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Annual Report of the Board of Public Charities of North Carolina, 1910:
Electronic Edition.

North Carolina Board of Public Charities


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Source Description:
(title page) Annual Report of the Board of Public Charities of North Carolina, 1910
(caption) Report of the Board of Public Charities for the Year 1910
North Carolina Board of Public Charities
181 p.
Raleigh, N.C.
Edwards & Broughton Printing Company, State Printers
[1911?]

Call number NCC C360 N87p 1910 c.2 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)



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Illustration

[Title Page Image]


ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES
OF
NORTH CAROLINA
1910

EDWARDS & BROUGHTON
PRINTING COMPANY
STATE PRINTERS


Page 2

Members of the Board

        OFFICE IN THE CAPITOL.


Page 3

Letter of Transmittal

RALEIGH, N. C., December 28, 1910.

HON. W. W. KITCHIN,
Governor of North Carolina.

        SIR:--We have the honor to present herewith the Annual Report of this Board for the year ending December 31, 1910.

        A careful perusal of the information contained herein will, we believe, show the deficiencies as well as the excellences of the charitable and penal institutions and their comparative cost; and we bespeak a careful investigation of the matters contained in the report and your interest and aid in developing the institutions according to the highest and best ideals.

Most respectfully,

W. A. BLAIR,
Chairman,

CAREY J. HUNTER,
Vice-Chairman,

A. C. MCALISTER,

HENRY C. DOCKERY,

JOSEPH G. BROWN,

Commissioners of the Board of Public Charities of North
Carolina.


Page 5

REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF PUBLIC CHARITIES
FOR THE YEAR 1910.

THE CAPITOL,
RALEIGH, N. C., December 27, 1910.

MR. W. A. BLAIR, Chairman, and MESSRS. CAREY J. HUNTER, A. C. MCALISTER, HENRY C. DOCKERY AND JOSEPH G. BROWN, Commissioners.

        GENTLEMEN:--I have the honor to present the following report of the condition and management of the charitable and penal institutions of the State for the year 1910.

        The voluntary reports of the eleemosynary institutions supported by county and municipal aid and by private charity are also included for the general information of our citizens.

        The law requires of the Board an annual report to the Governor and a biennial to the General Assembly. For convenience and for dispatch in getting the report quickly to the public and in printed form, it has been published in two parts, one for 1909 and one for 1910, but they should be considered together as the two constitute the biennial report to the Legislature.

        The needs of the several State institutions and of improved general policies for county institutions are fully discussed in part first and are followed by these recommendations which we repeat here, desiring to emphasize them, and to ask their earnest consideration by the lawmakers.

RECAPITULATION OF RECOMMENDATIONS AND SUGGESTIONS.

        1. A building for the observation and treatment of acute and recent cases at the Morganton Hospital, cost $50,000.

        2. Additional room for patients at the Goldsboro Hospital. Better fire protection, renewed flooring in some of the wards, and an officers' dining room. (Since the above was recommended the Goldsboro Hospital has built the dining room from proceeds of surplus farm products.)


Page 6

        3. The establishment of an epileptic village with buildings for the feeble-minded and idiots, entirely separate from any existing institution.

        4. A special appropriation not exceeding $500 per annum for the services of a specialist to examine the throat, ears, eyes and nose of newly admitted pupils at the School for the Deaf, Morganton.

        5. New and permanent sleeping quarters and dining room at the Tillery Farm. Better arrangements for fire protection, bathing facilities and sewerage. (Improvements have been made during 1910 in sleeping quarters, bathing facilities and sewerage.)

        6. Place the county convict camps under a State Board of Supervisors.

        7. Liberal support to the Tuberculosis Sanatorium, Soldiers' Home and Stonewall Jackson Training School.

        8. Appropriation and Directors on the part of the State for the Colored Reform School, chartered by the Assembly of 1909.

        9. Cultivation of more acreage at the County Homes and more land for these Homes deficient in this respect.

        10. Temporary aid only to the county poor in their own homes (outdoor relief) as far as possible, to prevent pauperization, and to spend this money now used for outdoor relief to adequately equip the County Homes.

        11. That the Board of Public Charities be authorized to employ an inspector to visit the several county charitable and penal institutions and make detailed reports.

        12. That the laws in regard to voluntary commitment of patients and those relating to private licensed hospitals be amended.

        13. A law looking toward the prevention of blindness from ophthalmia neonatorum (in co-operation with the State Board of Health and the Superintendent of the School for the Blind).

        14. That institutions hereafter established for the care of helpless children be not chartered or allowed to receive children except upon certificate from the Board of Public Charities after a thorough investigation as to means of support and reliability of the person or persons desiring to establish such institution.


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        15. State Camp for all tuberculous prisoners (From State's Prison, camps and jails).

        16. Change the end of the fiscal year from November 30 to an earlier date. (To give sufficient time for preparation and printing of biennial reports for the Assembly.)

        17. A suggestion for private philanthropy; the establishment of a ward or of a hospital for the treatment of crippled and congenitally deformed and diseased children such as are now successfully treated in the orthopædic hospitals.

INSANE, EPILEPTIC AND FEEBLE-MINDED.

        Special attention is again called to the need of more room for epileptics (most decidedly a separate institution for them). To the want of room for women at the Raleigh Hospital and the pressing need of more room at the Goldsboro Hospital.

        There is no provision for idiots no matter how dangerous they may be and notwithstanding the declared policy of the State in the law for care "of all mental defectives." A number of letters have come to this office asking for some place to properly care for the idiots and feeble-minded. Most especially should the feeble-minded women be provided for, and guarded against the unmentionable horrors which some have undergone, entailing money loss to the counties and suffering and weakness to their unfortunate progeny who can not hope to be anything but feeble-minded and dependent upon the counties for support.

PROPER EQUIPMENT FOR INSTITUTIONS.

        Our Hospitals and some of the other institutions fail in their highest usefulness for the want of the necessary equipment and expert help. There should be receiving buildings at the hospitals for the new and acute cases where patients could have the advantage of close study and the latest medical knowledge be made available through special pathological examinations, laboratory work, baths, etc.

        The physical condition of our hospitals is fine, the foundations are excellent for good results and the small added expenditure of this special medical and research work is the capstone


Page 8

to the institution. It means more cures and quick cures and a money saving expenditure. To properly equip the institutions for the medical care of the patients is the greatest present need. This should be done at all the hospitals, but the special recommendation has been made and is most earnestly repeated that $50,000 be appropriated for the Hospital at Morganton for such a building. The Morganton Hospital has a capacity of 1,250 beds and yet this need for special medical treatment can only be partially met and in scattered wards.

INCREASED MAINTENANCE FOR INSTITUTIONS.

        It is "penny wise and pound foolish" to have expensive buildings closed for want of furniture and equipment, and beds empty for want of support fund when the afflicted are clamoring for admission and the room has already been made for them.

        The annual support fund for the charitable institutions last year was $545,000 (not including the $5,000 for support of the Dangerous Insane Department which is maintained by the State's Prison). This year the amount asked for by the officials in charge to fill the rooms now available is $685,750, an increase of $140,750 per annum for maintenance.

        The normal capacity of all the charitable institutions is 4,812; if we take from this number the available beds at the two orphanages (525) and the Dangerous Insane Department (70) we have left for the other institutions 4,197. Taking out the $15,000, the annual amount given the two orphanages, there will be needed for the other institutions the sum of $670,750 for maintenance. This gives an average per capita of only $159.81, which is low compared with many States. To get the utmost good of the enormous sums invested in these plants we should certainly supply adequate support to fill them and also the necessary equipment to quickly cure or improve so the inmates may return to their homes and cease to be a burden to the taxpayer. (Tables follow giving the amounts asked for by each institution.) There is indebtedness to the amount of $21,744.05 which would have to be added to the above amount. The needs for special appropriations are given in the reports of the Superintendents which follow this summary.


Page 9

MEETING OF THE AMERICAN PRISON ASSOCIATION AND THE INTERNATIONAL
PRISON CONGRESS AT WASHINGTON, D. C., OCTOBER
2 TO 8.

        The Secretary was appointed a delegate by Governor W. W. Kitchin to the Prison Association meeting and she attended the deliberations of that most notable body. The two societies met at the same time and place. The International meets once in five years and this was its first session in America. The next will be held in London by invitation of that world power. Thirty-nine countries were represented, delegates having come from China, Japan, Africa and far distant lands.

        The Congress was divided into committees who met each morning and discussed a series of prepared questions, the consensus of opinions being crystallized into resolutions which were submitted to the General Assembly each afternoon and finally adopted as the opinions of the Congress. French and English were the official languages and everything was translated from one to the other. The following subjects were discussed, "Juvenile Offenders," "Idle and Vagabond Children," "Children Born out of Wedlock," "Probation," "Release on Parole," "The Indeterminate Sentence," "The Criminal Abroad," "Complicity in Crime."

        (The conclusions of the Congress will be found as an appendix to this report.)

        It must be remembered that the conclusions are the unanimous opinions of the representatives of thirty-nine countries of varying codes and civilizations. We would call attention to the conclusion on

RELEASE ON PAROLE.

        "Accepting the principle of conditional liberation on parole as an indispensable aid to the reformation of the prisoner, the Congress approves of the following resolutions:

        1. Conditional release should be given not by favor, but in accordance with definite rules. Prisoners of all classes, including workhouse prisoners, should be eligible for conditional release after serving for a definite minimum period.

        2. Conditional liberation should be given on the recommendation of a properly constituted board, but reserving always the control of government. This board should have the power of recalling the prisoner in case of unsatisfactory conduct.


Page 10

        3. The duty of caring for conditionally liberated prisoners should be undertaken by State agents, specially approved associations, or individuals who will undertake to befriend and supervise them and to report on their conduct for a sufficiently long period.

        4. Where the ordinary rules for parole are not applicable to life prisoners, their cases should be dealt with by the supreme government as a matter of clemency."


        We have the conditional release law, but the burden of its execution falls upon the Governor of the State. He should be relieved of this by appointing the prison board of directors to serve also as a parole board and every prisoner except life prisoners, should have the benefit of the release after serving the minimum sentence and showing by good conduct and otherwise their readiness to be so trusted. Of course, the pardoning power of the Governor would still remain and he would be the final arbiter in all cases. This would give every prisoner an even chance for liberty, when he had shown himself capable of becoming a useful citizen. But there should certainly be a State agent or special official to see that the paroled men keep their parole and that the public be protected by summarily remanding them to prison when parole is violated.

COUNTY HOMES.

(Commissioners' Reports.)

        The following seven counties do not maintain Homes for the Aged and Infirm but give outdoor relief: Carteret, Clay, Currituck, Graham, Lee, Mitchell, and Onslow.

        Fifty-four counties give as present at time of report: Whites, 453; colored, 254; color not given, 33; total, 740. Twelve additional counties from the Visitors' reports give in sixty-six county homes, 932. Of these, insane, 59; epileptic, 66; feebleminded, 225; total mental defectives, 350. Confined, 28.

        Died during the year, 204.

        Childen in charge, 31; most of these infants.

        As there are ninety-eight counties and ninety-one maintaining Homes, this leaves one-fourth not reporting the number cared for and only two-thirds have reported the cost of county poor.


Page 11

        Cared for in the County Homes (Commissioners' reports only), 740, at a cost of $60,002.30. Outdoor relief to 2,356 persons at a cost of $52,652.19; grand total, $112,654.49.

        The farms add materially to the support of the Homes and are not included in the reports.

        New sites purchased in Ashe and Haywood. Jones is building. Caswell, Granville, New Hanover and Vance have been improved. Lincoln, Madison and Tyrrell have erected new buildings.

        The Homes are inferior in Davie, Cabarrus, Iredell, Transylvania, Wilson, Yadkin, Yancey.

        Attention is called to part first of this report in regard to the growing amount of outdoor relief at the expense of properly and adequately equipped Homes.

COUNTY PRISONS.

(Commissioners' Reports.)

        Commissioners have reported sixty-two jails. Present at time of report: White men, 75; colored men, 194; white women, 9; colored women, 28; total, 306. Sixteen additional counties taken from Visitors' reports, making seventy-eight counties, increase the above sum to 107 white men; 261 colored men; grand total, 368. Insane confined, 12.

        Prisoners died during the year, 6. Boys under sixteen, 16.

        Generally speaking, the prisons are not kept in as cleanly a condition as they should be. The bedding and cells more particularly should be especially cleansed whenever not occupied and ready for the next comer. The great difficulty is the fact that prisoners wear their own old clothing into the jail and thus introduce dirt and vermin which require a continual fight from those in charge. A limited number of suits could be provided by the county and the men required to bathe and put these on while their own are fumigated. There is no excuse for the filth in some of our jails. Cleveland, Gaston and New Hanover jails are too small. Anson, Burke, Cabarrus, Clay and Mecklenburg are inferior buildings. Dare, Iredell and Perquimans are new. Rockingham and Richmond are building. Those of Pitt and Camden were burned during the year, but plans are under way for new jails.


Page 12

COUNTY CAMPS.

        There are forty counties which maintain camps, some of these more than one. Twenty-one Commissioners' reports have been received and four are added from the Visitors' reports, making twenty-five camps, reporting as follows: White men, 100; colored men, 738; colored women, 2; total, 840. Ten boys under sixteen. Died during the year, 10. Several of these were shot or accidentally killed.

        (Recommendations for camps will be found in part first, report of 1909. Later figures give total No. 1383. See page 39.)

MEETINGS AND INSPECTIONS.

        The four regular meetings of the Board have been held, three in Raleigh and one at Greensboro. The one at Greensboro was held at the same time as the annual meeting of the State Anti-Tuberculosis Society so the members might participate in the deliberations of that body. Tuberculosis is a house disease and the problem of the care of cases and the prevention of infection of the well arises in all institutions. Careful examination for this disease should be made of all inmates in the institutions and those afflicted segregated.

        Inspections have been made during 1910 of the Hospital and Epileptic Colony at Raleigh, Dangerous Insane Department and Penitentiary, School for the Blind and the Department for Colored Blind and Deaf, Soldiers' Home, Stonewall Jackson Training School, Sanatorium for Treatment of Tuberculosis, the Tarheel and Elkin Railroad Camps, Williams' Private Sanatorium, and Telfair Institute. All the institutions except the Goldsboro Hospital and the two orphanages at Oxford have been visited during the biennium. All licensed hospitals except Dr. McKanna's. The jails of Cabarrus, Guilford and Mecklenburg, the Guilford Workhouse for Women and Boys, and the County Homes of Guilford and Wake. Also Watts' Hospital has been visited by one of the Commissioners.

GENERAL WORK OF THE OFFICE.

        The details of the work can be found in the monthly reports to the Chairman and the quarterly reports to the Board which are on file in the office. The work includes sending out


Page 13

blanks, preparation of inquiries, statistics and reports, and correspondence with most of the States as well as our own citizens.

        We have many requests for reports, statistics and copies of laws.

        Many special cases arise during the year which must be met, but the details take too much space to be enumerated here.

BOARDS OF VISITORS.

        To the Boards of County Visitors we extend our thanks and appreciation of their self-sacrificing helpfulness in their care of the county institutions.

A WORD OF ACKNOWLEDGMENT.

        Thanks are due the Governor and State officials for their aid. To the superintendents of the institutions for their cordial attitude towards the Board.

        With personal thanks of the Secretary to the Commissioners for their unvarying courtesy and kindness.

Respectfully,

DAISY DENSON,
Secretary.

Adopted by the Board December 27, 1910.

CAREY J. HUNTER,
Chairman Pro tem.


Population of the Institutions for 1910.

        The population of the institutions was distributed during the year ending November 30, 1910, as follows:

        
  Total number cared for.
Hospital at Morganton 1,500
Hospital at Raleigh 1,009
Hospital at Goldsboro 916
Dangerous Insane Department 66
Epileptic Colony (State Hospital at Raleigh) 159
School for the White Blind 215
School for the Colored Blind and Deaf 213
School for the White Deaf 282
Soldiers' Home 167
Oxford Orphanage for White Children 376
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children 205
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School 60
North Carolina Tuberculosis Sanatorium 85
Total 5,253


Page 14

        Insane in Hospitals, 3,381; epileptics in Hospitals, 110; in colony, 159--total, 269.

        
Insane and epileptics in charge during the year 3,650
Present November 30, 1910, insane and epileptics 2,847

        Present in the institutions November 30, 1910:

        
Hospital at Morganton 1,224
Hospital at Raleigh 694
Hospital at Goldsboro 729
Dangerous Insane Department 52
School for White Blind 189
School for Colored Blind and Deaf 174
School for the White Deaf 247
Soldiers' Home 125
Oxford Orphanage for White Children 314
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children 201
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School 53
North Carolina Tuberculosis Sanatorium 30
Epileptic Colony (State Hospital at Raleigh) 148
Total 4,180

        Per capita cost per annum for maintenance during the year 1910:

        
State Hospital at Morganton $160.37
State Hospital at Raleigh 176.46
State Hospital at Goldsboro 117.37
Dangerous Insane Department (under same management as Prison) 100.00
Epileptic Colony (State Hospital at Raleigh) 190.03
School for the White Blind 198.01
School for the Colored Blind and Deaf 198.01
School for the White Deaf 200.00
North Carolina Soldiers' Home 136.00
Oxford Orphanage for White Children (not including earnings and contributions in kind) 80.00
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children 72.00
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School 150.00
North Carolina Tuberculosis Sanatorium, for year, $636.00; stay of patients averages two months, each therefore costs 106.00

        Present normal capacity of institutions:

        
Hospital at Morganton 1,250
Hospital at Raleigh 1,050
Epileptic Colony 192


Page 15

Hospital at Goldsboro 735
Dangerous Insane Department 70
School for the Deaf 300
School for the White Blind 200
School for the Colored Blind and Deaf 200
Soldiers' Home, about 150
Oxford Orphanage for White Children 325
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children 200
Stonewall Jackson Training School 60
Tuberculosis Sanatorium 60
Total 4,812

        Maintenance for the biennial period 1911-1912:

        
  Annual amount asked for for support.
Hospital at Morganton $200,000.00
Hospital at Raleigh and Epileptic Colony 183,750.00
Hospital at Goldsboro 87,000.00
Dangerous Insane Department 6,000.00
School for Deaf and Dumb 60,000.00
School for the Blind and the Colored Department 80,000.00
Soldiers' Home 30,000.00
Oxford Orphanage for White Children 10,000.00
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children 5,000.00
Stonewall Jackson Training School 15,000.00
Tuberculosis Sanatorium 15,000.00
Total $691,750.00

INDEBTEDNESS OF INSTITUTIONS.

Hospital at Raleigh $7,266.61
Epileptic Colony 2,750.80
School for the Deaf and Dumb 36.05
School for the Blind 5,690.59
Soldiers' Home 6,000.00
Total $21,744.05



Page 16

State Institutions.

STATE HOSPITAL AT MORGANTON.

JOHN MCCAMPBELL, M.D., Superintendent.

(Inspected by the Board of Public Charities, July 7, 1909, and found in excellent condition.)

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 1,250. Men. Women. Total.
Number of inmates at the beginning of the fiscal year 449 727 1,176
Number received during the year 167 157 324
Whole number in charge during the year 616 884 1,500
Number at the end of the fiscal year 502 722 1,224
Died 38 36 74
Daily average attendance 442 672 1,114
Discharged recovered 39 51 90
Discharged improved 14 19 33
Discharged not improved 1 7 8

        

        Per capita cost, $160.37. Estimated net value of farm and dairy products, $29,014.39. There is no outstanding indebtedness. Thirty pay or part-pay patients. We have sufficient room for the immediate future if idiots and extreme senile cases are rejected. Our most urgent need is a receiving department properly equipped with modern appliances for the treatment of mental diseases. 90 to 95 per cent are chronic cases. Twenty-five have been refused admission; they were idiots, epileptics, not citizens, criminal, and others were senile cases. No room at the Epileptic Colony, and the epileptics in the Hospital have not been transferred. There are 37 patients from the Eastern District. Percentage of mortality upon the whole number in charge was 4.9 per cent. Cures upon admissions, 27.7 per cent. No case of suicide. General health has been very good. Four cases of pellagra, sick when admitted. One ward is set apart for sick patients. There is an operating


Page 17

room. Original work is done. A complete physical and mental examination is made upon admission, and special examination for tuberculosis. Four cases of tuberculosis. They are kept separate from others where practicable. Seven to eight hundred are employed. We have special crafts taught the women. A few books have been added to the library, and a small sum could be well expended for this purpose. There are 41 male and 52 female attendants. Attendants are selected for general fitness, certain educational requirements, and recommendations. We can not get an altogether desirable class for the wages now paid.

JOHN MCCAMPBELL, M.D.,
Superintendent.

STATE HOSPITAL AT RALEIGH.

(Inspected by the Board of Public Charities, July 6, 1910, and found in excellent condition.)

