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Tyrrell yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Union yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Vance yes. no. yes. no. chapel.
Wake yes. no. yes. no. chapel, yes.
Warren ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Washington no. ---- yes. no. occasional.
Watauga yes. no. yes. no. yes.

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 161

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspections? Is a Record Kept of Inmates? Average Monthly Per Capita. Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm Products. Number Receiving Outdoor Relief. Monthly Per Capita. Annual Cost of This Class. Total Annual Amount. Homes.
yes. yes. $ 7.00 $ 2,675.00 200 $---- $3,500.00 $6,175.00 New Hanover
yes. ---- 6.50 1,800.00 46 1.33 1/3 800.00 2,600.00 Northampton
---- ---- ---- ---- 85 3.25 2,750.00 2,750.00 Onslow
yes. yes. 5.00 800.00 20 1.25 300.00 1,100.00 Orange
---- ---- 2.00 864.00 17 3.00 612.00 1,476.00 Pamlico
yes. yes. 7.00 2,200.00 50 2.00 1,100.00 3,300.00 Pasquotank
yes. yes. ---- ---- 40 2.00 1,000.00 1,000.00 Pender
---- ---- ---- ---- 50 5.00 1,068.00 1,068.00 Perquimans
yes. yes. 6.00 self-sustaining. 100 1.00 1,200.00 1,200.00 Person
yes. yes. 8.50 1,800.00 115 2.00 2,100.00 3,900.00 Pitt
yes. no. 8.00 ---- 2 5.00 120.00 120.00 Polk
yes. yes. 5.00 1,100.00 60 1.50 1,000.00 2,100.00 Randolph
yes. yes. 10.00 3,000.00 150 1.16 2/3 2,000.00 5,000.00 Richmond
yes. yes. 7.50 720.00 100 2.50 1,800.00 2,520.00 Robeson
yes. yes. 5.00 2,000.00 75 1.75 1,206.00 3,206.00 Rockingham
yes. yes. ---- 2,000.00 226 .83 1/3 1,000.00 3,000.00 Rowan
---- yes. ---- ---- ---- 2.50 1,000.00 1,000.00 Rutherford
yes. ---- 6.00 1,100.00 40 ---- 1,000.00 2,100.00 Sampson
yes. yes. 8.00 1,000.00 30 ---- 480.00 1,480.00 Scotland
no. yes. 4.40 500.00 40 1.80 850.00 1,350.00 Stanly
yes. yes. 5.00 1,200.00 46 ---- 478.50 1,678.50 Stokes
yes. no. ---- 1,200.00 ---- ---- 1,726.00 2,926.00 Surry*
yes. no. 8.00 300.00 16 6.00 1,200.00 1,500.00 Swain
yes. no. 6 to 10.00 700.00 15 to 20 3.50 300.00 1,000.00 Transylvania
yes. no. 8.50 204.00 11 3.77 228.00 510.00 Tyrrell
yes. yes. 6.00 2,000.00 88 1.50 to 3.00 2,500.00 4,500.00 Union
yes. yes. 7.00 600.00 43 2.00 1,032.00 1,632.00 Vance
yes. yes. ---- 8,000.00 120 1.00 1,200.00 9,200.00 Wake
---- ---- 8.00 1,920.00 60 1.47 1,058.40 2,978.40 Warren
yes. yes. 5.00 250.00 15 2.00 to 2.25 350.00 600.00 Washington
yes. no. 4.50 1,000.00 40 1.50 1,500.00 2,500.00 Watauga

        *Contract let for brick building.



Page 162

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Homes. Number of Inmates. Insane. Feeble-minded. Epileptic Insane Confined. Children. Building
White. Black. Total. White. Black. White. Black.
Wayne 9 14 23 1 3 0 3 1 0 0 frame.
Wilkes 17 0 17 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 frame.
Wilson 9 13 22 5 5 7 0 0 0 0 frame.
Yadkin 26 1 27 1 0 2 1 1 3 0 frame.
Yancey 5 0 5 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 frame.
Total 904 529 1,507 110 69 344 103 60 38 23 ----

Total, 1,507--color of 74 not given.

        
Insane 179
Epileptic 103
Feeble-minded 344
Total 626


Page 163

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Fire Protection. Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Ventilation. Food. Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908. Homes
well. yes. open fires, stoves. well. windows and doors. sufficient. 4 Wayne
none. no. heaters. spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 2 Wilkes
buckets. yes. open fires, stoves. wells. windows and doors. sufficient. 6 Wilson
none. no. open fires. well, spring. windows and doors. sufficient. 4 Yadkin
buckets. no. open fires, stoves. good. windows and doors. sufficient. ---- Yancey
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 303 Total


Page 164

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Homes. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in the Same Room with Other Inmates? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services?
Wayne yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Wilkes yes. no. yes. no. occasional.
Wilson no. no. yes. no. yes.
Yadkin yes. no. yes. no. yes.
Yancey yes. no. yes. no. no.


Page 165

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspections? Is a Record Kept of Inmates? Average Monthly Per Capita. Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm Products. Number Receiving Outdoor Relief. Monthly Per Capita. Annual Cost of This Class. Total Annual Amount. Homes.
yes. yes. $ 8.00 $ 1,000.00 150 $---- $ 250.00 $1,250.00 Wayne
yes. no. 4.25 868.70 75 1.00 900.00 1,768.70 Wilkes
yes. yes. 8.00 600.00 200 2.00 4,800.00 5,400.00 Wilson
yes. yes. 6.00 300.00 4 3.00 400.00 700.00 Yadkin
yes. yes. 6.25 500.00 14 3.00 504.00 1,004.00 Yancey

Annual expenditures exclusive of farm products, $100,861.69; number receiving outdoor relief, 6,011; annual cost of this class, $103,533.76; total annual amount, $204,395.45.


Page 166

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. White Males. White Females. Black Males. Black Females. Total. Material and Size. Number of Cells and Size.
Alamance 5 1 7 1 14 brick. 7 cells, 8×8.
Alexander 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 1 cell, 10×12.
Alleghany 0 0 0 0 0 brick and wood. 6 cells, 8×10.
Anson* 3 0 11 0 14 brick. 3 cells, 7×9.
Ashe 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 2 cells, 8×8.
Beaufort 5 0 6 1 12 brick. 6 cells, 7½×7½.
Bertie 0 0 0 0 0 brick, 3 rooms. 2 cells.
Bladen 0 0 7 0 7 brick. 6 cells, 7×8.
Brunswick 0 0 4 0 4 brick. 2 cells, 4 rooms.
Buncombe 8 1 6 2 17 brick and steel, 14 rooms. 16 cells, 12×14.
Burke 2 0 3 0 5 ---- ----
Cabarrus 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 6 cells, 12×14.
Caldwell 1 0 1 0 2 brick. 8 cells.
Camden 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 3 cells, 12×12.
Carteret 1 0 1 0 2 brick. 4 rooms.
Caswell* 0 0 0 0 0 ---- ----
Catawba 2 0 1 0 3 brick. 8 cells, 8×10.
Chatham 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 6 cells, 12×12, 6×12.
Cherokee* 0 0 0 0 0 ---- ----
Chowan* 0 0 3 1 4 brick. 2 cells.
Clay 0 0 0 0 0 frame. 2 rooms.
Cleveland 1 1 11 0 13 brick. 6 cells, 8×12.
Columbus 0 0 2 0 2 brick. 5 cells.
Craven 2 0 4 2 8 brick. 12 cells, 6×10.
Cumberland 1 0 5 2 8 brick. 20 cells, 6×8.
Currituck 0 0 1 0 1 brick. 4 cells, 8×8.
Dare 0 0 0 0 0 frame. no cells.
Davidson 1 0 2 1 4 brick. 3 cells, 6½×15.
Davie 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 5 cells.
Duplin 0 0 1 0 1 brick. 8 cells.
Durham 4 0 4 0 8 brick. 12 cells, 8×12.

        *New.



Page 167

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

How Many in a Cell? Is the Prison Ever Overcrowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Prisons.
3 no. shutters. windows. city water. stoves. Alamance
---- no. bars. windows and doors. well. open fires. Alexander
---- no. ---- windows and doors. none. stoves. Alleghany
3 seldom. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. heater. Anson*
---- no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. Ashe
4 yes. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. heaters. Beaufort
---- no. screens. windows and doors, flue. buckets. furnace. Bertie
6 no. bars. windows and doors force pump, hose. furnace. Bladen
4 no. ---- windows and doors. fireproof. stoves. Brunswick
4 no. wire screens. top of building. fireproof. steam. Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Burke
6 no. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. furnace. Cabarrus
1 no. wire screens. windows and doors. fireproof. stoves. Caldwell
1 no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. Camden
1 no. bars. flues, windows and doors. fire department. stoves. Carteret
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Caswell*
2 seldom. bars. windows and doors. pump, buckets. stove, fireplace. Catawba
2 to 6 no. screens. windows and doors. buckets. stoves. Chatham
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Cherokee*
2 no. bars. windows and doors. city department. heater. Chowan*
0 no. no. one door. none. stoves. Clay
3 to 4 no. bars. windows and doors. wells. furnace. Cleveland
1 to 8 yes. bars. windows and doors. none. heaters. Columbus
4 no. no. windows and doors. extinguisher. steam. Craven
2 seldom. bars. windows and doors. fire department. steam. Cumberland
---- no. no. windows and doors. fireproof. stoves. Currituck
---- ---- no. windows and doors. water and buckets. stove. Dare
3 not lately. bars. windows and doors. fireproof. steam. Davidson
---- no. bars. windows and doors. well. stove. Davie
1 no. bars, screens. windows and doors. fireproof. stove. Duplin
4 ---- bars. windows and doors. fire department. stoves. Durham

        *New.



Page 168

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Bedding. Sexes Separated? Children in Separate Cells? How Often is Drinking-water Furnished?
Alamance sufficient. yes. none. in cells.
Alexander sufficient. ---- none. as needed.
Alleghany sufficient. ---- yes. when called for.
Anson* sufficient. yes. yes. all the time.
Ashe sufficient. yes. no. twice daily.
Beaufort sufficient. separate cells. no. all the time.
Bertie sufficient. yes. yes. 2 or 3 times daily.
Bladen sufficient. yes. none. twice daily.
Brunswick sufficient. yes. yes. twice daily.
Buncombe sufficient. yes. yes. all the time.
Burke ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus sufficient. yes. no. three times a day.
Caldwell sufficient. yes. none. as wanted.
Camden sufficient. yes. yes. as wanted.
Carteret sufficient. yes. none. as wanted.
Caswell* ---- ---- ---- ----
Catawba sufficient. ---- none. in the jail.
Chatham sufficient. yes. yes. twice daily.
Cherokee* ---- ---- ---- ----
Chowan* sufficient. yes. yes. as needed.
Clay sufficient. ---- none. as needed.
Cleveland sufficient. ---- none. 4 to 5 times daily.
Columbus sufficient. yes. no. 3 to 4 times daily.
Craven sufficient. yes. none. as needed.
Cumberland sufficient. yes. yes. all the time.
Currituck as needed. yes. yes. twice daily.
Dare as needed. yes. none. as needed.
Davidson sufficient. yes. yes. as wanted.
Davie sufficient. yes. none. as needed.
Duplin sufficient. yes. none. as needed.
Durham sufficient. yes. no. city water.

        *New.



Page 169

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Daily Allowance of Food. Coffee or Other Warm Drink? Meals, Hours of Service. Provision for Bathing? Vermin? Disposition of Excreta. Prisons.
sufficient. yes, in winter. 2 meals. basin. no. sewerage. Alamance
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. none. no. buried. Alexander
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. none. no. buckets. Alleghany
1 lb. meat, 1 lb. meal. yes. 2 meals, 8 and 2. ---- no. sewerage. Anson*
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. none especially. no. removed. Ashe
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 9 and 3. bath tub. no. sewerage. Beaufort
sufficient. no. 3 meals. pans. no. sewerage. Bertie
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 9 and 3. buckets. no. pipe. Bladen
sufficient. when sick. 2 meals, 9 and 2. buckets. no. sewerage. Brunswick
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 1 and 7. bath rooms. no. sewerage. Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Burke
---- no. 2 meals, 8 and 2. none. no. sewerage. Cabarrus
sufficient. once a day. 3 meals. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Caldwell
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. basins. no. buckets. Camden
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. basins, buckets. no. buckets. Carteret
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Caswell*
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. pans. no. sewerage. Catawba
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 8 and 2. tubs. no. removed in buckets. Chatham
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Cherokee*
sufficient. no. 2 meals. lavatories. no. sewerage. Chowan*
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. none. no. pipe. Clay
sufficient. sometimes. 2 meals, 7 and 1. poor. no. sewerage. Cleveland
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 8 and 1. tub. no. buckets. Columbus
sufficient. sometimes. 2 meals, 9 and 2. shower bath. no. sewerage. Craven
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 8 and 3. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Cumberland
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 10 and 3. basins. no. pipes. Currituck
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. buckets. no. buried. Dare
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. none. no. sewerage. Davidson
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. tubs. no. thrown out. Davie
sufficient. sometimes. 2 meals, 8:30 and 3. basins. no. sewerage. Duplin
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 9 and 3. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Durham

        *New.