JAMES MCKEE, M.D., Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 1,050. Men. Women. Total.
Remaining October 31, 1909 335 342 677
Admitted during the fiscal year ending November 30, 1910 147 199 346
Total under treatment during the year ... ... 1,009
Discharged recovered 130 109 239
Discharged improved 1 1 2
Discharged unimproved 3 2 5
Discharged not insane 9 3 12
Died 23 26 49
Total removed 170 145 315
Remaining November 30, 1910 310 384 694
Daily average attendance during the year ... ... 818
Average number of officers and employees ... ... 154

        

    EXPENDITURES.

  • Current expenses:
  • 1. Salaries and wages. . . . . $42,536.43
  • 2. Clothing. . . . . 9,748.17
  • 3. Subsistence. . . . . 70,602.42
  • 4. Ordinary repairs. . . . . .8,336.03
  • 5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses. . . . . 9,537.25
  • Total. . . . .$140,760.30
  • Extraordinary expenses:
  • 1. New buildings, land, etc. . . . .10,913.70
  • Grand total. . . . .$151,674.00


Page 18

        Percentage of mortality upon the whole number treated, 4+. Cures upon admissions, 69 per cent. Patients from the Western District, 26. Pay and part-pay patients, 22. Amount received from patients for the year, $6,896.13. Ninety per cent of the cases are chronic. Sixty applications have been refused for following causes: old age, idiots, imbeciles, paralytics, drug and inebriates, not insane, and for want of room in the female wards. The epileptics in the Hospital have not been transferred to the Colony. There are 14 men and 7 women. There was no room for them in the Colony. There have been three cases of suicide--one man and two women. Coroner was called at once and necessary permit given. Some of the new buildings have not yet been occupied. The wards for tuberculous patients have not been occupied because window guards must be supplied. General health of the patients is good. We have no infirmary for sick patients to amount to anything; no operating room. Tubercular wards for both sexes. No original research work done, and only the physical examination made. No special or rigid examination for tuberculosis. We have five women with the disease. Sixty cases of pellagra. There are 350 patients working in the garden, laundry, sewing, knitting, and helping to keep the wards in order. No books added this year. No special arts or crafts taught the women. Twenty-one escapes. There are 31 male and 25 female attendants. These are selected by letter of testimonial of good moral character. Attendants do have opportunities for treating patients roughly without the knowledge of the superintendent. We have not sufficient room for the women.

        Receipts, $115,000.00. Disbursements, $140,760.30. Outstanding indebtedness, $7,266.61. Per capita cost, $176.46. Estimated net value of farm and dairy, $29,280.77. We will need for support for each year of the next biennial period, 1911-1912, $183,750.00.

JAMES MCKEE, M.D.,
Superintendent.

EPILEPTIC COLONY (STATE HOSPITAL, RALEIGH).

(Inspected by the Board of Public Charities, July 6, 1910, and found in excellent condition.)

CHARLES L. JENKINS, M.D., Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 192. Men. Women. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of inmates received during the year 82 43 17 17 159
Discharged improved .. 1 .. .. 1
Discharged not improved 3 .. .. .. 3
Discharged as cured .. .. .. .. ..
Died 2 4 .. .. 6
Remaining November 30 1910 76 38 17 17 148


Page 19

        The first patient was admitted to the Colony on December 29, 1909, from Wilkes County. The buildings were not completed at that time. No epileptics have been transferred from the two Hospitals as yet. General health of the patients has been good; mental condition has been bad. Fifty have been refused admission, as follows: paralytics, old age, not epileptic. Some refused to come. On file, 126 applications. We have some applications on file because the counties have more than their proportional quota and we are holding these back to give other counties an opportunity, as the number of rooms is limited. Eight attendants. Five employees. No special medical research work or investigation of phases of epilepsy. Chiefly custodial. The patients work on the farm, and the women sew and knit. Walking and games for recreation. Adequate heat, light and water supply. Sufficient fire protection. Insurance. Receipts have been $17,234.80. Disbursements, $19,995.60. Outstanding indebtedness, $2,750.80. Per capita cost, $196.035. No religious services. Chapel, amusement hall and laboratory are the special needs. It would be better to place the children in separate cottages. No serious accident or epidemic.

CHARLES L. JENKINS,
Superintendent in Charge.

STATE HOSPITAL AT GOLDSBORO.

W. W. FAISON, M.D., Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 735. Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients at the beginning of the fiscal year 270 410 680
Admitted during the year 103 133 236
Total number discharged or died 90 99 189
Discharged as recovered 25 50 75
Discharged as improved 10 14 24
Discharged as not improved 2 ... 2
Discharged as not insane 2 ... 2
Died 50 35 85
Total under treatment 373 543 916
Daily average attendance ... ... 715
Daily average number of officers and employees ... ... 97
Number remaining November 30, 1910 285 444 729

        

    EXPENDITURES.

  • Current expenses:
  • 1. Salaries and wages. . . . . $22,616.40
  • 2. Clothing. . . . . 5,561.35
  • 3. Subsistence. . . . .23,637.34
  • 4. Ordinary repairs. . . . . 2,914.00
  • 5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses. . . . .25,269.69
  • Total. . . . . $79,998.78


Page 20

        Extraordinary expenses:

        

  • 1. New buildings, land, etc. . . . .$1,916.01
  • 2. Permanent improvements to existing buildings. . . . .167.37
  • Total. . . . .2,083.38
  • Grand total. . . . . $82,082.16

        Receipts, $80,000.00; disbursements, $79,998.78. No indebtedness. Per capita cost, $117.37.

        The extraordinary expenses were paid with proceeds of cotton raised on the farm. This includes a building to be used for dining room, sewing room and steward's office.

        Percentage of mortality upon whole number treated was 9.52. Percentage of cures upon admissions, 31.77. No pay patients. Ninety-three per cent are chronic cases. Thirty-five have been refused for want of room. Applications on file, 81. There are 52 epileptics and some idiots and feeble-minded. No epidemic or serious accident. No case of suicide. General health of the patients is fairly good. There are wards set apart for the sick, and there is an operating room. No original research work done. A general examination upon admission, but no special examination for tuberculosis. There are 29 cases of tuberculosis, some of them arrested cases. They are separated from others by day as well as in their sleeping quarters. Nearly half of the patients are employed. They work on the farm, cut wood, in the laundry, kitchen, sewing room, and ward work. Ten cases of pellagra. Though not well marked, two-thirds of the cases had it upon admission. Several escapes, though all have been returned except two. Male attendants, 24; female attendants, 32. These are chosen from applicants. It is difficult to get desirable attendants. There are opportunities for attendants to ill-treat patients, because they are in charge of the attendants; but if patients are cruelly treated it is generally found out.

        We will need $87,000.00 per annum for maintenance during the coming biennium. We need additional room for both the insane and the epileptic insane, fire escapes, renewed flooring in some of the old buildings, and additional heating coils for two buildings not sufficiently heated.

W. W. FAISON, M.D.,
Superintendent.

DANGEROUS INSANE DEPARTMENT.

(Inspected in March, 1910, and found in satisfactory condition.)

DR. THOMAS M. JORDAN, Medical Director.

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 70. Men. Women. Total.
Inmates at the beginning of the fiscal year 40 10 50
Received during the year 14 2 16

Page 21

  Men. Women. Total.
Number discharged as cured ... ... 8
Died ... ... 3
Number at the end of the fiscal year 41 11 52
Daily average attendance ... ... 50
Average number of officers and employees ... ... 4

        Percentage of mortality, 5; of cures, 10. Daily employed, 6. Two escaped, but one has been recaptured. No tuberculosis. General health good. No epidemic or serious accident. The expenses of the department are defrayed by the State's Prison. Disbursements have been $5,719.98. Per capita cost, $100.00. Few are capable of attending religious services. Recreation is outdoor exercise in the prison yard. Care is mainly custodial. Necessary for support per annum for the next two years, $6,000.

J. J. LAUGHINGHOUSE,
Superintendent.

NORTH CAROLINA SANATORIUM FOR THE TREATMENT OF
TUBERCULOSIS.

(Inspected by the Secretary on December 12, 1910, and found in excellent condition.)

JAMES E. BROOKS, M.D., Superintendent.

W. R. ENGEL, M.D., Assistant Physician.

        The Sanatorium is most beautifully situated eight miles from Aberdeen, on the Aberdeen and Rockfish Railroad. Thirteen hundred acres of high, sandy land and also fertile acres for the farm, about fifty acres being in cultivation. Two deep wells, 210 and 214 feet, give good supply of fine water. Sewerage and electricity. Open fires.

        

    POPULATION.

  • Normal capacity, 60.
  • Number admitted during the year. . . . .85
  • Discharged as cured and improved, per cent . . . . .79.5
  • Died . . . . .3
  • Remaining November 30, 1910. . . . . 30

        There are two nurses and one attendant. Patients are charged one dollar per day, which is half of the expense of care. No charity patients taken. Some applications have been refused because of poverty and of the advanced stage of the disease.

        Six buildings have been completed, and the dining room and kitchen building is now in course of construction. These buildings are all frame and inexpensive, and exit is easily made in case of fire, but no special arrangement for checking fire except the distance between the cottages.

        Receipts from patients have been $5,314.10, and this has been expended. No outstanding indebtedness. The per capita cost of maintaining


Page 22

a patient for a year is $636.00, but it must be borne in mind that the average stay of a patient is 56 days, and therefore this yearly per capita serves for the training in self-care of six persons. We will need $15,000 per annum for support and $10,000 per annum for the development of the institution for the next two years.

JAMES E. BROOKS,
Superintendent.

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF AND DUMB.

PROF. E. McK. GOODWIN, Principal.

(Inspected by the Board July, 1909, and found in excellent condition.)

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 300. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number on the roll November 30, 1909 136 115 251
Admitted during the year ... ... 36
Whole number on the roll ... ... 282
Discharged or left voluntarily ... ... 35
Died ... ... 1
Number on the roll December 30, 1910 ... ... 247

        

    EXPENDITURES.

  • Current expenses:
  • 1. Salaries and wages. . . . . $28,716.35
  • 2. Clothing . . . . .1,620.00
  • 3. Subsistence . . . . .17,641.85
  • 4. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses . . . . .2,583.97
  • Total . . . . . $50,562.17
  • Extraordinary expenses:
  • 1. New buildings, land, etc . . . . .13,777.87
  • Grand total . . . . .$64,340.04

        Receipts for the fiscal year were: $50,000.00 for support; $15,000.00 for new building and repairs; earnings, $5,488.22; total, $70,488.22. Outstanding indebtedness, $36.05. Per capita cost of maintenance, $200.00. The compulsory attendance law has been enforced only to a limited extent; solicitors assisting in seven cases. Some applications refused for want of room and because of feeblemindedness. Two expulsions for flagrant disobedience of rules and attempt at running away. Some scarlet fever in a light form at present; general health is good. A physical examination is required, but no special examination for tuberculosis. One suspicious case, and we will send the child home. No specialist for the examination of the eyes, nose and throat, and no


Page 23

dentist except for extraordinary cases. No physical culture teacher. Attention is given to correct standing, sitting, breathing, etc. We have outdoor exercises for the boys, and the girls take outdoor exercise, but not systematically. No changes in the literary or industrial courses. Printing, carpentry, woodwork, shoemaking, farming and gardening are taught. Children become self-supporting. We have chapel exercises, Sunday School, and Christian Endeavor Society. We use the manual method for 63 and both oral and manual for 188. The new primary building is about completed, but is without furnishing. It will take $4,000 to complete and equip the building. It will take $60,000 per annum for the support of three hundred children. We also need a hospital building, cost about $10,000, and a water plant for the school, cost $20,000. About one hundred books have been added to the library. Miss Leatherman, of the State Library Commission, has advised and offered her services. The Superintendent of Public Instruction has visited the school, and we hope for a closer relation with that department. The superintendent is affiliated with the National Association of Schools for the Deaf and similar organizations, attending the annual meetings.

        The following table gives the cause of deafness, age at onset of the trouble, of the 36 new pupils received in 1910:

        
Cause. Number of Children. Age of Onset.
Congenital 26  
Typhoid fever 1 Two years.
Meningitis 1 Four years.
Whooping cough 1 Eighteen months.
Bronchitis 1 One year.
Cold in the head 1 Eighteen months.
Abscess in the head 1 One year.
Adenoids 1 Eighteen months.
Fever and earache 1 Eight months.
Unknown 2  

E. McK. GOODWIN,
Superintendent.

NORTH CAROLINA SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND AND DEAF.

(Inspected January 3, 1910, by Commissioners Hunter, Dockery, and the Secretary. Secretary.)

        Normal capacity of white and colored departments, 400.

        

DEPARTMENT FOR WHITE BLIND.

Normal capacity, 200. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number on the roll November 30, 1909 97 75 172
Admitted during the fiscal year 23 20 43

Page 24

Whole number during the year 120 95 215
Discharged 10 16 26
Died ... ... ...
Daily average attendance 105 77 182
Number on the roll November 30, 1910 110 79 189

        

    EXPENDITURES (FOR BOTH DEPARTMENTS).

  • Current expenses:
  • 1. Salaries and wages . . . . .$32,954.60
  • 2. Clothing (this is paid by the counties) . . . . .6,391.70
  • 3. Subsistence . . . . . 28,559.41
  • 4. Ordinary repairs. . . . .4,257.54
  • 5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses . . . . .4,919.04
  • Total . . . . .$77,082.29
  • Extraordinary expenses:
  • Permanent improvements to existing buildings. . . . .9,457.32
  • Grand total . . . . .$86,539.61

        The per capita cost has been $198.01, based on figures for both departments, as accounts are not kept separately; but the per capita for the colored is smaller than the per capita cost for the whites. Outstanding indebtedness is $5,690.59. We will need $80,000 per annum for support and more land and new buildings. Improvements during the year have been granolithic pavements on two sides of the square; outdoor gymnasium, woodwork of the buildings repainted. At the colored department metal ceilings have been placed in the auditorium, boys' building, and the remaining rooms of the girls' building. Several rooms replastered with fiber plastering and the plumbing in the main building has been entirely renewed. Our new library building is meeting our needs nicely; we have added a hundred books during the year. The compulsory attendance law has only been partially enforced. None have been refused admission. No epidemic or serious accident. Health has been fairly good. A physical examination is always made upon admission, and also examination for tuberculosis. None reported this year. There are specialists for treatment of eyes, ears, throat and nose. Some attention given to the teeth. Two physical culture teachers. Regular outdoor exercise. No additions to the literary or industrial courses. As trade or occupation for support the following are taught: Broom and mattress making, chair seating, piano tuning and repairing for the boys; sewing, fancy work, dressmaking, etc., for the girls. It is estimated that eighty-five per cent of our pupils become self-supporting after leaving the institution.


Page 25

DEPARTMENT FOR THE COLORED BLIND AND DEAF.

(Inspected by the Board October 26, 1910, and found in excellent condition, with the exception of part of the boys' building which needs changes in present toilet arrangements.)

A. W. PEGUES (Col.), Supervisor.

        

THE BLIND.

Normal capacity, 200. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number on the roll November 30, 1909 41 41 82
Admitted during the fiscal year 8 8 16
Whole number in charge 49 49 98
Discharged 7 9 16
Died ... ... ...
Daily average attendance 41 41 82
Number on the roll November 30, 1910 42 40 82

        

THE DEAF.

  Boys. Girls. Total.
Number on the roll November 30, 1909 54 45 99
Admitted during the fiscal year 4 12 16
Whole number in charge 58 57 115
Discharged 14 6 20
Died 2 1 3
Daily average attendance 50 47 97
Number on the roll November 30, 1910 42 50 92

        We had an epidemic of measles last spring. Present health is fairly good. We have about thirty-five acres of farm land, value $5,000.

        The following tables are for the newly admitted pupils of both departments:

        
CAUSES OF BLINDNESS.   AGE AT WHICH BLIND.   AGE OF ADMISSION.  
Unknown 14 At Birth 22 Thirty-one years 1
Ophthalmia neonatorum 12 Unknown 5 Thirty years 1
Congenital 6 Twenty-four years 1 Twenty-nine years 1
Albino 3 Twenty years 1 Twenty-five years 1
Ulcer 2 Seventeen years 1 Twenty-three years 1
Gun shot 2 Fifteen years 1 Twenty years 1
Explosion 1 Ten years 3 Nineteen years 1
Glaucoma 1 Nine years 1 Eighteen years 1
Poison oak 1 Eight years 3 Seventeen years 2
Cold 1 Seven years 1 Sixteen years 2
Small splinter 1 Six years 3 Fifteen years 5
Accident 1 Six and one-half years 1 Fourteen years 3
Fall 1 Four years 1 Thirteen years 4
Rising in head 1 One year 1 Twelve years 1
Irido cyclitis 1 Eight months 1 Eleven years 1
Spasms 1 Four months 1 Ten years 7
Inflammation 1 Five weeks 1 Nine years 2
Measles 1 One month 1 Eight years 6
    A few weeks 1 Seven years 5
    Ten days 1 Six years 5
  51   51   51


Page 26

        
CAUSES OF DEAFNESS.   AGE AT WHICH DEAF.   AGE OF ADMISSION.  
Congenital 10 At birth 10 Fourteen years 3
Fever 2 Unknown 1 Twelve years 2
Bronchitis 2 Very young 1 Ten years 5
Syphilis 1 Twelve years 1 Nine years 9
Rheumatism 1 Nine years 1 Eight years 3
Measles 1 Three years 1 Six years 2
Unknown 1 Two and one-half years 1    
Whooping cough 1 Two years 2    
    One year 1    
  19   19   19

        The experiment of work shops for the adult blind has proven very successful in a number of States, and I see no reason why it should not be so in North Carolina. Yes, we are affiliated with the National Associations and attend the annual meetings.

JOHN E. RAY, Principal.

NORTH CAROLINA SOLDIERS' HOME.

(Inspected by the Board on October 26th and found in excellent condition.)

CAPT. W. S. LINEBERRY, Superintendent.

        

    POPULATION.

  • Number on the roll January 1, 1910. . . . .161
  • Received during the year. . . . .31
  • Discharged during the year. . . . .18
  • Died. . . . .24
  • Number at the end of the fiscal year. . . . .125
  • Daily average attendance. . . . .116
  • Average number of officers and employees. . . . .25

        There are twenty-two in the hospital with three white nurses and three colored orderlies to care for them. The physician is Dr. R. S. McGeachy. Veterans suffering with tuberculosis occupy a separate cottage. General health has been very good. The average age is seventy-five. Eighty-five applications on file, refused for want of room.

        The appropriation for support for the last biennial period was $20,000 per annum. Disbursements have been about $23,600 and $1,000 for uniforms under special law. Outstanding indebtedness is about $6,000. Per capita cost of maintenance, $136. We will need $30,000 per year for support and special appropriation to meet the indebtedness.

W. S. LINEBERRY, Superintendent.


Page 27

STONEWALL JACKSON TRAINING SCHOOL.

(Visited December 13, 1910, by the Secretary and found in excellent condition.)

WALTER THOMPSON, Superintendent.

POPULATION.

        Normal capacity, 60.

        Fifty-three boys now present. Applications have been refused for lack of room in most cases, but some were not suitable subjects. We have a regular physician, and all suspicious cases of throat, ear and eye troubles are especially examined.

        The health of the children has been remarkably good. We have had one unfortunate and fatal accident. The literary course reaches about the seventh grade. For recreation the boys have outdoor sports. Receipts have been $21,000; disbursements, $18,000. No outstanding indebtedness. Two hundred and ninety acres. Bored well. Sewerage. Insurance. No special fire protection, but the cottages are built of brick and have stairways on both sides leading from the second story to the ground floor.

WALTER THOMPSON, Superintendent.

OXFORD ORPHANAGE.

COL. W. J. HICKS, Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 325. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children at the beginning of the fiscal year 160 164 324
Admitted during the year ending October 31, 1910 24 27 51
Readmitted 1 ... 1
Whole number in charge 184 192 376
Placed in families 9 4 13
Returned to own people 21 13 34
Went to school ... 3 3
To positions 2 5 7
Ran away 5 ... 5
Died ... ... ...
Remaining October 31, 1910 147 167 314

        

CURRENT OR ORDINARY RECEIPTS.

Appropriations and contributions $18,926.14
Singing class 11,443.95
Shoe shop, sundry sales, etc 1,655.85
Balance November 1, 1909 3,227.05
  $35,253.19


Page 28

        

CURRENT OR ORDINARY DISBURSEMENTS.

Salaries and wages (27 workers) $12,749.99
Clothing 1,578.45
Ordinary repairs and minor improvements 1,462.01
Office expenses, outdoor and domestic expenses 7,434.56
Singing class 1,666.09
Transfer to special cash 1,000.00
  $33,117.36
Special receipts 22,867.71
Extraordinary disbursements 17,548.61
Balance special cash November 1, 1910 $6,827.29

        Special receipts included a bequest of $1,000 by will of C. H. Belvin, of Raleigh. Children are received not younger than six years of age, and the age for the discharge of boys is sixteen; of girls, at eighteen. No epidemic or serious accident. The health of the children is excellent. There is reasonable fire protection, but we hope to improve the equipment. Good water supply. Sewerage, but there are three dry closets for day use. These are regularly and carefully looked after. Instruction in industrial work is given in the cottage homes, cook room, dining rooms, laundry, sewing rooms, the hospital, farm, dairy, shoe shop, printing office and woodworking shop. Literary courses are taught in the school. We place a few children in private homes when we are convinced, after careful investigation, that this action will most likely subserve the interests of the children. In this delicate and important work we endeavor to make a more and more thorough investigation and have better supervision.

        Any apparent defect of the eyes, throat, ears or nose would be referred to our physician for attention, and he takes the action deemed necessary.

        Special attention is given to the use of tooth brushes and to the care of the teeth of the children. The dentists of Oxford and other dentists of the State have done much valuable work on the children's teeth. We have not now the regular system for the care of the teeth which we hope and expect to have. Examination for tuberculosis is made only by regular physician of the orphanage. Before admission, a certificate is required from a reputable physician that the child is sound in mind and body.

        No changes to buildings this year; several improvements are contemplated as soon as we have sufficient funds. By strict economy and careful handling, the funds with which the institution has been provided in recent years have sustained it without debt, though we now need a larger income if the work is to be kept up to its present standard or is to be improved.

W. J. HICKS, Superintendent.


Page 29

OXFORD ORPHANAGE FOR THE COLORED.

HENRY P. CHEATHAM, Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 200. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number remaining November 30, 1909 66 99 165
Admitted during the year 20 16 36
Whole number in charge 87 118 205
Placed in families ... ... ...
Become self-supporting ... ... ...
Died 1 3 4
Remaining November 30, 1910 86 115 201

        

    EXPENDITURES.

  • 1. Salaries and wages. . . . .$3,145.00
  • 2. Clothing. . . . .985.15
  • 3. Subsistence. . . . .3,311.00
  • 4. Ordinary repairs. . . . .375.82
  • 5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses. . . . .648.35

        Per capita cost, $72. Receipts (not including building fund), $6,696.86; disbursements, $8,465.28. Ages of admission and discharge, from five to eighteen. No epidemic or serious accident. Present health of the children is good. We have no sewerage or adequate fire protection. Excreta hauled off daily. Good water supply, two wells and three pumps. Children are placed in private homes for only short periods. Care of eyes, throat and ears and teeth only by the matron. No examination for tuberculosis; children suffering from the disease would be declined. Examination for hookworm. Literary and industrial courses taught. Our main support is from the State. We need a building for dining room and chapel, and shall ask the State to help us by making a special appropriation for this. Our large brick dormitory for girls is nearing completion. One end of this is to take the place of the Infants' Department, which was destroyed by fire. The other part is for the large girls, teachers and matrons whose present quarters are dilapidated and came near going up in flames last winter. The new building is 165½ feet long and 40 feet wide; main part three stories, and two wings of two stories each. This building will cost $18,000; of this amount the State was kind enough to give us $5,000. From the public by subscriptions and labor from the orphans $5,212.16. All the brick was made at the brickyard by the boys, and nearly all the lumber is from the woods belonging to the institution and cut by the orphan boys with their own sawmill. We realize a great saving by using our own labor in hauling brick, sand and lumber. While we undertake to give each child here as far as possible elementary training in books, our chief aim is to give them thorough industrial training; and while our farm, shoe shop, blacksmith and wood shops have been blessings to them, the brickyard, sawmill, and the handling of brick and mortar in the construction of these


Page 30

new buildings are greater opportunities. It is surprising how aptly they catch on and how willingly they work, inspired with the belief that some day they will be masters of the same trades.

        The results from the farm and trucking departments have been equally satisfactory. The girls rendered cheerful assistance in the cultivation and harvesting of the crops. They are also given a careful and rigid training in domestic science. There never was an appropriation made to the colored people by the State which has done more good and which has been as much appreciated as the $5,000 given annually to help in the maintenance of this Home and the special amount, $5,000, given to aid in the erection of the new building. Our object and desire is to rescue, to save and make this element of the race a blessing to themselves and a credit to our great State. We are determined that the good people of the State shall not only realize our appreciation by our kind words and friendly acts, but that they shall see the good and actual fruits.

HENRY P. CHEATHAM, Superintendent.

STATE'S PRISON.

(Inspected March, 1910, and found in excellent condition.)

J. J. LAUGHINGHOUSE, Superintendent.

        

POPULATION.

Normal capacity, 1,000.  
Received from the counties during the year 186
Pardoned 29
Escaped 14
Died 15
Recaptured 8
Remaining end of fiscal year 785
Daily average number in charge About 700

        Of the total number given, 41 are colored women and 8 are white women.

        Daily average number of officers and employees, 140.

        Of those admitted during the year 43 whites and 62 blacks can read and write, and 18 whites and 63 blacks can neither read nor write.

        

AGE OF CONVICTS RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR.

Number under sixteen years of age 2
From 16 to 19 36
From 20 to 29 82
From 30 to 39 36
From 40 to 49 13
From 50 to 59 11
From 60 to 69 6
Total 186


Page 31

        

RAILROAD CAMPS.

  Men.
Camp at Elkin 75
Camp at Elizabethtown 75
Camp at Statesville 50
Camp at Rocky Mount 50
Camp in Hyde County 25
Total 275

        

EXPENDITURES.

Current expenses:  
1. Salaries and wages $56,764.99
2. Clothing 10,500.00
3. Subsistence 35,200.00
4. Ordinary repairs 650.00
5. Office, domestic and outdoor expenses 1,000.00
Total $103,614.99
Extraordinary expenses:  
1. New buildings $25,000.00

        Receipts for the year, $249,250.65; disbursements, $200,520. Value of assets (crops, etc.) is about $100,000. Amount to the credit of the prison in bonds this year, $54,000. Nothing to the credit of the prison in cash. The per capita cost of providing for a convict is $250 per annum. There are religious services at the prison, farm and camps. A room has been fitted up at the central prison as a library with the library fund, which has been on hand several years. There are about twelve hundred books, some of them gifts. About 5 per cent use the library at present. Blacks and whites have been separated in their sleeping quarters at the farm and camps, as the law provides.

        A number of minor improvements in the central prison. The dining room windows have been screened, plank flooring placed there in lieu of the dirt floor; iron bars instead of wooden slats to these windows so as to give more air and light. The general health has been unusually good. Discipline of the men fine. Three cases of tuberculosis; no deaths from this disease during the year. Prisoners are especially examined for tuberculosis upon admission. There is no celebration of holidays, but prisoners are given privileges and are not required to work on those days. Yes, we favor parole for prisoners. Great improvements have been made at the Tillery farm in sleeping quarters, bathing facilities and sewerage. No improvement in fire protection at the farm. Also improvements in the prison infirmary.

J. J. LAUGHINGHOUSE,
Superintendent.

(Treasurer Lacy's biennial report credits the State's Prison with $103,000 of stock in the Mattamuskeet Railway and the Elkin and Alleghany road.)
Page 32

RAILROAD CAMPS OF THE STATE'S PRISON.

ELKIN CAMP.

(Inspection by Commissioner A. C. McAllister, October 24, 1910, and the following report made.)

WALTER WILLIAMSON, Supervisor. ELKIN.

        This camp is two miles northwest of Elkin. Work is being done on the Elkin and Alleghany Railroad. The Supervisor has been in charge eight months. Served in charge of men for twelve or fourteen years in mining work. Guards, 13. Prisoners, 76. Salary of Supervisor, $100. Guards, $25. Monthly cost of running the camp is from $1,000 to $1,100, clothing not included. The State receives $1.50 per day for each man. The camp has been visited twice by the Superintendent of the Prison since February, once each by the representative of the Board of Internal Improvements and by the Board of Charities. It has been visited three times by Mr. Doughton, Director, and he will make a fourth visit this year; also by representatives of the State Board of Health.

        A record is kept of the condition of the prisoners. A daily report of the time made, sickness, etc.

        Obedience is required, no profane or indecent language allowed. Sixty days a year are allowed for good behavior. Five days deducted from good time made for each punishment with the lash. Leather strap two to three inches wide, and from six to twenty-five licks given ordinarily. A record is kept of corporal punishments. It is administered by the Supervisor or under his direction. None so punished in the last thirty days. No religious services except occasionally in the summer, about twice a month then. Voluntary services, ministers do not receive any pay. No Sunday School. A few magazines have been sent in and read. No instruction in reading or writing of the illiterate. No form of recreation. They spend Sunday in camp. They are allowed to see relatives or friends and to write to them. The health of the prisoners is good, they look well. The sick were on bedsteads in the end of the cell. One with cold, one with Bright's disease, two recovering from rock hurt. They are attended by Drs. Ring and Reece when sent for. Good well in the stockade and spring at safe distance away. Windows and transoms for ventilation. Stoves for heat and kerosene lamps for light. Required to bathe weekly, three prisoners using the same water in a thirty-gallon tub. Clothing changed weekly. Blankets washed every two months. Meat, vegetables and molasses and fresh meat one day in the week.

CHAFFIN'S CAMP.

(Inspected by Commissioner Carey J. Hunter and found in good condition.)

W. L. CHAFFIN, Supervisor. TAR HEEL.

        This camp is located at Tar Heel, Bladen County. Work is being done on the Elizabethtown Railroad. One supervisor and twenty guards.


Page 33

Twenty-two white and 118 colored prisoners; total, 140. Supervisor's salary $75, and guards $25. Monthly running expenses about $2,100. The State receives $1.50 per day for each convict. The Superintendent visits the camp regularly. Directors occasionally. Representative of the Board of Health and of the Board of Charities once each during the year. Records are kept of the men, time made, health and other matters of interest. We are very good to those who do their duty. Those who can not be persuaded have to be thrashed. Corporal punishment is inflicted and a record kept of the same. Five have been whipped in the last thirty days. Administered by the Supervisor. Common leather strap, from ten to twenty-five licks. Preachers come in. We have six preachers who are convicts, and they hold forth every Sunday. No regular Sunday School. No minister paid for his services. Yes, they have magazines and read them. No literary instruction. Not more than six who can not read and write; two of these are white men.

        On Sundays some of the negro preachers read the Bible and some listen. Others are plotting to escape. More escapes on Monday or after two or three days of rain than any other time. They are allowed to see friends or relatives only in the presence of an officer or guard. Blacks and whites in separate sleeping quarters. General appearance of the prisoners as to health is good. Bathe weekly. We have a fine pump, well sixty feet deep and furnishes bountiful supply. Special provision for excreta which is buried. Dr. Northrop is called in when any one is sick. Ventilation good. Heated by stoves; kerosene light. No vermin. If sent direct to the camp they are bathed and cleaned before entering our camp. Grounds good; kitchen, etc., adequate. Bedding changed as often as good weather will permit. Clothes changed once or twice a week and oftener if they get wet. Amount and kind of clothes depends upon the roughness of the work; at all times an abundance. No special sleeping clothes. They are allowed from one-half pound to three-quarters of good meat, peas, beans, rice and vegetables when they can be gotten. Fresh meat from time to time, and diet changed as often as possible.

        The health of my camp has been remarkably good; not one-fourth the sickness that there is in the same number outside. This is attributable to the fact that they are well fed with good, wholesome food, made to go to bed early and keep clean, and a physician sent for as soon as one gets sick. Our doctor says there is no comparison between the health of our convict camp and the outside negroes.

W. L. CHAFFIN, Supervisor.

(The Tar Heel Camp was inspected by Commissioner Carey J. Hunter and found in good condition. New canvas tents and new bedticks were being placed. The men looked well, except one or two who were allowed to do only part of a day's work because not strong. General impression as to physical conditions very favorable.)
Page 34

DR. CARROLL'S SANITARIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities. Inspected by the Board July, 1909, and found in excellent condition.)

DR. ROBERT S. CARROLL, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        This sanitarium for insane and inebriates and other nervous conditions was opened in July, 1904. Dr. Robert S. Carroll is president, Dr. W. L. Dunn, vice-president, and Miss L. R. Guffin, graduate nurse, acting superintendent of nurses.

        The following table gives the movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1910:

        
Normal capacity, 32. Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients remaining January 1, 1910 12 10 22
Admitted during the six months 27 19 46
Total number treated 39 29 68
Discharged as cured 22 8 30
Discharged as improved 3 5 8
Discharged as unimproved 1 3 4
Daily average number of patients 16 9 25
Daily average number of officers and employees 10 21 31
Died .. 1 1

        There are five male attendants and sixteen nurses. No epidemic or serious accident. No suicide. One escape, but returned to the hospital. Insane, 11; drug cases, 19; other nervous cases, 16. The resident States were: Arizona, 1; Arkansas, 1; District of Columbia, 1; Georgia, 1; Illinois, 1; Indiana, 2; Mexico, 1; Missouri, 1; New York, 1; North Carolina, 14; Ohio, 1; Pennsylvania, 1; South Carolina, 15; Tennessee, 4; Virginia, 1.

        Excellent city fire department; two fire plugs on the premises; hand extinguishers on each floor. Rates of charges, $25 to $75 per week.

        The Central building has been erected since the last report. It is a splendid four-story structure; basement and first floor of stone, containing sixty-four rooms and will be ready for occupancy by October. The down-town Sanitarium will then be closed and all work concentrated on the Highland Home property.

ROBERT S. CARROLL, M.D.,
President.

BROADOAKS SANATORIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities. Inspected by the Board July, 1909, and found in excellent condition.)

DR. ISAAC M. TAYLOR, Superintendent. MORGANTON.

        This sanatorium was opened September 15, 1901.

        The following table gives the movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1910:


Page 35

        
Normal capacity, 50. Men. Women. Total.
Number remaining January 1, 1910 13 16 29
Admitted during the six months 29 23 52
Discharged as cured 12 5 17
Discharged as improved 8 3 11
Discharged unimproved 9 1 10
Daily average number of patients .. .. 30
Died 1 .. 1
Average number of officers and employees .. .. 19

        Officers in charge are: Dr. Isaac M. Taylor, superintendent and resident physician; Dr. Louis G. Beall, resident assistant physician; Mrs. Sallie C. Taylor, matron. Now employed in ward service five men and five women. A night attendant of each sex is employed constantly.

        No sickness has developed in the sanatorium. One male patient set fire to his bed in May and was severely burned. Death resulted from complications.

        Resident States were as follows: North Carolina, 46; South Carolina, 21; Virginia, 4; Georgia, 4; Tennessee, 3; West Virginia, 1; Mississippi, 1; Illinois, 1. Of these cases fifty-three were insane; drug cases, 24; other conditions, 4.

        Charges as heretofore reported. We have recently purchased a house which we propose to use for sanatorium purposes for those who belong to the strictly nervous class, excluding drug and insane patients. A few patients are received by commitment, but most of them are voluntary patients.

ISAAC M. TAYLOR, M.D.,
Superintendent.

TELFAIR SANITARIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities. Inspected March 16, 1910, by Commissioners Hunter, Dockery, Brown, and McAlister and the Secretary. Found in good condition.)

DR. W. C. ASHWORTH, Superintendent. GREENSBORO.

        This sanitarium for the treatment of inebriates was opened in Greensboro July 30, 1907.

        The following is the table of movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1910:

        
Normal capacity, 20. Men. Women. Total.
Number remaining January 1, 1910 2 2 4
Admitted during the six months 35 14 49
Discharged as cured 21 11 32
Discharged as improved 5 3 8
Discharged as unimproved 2 .. 2
Daily average number of patients .. .. 12
Average number of officers and employees .. .. 8
Died .. .. ..


Page 36

        Five attendants, one man and four women. No epidemic, serious accident or suicide. No person ran away from the institution. Twenty-one drug cases and thirty-two other nervous conditions. Good fire protection. New apparatus has been added to the equipment in the medical department. Rates of charges, $15 to $40 per week. Residence States: North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, New York, Pennsylvania, Georgia, Florida, Louisiana and Tennessee. Patients rarely received by legal commitment; almost altogether they are here voluntarily. When commitment is made it is by regular process of law, before officer or magistrate within whose jurisdiction the case comes up.

W. C. ASHWORTH, M.D.,
Superintendent.

McKANNA THREE-DAY LIQUOR CURE HOSPITAL.

Report for July 1, 1910.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities.)

DR. J. J. McKANNA, President. REIDSVILLE.

        This institution for the care and treatment of inebriates was opened June 1, 1906. Dr. J. M. McGeehee is the resident physician; Dr. J. J. McKanna, superintendent; J. J. McKanna, Jr., manager.

        The following is the table of the movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1910:

        
Normal capacity, 20. Men. Women. Total.
Admitted during the six months 180 .. 180
Discharged as cured 175 .. 175
Discharged as improved .. .. 5
Discharged as unimproved .. .. ..
Daily average number of patients .. .. 1
Average number of officers and employees .. .. 10
Died .. .. ..

        Employed as attendants, four men and three women. No epidemic, accident or suicide. Residence States were North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Virginia, Florida, West Virginia, Alabama, Kentucky, District of Columbia.

        No insane. Ten drug cases; others alcoholism. Good fire protection. Rates of charges: Alcoholism, $100; drug cases, $35 per week. Slight improvements made. Patients come voluntarily.

J. J. McKANNA, JR., Manager.


Page 37

WILLIAMS' PRIVATE SANATORIUM.

(Licensed by the Board of Public Charities. Inspected on March 15, 1910, by Commissioners Hunter, McAlister, Dockery and Brown and the Secretary and found in satisfactory condition.)

DR. B. B. WILLIAMS, Superintendent. GREENSBORO.

        This institution was opened April 13, 1908. Alcoholism, morphine and other drug addictions treated.

        The following table gives the movement of population for the six months ending July 1, 1910:

        
Normal capacity, 14. Men. Women. Total.
Number remaining January 1, 1910 6 2 8
Admitted during the six months 60 9 69
Discharged as cured 50 9 59
Discharged as improved 10 .. 10
Discharged as unimproved .. .. ..
Daily average number of patients .. .. 6
Daily average number of officers and employees .. .. 3
Died .. .. ..

        One attendant for each sex. No epidemic, serious accident or suicide. No escape. Residence States were Pennsylvania, Virginia, West Virginia, Georgia, South Carolina, Florida and North Carolina.

        Twenty drug cases, others for alcoholism. Fair fire protection. City fire department. Alcoholism, $100; drug cases, $125. No changes since last report in buildings.

B. B. WILLIAMS, M.D.,
Superintendent.


Page 38

Condition of County Homes and Jails

(Visitors' Reports.)

CONDITION OF HOMES.

        The condition of Home buildings has been classed as follows:

        No County Home in Carteret, Currituck, Clay, Graham, Lee, Mitchell and Onslow.

        Inferior--Davie (to be improved), Cabarrus, Iredell, Transylvania, Wilson, Yadkin, Yancey.

        Fair--Ashe (new site purchased), Dare, Haywood (new site to be purchased), Jones (building), Macon, Pitt, Rockingham and Watauga.

        Good--Alamance, Alleghany, Anson, Bertie, Burke, Caldwell, Camden, Caswell (improved), Catawba, Chowan, Cleveland, Duplin, Edgecombe, Durham, Forsyth, Gaston, Gates, Granville (improved), Halifax, Harnett, Henderson, Hertford, Lenoir, Lincoln (new), Madison (new), Martin, McDowell, Montgomery, Moore, New Hanover (improved), Orange, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Person, Robeson, Rowan, Rutherford, Sampson, Scotland, Tyrrell (new), Vance (improved), Wake, Warren, Washington.

MANAGEMENT OF HOMES.

        Fair--Alleghany, Davie, Gaston, Iredell, Macon, McDowell, Rockingham, Transylvania, Wilson, Yancey.

        Good--Alamance, Ashe, Anson, Bertie, Burke, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Camden, Catawba, Chowan, Cleveland, Dare, Duplin, Durham, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Gates, Granville, Halifax, Haywood, Harnett, Henderson, Hertford, Jones, Lenoir, Lincoln, Madison, Martin, Montgomery, Moore, New Hanover, Orange, Pasquotank, Perquimans, Person, Pitt, Robeson, Rowan, Rutherford, Sampson, Scotland, Tyrrell, Vance, Wake, Warren, Watauga and Washington.

CONDITION OF JAILS.

        Fair--Alleghany, Cleveland (too small), Durham, Gaston (too small), Granville (improved), Lincoln, Montgomery, New Hanover (too small), Orange, Person, Sampson, and Wilson.

        Inferior--Anson, Burke, Cabarrus, Clay, Mecklenburg, and Rockingham (building).

        Good--Alamance, Ashe, Bertie, Caldwell, Carteret, Caswell, Catawba, Chowan, Dare (new), Davie, Duplin, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Gates, Halifax, Harnett, Haywood, Henderson, Hertford, Iredell (new), Jones, Lenoir, Lee, Macon, Madison, Martin, McDowell, Moore, Onslow, Pasquotank, Perquimans (new), Robeson, Rowan, Rutherford, Scotland, Transylvania, Tyrrell, Union, Vance, Wake, Warren, Washington, Watauga, and Yancey.