Page 170

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Are Prisoners Required to Clean Their Cells? Means of Cleansing. Religious Services? Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908.
Alamance yes. scrubbing. occasionally. none.
Alexander yes. scrubbing. no. none.
Alleghany yes. adequate. no. none.
Anson* ---- adequate. no. none.
Ashe yes. pump. no. none.
Beaufort yes. disinfectants. no. none.
Bertie yes. disinfectants. no. none.
Bladen yes. hose, broom. no. none.
Brunswick no. hose. occasional. none.
Buncombe yes. disinfectants. yes. none.
Burke ---- ---- ---- none.
Cabarrus yes. disinfectants. yes. none.
Caldwell yes. ---- occasional. none.
Camden yes. scoured. occasional. none.
Carteret ---- daily attention. sometimes. none.
Caswell* ---- ---- ---- none.
Catawba yes. disinfectants. yes. none.
Chatham yes. scouring. no. one.
Cherokee* ---- ---- ---- none.
Chowan* yes. disinfected, painted. no. none.
Clay no. the best. yes. none.
Cleveland no. all sorts. occasional. none.
Columbus no. scrubbing. yes. none.
Craven yes. scrubbing. occasional. none.
Cumberland yes. disinfectants. occasional. two.
Currituck yes. flushed from tank. no. none.
Dare to sweep. brooms. would have if needed. none.
Davidson yes. scouring. no. none.
Davie yes. buckets. no. none.
Duplin yes. waterworks. yes. none.
Durham yes. soap and water. yes. none.

        *New.



Page 171

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Tuberculous Prisoners Confined with Others? Insane. Punishment. Record Kept? Superintendent of Health Inspect Monthly and Report? Prisons.
White. Black.
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Alamance
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Alexander
none. 0 0 no. yes. ---- Alleghany
---- 1 0 no. yes. yes. Anson*
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Ashe
none, no means of separation. 0 0 no. yes. no. Beaufort
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Bertie
none. 0 0 none. yes. yes. Bladen
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Brunswick
separated from others. 0 0 no. yes. ---- Buncombe
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Burke
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Cabarrus
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Caldwell
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Camden
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Carteret
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Caswell*
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Catawba
no. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Chatham
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Cherokee*
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Chowan*
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Clay
none. 0 0 no. yes. ---- Cleveland
none. 0 0 no. yes. no. Columbus
one, precautions used. 0 0 no. yes. no. Craven
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Cumberland
none. 0 0 no. no. no. Currituck
none. 0 0 no. yes. no. Dare
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Davidson
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Davie
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Duplin
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Durham

        *New.



Page 172

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. White Males. White Females. Black Males. Black Females. Total. Material and Size. Number of Cells and Size.
Edgecombe 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 6 cells, 10×12, 8×12.
Forsyth 2 2 6 8 18 brick. 5 cells, 8×10.
Franklin 0 0 2 0 2 brick and rock. 4 cells, 6×10.
Gaston 3 0 2 1 6 brick. 4 cells, 8×10.
Gates 0 1 0 0 1 brick. 4 cells, 8×8.
Graham 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 5 cells, 8×10.
Granville 1 0 3 2 6 brick. 5 cells, 6×10.
Greene 0 0 2 0 2 brick and wood. 4 cells, 16×12.
Guilford 6 0 23 0 29 brick. 23 cells.
Halifax ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Harnett* 0 0 6 0 6 ---- ----
Haywood 2 0 0 0 2 brick. 6 cells.
Henderson 1 1 5 2 9 brick. 2 cells.
Hertford 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 3 cells.
Hyde 0 0 0 0 0 ---- ----
Iredell 1 0 0 1 2 brick. 3 cells, 8×10.
Jackson 6 0 0 0 6 ---- ----
Johnston 2 0 12 2 16 brick. 8 cells.
Jones 0 0 1 0 1 brick. 3 cells, 5×8.
Lee Not completed.            
Lenoir 2 0 6 0 8 brick. 8 cells, 8×12.
Lincoln 1 0 1 1 3 brick. 3 cells, 8×10.
McDowell 5 0 1 1 7 brick. 6 cells, 16×14, 8×10.
Macon 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 2 rooms.
Madison 3 1 0 0 4 brick. 14 cells, 8×8.
Martin 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 4 cells, 12×12.
Mecklenburg 2 0 14 4 20 brick. 21 cells, 7×8.
Mitchell 8 0 0 0 8 brick. 4 cells.
Montgomery 2 0 2 0 4 frame, cement and steel. 4 cells.
Moore 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 6 cells, 8×10, 6×8.
Nash 2 0 4 0 6 brick. 5 cells, 6×8.

        *New.



Page 173

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

How Many in a Cell? Is the Prison Ever Overcrowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Prisons.
3 to 10 no. screens, lattice work. windows and doors. fire department. stoves. Edgecombe
5 ---- bars. windows and doors. fire department. steam heat. Forsyth
2 ---- bars. windows and otherwise. fire department. stoves. Franklin
2 no. bars, shutters. windows and doors. buckets. stoves. Gaston
2 no. bars. windows and doors. fireproof. stove. Gates
1 ---- bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. Graham
---- no. bars. windows and doors. yes. stoves. Granville
1 ---- bars. windows. buckets. heaters. Greene
2 to 4 ---- bars. windows and otherwise. fire department. steam. Guilford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Halifax
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Harnett*
2 no. bars. windows and doors. city water. stoves. Haywood
---- no. bars. windows and doors. hose. steam. Henderson
---- no. screens. flue. fireproof. furnace. Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Hyde
5 to 6 sometimes. bars. windows and doors. city water. stoves. Iredell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Jackson
4 no. bars. pipe, windows and doors. none. stove. Johnston
---- no. bars. windows. none. heater. Jones
            Lee
5 no. bars. windows. ---- ---- Lenoir
4 no. bars. windows. fire company. ---- Lincoln
---- not at present. bars. special ventilation and windows. waterworks, fire dept. heaters. McDowell
1 no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. Macon
4 no. bars. windows and otherwise. none. stoves. Madison
2 no. bars. windows and doors. hose. stove. Martin
---- yes. bars. pipes, windows. fire department. steam. Mecklenburg
4 no. grating. pipes, windows. force pump. stoves. Mitchell
2 no. bars. ventilator in roof. water in jail. heaters. Montgomery
6 no. bars. pipe, windows. none. steam. Moore
4 no. bars. windows and doors. none. stove. Nash

        *New.



Page 174

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Bedding. Sexes Separated? Children in Separate Cells? How Often is Drinking-water Furnished?
Edgecombe sufficient. different cells. yes. all the time.
Forsyth sufficient. yes. no. city water.
Franklin sufficient. yes. yes. city water.
Gaston sufficient. yes. yes. as needed.
Gates sufficient. yes. yes. twice daily.
Graham sufficient. yes. none. as needed.
Granville sufficient. yes. no. all the time.
Greene sufficient. yes. none. 3 times daily.
Guilford sufficient. yes. no. as needed.
Halifax ---- ---- ---- ----
Harnett* ---- ---- ---- ----
Haywood sufficient. yes. none. as needed.
Henderson sufficient. yes. none. 3 times daily.
Hertford sufficient. yes. none. 2 to 3 times daily.
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell sufficient. yes. no. city water.
Jackson ---- ---- ---- ----
Johnston sufficient. yes. none. 3 times daily.
Jones sufficient. none. none. 3 times daily.
Lee ---- ---- ---- ----
Lenoir sufficient. yes. yes. all the time.
Lincoln sufficient. yes. none. 3 times daily.
McDowell sufficient. yes. none. in cells.
Macon sufficient. yes. none. as needed.
Madison sufficient. yes. yes. all the time.
Martin sufficient. yes. yes. twice daily.
Mecklenburg sufficient. yes. no. all the time.
Mitchell sufficient. yes. none. all the time.
Montgomery sufficient. yes. with the women. all the time.
Moore sufficient. yes. none. 3 or 4 times daily.
Nash sufficient. yes. none. 4 to 5 times daily.

        *New.



Page 175

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Daily Allowance of Food. Coffee or Other Warm Drink? Meals, Hours of Service. Provision for Bathing? Vermin? Disposition of Excreta. Prisons.
sufficient. if sick. 2 meals, 9 and 4. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Edgecombe
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 8 and 2. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Forsyth
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 9 and 2. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Franklin
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 9 and 3. basins. no. sewerage. Gaston
2 meals daily. no. 2 meals, 8 and 2. tubs. no. hauled off. Gates
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 7. none. no. sewerage. Graham
sufficient. when very cold. 2 meals. bath tubs. as free as can be. sewerage. Granville
sufficient. if wanted. 3 meals, 6, 12 and 6. none. no. ---- Greene
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 7 and 1. bath tubs. as free as possible. sewerage. Guilford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Halifax
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Harnett*
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7:30, 1:30 and 8. tubs. no. ---- Haywood
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. water and towels. no. sewerage. Henderson
sufficient. no. 3 meals. bowls, pans. no. sewerage. Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Hyde
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. tubs. no. sewerage. Iredell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Jackson
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 7 and 1. tubs. no. removed. Johnston
sufficient. no. 3 meals, 6, 12 and 6. tubs. no. buried. Jones
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Lee
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 8 and 3. bath rooms. some. sewerage. Lenoir
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. baths, towels. no. buried. Lincoln
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. bath tub. no. sewerage. McDowell
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. ---- no. pipes. Macon
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Madison
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 9 and 3. tubs, hot and cold water. no. sewerage. Martin
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 7:30 and 2. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Mecklenburg
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. tub. no. sewerage. Mitchell
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 7 and 4. tubs. no. sewerage. Montgomery
sufficient. yes. ---- tubs. some times. sewerage. Moore
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 9 and 3. bath tub. no. ---- Nash

        *New.



Page 176

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Are Prisoners Required to Clean Their Cells? Means of Cleansing. Religious Services? Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908.
Edgecombe yes. disinfectants. no. one.
Forsyth yes. disinfectants. yes. one.
Franklin yes. scrubbing. yes. none.
Gaston yes. disinfectants. occasional. none.
Gates yes. swept. no. none.
Graham yes. sewerage. no. none.
Granville yes. disinfectants. no. none.
Greene yes. ---- no. none.
Guilford yes. disinfectants. yes. one.
Halifax ---- ---- ---- ----
Harnett* ---- ---- ---- none.
Haywood yes. ---- yes. none.
Henderson yes. scrubbing. occasional. none.
Hertford yes. scrubbed. no. none.
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell yes. disinfectants. occasional. none.
Jackson ---- ---- ---- none.
Johnston yes. disinfectants. no. none.
Jones yes. disinfectants. occasional. none.
Lee ---- ---- ---- ----
Lenoir yes. disinfectants. occasional. none.
Lincoln yes. sweeping. no. none.
McDowell yes. disinfectants. very seldom. one.
Macon yes. scrubbing. occasional. none.
Madison yes. scrubbing. none. none.
Martin yes. hose. yes. none.
Mecklenburg yes. disinfectants. yes. none.
Mitchell yes. scouring. occasional. one.
Montgomery yes. scrubbing. occasional. none.
Moore yes. disinfectants. no. none.
Nash yes. different things. no. none.

        *New.



Page 177

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Tuberculous Prisoners Confined with Others?Insane. Punishment. Record Kept? Superintendent of Health Inspect Monthly and Report? Prisons.
White. Black.
no. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Edgecombe
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Forsyth
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Franklin
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Gaston
none. 0 0 no. yes. no. Gates
none. 1 0 no. ---- yes. Graham
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Granville
none. 0 1 no. yes. yes. Greene
separated. 0 0 ---- yes. ---- Guilford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Halifax
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Harnett*
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Haywood
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Henderson
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Hertford
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Hyde
none. 1 1 no. yes. comes when sent for. Iredell
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Jackson
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Johnston
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Jones
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Lee
none. 0 1 no. yes. yes. Lenoir
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Lincoln
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. McDowell
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Macon
none. 0 0 no. yes. no. Madison
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Martin
none. 0 0 yes, in small cell. yes. yes. Mecklenburg
none. 2 0 no. yes. no. Mitchell
none. 1 1 no. not regularly. yes. Montgomery
none. 1 0 no. no. no. Moore
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Nash

        *New.