        The jails of Pitt and of Camden were burned. Plans for new buildings are under way.


Page 39

MANAGEMENT.

        Inferior--Anson and Mecklenburg.

        Fair--Burke, Clay, Montgomery, New Hanover, Sampson and Wake.

        Good--Alamance, Alleghany, Ashe, Bertie, Cabarrus, Caldwell, Carteret, Caswell, Catawba, Chowan, Cleveland, Dare, Davie, Duplin, Durham, Edgecombe, Forsyth, Gaston, Gates, Granville, Halifax, Harnett, Haywood, Hertford, Henderson, Iredell, Jones, Lenoir, Lee, Macon, Madison, Martin, McDowell, Mitchell, Moore, Onslow, Orange, Pasquotank, Person, Perquimans, Rockingham, Robeson, Rowan, Rutherford, Scotland, Transylvania, Tyrrell, Union, Vance, Wake, Warren, Washington, Watauga, Wilson and Yancey.

NUMBER OF PRISONERS IN COUNTY CAMPS.

        (Blanks were sent to all Boards of Commissioners August 1, 1910, but failure of some to reply after repeated efforts on part of the Secretary to obtain answers necessitated requesting the information of visitors and sheriffs. However, the information is correct and gives the average number in charge for thirty-eight counties as 1,383. Total number during the year would, of course, be much larger. Terms, thirty days and up to ten years.)

        
Date report was received. County. Number in Charge.
Jan. 5 Anson 30
Sept. 19 Alamance 15
Aug. 30 Bertie 6
Jan. 4 Beaufort 32
5 Buncombe 66
Aug. 17 Cabarrus 23
Jan. 1 Cleveland 40
Dec. 30 Craven 16
  Columbus (Report of 1909) 43
Dec. 2 Cumberland 24
Jan. 4 Davidson 12
Sept. 7 Durham 73
Oct. 24 Edgecombe 34
Nov. 5 Forsyth 93
Aug. 14 Franklin 9
Jan. 10 Gaston 54
Nov. 21 Granville 14
Sept. 29 Halifax 44
Jan. 5 Haywood 21
Nov. 14 Henderson 25
19 Iredell 24
Jan. 9 Johnston 23


Page 40

Date report was received. County. Number in Charge.
Aug. 22 Lenoir 15
Sept. 11 McDowell 16
Jan. 5 Mecklenburg 125
Dec. 30 Nash 27
Aug. 13 New Hanover (two camps) 88
Nov. 11 Pasquotank 43
Aug. 13 Person 4
Nov. 26 Pitt 42
Sept. 11 Robeson 23
Nov. 22 Rockingham 35
Dec. 1 Rowan 64
  Rutherford  
  Stanly (Report of 1909) 19
Jan. 10 Sampson 16
  Union  
5 Wake 80
4 Wayne 29
5 Wilson 36
Aug., 1910, to Jan., 1911 40 1,383


Page 41

County Boards of Visitors, 1910

        
Alamance Rev. J. W. Holt Burlington.
  Hon. J. A. Turrentine Burlington.
  P. H. Fleming Burlington.
Alleghany W. F. Jones Stratford.
Alexander    
Anson Dr. J. M. Boyette Wadesboro.
  Mrs. W. J. Huntley Wadesboro.
Ashe W. H. Worth Jefferson.
Beaufort Dr. J. M. Gallagher Washington.
  Rev. J. A. Sullivan Washington.
  Rev. Robert V. Hope Washington.
Bertle J. H. Matthews Windsor.
  Mrs. Francis D. Winston Windsor.
Bladen Mrs. William Whitted Elizabethtown.
  Mrs. John A. McDowell Elizabethtown.
Brunswick George F. Drew Southport.
  Dr. Arthur Dosher Southport.
Buncombe Dr. L. M. Stevens Asheville.
  Mrs. William Turner Asheville.
Burke Robert T. Claywell Morganton.
  Miss Wilhelmina Tate Morganton.
  Mrs. Gaither Morganton.
Cabarrus J. M. Hendrix Concord.
  C. R. Andrews Concord.
Caldwell Dr. C. L. Wilson Lenoir.
  J. W. Curtis Lenoir.
  J. L. Nelson Lenoir.
Camden Geo. H. Riggs South Mills.
Carteret Mrs. W. H. Hendricks Beaufort.
  Mrs. H. H. Willis Beaufort.
Caswell Dr. S. A. Malloy Yanceyville.
Catawba Rev. M. A. Abernethy Newton.
Chatham Geo. Pilkington Pittsboro.
  James L. Griffin Pittsboro.
  Mrs. H. A. London Pittsboro.
Cherokee Mrs. R. H. Hyatt Murphy.
  Dr. N. B. Adams Murphy.


Page 42

Chowan Rev. Robert B. Drane Edenton.
  W. B. Shepard Edenton.
  Mrs. W. D. Pruden Edenton.
Clay L. F. Shuford Hayesville.
Cleveland J. A. Anthony Shelby.
  Geo. A. Hoyle Shelby.
  E. M. Beam Shelby.
Columbus Jackson Greer Whiteville.
  Rev. Charles C. Smith Whiteville.
  Mrs. J. J. Williamson Whiteville.
Craven S. M. Brinson New Bern.
  Harold Whitehurst New Bern.
Cumberland Rev. J. J. Hall Fayetteville.
  Rev. W. M. Fairley Fayetteville.
  Rev. Chas. Noyes Tyndall Fayetteville.
Currituck    
Dare Charles L. Mann East Lake.
Davidson Mrs. Charles A. Hunt, Sr Lexington.
Davie Mrs. A. M. Nail Mocksville.
Duplin A. P. Farrior Kenansville.
  J. A. Powell Warsaw.
  Mrs. A. P. Farrior Kenansville.
Durham Rev. A. P. Barbee Durham.
Edgecombe James R. Gaskill Tarboro.
  F. H. Pender Tarboro.
  W. L. Speight Tarboro.
Forsyth Rev. Edward S. Crosland Winston-Salem.
  W. P Hill Winston-Salem.
  H. W. Foltz Winston-Salem.
  Mrs. H. W. Foltz Winston-Salem.
  Mrs. Henry E. Fries Winston-Salem.
Franklin M. S. Davis Louisburg.
  Frank B. McKinne Louisburg.
Gaston J. P. Reid Gastonia.
Gates R. R. Taylor Gatesville.
  S. P. Cross Gatesville.
Graham W. H. Garrison Yellow Creek.
  W. M. Taylor Robbinsville.
  G. B. Walker Robbinsville.
Granville D. N. Hunt Oxford.


Page 43
Granville Rev. W. S. Hester Oxford.
  John H. Bullock Oxford.
Greene L. V. Morrill Snow Hill.
  James T. Sugg Snow Hill.
Guilford A. M. Scales Greensboro.
  Rev. Melton Clark Greensboro.
  R. C. Hood Greensboro.
  Mrs. W. H. Osborne Greensboro.
Halifax D. R. Anderson Halifax.
  W. F. Coppedge Halifax.
Harnett Dr. J. A. Withers Lillington.
  C. McArtan Lillington.
  H. T. Faucett Summerville.
Haywood Mrs. M. J. Branner Waynesville.
  Dr. J. E. Wilson, R. F. D. No. 2 Canton.
Henderson Dr. J. G. Waldrop Hendersonville.
  Thos. J. Rickman Hendersonville.
  Mrs. Lila R. Barnwell Hendersonville.
Hertford John A. Northcott Winton.
  Geo. Cowper Winton.
  John E. Vann Winton.
  W. P. Shaw Winton.
Hyde Dr. R. E. Windley Swan Quarter.
Iredell Dr. L. Harrill Statesville.
  Mrs. A. L. Coble Statesville.
  Mrs. D. A. Miller Statesville.
Jackson Rev. A. W. Davis Webster.
  W. D. Frizell Webster.
  Robt. L. Madison Webster.
  Lee T. Wild Webster.
Johnston    
Jones Julian K. Warren Trenton.
  F. W. Foscue Trenton.
  C. C. May Trenton.
Lenoir Rev. John H. Griffith Kinston.
  Geo. V. Cowper Kinston.
  J. R. Rountree Kinston.
  Mrs. C. B. Woodley Kinston.
  Miss May Oettinger Kinston.
Lee Dr. Lynn McIver Sanford.

Page 44

Lee A. W. Huntley Jonesboro.
Lincoln Rev. W. R. Minter Lincolnton.
  Dr. I. R. Self Lincolnton.
  Miss Kate Shipp Lincolnton.
  Mrs. R. S. Reinhardt Lincolnton.
McDowell J. M. Houck Marion.
  Dr. B. L. Ashworth Marion.
  Mrs. E. H. Dysart Marion.
  Mrs. E. A. Thomas Marion.
Macon Rev. J. A. Deal Franklin.
  Dr. Higgins Franklin.
  R. F. Jarrett Franklin.
  Theodore Andrews Franklin.
  Mrs. John C. Wright Franklin.
  Mrs. L. M. Rankin Franklin.
  Mrs. Ethel Deal Johnston Franklin.
Madison Rev. W. E. Finley Marshall.
  J. H. White Marshall.
  W. J. Weaver Marshall.
Martin Wilson G. Lamb Williamston.
  Dr. William E. Warren Williamston.
  Miss Hattie K. Thrower Williamston.
Mecklenburg John McDowell Charlotte.
  Rev. Francis M. Osborne Charlotte.
  F. S. Neal, R. F. D. No. 8 Charlotte.
  Mrs. S. W. Reid Charlotte.
  Mrs. H. M. Wilder Charlotte.
Mitchell W. H. Ollis Ingalls.
Montgomery R. T. Poole Troy.
  Dr. Charles Deligny Troy.
  O. B. Deaton Troy.
Moore John Campbell Carthage.
  Geo. Humber Carthage.
Nash J. B. Boddie Nashville.
New Hanover A. G. Hankins Wilmington.
  J. T. Kerr Wilmington.
Northampton J. S. Grant Jackson.
  Paul J. Long Jackson.
Onslow G. H. Simmons Jacksonville.
Orange N. W. Brown Hillsboro.


Page 45

Orange Miss Mary Tinnin Hillsboro.
Pamlico D. B. Hooker Bayboro.
  Geo. Farrell Bayboro.
Pasquotank Rev. E. W. Stone Elizabeth City.
Pender    
Perquimans Dr. T. O. McMullen Hertford.
  B. S. Lassiter Hertford.
Person Rev. E. W. Snipes Roxboro.
  J. A. Long, Jr Roxboro.
Pitt J. W. Smith Greenville.
  E. W. Braxton, R. F. D. No. 2 Greenville.
  R. N. Nichols, R. F. D. No. 6 Greenville.
Polk John R. Foster Tryon.
Randolph Henry C. Moffitt Asheboro.
  Mrs. Jean Rush Asheboro.
  Mrs. R. R. Ross Asheboro.
Richmond Robert A. Johnson Rockingham.
  J. S. Ledbetter Rockingham.
Robeson J. P. McNeill Lumberton.
Rockingham Ira R. Humphreys Reidsville.
  William Cummings Wentworth.
  Mrs. N. R. Reid Wentworth.
Rowan James D. Heilig Salisbury.
  W. W. Taylor Salisbury.
Rutherford Dr. E. B. Harris Rutherfordton.
  W. A. Thompson Rutherfordton.
  Mrs. S. E. Wolfe Rutherfordton.
  Mrs. A. L. Grayson Rutherfordton.
Sampson F. B. Johnson Clinton.
  Rev. Walter R. Noe Clinton.
  Rev. P. L. Clark Clinton.
  Mrs. T. L. Hubbard Clinton.
Scotland Mrs. Walter McEachin Laurinburg.
  Miss Effie McRae Laurinburg.
Stanly S. H. Milton Albemarle.
  R. E. Austin Albemarle.
Stokes M. T. Chilton Danbury.
  Mrs. R. H. R. Blair Danbury.
Surry H. F. Comer Dobson.
Swain    


Page 46

Transylvania Rev. Chalmers D. Chapman Brevard.
  Rev. R. C. Kirkpatrick Brevard.
  Rev. Paul F. Brown Brevard.
Tyrrell J. C. Meekins, Sr. Columbia.
  T. L. Jones Columbia.
Union A. W. Biggers Monroe.
  Mrs. F. B. Ashcraft Monroe.
  Rev. R. L. Kirkpatrick Monroe.
Vance Dr. F. R. Harris Henderson.
Wake Prof. I. C. Blair Raleigh.
  John A. Mills Raleigh.
Warren P. H. Allen Warrenton.
  H. J. White Warrenton.
  H. B. Hunter Warrenton.
  Mrs. Henry A. Boyd Warrenton.
  Mrs. J. B. W. Jones Warrenton.
Washington Col. W. F. Beasley Plymouth.
  W. Fletcher Ausbon Plymouth.
Watauga J. F. Church Foscoe.
Wayne M. L. Lee Goldsboro.
  Miss Mary C. Borden Goldsboro.
  Mrs. W. R. Hollowell Goldsboro.
Wilkes Rev. Z. Paris N. Wilkesboro.
  Mrs. W. F. Troyden N. Wilkesboro.
Wilson J. M. Leath Wilson.
  E. B. Mayo Wilson.
  Miss Clee Winstead Wilson.
  Mrs. Geo. Hackney Wilson.
Yadkin R. C. Puryear Yadkinville.
  Miss Julia Holt Yadkinville.
  Dr. J. M. Phillips Yadkinville.
Yancey Dr. H. B. Robertson Burnsville.


Page 47

Orphanages and Child-caring Institutions

        
Name. Location. Normal Capacity. Present Nov. 30, 1910. Whole Number During the Year 1910.
Alexander Home Charlotte 30 20 21
Baptist Orphanage Thomasville 386 386 420
Buncombe County Children's Home Asheville 25 9 22
Christian Orphanage Elon College 50 36 36
Crittenden Home (rescue home) Charlotte 25 16 8
Elhanan Orphanage (private individ'l) Marion 150 60 136
Eliada Orphanage (private indiv'l) Asheville 40 22 22
Falcon (private individual) Falcon 15 ---- ----
Faith Cottage (rescue home) Asheville 16 3 10
Lindley Training School (rescue home) Asheville 40 10 13
Methodist Orphanage Raleigh 140 142 142
Methodist Orphanage, W.N.C. Con. Winston-Salem 75 78 88
Nazareth Orphans' Home Crescent 50 22 22
N. C. Children's Home Society* Greensboro ---- 9 256
Odd Fellows Orphan Home Goldsboro 200 ---- ----
Presbyterian Orphans' Home Barium Springs 180 163 163
Rest Cottage (rescue home) Greensboro 30 ---- 25
Roman Catholic Orphanage for boys Raleigh (Nazareth) 60 60 60
Sacred Heart Orphanage Belmont (Gaston Co.) 30 26 30
Thompson Orphanage and Training School Charlotte 65 59 69
Pythian Orphanage (not open yet) Clayton ---- ---- ----
Oxford Orphanage for White Children Oxford 325 314 376
ORPHANAGES FOR THE COLORED.        
Oxford Orphanage for the Colored Oxford 200 201 205
Colored Orphan Home of Western Carolina Winston-Salem ---- ---- ----
Total ---- 2,177 1,636 2,124

        *Placed out by the Society from September, 1903, to May 31, 1910, three hundred and sixty-six children. Now in private homes subject to visitation, two hundred and fifty-six. Placed in private homes during the year for the first time, forty-one; transfers twenty-two.



Page 48

BAPTIST ORPHANAGE.

M. L. KESLER, Superintendent. THOMASVILLE.

        It is supported and controlled by the Baptist denomination of the State. It is directly under a board of trustees.

        
Normal capacity, 386 Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children remaining end of fiscal year, June 15 185 201 386
Admitted during the year ... ... 34
Whole number in charge ... ... 386
Returned to parents ... ... 27
Become self-supporting ... ... 2
To higher schools ... ... 3
Died ... ... 2
Remaining end of fiscal year ... ... 386

        Admitted from five to twelve years of age. Both sexes received. The institution has sewerage, good water supply and protection against fire. Nine grades in the graded school in the literary course. Girls are also taught cooking, sewing, laundry, housekeeping, and boys are taught printing, farming, dairying, shoemaking and repairing and dressing lumber.

        We do not place out children in private homes. There have been a number of minor improvements to the plant. Yes, a specialist looks after the eyes, throat, ears and teeth of the children. There is some oversight after leaving the institution, in finding positions especially. Children appear self-reliant and average well with those from normal homes.

        Receipts and disbursements were $52,298.56.

M. L. KESLER,
Superintendent.

PRESBYTERIAN ORPHANS' HOME.

W. T. WALKER, Superintendent. BARIUM SPRINGS.

        This institution is under the control of the Presbyterian Synod of North Carolina.

        
Normal capacity, 180. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children remaining end of last fiscal year, 1909 70 100 170
Admitted during the year ending October 31, 1910 20 20 40
Whole number in charge 72 91 163
Placed in families ... ... 1
Become self-supporting 5 11 16
Died ... ... ...
Remaining October 31, 1910 ... ... 163


Page 49

        Age of admission is six; that of discharge eighteen to nineteen.

        No epidemic. One serious accident, but the party recovered. We are arranging for sewerage, good water supply and fire protection. We have both literary and industrial instruction. Ten grades, prepare for college. We do not place children in families usually. Special care taken of eyes, throat, ears and teeth. Some oversight of them after leaving the Home. The children do well as a rule. We are well supported. Receipts were $28,749.76; disbursements, $25,883.97.

W. T. WALKER,
Superintendent.

METHODIST ORPHANAGE.

REV. JOHN N. COLE, Superintendent. RALEIGH.

        It is controlled and maintained by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.

        
Normal capacity, 140. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number of children in charge 52 90 142

        Received from six to twelve years of age and discharged at eighteen. No epidemic or serious accident. Sewerage and water supply. The work is correlated with the city schools. Three children in colleges or high schools. We rarely place out children. We are well supported in caring for them. Receipts were $26,000; disbursements, $19,000. A steam laundry building has been added. The eyes, throat, ears and teeth of the children are especially looked after.

REV. JOHN N. COLE,
Superintendent.

THE CHILDREN'S HOME OF THE WESTERN NORTH CAROLINA
CONFERENCE.

H. A. HAYES, Superintendent. WINSTON-SALEM.

        Normal capacity, 75.

        The third annual report of the board of trustees states that the Home has cared for eighty-eight children during the year. The property now consists of 190 acres, purchased for $28,500. On this land we have five cottages, a farm house, a schoolhouse, barn and other minor buildings. Expended in improvement and equipment, $10,491.71. The entire investment is $39,491.71. The institution is supported by the Methodist church on a regular business basis of assessment of churches and certain regular collections.

        A bright two-page leaflet called the Children's Home Record is issued monthly.


Page 50

THOMPSON ORPHANAGE AND TRAINING SCHOOL.

REV. WALTER J. SMITH, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        It is supported and controlled by the Protestant Episcopal Church of North Carolina

        
The normal capacity is 65. Boys. Girls. Total.
Admitted during the fiscal year 11 7 18
Whole number in charge ... ... 69
Placed in families and school ... ... 7
Become self-supporting ... ... 3
Died ... ... ...
Remaining October 31, 1910 ... ... 59

        Admitted from three to fourteen years of age. Both sexes received. Capacity sixty-five, but seventy can be accommodated by crowding. No epidemic or serious accident. Good water supply. Sewerage. Two-inch water pipe, with hundred feet of hose and fire extinguisher. Children are taught farming and regular school work. Sometimes place out children and try to keep in touch with them. We are well supported in caring for the children. Receipts, $7,690.67; disbursements, $7,644.93. A new roof to the barn and one room added to the building. Eyes, throat, ears and teeth cared for, but not as thoroughly as we would like. There is oversight after discharge as far as practicable. Children average well with those from normal homes in some respects, but not in all.

WALTER J. SMITH,
Superintendent.

PYTHIAN ORPHANAGE.

..... CLAYTON.

        The Pythian order of the State is building an orphanage at Clayton. One hundred acres of land has been donated and a handsome brick building is nearing completion.

CHRISTIAN ORPHANAGE.

REV. JAMES L. FOSTER, Superintendent. ELON COLLEGE.

        The Christian Orphanage is owned and controlled by the Southern Christian Convention.

        
Normal capacity, 50. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number remaining October 31, 1909 17 14 31
Admitted during the year 1 4 5
Placed in families ... ... ...
Died ... ... ...
Remaining October 31, 1910 ... ... 36


Page 51

        Both sexes received. Admitted at six and discharged at eighteen. No epidemic or serious accident. Fair water supply. No sewerage or protection against fire. They work on the farm and do the house work and attend the district graded school. Children have the advantage of the College Sunday School and church services. We are reasonably well supported. Receipts have been $3,945.51. About $200 worth of additional furniture and small fixtures have been added. We hope soon to put up fire escapes and to have the eyes of children treated. Our children have, we think, average fare in food, clothing, splendid beds, and good Sunday School and church advantages.