Page 178

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. White Males. White Females. Black Males. Black Females. Total. Material and Size. Number of Cells and Size.
New Hanover 6 0 13 3 22 brick. ----
Northampton 0 0 6 0 6 brick. 6 cells, 8×8.
Onslow 0 0 1 0 1 frame. 2 cells, 8×10.
Orange 3 0 12 0 15 ---- ----
Pamlico 0 0 3 0 3 brick. 4 cells, 6×10.
Pasquotank 2 0 5 0 7 brick. 8 cells.
Pender 0 0 3 0 3 brick. 2 cells, 8×10.
Perquimans* 0 0 0 0 0 Buildingnew jail.  
Person 2 0 2 0 4 brick. 3 cells, 6×6.
Pitt 1 0 14 1 16 brick. 6 cells.
Polk 2 0 0 0 2 brick. 2 cells, 8×8.
Randolph 1 0 2 0 3 frame. 4 cells, 12×12.
Richmond 0 0 21 1 22 brick. 4 cells, 12×14.
Robeson 3 1 Ind. 0 14 1 19 brick. 7 cells, 7×7.
Rockingham* 0 0 0 0 0 brick and wood. 8 cells, 12×12.
Rowan 0 0 14 3 17 brick, 3 rooms. 19 cells.
Rutherford 3 0 3 0 6 brick and steel. 6 cells, 8×10.
Sampson* 0 0 1 0 1 brick. 4 cells, 8×10.
Scotland 2 0 18 0 20 brick. 6 cells, 6×8.
Stanly 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 11 cells.
Stokes 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 6 cells, 8×10.
Surry 0 0 2 0 2 brick. 4 cells, 10×10.
Swain 1 0 0 0 1 brick, 2 rooms. 4 cells, 10×12.
Transylvania* 6 0 0 0 6 stone and frame. 4 cells, 12×14.
Tyrrell* 0 0 0 0 0 frame. none, 4 rooms.
Union 0 0 4 0 4 brick and steel. 8 cells, 6×8.
Vance 9 0 8 3 20 brick. 4 cells, 20×20.
Wake 12 1 12 2 27 brick. 19 cells, 12×14.
Warren* 0 0 3 1 4 ---- ----
Washington* 1 0 2 0 3 ---- ----

        *New.



Page 179

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

How Many in a Cell? Is the Prison Ever Overcrowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Prisons.
---- no. bars. windows and doors. city department. steam. New Hanover
none. no. bars. windows and doors. buckets. stoves. Northampton
none. no. bars. windows and doors. from fire department. heaters. Onslow
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Orange
---- no. bars. windows and doors. ---- stoves. Pamlico
8 to 10 no. bars. screens. windows and doors. fire department. stoves. Pasquotank
2 no. bars. windows and doors. buckets. furnace. Pender
            Perquimans*
2 no. bars. pipe and windows. fireproof. stoves. Person
4 to 8 no. bars. windows. waterworks. heaters. Pitt
2 no. bars. windows. buckets. stoves. Polk
2 no. bars. windows. none. stove. Randolph
1 to 6 yes. ---- windows and doors. none. hot air. Richmond
4 no. wire screens. windows. hose. steam. Robeson
4 sometimes. screens. windows and doors. none. stove. Rockingham*
4 no. bars. windows, flue. city fire department. steam. Rowan
4 no. bars. otherwise. fireproof. heater. Rutherford
2 no. no. otherwise. fireproof. stove. Sampson*
2 very seldom. bars. windows and doors. city water. heaters. Scotland
---- no. bars. doors and windows. buckets. stoves. Stanly
---- no. bars. windows and doors. pump. stoves. Stokes
3 no. bars. flue, windows and doors. none. stoves. Surry
---- sometimes. bars. windows and doors. hose and water. stoves. Swain
1 no. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. grates. Transylvania*
0 no. bars. windows and doors. none. heater. Tyrrell*
4 no. bars. windows and doors. city fire department. furnace. Union
5 sometimes. bars. windows and doors. well. stoves. Vance
4 sometimes. bars. pipe, windows. city department. furnace. Wake
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Warren*
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Washington*

        *New.



Page 180

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Bedding. Sexes Separated? Children in Separate Cells? How Often is Drinking-water Furnished?
New Hanover sufficient. yes. yes. all the time.
Northampton sufficient. yes. no. pumps.
Onslow sufficient. yes. none. as wanted.
Orange ---- ---- ---- ----
Pamlico sufficient. yes. ---- as wanted.
Pasquotank sufficient. yes. yes. as wanted.
Pender sufficient. yes. none. as wanted.
Perquimans* ---- ---- ---- ----
Person sufficient. yes. yes. 3 times daily.
Pitt sufficient. yes. none. all the time.
Polk sufficient. yes. yes. as wanted.
Randolph sufficient.   none. 3 times daily.
Richmond sufficient. yes. no. twice daily.
Robeson sufficient. yes. none. 3 times daily.
Rockingham* sufficient. yes. yes. 3 times daily.
Rowan 2 to 4 blankets. yes. yes. all the time.
Rutherford sufficient. yes. no. as needed.
Sampson* sufficient. yes. none. twice daily.
Scotland sufficient. yes. none. all the time.
Stanly sufficient. yes. yes. as wanted.
Stokes sufficient. yes. yes. several times a day.
Surry sufficient. yes.   as wanted.
Swain sufficient. yes. no. all the time.
Transylvania* sufficient. yes. yes. 3 times daily.
Tyrrell* sufficient. yes. yes. as wanted.
Union sufficient. yes. no. all the time.
Vance sufficient. yes. no, with women. 2 to 6 times.
Wake sufficient. yes. yes. water in cells.
Warren* ---- ---- ---- ----
Washington* ---- ---- ---- ----

        *New.



Page 181

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Daily Allowance of Food. Coffee or Other Warm Drink? Meals, Hours of Service. Provision for Bathing? Vermin? Disposition of Excreta. Prisons.
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 9 and 5. hot and cold shower. no. sewerage. New Hanover
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 9 and 3. tubs. no. sewerage. Northampton
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 8, 12 and 6. water. no. buckets. Onslow
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Orange
sufficient. ---- ---- none. no. buckets. Pamlico
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 9 and 3. bath tub. no. sewerage. Pasquotank
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 9 and 4. tubs. usually free. buckets. Pender
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Perquimans*
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. tubs. no. sewerage. Person
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 10 and 6. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Pitt
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 6, 12 and 6. basins. no. buried. Polk
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. tubs. no. buried. Randolph
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 9 and 2. bath tubs. not free. sewerage. Richmond
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 8 and 1. tub, shower bath. no. sewerage. Robeson
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 9 and 2. tubs. no. ---- Rockingham*
sufficient. ---- 2 meals, 8 and 2. 3 bath tubs. no. sewerage. Rowan
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. tubs, pans. no. sewerage. Rutherford
sufficient. yes. 2 meals. tubs. no. sewerage. Sampson*
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 8 and 1:30. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Scotland
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. tubs. no. sewerage. Stanly
sufficient. yes. 2 meals, 8 and 3. tub. ---- sewerage. Stokes
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. bath tub. no. sewerage. Surry
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 7:30, 12 and 6. none. no. sewerage. Swain
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 8, 1 and 7. tubs. no. sewerage. Transylvania*
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 9, 1 and 6. basins. no. buckets. Tyrrell*
sufficient. yes. 2 meals. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Union
sufficient. yes. 3 meals, 8, 1 and 6. tubs. not entirely free. sewerage. Vance
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 8:30 and 2:30. bath tubs. some. sewerage. Wake
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Warren*
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Washington*

        *New.



Page 182

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Are Prisoners Required to Clean Their Cells? Means of Cleansing. Religious Services? Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908.
New Hanover yes. waterworks. yes. none.
Northampton yes. scouring. no. none.
Onslow no. scoured. no. one.
Orange ---- ---- ---- ----
Pamlico ---- ---- no. none.
Pasquotank yes. soap and disinfectants. whenever wanted. none.
Pender yes. lime, scouring. no. none.
Perquimans* ---- ---- ---- none.
Person yes. disinfectants. no. none.
Pitt yes. waterworks. no. none.
Polk no. disinfectants. yes. one.
Randolph yes. disinfectants. ---- none.
Richmond yes. disinfectants. no. one.
Robeson yes. scrubbing. occasional. one.
Rockingham* yes. disinfectants. no. none.
Rowan yes. disinfectants. occasional. ----
Rutherford yes. ---- no. none.
Sampson* yes. waterworks. ---- none.
Scotland yes. soap, whitewash. yes. none.
Stanly yes. washed out. yes. none.
Stokes yes. sewer. yes. none.
Surry yes. lime. yes. one.
Swain no. disinfectants. no. none.
Transylvania* no. whitewashing. occasional. none.
Tyrrell* yes. cleaned by jailer. no. none.
Union yes. scouring. yes. none.
Vance yes. divest of old clothing and give them new, and wash the same. no. none.
Wake yes. hose. yes. none.
Warren* ---- ---- ---- ----
Washington* ---- ---- ---- ----

        *New.



Page 183

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Tuberculous Prisoners Confined with Others?Insane. Punishment. Record Kept? Superintendent of Health Inspect Monthly and Report? Prisons.
White. Black.
none. 1 1 no. yes. yes. New Hanover
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Northampton
none. 0 0 no. ---- yes. Onslow
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Orange
none. 0 0 no. ---- ---- Pamlico
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Pasquotank
none. 0 1 no. yes. yes. Pender
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Perquimans*
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes, Person
none. 1 1 no. yes. yes. Pitt
none. 2 0 no. no. yes. Polk
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Randolph
none. 0 0 no. yes. no. Richmond
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Robeson
none. 0 0 no. yes. no. Rockingham*
none. 1 0 no. yes. yes. Rowan
none. 0 0 no. ---- yes. Rutherford
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Sampson*
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Scotland
none. 0 0 no. yes. no. Stanly
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Stokes
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Surry
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Swain
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Transylvania*
none. 0 0 no. no. yes. Tyrrell*
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Union
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Vance
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Wake
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Warren*
---- 0 0 ---- ---- ---- Washington*

        *New.



Page 184

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. White Males. White Females. Black Males. Black Females. Total. Material and Size. Number of Cells and Size.
Watauga 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 5 rooms.
Wayne 5 0 20 0 25 brick. 16 cells, 7×9.
Wilkes 9 2 0 0 11 brick, 40×40. 5 rooms, 12×14.
Wilson 1 0 13 6 20 brick. 6 cells, 5×8.
Yadkin 1 0 1 0 2 brick, 5 rooms. 2 cells, 8×10.
Yancey* 0 0 0 0 0 concrete, 2 stories. ----
Total 164 11 367 53 595    

        *New.



Page 185

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

How Many in a Cell? Is the Prison Ever Overcrowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Prisons.
1 no. bars. ventilator, windows. waterworks. steam. Watauga
4 no. bars. ventilators. city fire department. furnace. Wayne
---- ---- bars. windows and doors. tank. heater. Wilkes
4 no. grating. windows and doors. city department. stoves. Wilson
1 no. grating. windows and doors. none. stoves. Yadkin
---- no. grating. windows and doors. fireproof. stoves. Yancey*

        *New.



Page 186

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Bedding. Sexes Separated? Children in Separate Cells? How Often is Drinking-water Furnished?
Watauga sufficient. yes. none. all the time.
Wayne sufficient. yes. none. all the time.
Wilkes sufficient. yes. yes. as needed.
Wilson sufficient. yes. yes. all the time.
Yadkin sufficient. yes. never have any. 3 times daily.
Yancey* sufficient yes. yes. all the time.

        *New.



Page 187

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Daily Allowance of Food. Coffee or Other Warm Drink? Meals, Hours of Service. Provision for Bathing? Vermin? Disposition of Excreta. Prisons.
plenty. yes. 3 meals, 6, 12 and 6. water. no. sewerage. Watauga
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 8 and 1. bath tubs. yes. sewerage. Wayne
sufficient. yes. 2 meals. yes. no. sewerage. Wilkes
sufficient. no. 2 meals, 8 and 6. tubs. no. sewerage. Wilson
sufficient. yes. 3 meals. bath tubs. no. sewerage. Yadkin
sufficient. yes. ---- basins. no. sewerage. Yancey*

        *New.



Page 188

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Prisons. Are Prisoners Required to Clean Their Cells? Means of Cleansing. Religious Services? Deaths from Sept. 1, 1907, to Sept. 1, 1908.
Watauga yes. all modern appliances. yes. none.
Wayne yes. scouring. yes. none.
Wilkes scrubbing. no. none. none.
Wilson yes. scrubbing. not often. one.
Yadkin yes. lime, brooms. occasional. none.
Yancey* ---- scrubbing. no. none.
Total ---- ---- ---- 14

        *New.


        Causes of deaths: consumption, 2: insane, 2; epilepsy, 1; heart failure, 2; heart trouble, 1; paralysis, 1; obstruction of the bowels, 1; gun-shot wound, 1; suicide, 1; hanged, 2. Died, 14.


Page 189

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Tuberculous Prisoners Confined with Others? Insane. Punishment. Record Kept? Superintendent of Health Inspect Monthly and Report? Prisons.
White. Black.
none. 0 0 no. yes. ---- Watauga
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Wayne
---- ---- ---- no. ---- yes. Wilkes
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Wilson
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Yadkin
none. 0 0 no. yes. yes. Yancey*
Total   20 7      

        *New.



Page 190

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Camps. Total Number of Prisoners. White Males. Black Males. Boys Under 16. Any Female Prisoners? Are Whites and Blacks Confined in the Same Room? Are the Sick Well Cared for?
Alamance 4 2 2 0 no. no. yes.
Anson 38 1 37 0 no. ---- ----
Beaufort (1) 20 0 20 0 no. separate camp. yes.
Beaufort (2) 20 0 20 0 no. no. yes.
Bertie Camp and Home together. Work on farm.            
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus 38 9 29 ---- no. in same room, but white at one end. yes.
Columbus 43 11 32 1 no. no. yes.
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- no. no. yes.
Cumberland 24 1 23 0 no. yes. yes.
Davidson 9 1 8 0 no. no. yes.
Durham 61 0 61 ---- no. no. yes.
Edgecombe 38 0 38 0 no. no. yes.
Forsyth 100 20 80 1 no. no. yes.
Gaston (1) 28 28 0 0 no. no. yes.
Gaston (2) 43 0 43 2 no. no. yes.
Granville 16 2 14 3 no. no. yes.
Guilford (1) 36 0 33 0 3 no. yes.
Guilford (2) 26 13 13 0 no. no. yes.
Halifax 29 0 29 ---- no. no. yes.
Haywood 9 6 3 0 no. yes. yes.
Henderson 12 3 9 0 no. no. yes.
Iredell 31 ---- ---- ---- no. no. yes.
Lenoir ---- ---- ---- ---- no. no. yes.
McDowell 30 9 21 0 no. no. yes.


Page 191

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Where and How Cared for? Deaths Since September 1, 1907, to September 1, 1908. How Many Known to Have Tuberculosis? Are They Confined in the Same Room at Night With Other Prisoners? Punishment. By Whom? By Whose Authority? County Camps.
at camp. ---- none. no. yes, whipping. overseer. superintendent. Alamance
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Anson
at camp. none. none. ---- yes. superintendent. county com'rs. Beaufort (1)
at camp. none. none. no, separate place. whipped. ---- county com'rs. Beaufort (2)
              Bertie
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
several camps. none. none. no. none, except confined in steel cells and tobacco cut off. ---- ---- Cabarrus
camp. none. none. none. 2, five licks with strap. superintendent. ---- Columbus
jail or hospital. none. 1, pardoned. ---- flogging. supervisor. ---- Craven
jail or hospital. none. none. yes. light whipping. superintendent. commissioners. Cumberland
physician. none. none. no. flogging. superintendent. commissioners. Davidson
at County Home. none. none. ---- no. ---- ---- Durham
hospital. 1 none. no. no. ---- ---- Edgecombe
camp and jail hospital. none. none. no. flogging. superintendent. county com'rs. Forsyth
in camp or in jail. 1 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gaston (1)
in camp or jail. none. ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gaston (2)
at camp. 0 none. no. whipping. superintendent. ---- Granville
physician. 1 (shot). none. no. whipped. ---- camp authorities. Guilford (1)
physician. none. none. no. whipped. superintendent. county com'rs. Guilford (2)
as doctor directs at camp. 1 none. none. 3, ten licks each. superintendent. commissioners. Halifax
at camp. none. none. yes. whipping. guard. superintendent. Haywood
at jail. none. none. yes. light whipping, 1. foreman. ---- Henderson
in jail, if ill. none. none. none. whipping. superintendent. ---- Iredell
at camp. ---- none. no. whipping. superintendent. commissioners. Lenoir
in camp. none. none. no. whipping, 3. superintendent. com'rs, solicitor. McDowell


Page 192

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Camps. Are Prisoners Chained Together at Night? Religious Services? Boys Confined With the Men? Where Are Prisoners Kept on Sunday? Material and Size.
Alamance yes. yes. none. at camp. frame.
Anson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Beaufort (1) yes. no. yes. at camp. tent.
Beaufort (2) yes. no. yes. at camp. tent, 30×50.
Bertie ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus one iron rod running through the building. when given. yes. in and around camp. frame, metal roof.
Columbus stock chains. yes. yes. in tent on stock chain. 2 tents, 20×30 and 15×20.
Craven no. occasional. yes. in camp under trees. frame, metal roof.
Cumberland yes. sometimes. yes. at camp. tents, 28×38.
Davidson yes. no. none. stockade. frame, 18×36, 16×20.
Durham yes. yes. yes. at camp. frame, 18×88.
Edgecombe yes. yes. in camp. in camp. tents.
Forsyth yes. yes. yes. camp grounds. frame, 20×74.
Gaston (1) no. yes. ---- quarters. frame, 18×16.
Gaston (2) no. yes. ---- quarters. frame, 18×10.
Granville no. no. in camp. in camp. frame, 16×20½.
Guilford (1) on a long chain. yes. no, house of correction. in grove in summer. frame, 18×50.
Guilford (2) on a long chain. yes. no. in shade in summer. frame, 14×60.
Halifax on one long chain. yes. none. tent or yard. tent, 45×24.
Haywood yes. yes. none. at camp. frame.
Henderson no. no. yes. at camp. frame, lined with sheet-iron, on wheels.
Iredell to one long chain. occasional. none. at camp. frame, 90×24.
Lenoir yes. ---- separate room. at camp. frame, 8×20.
McDowell yes. yes. ---- about the camp. frame, 20×40.


Page 193

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Number of Rooms. Fire Protection. Ventilation. Heat. Bedding. How Often is Drinking-water Provided? County Camps.
2,14×14. none. windows. stoves. sufficient. at all times. Alamance
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Anson
1,24×50. buckets. all necessary. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Beaufort (1)
1 buckets. all necessary. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Beaufort (2)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Bertie
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
4 rooms, 2 cells. buckets. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Cabarrus
2 buckets. side of tent. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Columbus
3 buckets. windows and doors. stove. sufficient. all the time. Craven
1 none. yes. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Cumberland
5 buckets. windows. heater. sufficient. as wanted. Davidson
3 buckets. windows all around. stoves. sufficient. all they want. Durham
---- none. ---- heaters. sufficient. when wanted. Edgecombe
3 none. windows. coal heaters. 1 bed and 3 blankets each. all the time. Forsyth
3 buckets. ventilated from top. stoves. sufficient. as desired. Gaston (1)
3 buckets. from top. stoves. sufficient. as desired. Gaston (2)
2 none. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Granville
3 barrels of water. windows. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Guilford (1)
2 water. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Guilford (2)
2 if needed. buckets. raising cover. heaters. sufficient. as wanted. Halifax
---- none. windows. stoves. sufficient. as desired. Haywood
2 none. windows. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Henderson
1 buckets. windows. stoves. sufficient. all hours. Iredell
1 small danger. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Lenoir
12 none. windows and otherwise. stoves. sufficient. as needed. McDowell


Page 194

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Camps. Food. Number of Meals. Coffee or Other Warm Drink? Required to Bathe? When Are the Blankets Washed? How Often is the Straw of Mattresses Changed?
Alamance sufficient. 3 yes. yes. twice a year. four times.
Anson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Beaufort (1) all they can eat. 3 no. yes. as needed. ----
Beaufort (2) all they want. 3 no. yes. as needed. ----
Bertie ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus sufficient. 3 in cold weather. yes. once in 3 months. once in 3 months.
Columbus sufficient. 3 yes. yes. as needed. once in 3 months.
Craven sufficient. 3 no. yes. ---- when worn out.
Cumberland sufficient. 3 yes. yes. as needed. buy new ones.
Davidson sufficient. 3 no. yes. monthly. monthly.
Durham all they want. 3 yes. yes. as needed. mattresses.
Edgecombe all they want. 3 yes. yes. as needed. burnt up and new ones bought.
Forsyth all they want. 3 yes. yes. as needed. every 30 to 60 days.
Gaston (1) all they want. 3 ---- yes. monthly. as needed.
Gaston (2) all they want. 3 ---- yes. monthly. as needed.
Granville sufficient. 3 if sick. yes. monthly. as needed.
Guilford (1) sufficient. 3 yes. yes. as needed. as needed.
Guilford (2) sufficient. 3 twice a day. weekly. as needed. as needed.
Halifax all they want. 3 ---- once a week. 4 times a year. new ones 3 or 4 times a year.
Haywood all they want. 3 yes. yes. as needed. ----
Henderson all they want. 3 yes. yes. every two weeks. every 5 weeks.
Iredell sufficient. 3 yes. yes. as needed. as needed.
Lenoir sufficient. 3 yes. yes. weekly. as needed.
McDowell sufficient. 3 yes. yes. every two weeks. once a month.


Page 195

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Free of Vermin? How is Excreta Disposed of? What Means Used for Cleanliness of Camp? Hours of Work. Number of Employees. Salary of Supervisor. Guards. Does the County Physician Make Monthly Inspection and Report to Commissioners? County Camps.
yes. carried off. disinfectants. 10 2 $ 50.00 $ 25.00 yes. Alamance
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Anson
yes. removed some distance. disinfectants. 6 to 12, 2 to 6. 4 50.00 25.00 ---- Beaufort (1)
yes. removed. disinfectants. 6 to 12, 2 to 6. 4 50.00 25.00 ---- Beaufort (2)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Bertie
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
yes. buckets, removed. disinfectants. 10 7 70.00 1.50 per day. yes. Cabarrus
yes. burned or buried. lime, water. sun to sun. 5 75.00 35.00 no. Columbus
yes. ---- cleaned daily. no special hours. 3 to 4 60.00 35.00 not specially. Craven
yes. buried. disinfectants. sun to sun, 1½ to 2 hours for dinner. 4 60.00 30.00 25.00 23.00 yes. Cumberland
yes. removed. scalded. 10 2 2.80 per day. 1.10 per day. yes. Davidson
yes. buried. soap and water. 10 6 75.00 30.00 yes. Durham
yes. buried. cleaned daily. 10 5 ---- ---- yes. Edgecombe
yes. sink. all means at our command. sun to sun. 20 75.00 20.00 yes. Forsyth
yes. buried. scoured. 10 4 60.00 1.50 per day. yes. Gaston (1)
yes. buried. scoured. 10 4 95.00 1.50 per day. yes. Gaston (2)
yes. carried off. disinfectants. sun to sun. 3 60.00 32.50 no. Granville
yes. removed. cleaned daily. reasonable mid-day rest. 5 60.00 22.50 not every month. Guilford (1)
yes. buried. disinfectants. no specified time, 2 hrs. at noon in summer. 7 60.00 22.50 grand. jury. Guilford (2)
yes. barrels, removed. soap and water. 10 8 2.00 per day. 1.00 yes. Halifax
yes. ---- soap and water. 10 3 or 4 40.00 20.00 yes. Haywood
yes. removed in tubs. all reasonable means. 10 in summer, 9 in winter. 2 40.00 35.00 yes. Henderson
yes. sink. soap and brooms. 8 3 ---- 1.50 and 1.00 per day. inspecting. Iredell
yes. removed. soap and water. 10 6 50.00 30.00 to 35.00 yes. Lenoir
yes. buried. every possible means. 10 4 50.00 25.00 yes. McDowell


Page 196

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Camps. Total Number of Prisoners. White Males. Black Males. Boys Under 16. Any Female Prisoners? Are Whites and Blacks Confined in the Same Room? Are the Sick Well Cared for?
Mecklenburg (1) 40 ---- ---- ---- no. yes, with divisions yes.
Mecklenburg (2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Moore 12 0 12 0 no. no. yes.
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover 94 6 88 2 no. no. yes.
Pasquotank 39 1 38 0 no. curtain between. fairly well.
Person 2 0 2 1 no. yes. yes.
Pitt 29 ---- ---- 0 no. no. yes.
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rockingham 45 20 25 0 ---- ---- ----
Rowan (1) 64 21 43 ---- sometimes, cooking, etc. no. yes.
Rowan (2) 64 21 43 ---- sometimes, cooking, etc. no. yes.
Sampson ---- ---- ---- ---- no. no. yes.
Union 27 3 24 0 no. yes, separate divisions. yes.
Wake (1) 60 16 44 0 no. no. yes.
Wake (2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wake (3) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wake (4) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wayne 35 4 31 1 no. same tents. yes.
Wilson 32 1 31 1 no. no. yes.
Total* 1,114 178 833 12 3 ---- ----

        *100 color not given.



Page 197

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Where and How Cared for? Deaths Since September 1, 1907, to September 1, 1908. How Many Known to Have Tuberculosis? Are They Confined in the Same Room at Night With Other Prisoners? Punishment. By Whom? By Whose Authority? County Camps.
hospital Co. Home. 1 epileptic. none. no. moderate restraint when needed. superintendent. commissioners. Mecklenburg (1)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg (2)
physician. none. none. ---- no. ---- ---- Moore
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
hospital camp. none. ---- yes. 5 to 15 lashes. foreman. ---- New Hanover
camp or jail. none. none. yes. flogging. superintendent. ---- Pasquotank
in camp. none. none. no. no. ---- ---- Person
every necessary attention. none. none. no. flogging. superintendent. ---- Pitt
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Randolph
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Rockingham
at camp or jail. none. none. no. slight whipping occasionally. ---- ---- Rowan (1)
at camp or jail. none. none. no. slight whipping occasionally. ---- ---- Rowan (2)
at camp. none. none. no. flogging. superintendent. commissioners. Sampson
physician, nurses. 1 none. no. flogging. superintendent. statutes. Union
in hospital if necessary. none. none. no. no. ---- ---- Wake (1)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (2)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (3)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (4)
at camp. none. none. no. whipping several. superintendent. commissioners. Wayne
at camp. 2 none. no. no. ---- ---- Wilson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Total*

        *100 color not given.