JAMES L. FOSTER,
Superintendent.

SACRED HEART ORPHANAGE.

RT. REV. LEO HAID, Superintendent. BELMONT.

        The Roman Catholic Orphanage for girls is located at Belmont, Gaston County. It is supported and controlled by the Roman Catholic Church. Mother Mary Teresa is directly in charge.

        
Normal capacity, thirty to forty.  
Number present October 31, 1909 28
Admitted during the year 3
Placed in families 3
Become self-supporting 1
Remaining October 31, 1910 26

        The health of the children has been excellent. No serious accident or epidemic. Sewerage, good water supply, but no special fire protection. Industrial and literary courses taught. Occasionally children are placed out and they are visited and overlooked. Special care taken of throat, ears, eyes and teeth. Receipts have been, $602.45; disbursements, $1,800. We are not very well supported and lack of means keeps everything at a standstill.

MOTHER MARY TERESA,
Directress.

ALEXANDER HOME FOR CHILDREN.

MRS. ROWLAND, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        Normal capacity, 30.

        The Home is for the care of children from three to ten, at our discretion. It is supported and controlled by the Presbyterian churches of the city. Whole number in charge during the year, 21. Of these one has become self-supporting. Thirteen are in colleges and high schools. No deaths. Now in charge, 20. We find homes for such as are given to us and care for others until parent or parents can take them. Those old enough attend school. We place children in private homes and


Page 52

visit them, keeping in touch with them. Industrial and literary courses are taught. Sewerage, fire protection and good water supply. Some improvements have been made. Children are especially cared for as to eyes, ears, throat and teeth. We are well supported in caring for the children.

MRS. ROWLAND,
Superintendent.

ELIADA ORPHANAGE.

REV. LUCIUS B. COMPTON, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        The Orphanage is controlled by a private board made up of different denominations and supported by free will offerings.

        
Normal capacity, 40. Boys. Girls. Total.
Number remaining October 31, 1909 8 10 18
Admitted during the year 1910 2 2 4
Placed in families ... ... ...
Died ... ... ...
Remaining October 31, 1910 ... ... 22

        No age limit for admission; discharged at 21. Both sexes received. The building has porches all around it and is easily accessible by ladder in case of fire. Sewerage. No serious accident or epidemic. Children taught industrial and literary course. None in high schools. We do not place out children. Special care is taken of the eyes, throat, ears and teeth of children. Improvements have been the painting of the building, the addition of twenty-five acres of land and a chapel and schoolhouse are under construction. Receipts have been $4,522.38; disbursements, $4,452.02. We are well supported in caring for the children.

HATTIE M. BYERS,
Secretary.

NAZARETH ORPHANS' HOME.

REV. DR. E. G. WILLIAMS, Superintendent. CRESCENT.

        It is under the control of the Reformed Church in the United States.

        
Normal capacity, 50. Boys. Girls. Total.
Whole number in charge Oct. 31, 1910 10 12 22
Admitted during the year ... ... 2
Died ... ... ...

        Admitted at four years of age; discharged at eighteen. Both sexes received. No epidemics or serious accident. Sewerage, water supply and good fire protection. Industrial and common school courses taught. Sometimes we place children in homes and visit and keep an oversight of them. We also keep them in mind after they leave the institution. We are well supported in caring for them. Receipts and disbursements for the past year were $2,600; $600 from the farm and $600 in goods


Page 53

donated. Special care is taken of the eyes, ears and throat and teeth of children. It is proposed to make the Home as nearly self-supporting as possible. The farm of one hundred acres, properly developed, will support one hundred at least.

REV. J. M. L. LYERLY,
President Board of Managers.

ELHANAN ORPHANAGE.

MISS MATTIE PERRY, Superintendent. MARION.

        It is not controlled by any church or organization, but is owned by the superintendent.

        
Normal capacity, 150.  
Whole number in charge during 1910 130
Placed in families 60
Become self-supporting ...
Died 1
Remaining October 31, 1910 60

        Both sexes received; no age limit. Sewerage, fire protection and water supply. Literary and industrial courses taught. Twenty in high schools and colleges. Children are placed in families and are visited and an oversight kept of them. Special care taken of eyes, ears, throat and teeth of the children. We are well supported. Receipts were $5,560; disbursements, $5,515.

MATTIE PERRY,
Superintendent.

NORTH CAROLINA CHILDREN'S HOME SOCIETY.

W. B. STREETER, Superintendent. GREENSBORO.

        Capacity not limited.

        This association receives children from one day to sixteen years of age and places them in private families. It is an incorporated society with a board of directors. It is entirely supported by private contributions. The record of the children cared for during the last fiscal year is as follows:

        
Number of new cases 180
Received during the year 35
Placed in families first time 41
Transfers 22
Died 2
Remaining 9

        

FROM SEPTEMBER 15, 1903, TO MAY 31, 1910.

Number of cases to date 935
Children placed 366
Died 8
Adopted 12

Page 54

In institutions 6
Restored to relatives 34
Self-supporting 45
Girls married 5
In homes subject to visitation 256
Applications for children 1,300
Applications investigated 1,260
Applications from families for children this year 236
Investigated 215
Visits by agents during the year 367

        Total cost from September 15, 1903, to May 31, 1910, has been $45,545.28. With this amount of cash we helped solve the problems of the thousand cases presented and received into legal custody and placed in homes the number shown by the report.

        Fifteen acres of land at Durham has been donated the society for a receiving home, and operations have already begun looking towards its erection. It is two miles from the court-house on the macadam road, with every advantage of perfect drainage, good soil, etc. It will be fireproof, with capacity of thirty. At present children awaiting placement are cared for wherever we can secure board for them. The four departments of work are: 1. Investigation of the alleged need of each child reported, to find out what ought to be done. 2. Temporary care of those received into legal custody, pending final disposition. 3. Investigation as to their fitness of families that offer to take children into their homes. 4. Supervision of the children after placement.

W. B. STREETER,
Superintendent.

BUNCOMBE COUNTY CHILDREN'S HOME SOCIETY.

MISS PEARCE, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        This is a county institution, controlled and supported by the county.

        
Normal capacity, 25.  
Admitted during the year 22
Remaining 9

        Both sexes received. No epidemic or serious accident. Sewerage, fire protection and good water supply. Children are placed out in private homes and visited regularly.

GEORGE S. POWELL,
Chairman Board.

SOUTHERN ORPHANAGE AND INDUSTRIAL INSTITUTION FOR
COLORED.

        We are embarrassed by want of proper and ample means of support, hence have been forced to suspend the care of orphans for a season.

W. H. QUICK,
Superintendent.


Page 55

LINDLEY TRAINING SCHOOL.

MISS ISABEL R. WHALLON, Matron. ASHEVILLE.

        This is a rescue home for girls. It is interdenominational, and is supported by voluntary contributions. It is five miles from the city.

        
Normal capacity of the home, forty to fifty. Girls. Children.
Remaining at the end of the last fiscal year 14 13
Admitted during the year 14 ..
Whole number in charge during the year .. 58
Returned home 10 ..
To relatives or friends 3 ..
Placed in families 2 ..
Married 1 ..
Remaining October 31, 1910 12 10

        About 75 per cent reform. Rules for admission are $5 for entrance fee, physician's fee and board per month, according to ability. We endeavor by various methods to keep an oversight of the inmates after leaving the institution. Children are occasionally placed in private families. No, as a rule, we do not think that mothers should be relieved of the care of their children, though there may be exceptions. Expenditures and receipts have been $2,640.49. "Hitherto the Lord has helped us."

MRS. M. E. HILLIARD,
President.

CRITTENTON HOME.

MISS HATTIE L. CADET, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        This is a rescue home and is under the management of the Protestant churches of Charlotte. It is supported by contributions, fees and earnings of the Home.

        
Capacity for 25 girls and infants. Women. Children.
Remaining beginning of the fiscal year 12 12
Admitted during the year 9 ..
Whole number in charge during the year 21 16
Returned to relatives and friends 6 2
Placed in families 7 6
Remaining end of the fiscal year 8 8

        When possible the women seeking admission pay $35 for the year, the time they are expected to remain at the Home. No epidemic or serious accident. Health is very good. Ninety-five per cent reform. As far as possible they are overlooked after leaving the Home. Children are not placed in private homes except when placed with the mother also. We do not think it right to relieve the mother of the


Page 56

responsibility of her child. The eyes of the infants are carefully looked after at birth. The institution is well supported.

MISS HATTIE L. CADET,
Superintendent.

REST COTTAGE.

MISS WINFRED R. COX, Matron. GREENSBORO.

        Normal capacity, 30. The institution is supported by contributions of the public.

        
  Women. Infants.
Number of persons remaining end of fiscal year 11 5
Whole number during the year 43 25
Died .. 3
Eloped .. 2
Returned to relatives and friends 15 ..
Placed in families 25 ..

        About 85 per cent reform. They must desire to leave a wrong life and lead a Christian one. No epidemic or serious accident. Children are placed in private homes occasionally. Whether it is right to relieve the mother of the responsibility of the child depends upon the intellectual and financial ability of the mother.

MISS WINFRED R. COX,
Matron.

FAITH COTTAGE.

REV. LUCIUS B. COMPTON, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        This is a rescue home and is located at 53 Atkinson street, Asheville. It is non-denominational and is controlled by a board of managers. Supported by free will offerings.

        
Normal capacity of the Cottage is 16. Women. Children.
Number remaining at beginning of fiscal year 5 1
Admitted during the year 18 4
Born in the home .. 5
Whole number in charge 23 10
Died .. ..
Returned to relatives and friends 6 ..
Placed in families 6 ..
Eloped from the home 5 ..
Remaining end of the fiscal year 6 3

        It would be difficult to tell what per cent reform. We try to keep up with them by correspondence and visiting after they leave the institution. They must show a willingness to forsake their former life and remain in the home at least six months. No epidemic or serious


Page 57

accident. City fire department. The house is so arranged that escape in case of fire would be easy. We do not relieve mothers of their children unless they are unable to care for them. The eyes of all infants are carefully watched by physician. Receipts have been $1,932.54; expenditures, $1,570.68. Building has been painted, laundry and sewerage improved and heating plant installed.

HATTIE M. BYERS,
Secretary.

CATHERINE KENNEDY HOME.

MRS. ROGER MOORE, President. WILMINGTON.

        This is a home for old ladies who have had advantages in the earlier years of their lives. We have two methods of admission: one is to pay $100 fee and provide for burial; the other is to pay $12 per month by those who are able. We have two of the latter class. The Home is undenominational, supported by $5,000 endowment and voluntary offerings.

        
Capacity of the Home is 20.  
Number in charge at the beginning of the fiscal year 12
Admitted 1
Left voluntarily 1
Discharged 1
Remaining October 31, 1910 11

        Cistern water; sewerage and city fire department. Three applications on file. We can receive all applying provided conditions of admission are fulfilled. Receipts, $1,747.32; disbursements, $1,468.91.

MRS. ROGER MOORE,
President.

ST. LUKE'S HOME.

MRS. B. F. DIXON, Leader of St. Luke's Circle. RALEIGH.

        This Home for old ladies was established in 1895. It is maintained through the efforts of the Circle and the assistance of friends. Those seeking admission must be of sound mind, no contagious disease and able to pay a small amount for board, fire, lights, etc. There is good fire protection, water supply and sewerage.

        
Normal capacity of the Home is 20.  
Died during the year 4
Remaining at the end of the fiscal year 17

        Some applications have been refused and others are now on file. No alterations or improvements. No endowment.

MRS. B. F. DIXON,
Leader.


Page 58

ODD FELLOWS' HOME.

E. LEFF WAGONER, Superintendent. GOLDSBORO.

        It is supported by a per capita tax on the membership of the Odd Fellows. When unable to support himself an Odd Fellow is eligible to admission.

        
Normal capacity, 50. Men. Women.
Number remaining beginning of the fiscal year 1 1
Admitted during the year 1 ..
Died 1 ..
Remaining 1 1

        Receipts and disbursements, about $10 per month for each. No applications refused; some on file. There is adequate fire protection. Water supply and sewerage.

E. LEFF WAGONER,
Superintendent.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MRS. F. P. WILD, Secretary. ASHEVILLE.

        This association was organized in 1884, and then known as the "Flower Mission." We have a central office with a secretary in charge, hours from 9-12 and 3-5. Regular and frequent visits of the committee and friendly visitors.

        
Applicants for aid 575
Visits by Secretary 606

        Total receipts, $2,097.47; disbursements, $2,189.71.

        Special attention is given to keeping careful records of cases. No relief is given without thorough investigation, except in cases of emergency, such as bitter cold, extreme illness on order of some one connected with this charity. We have secured work for many and have ministered to the sick and dying with physician, food, nurse, bed linen, fuel and visitor. The report would not be complete without the acknowledgment of the invaluable aid of the Salvation Army and the service of a nurse, kindly furnished by Dr. R. S. Carroll. We have a committee who visits the County Home regularly, and we are now endeavoring to establish a laundry where the poor can work.

MRS. F. P. WILD,
Secretary.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

REV. G. T. ADAMS, Chairman. DURHAM.

        
Number of persons aided 300
Refused aid 50

        Receipts and disbursements for the year, $1,000. It has stopped street begging in a large measure. We are well supported by the


Page 59

people. We have no public annual meeting and have not begun any particular constructive work. We are in touch with other charities of the city, with the city physician and hospital.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

L. B. MYERS, Secretary. CHARLOTTE.

        The association was organized in October, 1909.

        
Received material aid 79
Refused aid 99

        Many more received aid in other ways--work, counsel, institutional care and put in touch with relatives and friends. Many refused material aid were helped in other ways. Receipts and disbursements have been about $1,000. Street begging has been greatly reduced. We find work for the unemployed, send children to school and furnish physicians and medicines to the sick. We have a work test. Have no nurse. We are well supported by the public. We publish reports in the daily press and have frequent articles in the papers; hold an annual meeting. We send delegates to the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, where these questions are discussed. We are in close touch with the other charities, the city physician and hospitals.

L. B. MYERS,
Secretary.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

REV. R. S. STEPHENSON, Superintendent. RALEIGH.

        The object of the association is to join the charitable forces of the city in a united effort to help the poor by upholding the family. Proper investigation of all cases is one of the governing principles.

        
Number of families aided during the year 900
Number of individuals helped 1,692
Number refused aid 110

        Receipts have been $2,725.96; disbursements, $2,398.63. Street begging has been almost eliminated. We are fairly well supported by the public. We hold annual meetings and publish monthly reports and articles in the daily papers. We send delegates to the National Conference of Charities and Corrections, where the expert workers in organized charities meet and discuss the problems incident to the work. We are in touch with other charities, the city physician and hospitals. We are now working for a fund to maintain a district nurse, a much felt need in this community.

REV. R. S. STEPHENSON,
Secretary.


Page 60

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MRS. A. L. COBLE, President. STATESVILLE.

        This organization was founded in 1903 under the name of the "Benevolent and Relief Association." There is a board of directors, consisting of two members from each church in the city. A dozen friendly visitors. There is thorough investigation in each case. Monthly meetings are held. The ministers of the city are honorary members. The association is fairly well supported by contributions from the churches and from a few individuals. The town gives a monthly contribution and the county will probably do so in the future. Special attention is paid to tuberculosis. Street begging has been greatly reduced and many families who had begged for years are now proudly self-supporting. A supply of wood is bought in the early fall and stored for use and delivered by the city wagons. Homes found for children, employment for those able to work. A nurse is frequently employment for those able to work. A nurse is frequently employed.

MRS. A. L. COBLE,
President.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MISS CARRIE L. PRICE, Secretary. WILMINGTON.

        This association was organized in 1893. There is a central office with a regular secretary in charge. It is supported by the county, the churches and individuals. There are friendly visitors and the committee holds regular and frequent meetings. The public is reached through the press, the annual meeting and the reports.

        
Number of families aided 126

        Receipts have been $3,046.30; disbursements, $2,745.86. Street begging has been greatly reduced. There is a district nurse supported by a circle of King's Daughters. The office rooms are provided by the county. We are in close touch with the other charities, the city physician and hospital. Have sent a delegate to only one meeting of the Conference of Charities.

CARRIE L. PRICE,
Secretary.

ASSOCIATED CHARITIES.

MISS ANNA GROGAN, Secretary. WINSTON-SALEM.

        This association was organized in 1905. Mrs. W. B. Taylor is President. The board meets monthly. The public is reached through the press and by public meetings. At the end of our fiscal year we held a union meeting in the largest church in town on Sunday night and the annual report was read and a nice sum realized.

        
Number of individuals helped 289
Refused aid 110


Page 61

        Receipts were $929.82; disbursements, $840.24. Street begging has been greatly reduced. We have a charity hospital for tuberculosis patients. During the year 400 visits were made, 234 garments distributed and work was secured for a number of persons. We have not sent delegates to the National Conference.

        We keep in touch with other charities, with the city physician and the hospitals. We are well supported by the public.

ANNA GROGAN,
Secretary.

BENEVOLENT SOCIETY.

MRS. SOLOMON WEIL, President. GOLDSBORO.

        This society has been in existence for twenty-five years.

        
Aided during the past year 50
Refused aid 5

        Receipts, $500; disbursements, $475. Street begging has been lessened greatly. We have a sewing class. We give wood and groceries, and in urgent cases pay rent. Orders are given and must be countersigned by the president. We have a public annual meeting and friendly visitors. Reports of work published. We have not sent a delegate to the National Conference.

MRS. SOLOMON WEIL,
President.


Page 62

Municipal and Private Hospitals for the Sick and
Injured

BILLINGSLEY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

MISS E. B. FLYNN, Superintendent. STATESVILLE.

        The hospital receives funds from the city.

        
Available beds, 10. Men. Women. Total.
Admitted during the last fiscal year 25 34 59
Died .. .. 7
Discharged cured or improved .. .. 52
Remaining end of fiscal year .. .. ..

        One regular nurse and sometimes two pupil nurses. Charity patients, 8. Schedule of charges, one and two dollars per day. We have sewerage and fire protection. No endowment. No insane or inebriates treated. No children's ward. Receipts were $1,423.09; expenditures, $62,424.59. The county and city paid jointly $1,001.79.

MISS E. B. FLYNN,
Superintendent.

CHARLOTTE SANATORIUM.

DR. REGISTER, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        No county or municipal funds received. It is a private institution for medical and surgical cases.

        
Available beds, 50. Men. Women. Total.
Number remaining at the beginning of the fiscal year 20 10 30
Admitted during the year 464 375 839
Died ... ... 21
Remaining at the end of fiscal year ... ... 35

        Thirty-two nurses. No charity patients. Schedule of charges, $2 to $6 per day. Fire protection. Good sewerage and water supply. Insured. No endowment fund. Expenditures, $35,291.61; receipts, $39,278.56. No children's ward.

DR. REGISTER,
Superintendent.

CLARENCE BARKER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

MISS M. H. TRIST, Superintendent. BILTMORE.

        This is a memorial hospital and is under the supervision of All Souls' Church and the vestry, with such other persons as they may associate with them. It has an endowment of $20,000. Nothing received from public funds.


Page 63

        
Available beds, 16. Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients admitted during the year 57 78 135
Died ... ... 2
Discharged ... ... 141
Whole number treated ... ... 143
Remaining October, 1910 ... ... 11

        Six nurses. Charity patients, 21. Schedule of charges for pay patients, $20, $15 and $8.50 per week. Good fire protection and insured. Sewerage. No insane or inebriates treated. No children's ward. Receipts were $9,822.18; expenditures, $11,162.

MISS MARY H. TRIST,
Superintendent.

S. R. FOWLE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

DR. J. L. NICHOLSON, Superintendent. WASHINGTON.

        This hospital was established in 1904. It is managed by a board of directors. General surgical and non-contagious medical cases received. No endowment and no public funds.

        
Available beds, 15. Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients remaining end of fiscal year 2 3 5
Admitted during the year ... ... 85
Died ... ... 2
Discharged ... ... 78
Remaining end of fiscal year ... ... 5

        Nurses, 5; charity patients, 10. Schedule of charges, $10 to $15 per week. It is not insured. Sewerage. No children's ward. Receipts, $2,200; disbursements, $3,500. We have added new sterilizer, cook range, and the grounds have been improved.

J. L. NICHOLSON, M.D.,
Superintendent.

WATTS HOSPITAL.

MISS MARY L. WYCHE, Superintendent. DURHAM.

        The following table gives the movement of population for the fiscal year:

        
Available beds, 70. Men. Women. Total.
Whole number treated during the year 308 427 735
Died ... ... 40
Remaining at end of fiscal year ... ... 33

        Public funds received for expenses, $3,600 from the city and $2,400 from the county. Endowment fund is $205,300, yielding $12,984 income.


Page 64

Expenditures have been $27,298.52; receipts were $8,673.20. Seventeen nurses. Charity patients, 420. Schedule of charges for pay patients, $10 to $25 per week.