Page 198

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Camps. Are Prisoners Chained Together at Night? Religious Services? Boys Confined With the Men? Where Are Prisoners Kept on Sunday? Material and Size.
Mecklenburg (1) no. yes. trusties, open yard. in stockade. frame, 18×90×12.
Mecklenburg (2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Moore chained to long chain. no. none. in camp. frame, 20×40.
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover no. yes. yes. in stockade fence. frame.
Pasquotank yes. no. yes. at or near camp. canvas tent.
Person yes. no. none. in camp. frame.
Pitt yes. no. none. in camp. tents, 20×40.
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rockingham ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rowan (1) separately chained. yes. yes. in camp. 16×50.
Rowan (2) separately chained. yes. yes. in camp. 12×16.
Sampson yes. occasional. ---- in camp. tent 40×20.
Union yes. every Sunday, none. in the stockade. frame 20×38.
Wake (1) yes. yes. yes. in camp. frame, 4 removable cars, 14×30.
Wake (2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wake (3) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wake (4) ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wayne yes. yes. yes. in camp. tents.
Wilson yes, when not in stockade. yes. corridor. in stockade. brick, 80×30.
Total* ---- ---- ---- ---- ----

        *100 color not given.



Page 199

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Number of Rooms. Fire Protection. Ventilation. Heat. Bedding. How Often is Drinking-water Provided? County Camps.
1 bucket system. windows at top. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Mecklenburg (1)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg (2)
2 none. windows. stoves. straw with two blankets. as needed. Moore
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
4 barrels, extinguishers. ventilation in roof. stoves. matting, two double blankets as needed. New Hanover
1, 24×50 none. plenty of ventilation. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Pasquotank
2 ---- windows. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Person
2 buckets. windows. heaters. sufficient. all the time. Pitt
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Randolph
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Rockingham
2 barrels of water. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Rowan (1)
2 barrels of water. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Rowan (2)
---- none. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Sampson
1 waterworks. windows and doors. heaters. sufficient. every hour. Union
1 room. none. windows. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Wake (1)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (2)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (3)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (4)
---- none. windows. stoves. sufficient. as needed. Wayne
1 story, 2 rooms. force pump and hose. windows, doors and otherwise. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Wilson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Total*

        *100 color not given.



Page 200

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Camps. Food. Number of Meals. Coffee or Other Warm Drink? Required to Bathe? When Are the Blankets Washed? How Often is the Straw of Mattresses Changed?
Mecklenburg (1) sufficient. 3, butter milk. ---- yes. weekly. weekly.
Mecklenburg (2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Moore all they will eat. 3 yes. yes. every two weeks. occasionally.
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover all they want. 3 no. yes. twice a month. every 2 months.
Pasquotank all they can eat. 3 ---- yes. as needed. old mattresses burned.
Person sufficient. 3 no. yes. as needed. as needed.
Pitt all they can eat. 3 ---- yes. as needed. as needed.
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rockingham ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rowan (1) all they want. 3 yes. yes. monthly. as needed.
Rowan (2) all they want. 3 yes. yes. monthly. as needed.
Sampson all they want. 3 ---- ---- as needed. as needed.
Union all they want. 3 yes. yes. as needed. every quarter.
Wake (1) sufficient. 3 yes. yes. monthly. as needed.
Wake (2) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wake (3) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wake (4) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wayne sufficient. 3 yes. yes. frequently. buy new ones.
Wilson sufficient. 3 yes. yes. yes. as needed.
Total* ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----

        *100 color not given.



Page 201

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Free of Vermin? How is Excreta Disposed of? What Means Used for Cleanliness of Camp? Hours of Work. Number of Employees. Salary of Supervisor. Guards. Does the County Physician Make Monthly Inspection and Report to Commissioners? County Camps.
yes. sinks. lime, disinfectants, change of clothes. sun to sun. 5 $ 100.00 $ 45.00 yes. Mecklenburg (1)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg (2)
yes. ---- disinfectants. 6 to 6 4 135.00 in all. ---- inspection made, no formal report. Moore
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
yes. buried. disinfectants. sun to sun, 1 hour in winter and 2 in summer for dinner. 12 ---- 20.00 yes. New Hanover
yes. removed. disinfectants. usual hours. 5 60.00 30.00 yes. Pasquotank
yes. ---- all necessary means. 10 3 67.50 20.00 yes. Person
yes. removed. cleaned daily. all day. 4 100.00 1.50 per day. yes. Pitt
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Randolph
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Rockingham
yes. buried. disinfectants. 9 8 60.00 35.00 yes. Rowan (1)
yes. buried. disinfectants. 9 8 65.00 40.00 yes. Rowan (2)
yes. ---- disinfectants. 7 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 4 50.00 20.00 yes. Sampson
yes. removed daily. disinfectants. sun to sun, 2 hours off in summer one guard to ten men. 50.00 20.00 yes. Union
yes. buried disinfectants. 10 6 35.00 25.00 yes. Wake (1)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (2)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (3)
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake (4)
yes. carried off. disinfectants. 10 4 50.00 20.00 yes. Wayne
yes. sewerage. soap and water. 10 5 60.00 30.00 yes. Wilson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Total*

        *100 color not given.



Page 202

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

MENTAL DEFECTIVES.

County Insane Confined Epileptic Feeble-minded
Jail. Home.
White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women. White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women.
Alamance 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 7
Alexander 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 2 2
Alleghany 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Anson* 1 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 1 4
Ashe 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 5
Beaufort 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Bertie 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Bladen 0 0 0 0 Home not in use.            
Brunswick 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 2 2
Buncombe 0 0 0 0 5 0 0 0 4 4 12
Burke 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3
Cabarrus 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 1 5
Caldwell 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
Carteret 0 0 0 0 No Home.            
Camden 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Caswell 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Catawba 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 1
Chatham 0 0 0 0 0 3 2 3 2 3 10
Cherokee 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0
Chowan 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3 0 0 0
Clay 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Cleveland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 3
Columbus 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 1
Craven 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 2
Cumberland 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 1 4 1 1
Currituck 0 0 0 0 No Home.            
Dare 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Davidson 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Davie 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 2
Duplin 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 0

        *Sex not given for 14 whites not counted in above. Sex not given for 24 colored.



Page 203

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

MENTAL DEFECTIVES.

County Insane Confined Epileptic Feeble-minded
Jail. Home.
White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women. White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women.
Durham 0 0 0 0 2 6 3 1 4 1 0
Edgecombe 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2 8
Franklin 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 9
Forsyth 0 0 0 0 3 0 1 0 4 2 20
Gaston 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 9
Gates 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Graham 1 0 0 0 No Home.            
Granville 1 0 0 0 1 1 1 4 0 1 0
Greene 0 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 2
Guilford 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 2 3 6
Halifax ---- ---- ---- ---- 0 0 0 1 0 4 10
Harnett 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Haywood 1 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 1 3
Henderson 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1
Hertford 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 2
Hyde 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ---- ----
Iredell 1 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 3 ---- 11
Jackson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1
Johnston 0 0 0 0 2 3 0 0 3 2 7
Jones 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Lee Not completed.       No Home.            
Lenoir 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 ----
Lincoln 0 0 0 0 0 2 1 0 0 0 3
McDowell 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 4
Macon 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
Madison 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 4
Martin 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 2 ----
Mecklenburg 0 0 0 0 1 1 2 2 4 2 40
Mitchell 2 0 0 0 No Home.            
Montgomery 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1


Page 204

        
County Insane Confined Epileptic Feeble-minded
Jail. Home.
White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women. White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women.
Moore 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0 0
Nash 1 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 4
New Hanover 1 0 1 0 6 0 0 0 0 1 12
Northampton 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 4 4
Onslow 0 0 0 0 Building Home.            
Orange ---- ---- ---- ---- 0 0 0 0 0 0 8
Pamlico 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Pasquotank 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 3 6
Pender 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Perquimans 0 0 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 2 0
Person 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0
Pitt 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 1 3 6
Polk 2 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- 4 2 0 0 0 3 11
Richmond 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2 4
Robeson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Rockingham 0 0 0 0 2 2 1 0 4 0 5
Rowan 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Rutherford 0 0 0 0 *3 ---- *3 ---- at times. 2 5
Sampson 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 3
Scotland 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Stanly 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 8
Stokes 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 2 6
Surry 1 (died) 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 6
Swain 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Transylvania 0 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 1 2 8
Tyrrell 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 0
Union 0 0 0 0 1 2 0 1 3 4 8
Vance 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Wake 0 0 0 0 *11 ---- *21 ---- 2 8 6

        *Sex not given for 14 whites not counted in above. Sex not given for 24 colored.



Page 205

        
County Insane Confined Epileptic Feeble-minded
Jail. Home.
White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women. White Men. White Women. Colored Men. Colored Women.
Warren 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 1 0
Washington 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Watauga 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 1 1
Wayne 0 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 1 3 0
Wilkes 0 0 0 0 1 3 0 0 1 0 0
Wilson 0 0 0 0 1 4 4 1 0 0 7
Yadkin 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 1 2
Yancey 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total 19 1 5 2 *47 50 *20 24 60 103 344

        *Sex not given for 14 whites not counted in above. Sex not given for 24 colored.


        
Insane in jails 27
Insane in Homes 179
Epileptic 103
Feeble-minded 344
Total 626
Insane whites 111
Insane blacks 68
Total 179


Page 206

NEW LEGISLATION.

[PUBLIC LAWS, SESSION OF 1909.]

        CHAPTER 18. To amend subsection 15 of section 1318, Revisal of 1905, relating to powers and duties of county commissioners. Authorized to establish and maintain wholly or in part one or more tuberculosis dispensaries or sanatoria.

        CHAPTER 176. Relative to the property of insane people discharged from the insane asylums. Persons declared of unsound mind restored to legal rights by certificate of recovery, sworn and subscribed to by superintendent of hospital and recorded in the county of such persons' residence.

        CHAPTER 484. An act to confer certain powers on the directors of State institutions in regard to land. Power given to grant privileges and easements.

        CHAPTER 510. To issue bonds to carry out the act of 1907, for the care of the insane. Issue of $500,000 four per cent forty-year bonds authorized; $20,000 deficit of State Hospital at Morganton and $11,000 at Goldsboro to be paid from the proceeds.

        CHAPTER 443. Mode of capital punishment. Death by hanging abolished. Electrocution at the State's Prison. Warden or deputy to be executioner.

        CHAPTER 747. Five thousand dollars for dormitory at Colored Orphan Asylum at Oxford. Governor to appoint building committee.

        CHAPTER 779. To amend pension law. Appropriation $450,000.

        RESOLUTION 36. To purchase suits of Confederate gray, one suit per year, for each veteran in the Soldiers' Home.

        CHAPTER 684. Pension of $6 per annum as pocket money for the veterans in the Soldiers' Home.

        CHAPTER 617. County commissioners authorized to levy and collect a tax of not more than 2 cents on property and 6 cents on polls for purposes of increasing pensions of Confederate soldiers and widows of such.

        CHAPTER 822. Widows who were married to Confederate soldiers before January 1, 1868, entitled to pensions.

        CHAPTER 831. To prevent boards of directors of State institutions from electing one of their number to any position under their control. Forbidden to elect such person who is or has been a member of the board within six months.

        CHAPTER 449. Appropriations.

        CHAPTER 817. Reformatory for negro youth. Foulk's Reformatory and Manual-training School incorporated. If the State appropriates as much as $15,000 for school, successors to trustees named to be


Page 207

appointed, three by the Governor. Sixteen additional trustees to be appointed by the Governor if State makes appropriation for school; otherwise, by trustees named.

        CHAPTER 832. Separation of white and colored prisoners. To be as complete as possible at all times.

        CHAPTER 845. Reports from superintendent and meetings of the directors of Sanatorium for Treatment of Tuberculosis.

        CHAPTER 910. White epileptics to be cared for at the State Hospital at Raleigh.

        RESOLUTION 43. Contingent appropriation for care of epileptics at Raleigh not to exceed $170 per capita.

        RESOLUTION 48. In regard to higher education of the blind. National college at Washington, to ask for it, similar to the one for the deaf.

        RESOLUTION 52. Election of directors of Tuberculosis Sanatorium.

        CHAPTER 917. An act to amend section 180 of Revisal. Forfeiture of right of custody of children by parents.

HEALTH.

        CHAPTER 389. An act to provide diphtheria antitoxin for indigent persons sick of diphtheria. State Board of Health to provide for a supply to be distributed to counties, cities or towns on requisition. Five hundred dollars to carry act into effect.

        CHAPTER 900. Adulterated food.

        CHAPTER 808. Mineral waters to be analyzed. Tax on sale of waters. Nonresidents selling bottled waters to submit proof of purity.

        CHAPTER 793. Board of Health. Powers in relation to inspection, supervision, preservation of water supplies and construction of water system defined.

        CHAPTER 722. Registration of deaths in cities or towns of one thousand and over. Secretary of the State Board of Health to be State Registrar of Vital Statistics. Regulation of burial or removal permits and certificate of cause of death.

        CHAPTER 706. Sanitary surroundings for State and educational institutions. Unlawful to keep swine or swine pens if petition against such keeping be presented by majority of qualified voters.

        CHAPTER 707 (section 1051 of Revisal). Coroner to hold inquest at request of the solicitor.