        We have had applications for treatment of orthopædic cases and have treated them. Two new buildings in course of construction, but not yet completed.

MISS MARY L. WYCHE,
Superintendent.

(This hospital is the gift of Mr. George Watts to the city of Durham. With buildings and endowment it has cost about half a million and is the largest gift to any charity in the history of the State.)

ST. LEO'S HOSPITAL.

SISTER VERONICA, Superintendent. GREENSBORO.

        This modern, up-to-date hospital was opened for patients in 1906. No public funds received.

        
Available beds, 100. Men. Women. Total.
Number of patients remaining at the beginning of the fiscal year ... ... 30
Admitted during the year 308 478 786
Whole number treated ... ... 816
Died ... ... 39
Discharged ... ... 701
Remaining October 31, 1910 ... ... 46

        Nurses, 30; charity patients, 212. Schedule of charges, $1 to $3 per day. Hose and patent fire extinguishers on each floor. Insured. Sewerage. No insane or inebriates taken except in emergency cases.

SISTER VERONICA,
Superintendent.

ST. LUKE'S HOSPITAL.

DRS. T. MARSHALL WEST AND R. B. HAYES. FAYETTEVILLLE.

        This hospital is a strictly private general hospital conducted by Drs. T. Marshall West and R. B. Hayes. No state or municipal aid is received. The present management has only been in charge six months.

R. B. HAYES, M.D.

MISSION HOSPITAL.

MISS MARY P. LAXTON, Superintendent. ASHEVILLE.

        The hospital was organized in 1885 and is under a board of managers. The city and county each pay $100 per month on expenses.


Page 65

        
Available beds, 60.  
Number of patients remaining end of fiscal year 30
Admitted during the year 754
Whole number treated 784
Died 40
Discharged 715
Number remaining end of fiscal year 29

        Number of nurses, 18; charity patients, 525. Schedule of charges for pay patients, $12.50 to $25 per week. Sewerage. Fire protection and insured. Endowment, $13,000. Expenditures and receipts, about $15,000 per annum.

MARY P. LAXTON,
Superintendent.

JAMES WALKER MEMORIAL HOSPITAL.

DR. RALPH B. SEEM, Superintendent. WILMINGTON.

        This hospital was the gift of Mr. James Walker to the people of Wilmington and New Hanover County. The county pays $9,000 and the city $6,000 annually for support. Medical and surgical cases treated; chronic and incurable cases only temporarily.

        
Available beds, 85.  
Number remaining October 31, 1909 36
Admitted during the year 1,111
Died 92
Discharged 1,013
Number remaining October 31, 1910 42

        Nurses, 20. Charity patients, 628. Schedule of charges for pay patients, $7 to $9 per week in the wards; $15 and $20 per week in the rooms. We have fire protection, insured; sewerage. No endowment fund. Expenditures were $31,631.53; receipts, $31,283.17. No orthopædic cases treated; seldom have applications. We have added to our equipment by the installation of an electric elevator and increased the efficiency of our work by employing a dietitian and an assistant to the superintendent of nurses.

RALPH B. SEEM, M.D.

PITTMAN HOSPITAL.

MISS M. T. SHACKLEFORD, Superintendent. TARBORO.

        Available beds, 25. Nurses, 4. Schedule of charges, $7 to $25 per week. Fire protection. Insured. Sewerage. Endowment fund. No children's ward. Have had applications for orthopædic cases.

M. T. SHACKLEFORD,
Superintendent.


Page 66

PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITAL.

MISS ELLA H. MACNICHOLS, Superintendent. CHARLOTTE.

        This is a Presbyterian hospital and training school for nurses. No county or municipal funds are received.

        
Available beds, 45. Men. Women. Total.
Number remaining beginning of the fiscal year 8 25 33
Admitted during the year ... ... 650
Died ... ... 21
Discharged ... ... 640
Remaining October 31, 1910 ... ... 22

        Nurses, 20. Charity patients, 77. Charges for pay patients, $10 to $25 per week. Sewerage. Fire protection and insured. No endowment. Expenses were $15,500; receipts, $1,600. We have a children's ward. No crippled children treated.

MISS ELLA H. MACNICHOLS,
Superintendent.

RUTHERFORD HOSPITAL.

MISS A. D. BELT, Superintendent. RUTHERFORDTON.

        The county gives $500. There is a new annex for colored patients.

        
Available beds, 35.  
Number of patients remaining beginning of fiscal year 18
Admitted during the year 492
Whole number treated (including 241 out-patients) 733
Died (including accident cases) 10
Discharged 392
Remaining end of fiscal year 29

        Operation mortality 2 per cent. Nurses, 9. Charity patients, about 50. Charges, $10 and upward per week. We have sewerage; fire protection; insurance. No endowment. No children's ward but cases for orthopædic hospital have been treated. A new hospital of brick, thoroughly modern, is in course of construction, to be completed by January, 1911. Capacity, 60 beds.

HENRY NORRIS, M.D., President.

The patronage the hospital is receiving has outgrown the present building, which will be torn down when the new structure is completed. The new building will be constructed of brick with limestone facings. The front will be 124 feet with two wings, each 104 feet. Floors to be of maple with tiles in bath and operating rooms. It is modeled after the newest part of the University of Pennsylvania's Hospital.
Page 67

STEWART SANATORIUM.

MISS MAYBELLE S. COVINGTON, Superintendent. NEW BERN.

        This is a private hospital. One bed is maintained in the ward by Mr. Blades.

        City and county pay $10 per week for any patient sent in by them.

        
Available beds, 25.  
Number of patients at the end of the fiscal year 11
Admitted during the year 309
Died 12
Discharged 286
Remaining 11

        Nurses, 8. City cases, 27; county cases, 11. Ten dollars for ward bed and $18 per week for private room. Sewerage; fire protection and insurance. Some alcoholics. No children's ward. One case for orthopædic hospital. Several of the churches have had patients here. One dollar and thirty-five cents per day received for marine cases.

MAYBELLE S. COVINGTON,
Superintendent.

TWIN-CITY HOSPITAL.

MISS L. EUGENIA HENDERSON, Supt. WINSTON-SALEM.

        The two towns give $1,600 per annum. Some endowment.

        
Available beds, 30.  
Number remaining at the end of the last fiscal year 14
Admitted during the year 425
Whole number treated 439
Died 26
Discharged 392
Remaining end of fiscal year 21

        Number of nurses, 9. Charity patients, 172; day charity work, 1,596. Charges are $5, $10, $12.50, $15 and $18 per week. Sewerage; fire protection and insurance. One case for orthopædic hospital. No children's ward. Have built a sterilizing room with outfit; diet kitchen built and furnished; new bathrooms.

MISS EUGENIA HENDERSON,
Superintendent.

CRAGMONT SANATORIUM.

DR. I. J. ARCHER, Superintendent. BLACK MOUNTAIN.

        Available beds, 25.

        This is a private sanatorium for tubercular patients. Nurses, 2. Schedule of charges, $20 to $35 per week. It is insured and has fire protection, sewerage and good water supply.

I. J. ARCHER, M.D., Superintendent.


Page 68

Hospitals Exclusively for the Colored

LEONARD MEDICAL SCHOOL HOSPITAL.

        Available beds, 50.

        This hospital is maintained in connection with Shaw University Medical School. The old building is closed for repairs. The new hospital, to cost $30,000, is in course of construction. The city pays $5 per week for cases sent by it. We have a children's ward and treat from five to ten cases of crippled children annually, such cases as would be cared for in an orthopædic hospital.

C. O. ABERNETHY,
Acting Dean Med. Dept. Shaw University.

PICKFORD SANITARIUM.

DR. L. A. SCRUGGS, Superintendent. SOUTHERN PINES.

        This hospital is for the treatment of negro consumptives. No funds received from county or town. Contributions from friends.

        
Available beds, 24.  
Number of patients remaining at the beginning of the year 4
Admitted during the year 24
Out-patients 60
Whole number treated 84
Died at the hospital 0
Outside mission 8

        The hospital is closed from May 1st to November 1st. One nurse. Charity patients, 57. The charge is $15 per month. Fire protection and insurance needed. No sewerage. No endowment. Expenditures and receipts were $649.69.

        The negro is the great source of spreading tuberculosis. The State is not only duty-bound to establish a place for his care as a consumptive, but seems impelled to do so in self-defense. The negro is the servant for the most part in the home of the white race in North Carolina as cook, laundress, nurse and custodian of the children, and serves in bedrooms, dining-rooms, etc. He is the same as mentioned above in his own home at night! Then, too, these servants often do the laundry work, and for themselves also, living and going from infected houses, giving the entire State a double source of infection. This information I have carefully gathered during a quarter of a century in professional life.

L. A. SCRUGGS, M.D.,
Superintendent.


Page 69

County Homes

ALAMANCE.

        The Home is as previously reported. Now in charge, 16. No insane, no epileptic. Plenty of good food in such variety as in general use. Cost per capita monthly, $5.50. Superintendent is J. F. Tarpley, Burlington, R. F. D. No. 9. He is satisfactory. Pay, $25 per month and board of family. Physician, Dr. J. W. Long, Graham. Salary, $150 per year. Two deaths--one from consumption, the other heart trouble. Seven are able to do light work. Premises in very good condition. Sixty acres, 45 in cultivation. Wheat, corn, oats and vegetables. Religious services provided during the summer season. No children. Outdoor relief to 69 at an average cost of $1.48 per month. General impression is favorable; management, good.

REV. J. W. HOLT.

J. A. TURRENTINE.

P. H. FLEMING.

Received March 19, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The buildings are unchanged since last report. Now in charge, 22. One colored male epileptic. One very old colored man whose mind is enfeebled. No deaths. Premises and kitchen in fair condition. Three infants born in the Home. Outdoor relief to 77 at an average rate of $1.50 per month. General impression is favorable.

REV. J. W. HOLT.

P. H. FLEMING.

J. A. TURRENTINE.

Received October 25, 1910.

ALLEGHANY.

        The County Home is about two miles from the county seat. Three buildings one story, two 20 × 18 feet, and one 60 × 18. Well ventilated by windows. Open fires. Spring. Can accommodate 20. In charge, 3. One helpless. No insane or epileptic. No children. Sufficient amount of food. The superintendent is Thomas Nichols. He receives $1.50 per week each and use of the farm. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. B. O. Choate, Sparta. Paid $2 per visit. The inmates are reasonably well cared for. The Superintendent and family live in the Home. Good condition; the buildings are new. Kitchen good. Seventy acres, 35 in cultivation. Four or five head of cattle. Religious services once in a while. Outdoor relief to four or five at $4 per month. General impression is favorable.

W. F. JONES.

Received July 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the Home since the last report.

W. F. JONES.

Received September 8, 1910.
Page 70

ANSON.

        The home is two miles from the county seat. Six buildings; ventilated by windows and doors. Pump in the yard. Open fires. Can accommodate 40. Now in charge, 26. Two insane. One colored male epileptic. None confined. Good food. All go to the table except the insane and the helpless. The Superintendent receives $125 and board for self and family and use of the farm. He is entirely satisfactory. Dr. J. M. Covington, Jr., Wadesboro, is the physician. Paid by the visit. Four admitted in six months; died, 2. Premises neat and well kept. Kitchen clean. One hundred and thirty acres good land; 15 in cultivation. Corn, cotton, potatoes and vegetables raised. Occasional religious services by local ministers. No children. Some outdoor relief given. General impression of the management is favorable.

DR. J. M. BOYETTE.

Received March 11, 1910.

ASHE.

        The Home is about four miles from the county seat. Five frame buildings; one and two rooms each. Ventilated by windows and open fireplaces. No fire protection. Spring. None can be comfortably cared for. Eighteen now in charge. Five whites, insane; one epileptic. None of these confined. All they want of good, mountain rations. Cost, $1.33 per week by contract. Superintendent is W. R. Brown, Crumpler. He receives 19 cents per day and free use of the farm. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. C. Testerman, Jefferson. Paid by the visit. Admitted in six months, 2. No deaths. The sick are well cared for. It is an old, run-down farm, and buildings not in good repair. One hundred acres very poor land. Four cows. Two or three acres in cultivation. Occasional religious services in warm weather. No room of sufficient size for cold weather. Two infants too small to be placed out. Outdoor relief at an average rate of $1 to $20. The impression of the management is favorable under the conditions.

        Remarks.--The Commissioners have sold the present Home and are contemplating the purchase of a better farm and erecting good buildings so that the poor can be comfortably cared for.

W. H. WORTH.

Received March 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The old County Home has been sold and a new one purchased two miles from the county seat. Inmates at the old Home still temporarily.

W. H. WORTH.

Received September 11, 1910.

BERTIE.

        There has been no change in the Home since the last report.

J. H. MATTHEWS.

Received April 22, 1910.
Page 71

BURKE.

        The Home is unchanged as to buildings. In charge, 14 idiots--six white men, six white women and two colored women. Of these two are epileptic and one confined. Superintendent is A. D. Gibbs, R. F. D. No. 4. Physician is E. W. Phifer, Morganton. Sick are well cared for. One hundred and six acres; 15 in cultivation.

        Remarks.--The Home is in good shape and Mr. Gibbs is doing all that can be done.

R. T. CLAYWELL.

MISS WILHELMINA TATE.

MRS. GAITHER.

Received September 29, 1910.

CALDWELL.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. The Superintendent is Marion Hodges, Lenoir, R. F. D. No. 1. County physician is Dr. C. L. Wilson; paid by the visit. Two admitted in six months. One death--tuberculosis. The sick are well cared for. One blind boy.

DR. C. L. WILSON.

Received April 27, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged as to building. Now in charge, 7; five of these weak-minded. The Superintendent receives $6 per month each and all he can make on the farm. No deaths. No children. Outdoor relief to about thirty at from $1 to $10 per month. Other items previously reported. Favourable impression.

C. L. WILSON, M.D.

Received September 3, 1910.

CAMDEN.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Superintendent is Malachi Sawyer, Camden. He receives $10 per month and use of the buildings. This is nothing more than a compensation for taking care of the buildings, as there is only one inmate. Only two in charge in six months. One improved in health and was discharged.

        Remarks.--I regard the management by the Board of County Commissioners as very economical, not only at the Home, but in the public affairs generally. At present there is no outdoor relief.

GEORGE H. RIGGS.

Received April 28, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the buildings, etc. Only one white woman cared for, and the keeper looks well after her comfort.

GEO. H. RIGGS.

Received October 11, 1910.

CARTERET.

        There is no county home in this county.

MRS. W. H. HENDRICKS.

September 23, 1910.
Page 72

CASWELL.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report as to buildings. Now in charge, 18. Six helpless; none insane. One colored female epileptic. None confined. Supplied a good, nutritious diet. Average cost, $1.50 per week. Superintendent is E. B. Barker, Yanceyville. Receives $150 per year. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. S. A. Malloy, M.D., Yanceyville. Salary, $150 per year. Two admitted in six months. No deaths; no discharge. The sick are well cared for. The buildings are in splendid repair. A new frame building for the kitchen. Crops are corn, tobacco, wheat, oats, peas, beans, potatoes. Used to support the Home. Different denominations hold services. No children. Outdoor relief to 80.

        Remarks.--A new kitchen and wash-house has been built since the last report, and a new range put in. The row of houses used by the colored inmates has been covered with tin and a long porch built on the west side.

S. A. MALLOY, M.D.

Received March 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        Buildings have been covered with a tin roof and a porch built across the front. Now in charge, 18. No deaths. No children. Premises and kitchen in good condition. Other items unchanged.

S. A. MALLOY, M.D.

Received September 8, 1910.

CATAWBA.

        The Home is six miles from the county seat. One large, two-story building and a kitchen and dining room. Ventilated by windows and doors. Well and pump. Open fires. Now in charge, 23; two idiots. Good, wholesome food. Superintendent is Oren Cline, Conover. Physician is Dr. Blackburn, Hickory. He receives $350. Died, two in six months. Premises in very good condition. Two hundred acres of land; about fifty to seventy-five in cultivation. Crops are wheat, corn, oats and vegetables, used at the Home generally. Regular monthly religious services. One idiotic negro child and one infant.

        Remarks.--I think our poor are well cared for. I visited the Home on yesterday; found all in fairly good health and fairly well satisfied except a few old folks, who are not satisfied anywhere.

REV. M. A. ABERNETHY.

Received September 7, 1910.

CHOWAN.

        The Home is unchanged as to buildings. Now in charge, 6. Two colored women insane but not confined; one epileptic. M. M. Harrell is Superintendent, Tyner, R. F. D. No. 3. Physician is Dr. H. M. S. Cason, Edenton. Four admitted in six months. No deaths. Three


Page 73

discharges. Premises in good condition. No children. General impression of the management is favorable. Other items unchanged.

REV. ROBERT B. DRANE.

WILLIAM B. SHEPARD.

Received June 18, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. Seven in charge. Three insane; one epileptic. Two admitted in six months. One death from consumption. Three discharged. No children. Some outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

        Remarks.--One old lady is fond of knitting. Is there any provision for supplying materials to such an one?

REV. ROBT. B. DRANE.

Received September 29, 1910.

CLAY.

        This institution has been abandoned at present. No one in charge.

L. F. SHUFORD.

Received March 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        Mr. Scroggs has charge of the Home again. There are no inmates, while five or six in the county receive aid. The county should build another department for the colored as there are several who should be at the Home. The Home should be enlarged and fitted for the reception of those receiving aid. Mr. Scroggs is a good man and makes a good keeper.

L. F. SHUFORD.

Received September 6, 1910.

DARE.

        The Home is unchanged as to buildings. There are two--one and two rooms respectively. Can accommodate 10. Now in charge, 2. One of these an insane colored man. No admissions in six months and no deaths. About six acres, with three or four in cultivation. No stock. No children. I believe that there is fairly good management.

CHARLES L. MANN.

Received March 11, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since last report. Only two inmates. Farm fairly good land; small. General impression is fairly good. No great need for it in this county at present, and hope there will not be, as the population is small.

CHARLES L. MANN.

Received September 3, 1910.

DAVIE.

        The buildings are as heretofore reported. Well. Stoves and open fires. Now in charge, 7. Two insane--one white and one colored. As much as they wish to eat. Dr. M. D. Kimbrough, Mocksville, is the


Page 74

physician. Two deaths in six months. Crops are cotton and corn. Two horses. No children. Premises not neat or in good condition. Dilapidated and out of repair.

        Remarks.--I found the Home in bad shape. The keeper's wife died in the last few months and the children are doing the work. Those poor creatures have not a comfort on earth. Every room there was filthy save one. I took them a little treat and they were as delighted as children.

MRS. A. M. NAIL.

Received June 13, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the building. Now in charge, five colored and one white. One white woman idiotic. One inmate entirely helpless and blind. Sick are not well cared for. Buildings dilapidated and not well arranged.

        Remarks.--Our County Home is a disgrace to Davie. There is not one comfort--even the very beds are scanty. I questioned some of the inmates and they said that the keeper was kind to them.

MRS. A. M. NAIL.

Received September 21, 1910.

DUPLIN.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge 3. Died in six months, 3; all very old. Those now in charge are white. One a paralytic man who has been there for several years. The second is a woman who has deformed feet and has been there twenty years; the third has been there about a year. One epileptic recently sent to the hospital. Discharged, 2. We have no regular services, but occasionally get several and hold prayer meeting for them, which they seem to enjoy very much. The Home is well kept, and they seem to be very comfortable.

A. P. FARRIOR.

Received June 29, 1910.

EDGECOMBE.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Now in charge, 36. One epileptic confined. As much as wanted of good, wholesome food at a cost of $2.50 per week for each inmate. Superintendent is W. T. Gerhan, R. F. D. No 3, Tarboro. He receives $37.50 per month. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. Bass, Tarboro. Salary, $50 per month. Admitted in six months, 9; died, 5; discharged, 1. Premises and kitchen in good condition. One hundred acres in cultivation. Five mules. Corn, grain and vegetables; disposed for benefit of the Home. Open to all denominations for religious services. Two small children. Outdoor relief to more than a hundred at a dollar a month.


Page 75

        Remarks.--The Home for the Aged and Infirm in this county is kept in very good condition and the inmates are well cared for.

F. H. PENDER.

Received July 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report.

F. H. PENDER.

Received August 29, 1910.

FORSYTH.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 48. Three insane--one white man, one colored man and one colored woman--all confined. One colored woman an epileptic. All the food they want supplied by the farm. Superintendent is C. C. Flynt. Receives $50 per month and board and rooms for self and family. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. J. K. Pepper, Winston-Salem. Received for services as county physician during the fiscal year, $2,442.39. admitted in six months, 16; died, 11--two from tuberculosis. The sick are well cared for. They are new buildings, well arranged, neat and in good condition. Kitchen clean. Two hundred and fifty acres good land; 100 in cultivation. Four mules, five cows and 25 hogs. Crops are wheat, corn, oats, potatoes and vegetables for use of the Home. Some grain is sold each year. Religious services are held regularly each month by the different pastors of the city. Outdoor relief to 9 persons at an average cost of $4 per month. General impression of the management is very good.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND, Chairman.

MRS. C. J. FOLTZ.

W. P. HILL.

H. W. FOLTZ, Secretary.

Received May 24, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        There has been no change in the Home. There are six fire extinguishers at the main building and two at the barn. Forty-nine now in charge. Four insane. Two of these confined all the time. One colored epileptic not counted with the insane. Eighteen have been admitted in six months and seven have died. Seven discharged. Premises and kitchen neatly kept; clean and in good condition. Raised this year 1,200 bushels of corn and 529 bushels of wheat. One hundred acres in cultivation. Extra corn and wheat is sold. A white woman, feebleminded, brought in last week with a two-year-old child, and has since given birth to another infant; both colored. Nine receive outdoor relief at an average of $4 per month.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND.

MRS. C. J. FOLTZ.

W. P. HILL.

Received November 5, 1910.
Page 76

GATES.

        No change in the buildings since the last report. Now in charge, 10. Three helpless. No insane or epileptic. Three wholesome meals. Cost less than a dollar per week. Mrs. M. E. Riddick, Gatesville, is Superintendent. Died, 1; old age. Houses for the inmates are neat and the keeper's house has been thoroughly repaired. The location is high and well drained and in good condition generally. Occasional services by the Home Missionary Society. No children.

S. P. CROSS.

Received September 16, 1910.

GASTON.

        The Home is unchanged. Can accommodate 40. Now in charge, 20. One white man insane. One colored man epileptic. One confined. All they want of good, wholesome food. Cost, $2 per week each. C. C. Craig, Dallas, is the Superintendent; $400 per year. He is satisfactory. Dr. L. N. Glenn, Gastonia, is the physician. Admitted in six months, 12. Died, five: three from tuberculosis. Sick are well cared for. One hundred and fourteen acres; 50 in cultivation. Two mules. Crops are cotton, corn and vegetables. No provision for religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to about 60 at $2 per month. General impression is favorable.

J. P. REID.

Received May 18, 1910.

GRANVILLE.

        The Home is situated about a mile from the county seat in a beautiful oak grove. Three brick buildings, four frame buildings and a chapel. Ventilated well. Well and pump. Open fires. Can accommodate 35. Now in charge, 20. Four insane women, two white and two colored; none confined. Plenty of good food. Total cost, $75 per month. Superintendent is W. S. Daniel, R. F. D. No. 6, Oxford. Superintendent and wife receive $65 per month in money. He is a very good man. Physician is Dr. S. D. Booth. Admitted in six months, 2; died, 3. All the buildings have been newly painted and covered; all neat and in good condition. Kitchen good. Three hundred acres: most of it sandy land; 60 in cultivation. Three mules, 1 horse, 7 milch cows, 5 young cows and 30 hogs. Crops are corn, tobacco, peas, potatoes, grass and clover and vegetables. All used at the farm except tobacco and extra food. Regular religious services once a month. One blind boy, feebleminded. One colored boy, twelve years old, should be in an orphanage. Outdoor relief to 175 at a cost of $2 per month.

        Remarks.--There has been much improvement at the County Home since the last report.

D. N. HUNT.

W. S. HESTER.

Received June 6, 1910.
Page 77

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. Buildings in good condition and present a fine appearance. One death; one discharge in six months. General impression is favorable. Other items previously answered.

D. N. HUNT.

W. S. HESTER.

J. H. BULLOCK.

Received September 14, 1910

HALIFAX.

        The Home is three miles from the county seat. Ten frame buildings; well ventilated. Well. Open fires. Can accommodate 40. Now in charge, 30. One colored woman insane. Two white men, one colored man and one colored woman epileptic. Average per capita cost monthly, $4. Superintendent is W. B. Drewry, R. F. D. No. 2, Halifax. Salary, $25 per month. Dr. I. E. Green, Weldon, is physician. Salary, $500 per annum. Admitted in six months, 3; died, 7--one from tuberculosis. Sick fairly well cared for. Four hundred acres poor land; 35 or 40 in cultivation. Corn, peas, potatoes. Preaching once a month by Rev. O. G. Willcox. No children. No outdoor relief General impression is favorable.

D. R. ANDERSON.

W. F. COPPEDGE.

Received May 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the Home. Twenty-nine persons now there: four colored insane and five epileptics. Of the latter three are white women. Admitted, 1; discharged, 1; died, 1. Premises and kitchen in good condition. One idiotic child. General impression is favorable.

D. R. ANDERSON.

W. F. COPPEDGE.

Received October 17, 1910.

HARNETT.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. No one in care of the Home at present. F. J. Cox is the Superintendent.

DR. J. H. WITHERS.

Received May 13, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        Three frame buildings. Open fireplaces. Well. The buildings are plastered and well lighted. One for the keeper's family and one for inmates. One hundred acres of half-cleared but good farming land. Corn and cotton chiefly grown and rents go to the county. About thirty-eight persons receive $2 per month each from the county. None in charge at the Home for about a year.

        Remarks.--The outside poor should receive more help or be required to live at the Home.

J. H. WITHERS.

H. T. FAUCETT.

Received November 12, 1910.
Page 78

HAYWOOD.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Three suffering from epilepsy have been sent to the hospital at Raleigh. Three veterans have died in the Home since the last report. Superintendent is Mr. Moody, Canton, R. F. D. No. 2. Physician is Dr. McCracken, Waynesville. Three deaths in the last six months. I think that the sick are fairly well cared for. There is a good farm, neatly kept and the kitchen is clean. Corn, wheat and vegetables raised. Occasional religious services One little girl who should soon be placed in a home for children. General impression is favorable.

        I have visited the County Home in May since the regular Christmas visit I always make. Found the inmates fairly well except one old lady. Our new Home has not yet been built. The Commissioners are in favor of selling the farm and buying a place nearer Waynesville, which would be much better in many respects.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received October 15, 1910.

HENDERSON.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 5. Three white male epileptics; none confined. Superintendent is John C. Parker, Hendersonville. He receives $25 per month and home. He is satisfactory. Admitted in six months, 1. No deaths. No children. No outdoor reief.

        Remarks.--The County Home is under new management with a new system of finances.

MRS. LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received March 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        Six rooms have been added since the last report. Can accommodate 15. Now in charge, 7. One white epileptic. Admitted in six months, 2; died, 1. Premises and kitchen very good. No children. No outdoor relief. The Home is in good condition and inmates well cared for.

MRS. LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received September 26, 1910.

HERTFORD.

        The Home is about seven miles from the county seat. Four buildings besides the Superintendent's home. Pump, stoves and fireplaces. Can accommodate 15. Now in charge, 8. One white female who is very feeble-minded. Good, substantial food. Cost, $1.72 per week for each person. M. M. Brown is superintendent. Address, Ahoskie, R. F. D. He receives $225 per year and no perquisites. Physician is Dr. J. H. Mitchell, Ahoskie. One death. Four admitted and two children removed. Keeper and his family give necessary attention to all inmates. Premises neat, clean and well kept. Kitchen good. Sixty-five acres, 25


Page 79

in cultivation. Horse, cow and hogs. Crops are cotton, peanuts, corn and vegetables. The latter used for the home and the former turned into cash. Occasional religious services. One negro infant with its mother. General impression is very favorable--good as can be under the circumstances.

W. P. SHAW, Chairman.

J. A. NORTHCOTT.

Received September 9, 1910.

IREDELL.

        The Home is six miles from the county seat. Fourteen frame buildings; ventilated by windows and doors. No special fire protection. Well. Open fires and stoves. Can accommodate thirty. Twenty-four now in charge. One white woman insane but not confined. Good food in ample quantity. Average cost per capita, $5 per month. W. C. Perry, Barium Springs, is Superintendent. He receives $360 a year. He is a fine officer. Dr. M. R. Adams, Statesville, is the physician. Salary, $20 per month. Ten deaths, chiefly from infirmities of age. The buildings are rather old and dilapidated but reasonably comfortable. Kitchen good. Two hundred and thirty-five acres of good land; 60 in cultivation. Two mules. Wheat, corn, oats and vegetables raised for benefit of the Home. Religious services by the ministers of different denominations. Outdoor relief to a number of persons at an average of $3 per quarter. General impression of the Home is favorable.

        Remarks.--Special dinners are sent by the ladies of the town to the Home on Thanksgiving and Christmas. It is much desired that our County Home should be moved nearer to Statesville, and it is hoped that as soon as the county finances recover from the expense of building the fine new jail, that we can build a new, commodious and comfortable Home on a site near town where water and electric lights may be had from the town plants.

MRS. A. L. COBLE.

MRS. D. A. MILLER.

DR. HARRILL.

Received November 10, 1910.

JONES.

        The Home is about two miles from the county seat. Pump. Open fires. In charge, 2. None insane. Good variety of food and all they want. Superintendent is H. Pollock, Trenton. He receives $25 per year and he is allowed to furnish supplies from his store. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. A. F. Hammond, Pollocksville. None admitted in six months; no deaths. The building is good. Surroundings are bad, situation is bad, out of the way, lonely. Kitchen in good condition. Twenty-five acres and two cleared. The land is rented out. No children. Outdoor relief to four at $4 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

F. W. FOSCUE.

JULIAN K. WARREN.

Received March 28, 1910.
Page 80

SECOND REPORT.

        The Commissioners have purchased a nice place about one mile from the county seat on the main road and will build a new Home. It will be made comfortable and convenient. The people visit the inmates on special occasions and carry them things. Religious services several times a year.

J. K. WARREN.

Received August 31, 1910.

LEE.

        There is no Home in this county.

LYNN MCIVER, M.D.

Received September 12, 1910.

LINCOLN.

        We have a splendid new County Home, built of brick, heated by furnace with lights and water. It is on the public road and in sight of the railroad, so that every one can see it. This is a great advantage, the county is proud of it, and it is really a credit to any county. The inmates of the old home have not yet been moved to the new quarters because of a recent case of smallpox there and we have been unable to make the regular visit.

MISS KATE C. SHIPP.

MRS. R. S. REINHARDT.

DR. I. R. SELF.

REV. W. R. MINTER.

Received March 13, 1910.

MACON.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 8. Two insane; 1 epileptic. None confined. The Superintendent receives $6 per month for each inmate and the crops from the farm. Physician is Dr. S. H. Lyle, Franklin. He receives $100 per year. None admitted or died in six months; one discharged. Kitchen good. No children. Outdoor relief to 30 at $2.50 per month. Management as good as can be with the means at hand.

        Remarks.--The sick are well cared for in a general way, but particular cases do not have the special care required. The epileptic is in the care of an infirm old woman, an inmate, who at times needs a caretaker herself. Some of the buildings need a new roof.

REV. J. A. DEAL.

W. H. WIGGINS.

THEODORE ANDREWS.

Received April 8, 1910.

MADISON.

        The Home is two miles west of the county seat in a beautiful location. Two frame houses, two stories and long porches. Ventilated by windows


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and vent pipes. Three rooms in the superintendent's house. Four dormitories, four day wards, dining room, kitchen, two bath rooms and two cells for insane. Waterworks, artesian well, furnace. Can accommodate seventy-five. Now in charge, 18. One helpless: no insane. Good, wholesome food, not limited. Superintendent is James Haynie, R. F. D. No. 2. He receives $5 per month for feeding each person. Dr. W. J. Weaver, Marshall, is the physician. He receives $300 per year. Five admitted in six months; died, 4; discharged, 8. Sick well cared for. Premises neat, clean, new and well arranged. Kitchen clean and well arranged. Forty or fifty acres, not very good land. Six acres in cultivation; no stock. Presbyterian minister has services once a month. There are two boys--one an imbecile and is to go to the North Carolina Children's Home Society. Outdoor relief to 8 at $4 per month. General impression is favorable.

REV. W. E. FINLEY, Chairman.

J. H. WHITE.

DR. W. J. WEAVER.

Received September 6, 1910.

McDOWELL.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. None insane. No children.

        Remarks.--The ladies of the committee made this visit. They think that more male help or a stronger person to provide comforts would be better. Should be a good supply of wood on hand for fuel.

JOHN M. HOUCK.

Received February 21, 1910.

MITCHELL.

        There is no Home at present in this county.

W. H. OLLIS.

Received January 5, 1910.

MARTIN.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Can accommodate twenty or more. Now in charge, 8. One insane epileptic, not confined. Superintendent is James D. Bowen, Williamston. He receives $25 per month. He is satisfactory. Dr. William E. Warren is county physician. Salary $120 per year. None admitted in six months; died 1. Premises all right in every respect. Kitchen good and perfectly sanitary. Religious services. No children. About twenty receive outdoor relief. General impression of the management is favorable.

WILLIAM E. WARREN, M.D.

Received March 7, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report.

DR. W. E. WARREN.

Received September 2, 1910.
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MONTGOMERY.

        The Home is two miles from the county seat. It is a new brick building with a main building and two wings. Well ventilated. Stoves. Well. Can accommodate 25; now in charge, 10. Insane, 4, one of these an epileptic. None confined. Sufficient amount of food. Superintendent receives $8.50 per month for each inmate. He is C. W. Bell, Troy. Physician is Dr. Charles Daligny, Troy. Salary, $50 per year for service to home and jail. None admitted in six months. Died, 1. The building is new, well arranged and in good sanitary condition. Kitchen very good. One hundred and twenty-five acres. Average land; most of it in wood. Five acres cultivated; vegetables for the Home. Preaching once a month by local ministers. No children. A number receive outdoor relief.

        Remarks.--The Home is in very good condition, but sewerage ought to be provided; also a driven well and reservoir to furnish water for the house and for fire protection.

R. T. POOLE.

C. DALIGNY, M.D.

Received July 1, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report.

R. T. POOLE.

Received July 1, 1910.

MOORE.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 7. Bored well, 175 feet deep. Three insane and confined. All women--1 white, 2 colored. One is also epileptic. Good, substantial food at a cost of $2.50 per week. Superintendent is D. H. Muse, Carthage. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. Gilbert McLeod, Carthage. Receives $1 per visit. Admitted, 1 in six months. Premises neat and in good condition. Kitchen good. No provision for religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to 46 at an average of $3.50 per month. General impression of the management is favorable.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received March 17, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in buildings. Eight in charge at a per capita cost of $10 per month each. No children. Outdoor relief to forty-nine at a cost of $3 per month each. Impression is favorable.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received September 11, 1910.

NEW HANOVER.

        The Home is as heretofore reported as to buildings. Now in charge, 17. Two insane; one of these epileptic also. Confined occasionally. As much as they want of wholesome food. Superintendent is H. C.


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Blake, Wilmington. He receives $40 per month and part of the crop. Physician is W. D. McMillan, M.D. Died, 2. In cultivation, 75 acres. Religious services by the Y. M. C. A. No children.

        Remarks.--We have a new Superintendent, who came in about two months ago and could not find the records of his predecessor. The Home is being thoroughly painted and cleaned inside and all the rooms have recently been furnished with new iron bedsteads, mattresses and blankets, which add greatly to the appearance and comfort of the place. I would be glad if the veteran could be sent to the Soldiers' Home. He is very lonely and destitute.

A. G. HANKINS

Received March 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is not changed. Now in charge, 14. Of these one is insane, but not confined. Superintendent is paid a salary and a part of the crop. One death in six months. Religious services on Sunday. Some outdoor relief. I am glad to be able to make a favorable report.

A. G. HANKINS.

J. T. KERR.

Received November 16, 1910.

ONSLOW.

        There is no County Home. The county pays to the outside poor annually $3,000. In a few years they will have paid out enough to buy and fit up a nice County Home.

G. H. SIMMONS.

Received July 19, 1910.

ORANGE.

        The Home is five miles from the county seat on the highest point in the vicinity. Two brick buildings, six rooms in each. Well. Open fires. Can accommodate 30; now in charge, 12. All able to do light work. No insane or epileptic. Wholesome food. Cost, $5 per month for each inmate. Superintendent is R. D. Bain, Efland, R. F. D. No. 1. He receives $400 per annum and is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. C. D. Jones, Hillsboro. He receives $3 for each monthly visit. None admitted and no deaths in six months. There are no bedridden or very sick now. The keeper and his wife care for them, helped by the strongest inmates. They could do basket weaving and knitting. The premises are well arranged, neat and clean; whitewashed inside once a year, outside once in two years. The kitchen is a typical country kitchen, as neat as the average one. Six hundred acres; 90 in cultivation. Four cows, 2 mules and a horse; 8 hogs and chickens. Crops are corn, wheat, oats and vegetables, all used at the Home. No provision for religious services. Two colored men go to a church near. No children. Outdoor relief to 17 at cost of $1.25.

        Remarks.--The keeper and his family seem to be very pleasant and good natured. Premises attractively clean. The inmates are all old


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and quite feeble, but able to help in the cooking, cleaning, etc. They seem fairly contented, comfortable and cheerful. Three are less strong mentally than others.

MARY I. TINNIN.

N. W. BROWN.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the buildings. Now in charge, 12, and 8 are feeble-minded. None confined. All the food they want at an average per capita monthly of $5. The premises are well arranged, fairly neat and in fair condition. Kitchen is used as the dining room and is unattractive. Six hundred acres; 85 in cultivation. No religious services, but plans for services being made. No children. Outdoor relief cost $50 per month. Most of the inmates are like the harmless patients in the hospital.

MARY I. TINNIN.

N. W. BROWN.

Received September 29, 1910.

PASQUOTANK.

        There have been no changes at the Home. Now in charge, 18. As much food as needed of good quality. Superintendent is Samuel Jarvis, Elizabeth City. He receives $200 and is a satisfactory officer. Physician is Dr. H. T. Aydlett, Elizabeth City. Paid $300 for all the county work. Admitted, two in six months; one death. Sick well cared for by other inmates. Premises well arranged. Houses in good repair. Trees planted about the yard. Kitchen good. General crops and vegetables. Occasional services by ladies. No children. No punishment. One inmate confined in prison. He fought with another inmate, who died from the effect of the blow. General impression of the management is favorable.

REV. E. W. STONE.

Received March 11, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the building. Now in charge, 17. Insane, 8; four of these are epileptic also. One epileptic besides. Two occasionally confined. Two admitted and two deaths in six months. Sick are as well cared for as practicable under the present system; inmates who are able do the nursing. Premises well kept; buildings in good repair. Kitchen clean. Three acres; two in cultivation. Occasional religious services by the ladies. One woman confined for disobedience and quarreling. No outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

REV. E. W. STONE.

Received September 14, 1910.

PERSON.

        The Home is about a mile from the county seat. Three brick buildings, 16 feet square. Wells. Open fires. No special fire protection. Can accommodate 40. Now in charge, 15; helpless, 2. No insane. As


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much food as is necessary. The superintendent is S. M. Morris, R. F. D., Roxboro. He receives $20 per month and support for family of four. Dr. T. Long, Roxboro, is the physician. One death in six months. Sick are well cared for. Premises neat and attractive; everything looks clean. Kitchen well kept. Three hundred and seven acres good land; 50 in cultivation; three horses, cows and hogs. Corn, tobacco and vegetables used for the support of the Home. They made a support last year. Fine shade. Preaching twice a month in reach of the Home--the Baptist and the Methodist churches. There are five children with their mother. No attempt has been made to put them in an orphanage. No outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

REV. E. W. SNIPES.

Received September 6, 1910.

PERQUIMANS.

        The Home is four miles from the county seat. Four buildings. Driven well for drinking water and dug well for other purposes. Stoves. Now in charge, 10; one insane white woman; one colored woman, an epileptic. None confined. Good and wholesome food. Cost about 11 cents per day for each inmate. Simon Stallings is superintendent. He receives $67.50 per quarter and use of the farm. He is satisfactory. Dr. T. S. McMullan is physician; $200 per year. Died, 1. Sick well cared for. Houses in line, with about thirty feet width yard. Trees and flowers. Premises well kept. Sixty acres good land, all in cultivation, with horses and cows. Cotton and corn raised. No regular religious services. No children. Outdoor relief to 30. Average cost, $1 per month. General impression is favorable.

DR. T. S. MCMULLAN.

Received March 10, 1910.

PITT.

        The Home is unchanged except one new building of two rooms, 16×16 feet each. Can accommodate 40. Now in charge, 15; helpless, 6. Three insane epileptics; of these two are confined. All they want of good food. Cost of the Home last year was $22 71.75, including farm labor and superintendent's salary. Superintendent is Arden L. Tucker, R. F. D. No. 3, Greenville. He receives $300 and expenses. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. William Fountain. Admitted in six months, 3; died, 1. Sick well cared for. Premises in good condition, neatly kept and well arranged. Kitchen excellent. One hundred and eighty-seven acres on sandy ridge; 33 in cultivation. Religious services twice a month. One child. Father dead and mother gone. Tried to have her admitted to the orphanage, but failed. Outdoor relief to 115 at a cost of $2,756. General impression is very favorable. All in charge are doing their duty.