        CHAPTER 702. Courtrooms to be fumigated and put in sanitary condition during the week preceding court.

        CHAPTER 713. Narcotic drugs to habitués. Punishment in the discretion of the court.

        CHAPTER 881. To authorize the Board of Internal Improvements to require and take sufficient bonds of contractors on public works and buildings. Given charge of alterations or erection of public buildings


Page 208

and authorized to employ a clerk. Member of the board making investigations to be paid a sum to be fixed by Governor and Council of State.

        CHAPTER 733. Governor may appoint expert accountant to examine and check up books and accounts and to make such examination as is proper as regards books and accounts of State departments and institutions.

        CHAPTER 500. Relating to the Board of Public Charities. Appointing members.

        CHAPTER 899. Relating to Board of Public Charities. Expenses of members, secretary or other official for inspecting institutions paid.

        CHAPTER 903. Appropriation of $5,000 to enlarge the Dangerous Insane Department. From the Hospital Commission fund. To be expended by Prison Board.

        CHAPTER 408. Upon subscription of $40,000 by solvent individuals and $60,000 by Watauga County and payment of $10,000 on such subscription, not less than fifty nor more than one hundred and fifty convicts may, on approval of the Governor and Council of State, be hired to the company. Hire payable in stock, to be issued to State and penitentiary, credited on the books of the Treasurer, with par value of the same.

        CHAPTER 359 (Private Laws). Statesville Air Line Railroad. One hundred and fifty convicts to be furnished by the penitentiary, on approval of the Governor, and paid in common stock of the company.

SAFETY OF LIFE.

        CHAPTER 446. Act requiring electric headlights on certain locomotive engines, 1,500 candle power. One-fourth of engines not now equipped to be so by April, 1910; one-fourth by April, 1911, 1912, 1913. Does not apply to switch engines and those used in the day. One hundred and twenty-five or less miles in length, or branched into the State 100 or less, not included.

        CHAPTER 637. Hotels, lodging houses, places of amusement and all other houses where fire is likely to cause loss of life to be properly equipped with fire escapes and swinging doors and other means of egress.

        CHAPTER 795. Manufacture, sale or gift of duplicate switch-lock keys forbidden.

        CHAPTER 677. Fifty dollars instead of $20 to be paid to mother of indigent children. (Section 924, Revisal.)

        CHAPTER 336 (Private Laws). To amend compulsory school law of Asheville. Incorrigibles may be sent to Stonewall Jackson Training School.

        CHAPTER 902. Money available to State Hospital Commission.


Page 209

COUNTY INSTITUTIONS.

        CHAPTER 641. An act to authorize and empower the Board of Commissioners of Forsyth to adopt such rules and regulations for enforcing such discipline, etc., as are not inconsistent with laws of the State. Records to be kept, and prisoners having committed no infraction of discipline to be allowed, if sentenced for more than 12 months, five days, and for not less than six months, three days in diminution of sentence.

        CHAPTER 413. To amend section 1318 of Revisal. Contracts in relation to county buildings not to be made until after advertisement for bids. Resolution of commissioners of Tyrrell County, authorizing issuance of bonds for jail, annulled. Board authorized to contract for erection of jail with the lowest bidder, after advertising for bids, and to issue bonds and to levy tax for the same.

        Laws passed for the erection of new County Homes in Ashe, Lincoln, Yancey, Surry and for additional land for Davie Home, not to exceed fifty acres and contiguous to present farm.

        For new jails, Mecklenburg, Iredell, Cabarrus, Tyrrell and Gaston.

        Chain gangs established in Macon, Caldwell, Bladen. Lee can establish a camp or hire out prisoners. McDowell to vote on chain gang for certain townships. Warren to work all misdemeanants for terms of less than two years on the county farm. Caswell to work on county farm. Columbus and Randolph to hire out or use for County Home. Prisoners awaiting trial in the jails of Lenoir, Person and Anson (Pitt obtained such a law two years ago), at their own request, can work in the camps, and if adjudged guilty such time shall count on their sentence; if freed, to be paid for the same.


Page 210

APPROPRIATIONS TO CHARITABLE INSTITUTIONS.

[SESSION OF 1909.]

        

The appropriations for maintenance made for the biennial period of 1909-1910 were, for each year, as follows:

    Annual. Biennium.
State Hospital at Morganton 1909 $ 175,000 $ 365,000
State Hospital at Morganton 1910 190,000  
State Hospital at Raleigh   115,000 230,000
State Hospital at Goldsboro   80,000 160,000
Dangerous Insane Department   5,000 10,000
Schools for White Blind and Colored Blind and Deaf   65,000 130,000
School for the Deaf and Dumb   50,000 100,000
North Carolina Soldiers' Home   20,000 40,000
Oxford Orphanage   10,000 20,000
Oxford Orphanage for the Colored   5,000 10,000
State Tuberculosis Sanatorium   7,500 15,000
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School   10,000 20,000
Total     1,100,000

        

APPROPRIATIONS FOR IMPROVEMENTS, REPAIRS AND ADDITIONAL EQUIPMENT FOR THE BIENNIAL PERIOD, 1909-1910.

To be expended by Hospital Commission (available at once) $ 214,000
School for the Deaf and Dumb. Morganton, for repairing and painting buildings 3,000 6,000
For erecting a new building 12,000 24,000
School for the Blind and Colored Blind and Deaf for purchase of books 100 200
Renewing heating plant, boilers, pianos and improvements 15,000 30,000
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training School 10,000 20,000
State Tuberculosis Sanatorium 15,000 30,000
Enlargement of the Dangerous Insane Department (Hospital Commission Fund)   5,000
For care of Confederate Soldiers' Cemetery, to be paid over to the Ladies' Memorial Association of Wake County 200 400
Oxford Orphanage for the Colored, for dormitory building   5,000
To liquidate indebtedness (Hospital Commission Fund):
Hospital at Morganton   20,000
Hospital at Goldsboro   11,000
Total   370,600
Grand total for two years   1,470,000
Pensions to Confederate veterans and widows 450,000  


Page 211

AN ACT TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT TO AMEND CHAPTER 85,
VOLUME 2 OF THE REVISAL OF 1905, RELATING TO THE
BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES.

        The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

        SECTION 1. That Joseph G. Brown, W. A. Blair, A. C. McAlister, Henry C. Dockery and Carey J. Hunter be and they are hereby appointed as the members of the Board of Public Charities of the State of North Carolina, and that their terms of office shall begin on July first, nineteen hundred and nine. That the said Carey J. Hunter and A. C. McAlister shall each hold their term of office for two years, and that Joseph G. Brown and Henry C. Dockery shall hold their offices for four years, and that W. A. Blair shall hold said office for a term of six years. That all vacancies occurring for any cause shall be filled by the appointment of the Governor for the unexpired term. He shall also appoint members of said board as the terms of those herein appointed expire, and that the term shall be six years.

        SEC. 2. That all laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed.

        SEC. 3. This act shall be in force from and after its ratification.

        Ratified this the 5th day of March, A. D. 1909.

AN ACT TO AMEND CHAPTER 66, VOLUME 1, REVISAL OF 1905,
RELATING TO THE BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES.

        The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

        SECTION 1. That section two thousand eight hundred and seven (2807) of the Revisal of one thousand nine hundred and five be and the same is hereby amended by adding at the end of said section the following: "Provided, that the actual expenses of the members of said board, or the secretary or such other official as hereafter may be appointed by said board, incurred while making such inspections of the charitable and penal institutions as the board may deem necessary, shall be paid."

        SEC. 2. All laws or clauses of laws in conflict with this act are hereby repealed.

        SEC. 3. This act shall be in force from and after its ratification.

        Ratified this the 9th day of March, A. D. 1909.

AN ACT TO REQUIRE ALL WHITE EPILEPTICS OF THE STATE
TO BE ACCOMMODATED, MAINTAINED AND CARED FOR
AND TREATED AT THE STATE HOSPITAL AT RALEIGH.

        The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

        SECTION 1. That whenever it becomes necessary for any white person of this State, afflicted with the disease known as epilepsy, to be


Page 212

confined or to receive hospital treatment, such person shall be accommodated, maintained, cared for and treated at the State Hospital at Raleigh. Said epileptics shall be committed by the clerks of the Superior Courts of the several counties to said State Hospital at Raleigh in the manner now provided by law for the commitment of insane persons to the several hospitals for the insane, and when such person shall be committed it shall be the duty of the Superintendent of the State Hospital at Raleigh and he is required to receive such person and care for, maintain and treate him or her at said hospital at Raleigh: Provided, said superintendent shall find such person to be afflicted to such extent as to properly be a public charge; and Provided further, that any person so committed who is able to pay shall be charged actual cost of maintenance.

        SEC. 2. That all epileptics now being confined and cared for and maintained at the State Hospital at Morganton shall be transferred from said State Hosptial at Morganton to the State Hospital at Raleigh.

        SEC. 3. That all laws and clauses of laws in conflict with any of the provisions of this act are hereby repealed.

        SEC. 4. That this act shall be in force from and after the completion of the buildings now being erected at the State Hospital at Raleigh by the State Hospital Commission for the care and maintenance of white epileptics.

        Ratified this the 9th day of March, A. D. 1909.

AN ACT FOR THE SEPARATION OF WHITE AND COLORED
PRISONERS IN THE STATE PENITENTIARY AND IN THE
COUNTY JAILS AND CONVICT CAMPS DURING SLEEPING
AND EATING HOURS.

        The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

        SECTION 1. That white and colored prisoners shall not be confined or shackled together in the same room of any building or tent, either in the State penitentiary or at any State or county convict camp, during the eating or sleeping hours, and at all other times the separation of the two races shall be as complete as practicable.

        SEC. 2. That any officer or employee of either the State or any county in the State having charge of convicts or prisoners who shall violate or permit the violation of this act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon conviction shall be fined not more than fifty dollars or imprisoned not more than thirty days.

        SEC. 3. That this act shall be in force from and after its ratification.

        Ratified this the 8th day of March, A. D. 1909.


Page 213

AN ACT TO PRESCRIBE THE MODE OF CAPITAL PUNISHMENT
IN NORTH CAROLINA.

        The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

        SECTION 1. That death by hanging under sentence of law in North Carolina shall be and is hereby abolished and electrocution or death by electricity substituted therefor.

        SEC. 2. The mode of executing a death sentence must in every case be by causing to pass through the body of the convict or felon a current of electricity of sufficient intensity to cause death, and the application of such current must be continued until such convict or felon is dead; and the warden of the penitentiary of North Carolina or, in case of his death, inability or absence, a deputy warden shall be the executioner; and when any person, convict or felon shall be sentenced by any court of the State having competent jurisdiction to be so executed, such punishment shall only be inflicted within a permanent death chamber which the superintendent of said State penitentiary is hereby authorized and directed to provide within the walls of the North Carolina penitentiary at Raleigh, North Carolina. The superintendent of said State penitentiary shall also cause to be provided, in conformity with this act and approved by the Governor and Council of State, the necessary appliances for the infliction of the punishment of death in accordance with the requirements of this act. For the expenses of such appliances a sum not exceeding one thousand dollars shall be allowed and paid out of the treasury upon the warrant of the Auditor of the State.

        SEC. 3. That upon the sentence of death being pronounced against any person in the State of North Carolina convicted of a crime punishable by death it shall be the duty of the judge pronouncing such death sentence to make the same in writing, which shall be filed in the papers in the case against such convicted person, and a certified copy thereof shall be transmitted by the clerk of the Superior Court in which such sentence is pronounced to the warden of the State penitentiary at Raleigh, North Carolina, not more than twenty nor less than ten days before the time fixed in the judgement of the court for the execution of said sentence; and in all cases where there is no appeal from said sentence of death and in all cases where said sentence is pronounced against a prisoner convicted of the crime of rape it shall be the duty of the sheriff, together with at least one deputy, to convey to the penitentiary at Raleigh such condemned felon or convict forthwith upon the adjournment of the court in which said felon was tried, and deliver said convict or felon to the warden of said penitentiary: Provided, that in all cases where an appeal is taken from the death sentence by any person or persons convicted of a crime punishable by death, except the crime of rape, such convicted felon or convict shall not be taken or conveyed to said penitentiary unless,


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in the judgment of the sheriff of the county in which said felon was tried and the solicitor prosecuting said felon, it shall be deemed necessary for the safety and safe-keeping of said convicted person or felon during the pendency of said appeal.

        SEC. 4. The said warden or deputy warden (in case of the disability, death or absence of the warden), unless a suspension of execution be ordered, shall cause the person, convict or felon against whom the death sentence has been so pronounced to be electrocuted as provided by section two of this act. At such execution there shall be present the warden or deputy warden, the surgeon or physician of the penitentiary and twelve respectable citizens. The counsel and any relatives of such person, convict or felon and a minister or ministers of the gospel may be present if they so desire.

        SEC. 5. The warden, together with the surgeon or physician of the penitentiary, shall certify the fact of the execution of the condemned person, convict or felon to the clerk of the Superior Court in which such sentence was pronounced, and said clerk shall file such certificate with the papers of the case and enter the same upon the records thereof.

        SEC. 6. Should the condemned person, convict or felon be granted a reprieve by the Governor or obtain a writ of error, or a new trial be granted by the Supreme Court of the State of North Carolina, or should the execution of the sentence be stayed by any competent judicial tribunal or proceeding, notice of such reprieve, new trial, appeal, writ of error or stay of execution shall be served upon the warden or deputy warden of the penitentiary by the Sheriff of Wake County, in case such condemned person is confined in said penitentiary, or upon any sheriff having the custody of any such condemned person, also upon the condemned person himself. In case of an appeal, should the Supreme Court find no error in the trial or should the execution of the sentence be stayed by any competent judicial tribunal of proceeding, such condemned person, convict or felon shall be executed as is provided in section two of this act, the Governor of North Carolina setting the day for said execution; and it is hereby made the duty of said Governor to set the date for said execution and notify the warden of the penitentiary thereof.

        SEC. 7. Should a new trial be granted the condemned person, convict or felon against whom sentence of death has been pronounced, after he has been conveyed to the penitentiary, then he shall be conveyed back to the place of trial by such guard or guards as the warden of said penitentiary shall direct, their expenses to be paid as is now provided by law for the conveyance of convicts to the penitentiary.

        SEC. 8. Nothing in this act shall be construed to alter in any manner the execution of the sentence of death imposed on account of any crime or crimes committed before the ratification of this act.


Page 215

        SEC. 9. Upon application, written or verbal, of any relative as near as the degree of fourth cousin of the person executed, made at any time prior to the execution or on the morning thereof, the body, after execution, shall be prepared for burial under the supervision of the warden or deputy warden and shall be returned to the nearest railroad station of the relative or relatives asking for such body. The cost of preparing said body for burial, including transportation, shall in no case exceed the sum of fifty dollars, and shall be paid by the State of North Carolina upon a warrant of the Auditor of said State. In the event that no relative asks for the body of such executed person, convict or felon, the same shall be disposed of as other bodies of convicts dying in the penitentiary.

        SEC. 10. That this act shall be in force from and after its ratification.

        Ratified this the 6th day of March, A. D. 1909.

JAILS--HOW TO BE CONSTRUCTED.

        The Constitution, Article XI, section 6: It shall be required by competent legislation that the structure and superintendence of penal institutions of the State, the county jails and the city police prisons secure the health and comfort of the prisoners, and that male and female prisoners be never confined in the same room or cell.

        Section 1336, Chapter 24, Volume I, Revisal of 1905: Five apartments.--The common jails of the several counties shall be provided with at least five separate and suitable apartments, one for the confinement of white male criminals, one for white female criminals, one for colored male criminals, one for colored female criminals, and one for other prisoners.

        Section 3660, Chapter 81, Revisal of 1905: In improper apartments.--If the sheriff or jailer shall wantonly or unnecessarily confine those committed to his custody in any apartment other than that provided and designated by law for persons of the description of the prisoner, he shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

PAGE 206, BIENNIAL REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY-GENERAL,
1907-1908.

BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES,
Raleigh, N. C.

        Replying to your favor requesting an opinion as to the meaning of the word "apartment," in section 1336 of the Revisal, I would say


Page 216

that there is a marked distinction in the words "cell," "room" and "apartment." A cell is a very small and close place, used for the confinement of prisoners. A room is a particular portion of space reserved for the occupation of some person or object. An apartment is a larger and more comprehensive term than either of these, and may include both. I would say that an apartment is a distinct division of a building, separated from the other parts of the building.

        Under section 1336 of the Revisal of 1905, a jail should be constructed somewhat as follows: One floor should be divided into two apartments, separated by a hallway, each apartment being subdivided into cells, in the one apartment to be confined the white male prisoners and in the other the white female prisoners. The second floor should be divided into two apartments and each apartment subdivided into cells, and in one of these apartments the colored male prisoners should be confined and in the other the colored female prisoners. Now, as to the other apartment, which it says is for other prisoners, I should construe that to mean for the criminal insane persons, and it seems that this should be separate and apart from the other apartments, or it could be placed upon the third floor of the building or in an adjoining wing or an outhouse of the building. There should be a solid partition between the whites, the blacks and the criminal insane, as the intention is to not allow any communication of any kind whatever between the races. It seems to me that the fifth apartment--that is, the one for the criminal insane--should be subdivided into two apartments, in order that the races may be separated. * * *

HAYDEN CLEMENT,
Assistant Attorney-General.

COUNTY SUPERINTENDENTS OF HEALTH.

[CHAPTER 95, REVISAL OF 1905.]

        Section 4445: Duties of.--The duty of the county superintendent of health shall be to carry out, as far as possible, such work as may be directed by the sanitary committee and by the State Board of Health. He shall always promptly advise the secretary of the State Board of Health of the unusual prevalence of disease in his county, especially of typhoid fever, diphtheria, yellow fever, smallpox and cholera. He shall make the medico-legal post-mortem examinations for coroners' inquests, attend the inmates of the home for the aged and infirm and the prisoners in the jail or convict camps of his county, and make examination of lunatics for commitment. He shall be the sanitary inspector of the home and jail, including convict camps of his county, making MONTHLY REPORTS to the board of county commissioners and to the secretary of the State Board of Health.


Page 217

AN ACT PROVIDING FOR THE SEPARATION OF PRISONERS
SUFFERING WITH TUBERCULOSIS FROM OTHER PRISONERS.

[CHAPTER 567, PUBLIC LAWS 1907.]

        The General Assembly of North Carolina do enact:

        SECTION 1. That the Board of County Commissioners of the respective counties of North Carolina shall provide in the jailhouse or in any camp or place where prisoners are committed for keeping or sentenced to a term of imprisonment in any county in the State of North Carolina, separate cells or rooms or a place in which shall be confined any prisoner or prisoners who may be committed for keeping or sentenced to said prison or place of confinement for a term of imprisonment, who has been examined by the County Superintendent of Health and pronounced by the said County Superintendent of Health as being affected with tuberculosis.

        SEC. 2. That it shall be the duty of any sheriff of any county when a prisoner is placed in his custody for the purpose of being committed to jail or any place of confinement mentioned in this act, who said sheriff has been informed or has any reason to believe or suspect is suffering with tuberculosis, to have any such prisoner examined by the County Superintendent of Health, and if said prisoner shall be pronounced by said County Superintendent of Health as a tuberculous prisoner, then said prisoner shall be separated from the other prisoners and confined in a separate cell or place provided for by this act.

        SEC. 3. That it shall be the duty of the Board of Directors of the State's Prison to provide separate cells or apartments in the said State's Prison in which shall be kept any prisoner or prisoners who may be sentenced to that institution for a term of imprisonment, who after being examined and pronounced by the physician in charge as being affected with tuberculosis.

        SEC. 4. That the cells and places of confinement provided for in this act for prisoners affected with tuberculosis shall be kept exclusively for said tuberculous prisoners, and under no circumstances or condition shall any other prisoner be committed or sentenced to the institutions and places of imprisonment mentioned in this act, who is well and not affected with tuberculosis, be confined in the cells or places of confinement therein provided for tuberculous prisoners: Provided further, that when said cells or places of confinement provided for in this act, either in the county jail or camps or the State's Prison, have been used and occupied by any prisoners affected with tuberculosis, the said cells or places of confinement shall not be used for any other prisoners until the County Superintendent of Health or the physician in charge and health authorities of the State's Prison have been notified, and the said cells or places of confinement


Page 218

have been thoroughly fumigated and disinfected under the supervision of the said County Superintendent of Health or the physician in charge and the health authorities of said State's Prison, in the manner prescribed and required by the State Board of Health.

        SEC. 5. Whenever any prisoner or prisoners shall be committed to any of the prisons or places of confinement designated in this act, it shall be the duty of the sheriff of the county or the warden of the State's Prison, as the case may be, in the event any such prisoner or prisoners be known or suspected by said authorities to be suffering with tuberculosis, to have any such prisoner or prisoners examined by the County Superintendent of Health or the physician in charge within five days after they have been committed or sentenced to said prison.

        SEC. 6. That nothing contained in this act shall be so construed as to interfere with or prevent the county or State authorities from working together all prisoners on public works as now provided for by law.

        SEC. 7. That any person or persons violating any of the terms or provisions of this act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and upon conviction shall be punished in the discretion of the court.

        SEC. 8. This act shall be in force from and after August first, one thousand nine hundred and seven.

        In the General Assembly read three times, and ratified this the 4th day of March, A. D. 1907.

RULES FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF PRISONERS HAVING
CONSUMPTION.

        1. They should be confined in a special cell, or compartment, with a sunny exposure, if possible.

        2. They should have their own special drinking-cups and tableware.

        3. They should be provided with spit-cups with handles, so that they can be held near the mouth. Some antiseptic solution, or at least water, to prevent the drying of the spit before it is destroyed, should be put in the cup. The cups should be scalded out every day.

        4. They should be absolutely forbidden to spit on the floor or walls and made to use the spit-cups always.

        5. They should be supplied with the most nutritious food that circumstances will permit.

        6. They should be allowed as much fresh air as possible--day and night.

        7. They should not be required to do any work that will tire them, as fatigue is harmful.


Page 219

        8. The cell or room when vacated by a consumptive should be immediately disinfected, by washing the entire interior of an iron cell and the wood-work, in case of a room, with a 1-1000 solution of bichloride of mercury. Plastered wall should be whitewashed.

RICHARD H. LEWIS,
Secretary State Board of Health.

RULES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE CONDUCT OF PRIVATE
INSTITUTIONS FOR THE CARE AND TREATMENT OF INSANE
PERSONS, IDIOTS, FEEBLEMINDED PERSONS AND
INEBRIATES.

        No. 1 All persons desiring to open or maintain an institution for the treatment and care of insane persons, idiots, feebleminded persons or inebriates must apply for license as per form prescribed, which will be sent to them upon request by the Secretary of the Board of Public Charities, Raleigh, North Carolina.

        No. 2. License will be granted upon such application, no objection appearing, and will be issued in the form approved by the board and attached to these regulations.

        No. 3. Said license shall be good for the period therein named, but may be vacated and annulled at any time, by action in the Superior Court of Wake County, by the Board of Public Charities when it shall appear to the satisfaction of said board that the managers of said institution for insane persons, idiots, feebleminded persons or inebriates have been guilty of gross neglect or of cruelty or immorality.

        No. 4. Said license shall be exposed to public view in the office of the superintendent of said institution.

        No. 5. The superintendent of said institution for the care and treatment of insane persons, idiots, feebleminded persons or inebriates, shall file with the Board of Public Charities a copy of its by-laws, rules and regulations for its daily governance, and a statement of its rates of charges.

        No. 6. The said institution shall be open to the inspection of the Board of Public Charities or any representative thereof, which inspection shall be performed when and as often as the board may see fit.

        No. 7. The superintendent of said institution shall report to the Board of Public Charities, on the first days of January and July, respectively, of each year, in reply to inquiries duly sent from the office of the board; and said inquiries shall always include in their number the names of the officers of the institution, the number and residence of all patients in the institution, and of those admitted and discharged during the preceding six months, and such other matters as may be necessary for the full information of the inspecting or reporting representative of the board.


Page 220

        No. 8. The books of the institution shall at all times be open to the inspection of the Board of Public Charities or any member thereof.

        No. 9. The superintendent of the institution for the care and treatment of insane persons or inebriates, or its active medical officer, shall be a physician in good standing, holding license from the State Medical Board of North Carolina.

        No. 10. The female department, if any, shall be wholly separated from the male department.

        No. 11. The chief attendants in both departments shall be trained nurses.

        No. 12. In the event of a death in the institution, if no resident consulting physician has been in attendance, the coroner shall be notified to take action.

        No. 13. Such additions to these regulations will be made as experience may require.

FORM OF APPLICATION FOR LICENSE.

        To the Board of Public Charities of North Carolina:

        In compliance with chapter 1 of the Public Acts of 1899, being an act concerning private hospitals or homes for the care and treatment of the insane, inebriates, idiots and feebleminded persons, I, ........ of the town of ........, county of ........, State of North Carolina, hereby apply for a license to conduct and maintain within this State an institution for the treatment and detention of ........; and I promise to obey the law and to abide by the regulations of the Board of Public Charities. I declare and state that the proposed location of such institution is in the town of ........., county of ........., State of North Carolina.

        (Describe the institution.)

         .........................................................................

        The number of persons for whom accommodations will be provided is ........; the name of the person to be placed in charge is ........; and I also further declare that the said ........ is a physician in good standing, holding license from the Medical Board of North Carolina, and has had an experience of ........ years' medical attendance in ..................................................................................

        (Give names below of three reliable persons as reference.)

        ..........................................................................

        Dated at ........, this ........ day of ........ A. D. 19....

        Subscribed and sworn to before me, this .... day of 19...................


Page 221

LIST OF STATE INSTITUTIONS, PRIVATE HOSPITALS,
ORPHANAGES AND OTHER BENEVOLENT INSTITUTIONS.

        

STATE INSTITUTIONS.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Dangerous Insane Department Jas. R. Rogers, M. D. Raleigh.
North Carolina Soldiers' Home Capt. R. H. Brooks Raleigh.
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children John Cheatham Oxford.
Oxford Orphanage for White Children Col. W. H. Hicks Oxford.
School for the Deaf and Dumb Prof. E. McK. Goodwin Morganton.
School for the Blind and Deaf Prof. John E. Ray Raleigh.
State Hospital at Goldsboro Dr. W. W. Faison Goldsboro.
State Hospital at Morganton Dr. John McCampbell Morganton.
State Hospital at Raleigh Dr. Jas. McKee Raleigh.
State's Prison J. J. Laughinghouse Raleigh.
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School Walter Thompson Concord.
Tuberculosis Sanatorium Dr. J. E. Brooks Montrose (near Aberdeen.)

        

HOSPITALS (PRIVATE AND THOSE RECEIVING MUNICIPAL AID.)

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Asheville Mission Hospital Miss Mary P. Laxton Asheville.
Atlantic Coast Line   Rocky Mount.
Billingsley Hospital   Statesville.
Charlotte Sanatorium Miss E. E. Cherryman Charlotte.
Biggs Sanatorium Dr. Biggs Greensboro.
Central Carolina Hospital Dr. J. P. Monroe Sanford.
Cragmont Sanatorium Dr. I. J. Archer Black Mountain.
Clarence Barker Memorial Miss Mary Trise Biltmore.
Davidson Hospital   Davidson.
Dr. Long's Sanatorium Dr. Henry Long Statesville.
Goldsboro Hospital   Goldsboro.
Good Samaritan (colored) Miss Anna Robertson Charlotte.

Page 222

HOSPITALS (PRIVATE AND THOSE RECEIVING MUNICIPAL AID.)--Continued.

Highsmith Hospital Co. Dr. J. F. Highsmith Fayetteville.
James Walker Memorial Hospital Dr. Ralph B. Seem Wilmington.
Junior Order Hospital   High Point.
Leonard Medical School Hospital (colored) Shaw University Raleigh.
Lincoln Hospital (colored) Dr. C. H. Shepard Durham.
Mercy General Hospital Sister M. Dolores Charlotte.
Pickford Sanitarium (colored) Dr. L. A. Scruggs Southern Pines.
Pittman Hospital Miss M. T. Shackleford Tarboro.
Presbyterian Hospital Miss Ella H. MacNichols Charlotte.
Rex Hospital Miss Ella I. Harris Raleigh.
Rutherford Hospital Dr. Henry Norris Rutherfordton.
St. Agnes (colored) Mrs. A. B. Hunter Raleigh.
St. Leo's Hospital Sister Veronica Greensboro.
St. Luke's Hospital Dr. J. H. Marsh Fayetteville.
St. Peter's Hospital Mrs. John Wilkes Charlotte.
Salisbury Hospital   Salisbury.
Sanitarium   Kinston.
Slater Hospital (colored) A. J. Brown Winston-Salem.
S. R. Fowle Memorial Hospital Miss Julia A. Smith Washington.
Stewart Sanatorium Miss M. Covington New Bern.
Thermal Belt Sanitarium Dr. W. R. Engel Tryon.
Twin City Hospital Miss Eugenia Henderson Winston-Salem.
Watts Hospital Miss Mary Wyche Durham.
Wilson Sanitarium Miss Cleone Hobbs Wilson.
Winyah Sanatorium   Asheville.

        

LICENSED HOSPITALS FOR CARE OF INSANE AND INEBRIATES.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Broadoaks Sanatorium Dr. Isaac M. Taylor Morganton.
Dr. Carroll's Sanitarium and Highland Home Dr. Robert S. Carroll Asheville.
Dr. McKanna's Sanitarium Dr. J. J. McKanna Reidsville.
Telfair Institute Dr. W. C. Ashworth Greensboro.
Williams' Private Sanatorium Dr. B. B. Williams Greensboro.


Page 223

        

ORPHANAGES AND CHILD-CARING INSTITUTIONS.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Alexander Home Mrs. C. M. Carson Charlotte.
Allen Industrial Home and School   Asheville.
Baptist Orphanage M. L. Kesler Thomasville.
Buncombe County Children's Home J. P. Howatt, Chairman Asheville.
Charlotte Day Nursery   Charlotte.
Christian Orphanage Rev. J. L. Foster Elon College.
Colored Orphan Home of Western Carolina J. Perry Winston-Salem.
Crittenton Home Mrs. M. C. Carter Charlotte.
Elhanan Institute Miss Mattie Perry Marion.
Eliada Orphanage and Rescue Home Lucius B. Compton Asheville
Faith Cottage Lucius B. Compton Asheville.
Lindley Training School Mrs. M. E. Hilliard Asheville.
Methodist Orphanage Rev. J. N. Cole Raleigh.
Nazareth Orphans' Home Rev. J. M. L. Lyerly Crescent.
North Carolina Children's Home Society W. B. Streeter Greensboro.
Odd Fellows' Orphan Home J. F. Brinson Goldsboro.
Presbyterian Orphans' Home John Wakefield Barium Springs.
Rest Cottage Mrs. W. R. Cox Greensboro.
Roman Catholic Orphanage for Boys Father Price Raleigh.
Sacred Heart Orphanage Mother Teresa Belmont.
Southern Orphanage and Industrial Home for Colored Youth W. H. Quick Sanford.
The Thompson Orphanage and Training School Rev. Walter Smith Charlotte.

        

PERMANENT HOMES FOR THE OLD.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Catherine Kennedy Home Mrs. Roger Moore, Pres. Wilmington.
Odd Fellows' Home for Aged Odd Fellows J. F. Brinson Goldsboro.
Salem Home (for women) Mrs. M. E. Vogler Winston-Salem.
St. Luke's Home (for women) Mrs. B F. Dixon, Pres. Raleigh.


Page 224

        

ORGANIZATIONS FOR RELIEF OF THE POOR IN THEIR HOMES.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Associated Charities Miss A. I. Slaughter Asheville.
Associated Charities Mrs. R. D. Blacknall Durham.
Associated Charities   Charlotte.
Associated Charities W. E. Bowers High Point.
Associated Charities Rev. R. S. Stephenson Raleigh.
Associated Charities Miss Carrie L. Price Wilmington.
Associated Charities Miss Annie Grogan Winston-Salem.
Associated Charities   Salisbury.
Ladies' Benevolent Society Mrs. Weil, President Goldsboro.



Page 225

INDEX.

  • Appropriations, Biennial Term, 1909-1910 11
  • Appropriations, Biennial Term, 1907-1908 10
  • Associated Charities 25, 70
    • Associated Charities (Asheville) 71
    • Associated Charities (Durham) 72
    • Associated Charities (Raleigh) 70
    • Associated Charities (Wilmington) 72
    • Associated Charities (Winston-Salem) 71
  • Compulsory education (blind, deaf and dumb) 17, 34, 35
  • County Convict Camps 21
    • Reports of Visitors 137
    • Statistics of 190
  • County Superintendents of Health, sanitary inspectors of county institutions 216
  • Epileptics, statistics of 205
    • Law for care of white epileptics at the Raleigh Hospital 211
    • Epileptic village, need of 15
  • General work of the office 26
  • Home, North Carolina Soldiers' (Raleigh) 18
    • Report of 40
  • Homes, the County (for aged and infirm), condition of 23, 50
    • Expense of 165
    • Reports of (alphabetically), for 1908 86
    • Statistics 150
  • Homes (private, for aged women):
    • Catherine Kennedy Home (Wilmington) 69
    • St. Luke's Home (Raleigh) 70
    • The Salem Home (Winston-Salem) 69
  • Home for Aged Odd Fellows (Goldsboro) 70
  • Hospitals, the State, for Insane (Morganton) 70
    • Report of, for 1908 28
    • Statistics 28
  • Raleigh Hospital, report of, for 1908 29
    • Statistics 29
  • Goldsboro Hospital (for colored insane), report of 31
    • Statistics 31
  • Dangerous Insane, State's Prison, Raleigh 14
    • Report of, for 1908 32
    • Statistics 32

    Page 226

  • Hospitals, Private, licensed by the Board of Public Charities 24
    • Broadoaks Sanatorium (Morganton) 43
    • Highland Home (Dr. Carroll's Sanitarium, Asheville) 45
    • McKanna Three-day Liquor Cure (Reidsville) 49
    • Perfected Liquor Cure (Greensboro), discontinued 47
    • Telfair Sanitarium (Greensboro) 47
    • Williams' Private Sanatorium (Greensboro) 48
    • Form of application for license 220
    • Rules and regulations for the conduct of private licensed institutions 219
  • Hospitals, Municipal, Church, etc 5
    • List of 74, 221
    • Asheville Mission (Asheville) 75
    • Charlotte Sanatorium (Charlotte) 79
    • Cragmont Sanatorium (Black Mountain) 79
    • Clarence Barker Memorial (Bilmore) 81
    • Dr. Long's Sanitarium (Statesville) 79
    • James Walker Memorial (Wilmington) 78
    • Mercy General Hospital (Charlotte) 82
    • Pittman Memorial (Tarboro) 77
    • Presbyterian Hospital (Charlotte) 76
    • Rex Hospital (Raleigh) 76
    • Rutherford (Rutherfordton) 80
    • S. R. Fowle Memorial (Washington) 76
    • St. Leo's (Greensboro) 77
    • St. Luke's (Fayetteville) 79
    • Twin-City (Winston-Salem) 78
    • The Thermal Belt Sanitarium (Tryon) 81
    • Watts (Durham) 75
    • Wilson Sanitarium (Wilson) 80
  • Hospitals Exclusively for the Colored:
    • Good Samaritan (Charlotte) 84
    • Leonard Medical School, Shaw University (Raleigh) 83
    • Pickford Sanitarium (Southern Pines) 84
    • Slater (Winston-Salem) 83
    • St. Agnes (Raleigh) 85
  • Insane 12
    • Need of study of causes of insanity 7
    • Hydrotherapeutic treatment of 7
    • In County Homes and jails 14, 205
    • Statistics 202, 205
  • Inspections and meetings 25
  • Jails, county, law for construction of 215
    • Opinion of Assistant Attorney-General in regard to 215

    Page 227

  • Jails, county, condition of 50
    • Counties needing new jails 23
    • Reports of (alphabetically), for 1908 114
    • Statistics 166
  • Laws of 1907--Separation of tuberculous prisoners from others 217
  • Laws of 1909--Relating to Board of Public Charities 211
    • Requiring separation of black and white prisoners, 212
    • Prescribing mode of capital punishment 213
    • White epileptics to be received at the Raleigh Hospital 211
  • Legislation, Session of 1909, relating to Charities and Corrections, 206
    • To health 207
    • Protection of life 208
  • Letter of transmittal 3
  • List of State charitable and penal institutions and private charities 221
  • List of Superintendents and location of institutions 221
  • Members of the Board of Public Charities 2
  • National Conference of Charities and Corrections, meeting of 26
  • North Carolina School for the Blind and Deaf (Raleigh) 17
    • Ophthalmia Neonatorum, prevention of 6
    • Report for 1908 35
    • Statistics 35
  • North Carolina School for the Deaf and Dumb (Morganton) 17
    • Report for 1908 33
    • Statistics 33
  • Orphanages and Child-caring Institutions 16
    • List of 58
    • Alexander Home (Charlotte) 65
    • Baptist Orphanage (Thomasville) 59
    • Buncombe County Children's Home (Asheville) 64
    • Christian Orphanage (Elon College) 62
    • Colored Orphan Home (Winston-Salem) 69
    • Methodist Orphanage (Raleigh) 61
    • Nazareth Orphans' Home (Crescent) 65
    • North Carolina Children's Home Society (Greensboro) 64
    • Odd Fellows' Orphan Home (Goldsboro) 63
    • Orphan Home and School (Dewdrop), removed to Georgia 68
    • Oxford Orphanage for White Children (Oxford) 19, 37
    • Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children (Oxford) 19, 39
    • Presbyterian Orphans' Home (Barium Springs, Iredell County) 60
    • Roman Catholic Orphanage for Boys (Nazareth, near Raleigh) 62
    • Sacred Heart Orphanage for Girls (Belmont) 61
      Page 228

    • Southern Orphanage and Industrial Training School for Colored Youth (Sanford) 68
    • Thompson Orphanage and Training School (Charlotte) 60
  • Orphanages and Rescue Homes:
    • Crittenton Home (Charlotte) 67
    • Faith Cottage and Elida Orphanage (Asheville) 67, 68
    • Lindley Training School (Asheville) 66
    • Rest Cottage (Greensboro) 66
  • Per capita cost in State institutions, 1908 9, 12
  • Population of State institutions, how distributed 9
  • Preventive measures 5, 6, 7, 8
  • State Hospital Commission 13, 28, 30, 31
  • State's Prison 19
    • Report of, for 1908 42
    • Statistics 42
  • State Tuberculosis Sanatorium 18, 41
  • Stonewall Jackson Training School 18, 41
  • Rules for the care of tuberculous prisoners 218
  • Visit of Secretary of the Board to institutions of other States 27
  • Visitors of Charities in the counties, list of 52
  • Visitors of Charities in the counties, referred to 27