Page 86

        Remarks.--We had thought of building a modern Home, but since the court-house and jail were burned we will have to postpone it at present.

J. W. SMITH.

ROBERT N. NICHOLS.

Received June 4, 1910.

ROBESON.

        The Home is one mile from the county seat. Six frame buildings, two rooms each. Ventilated by windows and doors. Pump. Open fires. Can accommodate 24. Now in charge, 11; one helpless; one insane and two epileptics. None confined. Plenty of plain, substantial food. One admitted and two deaths in six months. Premises neat and in good condition. Thirty acres of poor land; 10 cultivated. No religious services except reading of the Bible by the keeper. No children. Some outdoor relief.

J. P. McNEILL.

Received September 21, 1910.

ROCKINGHAM.

        The Home is unchanged. Open fires. About forty now in charge. Two insane. One white male epileptic. One of these confined. Monthly per capita cost, $6. Plenty of wholesome food. Supervisor is Layton Ford, Wentworth. Salary, $25 per month and expenses. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. Sam Ellington, Wentworth. The sick are well cared for. Kitchen is too small. Four hundred acres; 75 in cultivation. No provision for religious services. No children. Yes, outdoor relief given; too much of it. General condition is fair. The superintendent does about the best he can.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received March 12, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the Home building. The inmates come and go; a number of them go off to make a crop in the summer and come back in the winter. One was burned; several died of old age. No children. Forty-five or fifty persons receive relief outside.

        Remarks.--We need new buildings, but we have built a new court-house and are now building a jail, and will get to the Home next.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received September 1, 1910.

ROWAN.

        No change in the Home since the last report. Now in charge, 15. Four helpless; none insane or epileptic. Ample amount of food. Cost, $2.50 per week for each. Mrs. J. S. Patterson, Salisbury, R. F. D. No. 3. Salary, $25 per month, home and fire wood. She is satisfactory. Physician is M. L. Smoot, Salisbury. Admitted in six months,


Page 87

11; died, 1; discharged, 8. Premises good, neat, clean and airy and buildings well preserved. Excellent kitchen. Thirty acres in cultivation; two horses; 124 acres fair land. Corn, wheat, oats and vegetables raised; all consumed at the Home. No regular religious services. No children. Some outdoor relief. General impression of the management is favorable.

JAMES D. HEILIG.

Received April 1, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the buildings since the last report. Now in charge, 22. Admitted in six months, 18; died, 3; discharged, 11. Conditions of premises all favorable; kitchen neat and perfectly clean. No children.

        Remarks.--We beg to report that we found everything at the Home nicely kept and all satisfied.

JAMES D. HEILIG.

W. W. TAYLOR.

J. B. COUNCILL, M.D.

Received October 17, 1910.

RUTHERFORD.

        The Home is unchanged. Now in charge, 25. One white boy insane epileptic. Plenty of good food. Superintendent receives $500 per year. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. E. B. Harris, Rutherfordton. Salary, mileage and $2 per visit. Died in six months, 2; discharged, 3. No children. No provision for religious services. No outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

E. B. HARRIS, M.D.

Received June 6, 1910.

SAMPSON.

        Home is two miles from the county seat. Five buildings. Doors and windows. Open fires. Wells. Can accommodate 30. Now in charge, 14. Three feeble-minded white women. One of these is epileptic. One colored man epileptic. Sufficient amount of wholesome food. Cost, $1 per week, in addition to produce of the farm. Superintendent is E. H. Lewis, Clinton, R. F. D. He receives $25 per month and table supply from the farm. He is satisfactory. The physician is Dr. G. M. Cooper, Clinton. He receives $2 per visit once a month and goes oftener if needed. Four admitted in six months; died one. The premises are well arranged, neat and in good condition. Kitchen good. One hundred and fifty acres of fair land; sixty in cultivation. Crops used at the Home. Two mules, two cows, twenty hogs, sixty chickens. Frequent religious services. Two children whose unmarried mother is an inmate. No homes for them as yet. Some outdoor relief. General impression of the management is favorable.

REV. WALTER R. NOE.

REV. P. L. CLARK.

MRS. T. L. HUBBARD.

Received May 13, 1910.
Page 88

SCOTLAND.

        The Home is as heretofore reported. Only one in charge. P. J. Fee is superintendent. He receives $30 per month--$7.50 for each inmate. Dr. Blue is the physician. Outdoor relief to thirty at $1.50 per month.

MRS. W. McEACHIN.

A. F. PATTERSON.

Received May 7, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the Home. Now in charge, 1. General impression is favorable.

MISS EFFIE McRAE.

MRS. W. McEACHIN.

Received November 16, 1910.

TRANSYLVANIA.

        The Home is well located two miles from the county seat. Two frame buildings with two rooms each. Two windows and door to each room. Spring four hundred feet away. Open fires. In charge, 5. All white--two men and three women. All weak minded. Sufficient food, vegetables, milk, etc. Superintendent is W. P. McGaha, Brevard. He receives $6 per month each and use of five acres of land. Physician is Dr. Goode Cheatham, Brevard. None admitted in six months; no deaths. Rooms seem to be comfortable, but the inside needs some repairs, plastering and whitewashing. Cooking is done in the superintendent's house. Fifty or seventy-five acres; about four or five that will produce. Occasional religious services by the women of the churches. No children. Outdoor relief to 19 at an average of $3.47 per month. Management as good as can be expected.

C. D. CHAPMAN, Chairman.

PAUL F. BROWN.

C. S. KIRKPATRICK.

Received April 4, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 5. one admitted and one died during the six months. No children.

C. D. CHAPMAN.

PAUL F. BROWN.

C. S. KIRKPATRICK.

Received October 15, 1910.

TYRRELL.

        The Home is unchanged. Only one in charge. Cost, $8 per week. E. H. Gurkins is superintendent. He has the use of the farm and $8 per month of each inmate. Dr. J. L. Spruill is the physician. Salary, $200 per year for the county work. None admitted in six months; one transferred to the hospital for insane. Premises clean and well kept.


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No children. Fifteen receive outdoor relief at an average of $3 per month. The County Home and jail are well kept and well arranged.

J. C. MEEKINS, SR.

Received March 13, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the Home since the last report. Only one in charge. No religious service since the death of Rev. Mr. Caraman, who held a monthly service, which was enjoyed by the keeper and his family and the neighbors generally. It was a good work in a good cause.

J. C. MEEKINS, SR.

Received September 3, 1910.

VANCE.

        The Home is unchanged except one new building for inmates 18 feet square. Well. Open fires. Now in charge, 8. Insane, one white and one colored woman. Not confined. Ample amount of good food. Cost, $1,200 per year with an average number of twelve. Superintendent is J. W. Oakley, Henderson, R. F. D. No. 4. He receives $300 per year with board and lodging for family. Physician is Dr. E. F. Fenner, Henderson. Admitted in six months, 1; died, 5. The houses will soon be recovered. Two hundred and fifty acres; 75 in cultivation. A horse, mules, cows and hogs. Crops are corn, wheat, oats, peas, potatoes and truck patches. Occasional religious services. No children. No outdoor relief. General impression of the management is favorable.

DR. F. R. HARRIS.

Received June 8, 1910.

WAKE.

        The Home is unchanged as to buildings. Now in charge, 75. Water has been added and a number of minor improvements. Screens placed to doors and windows and all the buildings and outbuildings neatly whitewashed inside and out. There are 26 insane, though none of these are in confinement. Of these 15 are colored and 11 white. Six are epileptic (all of these are colored). Mr. Rowland is the superintendent and he is a satisfactory officer. Salary, $720. Physician is Dr. J. J. McCullers, McCullers, N. C. Paid $600 per year. Admitted during six months, 14; died, 11; discharged, 4. Premises and kitchen in good condition. Six hundred and ninety acres; 150 in cultivation. Eight mules, fourteen cows and one hundred and fourteen hogs. Corn, cotton, wheat and potatoes raised and used for support of the Home. Cost of Home for the year, $13,600. This includes improvements added to the plant. No children. Different denominations hold services each month. Outdoor relief to 130 at $1 per month.

        Remarks.--We are glad to say that we found the inmates cheerful and well satisfied. The various rooms neat and well kept. The keeper


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of the Home is giving general satisfaction and there will be many regrets if he should not be continued in office.

I. C. BLAIR.

JOHN A. MILLS.

Received November 8, 1910.

WARREN.

        The Home is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 18. Four insane. None confined. Sufficient amount of wholesome food; cost, $1.40 per week. Superintendent is H. T. Egerton, Warrenton. He received $7 per month for each inmate and the use of the farm. Physician is Dr. M. P. Perry. Admitted in six months, 11; died, 2. Sick well cared for. No special attendant. Premises in good condition. Kitchen good. One hundred and sixty acres fairly good land; thirty in cultivation. Three horses, three cows. No provision for religious services. One child with its mother. No outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

P. H. ALLEN.

Received April 16, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the buildings, etc. In charge, 16. Two colored males insane. No epileptics. None confined. Admitted in six months, 9; died, 2; discharged, 7. One white child with its mother. No outdoor relief. General impression is favorable.

P. H. ALLEN.

Received September 26, 1910.

WASHINGTON.

        The Home is about half a mile from the county seat. Four frame buildings. Ventilated by windows and doors. Pump. Open fires. Can accommodate 20. Now in charge, 4. Two idiotic negroes, one of whom is epileptic. None confined. All they can eat supplied them. Average weekly cost of maintenance about $3.50. H. Gurkin, Plymouth, is in charge. Dr. W. H. Ward is physician. One admitted and one died in six months. Cottage system neat and clean; kitchen well kept. Ten acres clay land; light subsoil. Corn, potatoes and vegetables raised for use of the Home. Occasional services. No children. The county gives aid to twenty at about $12 per month. General impression of the Home is favorable.

COL. W. F. BEASLEY, Chairman.

W. FLETCHER AUSBON.

Received March 8, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the Home. Only two inmates, who are brothers; one can be made to understand, the other is beyond comprehending at all. Outdoor relief to 20. The Home is nicely arranged, situated on a hill in an oak grove and is in good condition. Kitchen neat and clean.

COL. W. F. BEASLEY, Chairman.

W. FLETCHER AUSBON.

Received August 31, 1910.
Page 91

WATAUGA.

        The Home is situated on a stream near Rich Mountain, three miles from the county seat. Four frame buildings. Ventilated by windows and doors. Open fires. Spring. Can care for sixteen. Thirteen, and during the summer months fourteen, when a blind girl returns from the State School. Five insane and one of these is epileptic. None confined. Good food. Cost, $850 annually, with an average of twelve. Superintendent is Jesse H. Brown, Adams. He receives $5 per month for each inmate and the use of the farm. He is satisfactory. Physician is Dr. McD. Little, Blowing Rock. Two admitted in six months and two deaths. One from consumption. The buildings are not well arranged; are dilapidated and out of repair, except one new building. Kitchen good. One hundred and ten acres of ordinary land; 75 in cultivation. Sheep, hogs and poultry. Crops are corn, buckwheat, oats, etc., used at the Home. Often have religious services by volunteers. No children. Forty receive outdoor relief at a cost of from one to four dollars per month. The impression is favorable.

J. F. CHURCH.

Received May 25, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The Home is a good frame building and is unchanged since the last report. Now in charge, 15. No insane. No children. No admissions in six months; one death. Kitchen good and neat. Land is poor; ten to fifteen acres in cultivation. Religious services. General impression is favorable.

J. F. CHURCH.

WILSON.

        The Home is built of wood. Ventilated by windows and doors. Well. Open fires. Can accommodate 30; now in charge, 16. None insane; seven feeble-minded. No children. Sick are as well cared for as can be with facilities at hand. Good food.

J. M. LEATH.

Received April 16, 1910.

YANCEY.

        The Home is about six miles from the county seat on a stream. No change in the buildings. Now in charge, 4. One white woman insane. Allison English is the superintendent, Cane River. No deaths. General impression is not very favorable as to buildings; need improving.

H. B. ROBERTSON, M.D.

Received March 19, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the Home. Six now in charge. One helpless. One white woman insane, but not confined. No children. Admitted, 2; no deaths.

H. B. ROBERTSON, M.D.

Received September 3, 1910.


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County Jails

ALAMANCE.

        The prison is unchanged. It is built of brick. City waterworks. Three rooms, eight cells. Two in a cell at present. Seldom overcrowded. Iron gratings to windows. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. Hammocks. Two comforts to each. No suffering from cold. Upstairs for males; downstairs for females. No children. City water in cells. Sewerage. Two meals. No warm drink. Free of vermin; disinfected twice a week. Tub, water and soap furnished. No religious services; reading matter and Testaments. None with tuberculosis. One colored male insane, awaiting admission to the hospital. Superintendent of Health makes a monthly inspection. Record kept. Now confined, six colored males and two whites.

REV. J. W. HOLT.

J. A. TURRENTINE.

P. H. FLEMING.

Received March 19, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the prison. No deaths; no insane now confined. In charge, 9 white males, 2 white females; 22 colored males, 1 colored female. Total, 34.

REV. J. W. HOLT.

J. A. TURRENTINE.

P. H. FLEMING.

Received October 25, 1910.

ALLEGHANY.

        The prison is built of brick. It is not fireproof and no means for extinguishing fire. Five rooms for prisoners. It is never overcrowded. Bars. Some suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. The sexes have separate adjoining cells. We seldom have more than one or two prisoners at a time. Drinking water when called for. Sufficient amount of ordinary food. Three meals per day and coffee sometimes. The jail is cleansed once a month or oftener and is free of vermin. Excreta removed in buckets. Water and towels are furnished once a day for bathing. No religious services. No sick. Only one insane person during the year, and he has been sent to the Hospital. No prisoners now in charge.

W. F. JONES.

Received July 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the prison since the last report.

W. F. JONES.

Received September 8, 1910.
Page 93

ANSON.

        The prison is built of brick. City water. Cage with four cells, 8 × 10 feet. Not crowded at this time. Bars. Ventilation by window. Heater. Sufficient bedding. Third story by males; second by females. Sufficient amount of food. Two meals per day. It is not free of vermin, prisoners complain. No provision for bathing. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No insane. Record kept and Superintendent of Health is required to make a monthly report. Now confined, three negro men and two whites.

J. M. BOYETTE.

Received March 11, 1910.

ASHE.

        The prison is built of brick. Five steel cells. Never overcrowded. Windows barred but with good ventilation. Stoves. All the bedding they ask for. No suffering from cold. No women; no children. Sewerage. Water at all times. Three meals and coffee. Free of vermin. Required to clean their cells. No religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No regular record kept of prisoners. Now confined, seven white men.

W. H. WORTH.

Received March 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since last report. No death. None now confined.

W. H. WORTH.

Received September 11, 1910.

BERTIE.

        No change in the jail since the last report.

J. H. MATTHEWS.

Received April 22, 1910.

BURKE.

        The jail is unchanged except the addition of sewerage. Religious services. No insane. County physician makes monthly inspection. Record kept. Now confined, two whites and one black male.

ROBERT T. CLAYWELL.

MRS. GAITHER.

MISS WILHELMINA TATE.

Received September 29, 1910.

CALDWELL.

        The prison is built of brick. Waterworks. Ten rooms or cells for prisoners. Cells ten feet square. Never overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. Suffered a little from cold at times. Three blankets each; hammocks. Upper story for males. Children are not confined


Page 94

separately. Three meals per day and coffee. Sewerage and water. Free of vermin. Antiseptic spray, broom and lime washes. Bath tubs. Required to clean their cells. Occasional religious services. No deaths; no tuberculosis. Now confined, one insane white woman 32 years old. Application made for her admission to the hospital. Two colored prisoners. No complete record kept of the prisoners.

DR. C. L. WILSON.

Received 27, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in prison building. No deaths. Now confined, three white males and one colored male under sixteen.

C. L. WILSON, M.D.

Received September 3, 1910.

CAMDEN.

        At present we have no jail or prisoners. At the March Term of court three colored prisoners were confined for burglary and larceny. The trial being ended, they were placed in jail, and before the sheriff had time to take them to the chaingang they fired the jail. These prisoners were not citizens of this county. The Commissioners have taken steps for building a new jail, a modern building, to take the place of the one burned, which was erected sixty-three years ago.

GEORGE H. RIGGS.

Received April 28, 1910

SECOND REPORT.

        The Commissioners have replaced the old, antiquated building called a prison (recently burned) with a new, up-to-date building with modern improvements; cost about $6,000, which will not only add to the safety of criminals confined but to their comfort also.

GEO. H. RIGGS.

Received October 11, 1910.

CARTERET.

        The prison is unchanged as to building. It is never overcrowded. Well ventilated. Stoves. No suffering from cold. All the bedding they need. Sexes separated. Three meals per day and coffee. Fresh water when called for. Free of vermin. Excreta buried. Water in the buckets for washing. Required to clean cells. Religious services by the ladies of the W. C. T. U. No insane; no tuberculosis. No one confined at present.

MRS. W. H. HENDRICKS.

Received March 24, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the prison since the last report. No one now confined.

MRS. W. H. HENDRICKS.

MRS. WILLIS.

Received September 23, 1910.
Page 95

CASWELL.

        The building is unchanged. It is never overcrowded. Stoves. Six blankets for each prisoner and hammocks. No children. Fresh drinking water twice a day. Three meals and coffee. Disinfectants used. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Tubs. Required to clean cells. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No insane. Record kept. Now confined, four colored males.

        Remarks.--I am glad to inform you that we haven't a case of tuberculosis either at the Home or the jail. Our Commissioners require me to fumigate and disinfect the courthouse, jail and County Home twice a year and oftener, if needed. The Commissioners are wide-awake men and believe in taking all sanitary precautions.

S. A. MALLOY, M.D.

Received March 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the prison. No deaths. Now confined, two whites and five colored.

S. A. MALLOY, M.D.

Received September 8, 1910.

CATAWBA.

        The prison is built of brick. Five departments. Ventilated by windows; barred. Stoves. Prisoners are subject to suffering from cold in the one big cell. Sufficient amount of bedding to keep warm. Sexes separated. Drinking water as needed. Sufficient amount of food. Two daily meals. Soap and disinfectant used. Free of vermin. Sewerage in part only. Required to clean their cells. No deaths. One colored man about forty years old partially insane. He has been there for about twelve months. One white male awaiting trial.

REV. M. A. ABERNETHY.

Received September 7, 1910.

CHOWAN.

        The jail is unchanged since the last report. Free of vermin. Prisoners required to clean their cells. No religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis or insane. Superintendent of Health makes monthly inspections. Record kept. Now confined, twelve colored males, two under sixteen.

REV. ROBERT B. DRANE.

WILLIAM B. SHEPARD.

Received June 18, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report in the building. No religious services. No deaths. One insane man, who has recently been sent to the Raleigh Hospital.

        Now confined, one black male. Other items as reported.

REV. ROBERT B. DRANE.

WILLIAM B. SHEPARD.

Received September 29, 1910.
Page 96

CLAY.

        No one in our county prison at present. No improvement in any way.

L. F. SHUFORD.

Received March 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change has been made in the jail. No one confined since the last report.

L. F. SHUFORD.

Received September 6, 1910.

DARE.

        The prison is built of brick. It is a new building and no prisoners have been confined in it as yet.

CHARLES L. MANN.

Received March 11, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        New building. Five colored males now confined.

CHAS. L. MANN.

Received September 3, 1910.

DAVIE.

        The jail is new. Concrete walls and steel cages. Room for 36 prisoners. Good ventilation. Bars at windows. Steam heat and electric lights. No suffering from cold. Plenty of bedding. Sexes separated. Drinking water as wanted. Sewerage. Three meals; coffee if sick. Disinfectants used. Free of vermin. Bath tubs. No religious services. No deaths. Only one prisoner, serving thirty-day sentence. Superintendent of Health makes monthly inspections. Record kept.

MRS. A. M. NAIL.

Received June 13, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change. Seven prisoners in jail; one little negro boy thirteen years old for housebreaking. Things were in very fair condition.

MRS. A. M. NAIL.

Received September 21, 1910.

DUPLIN.

        There has been no change in the jail since the last report. Now confined, one colored male.

A. P. FARRIOR.

Received June 29, 1910.

EDGECOMBE.

        The jail is built of brick, concrete and steel. City water and fire department. Three rooms. Two-story steel cages. Six cells 6 × 10 feet. Never overcrowded. Bars and screens. Ventilated by windows. Coal stoves. No suffering from cold. Sufficient amount of bedding; hammocks.


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Sexes separated and children in separate room. Water at all times. Two meals a day. No vermin. Sewerage. Tubs. Required to clean cells. Very rarely punished. If necessary, for insubordination, men are put on bread and water. No religious services. No deaths. No prisoners now confined. Superintendent of Health makes monthly inspections. Record kept.

F. H. PENDER.

Received July 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since last report.

F. H. PENDER.

Received August 29, 1910.

FORSYTH.

        The jail is built of concrete and steel. It is fireproof. City fire department. Fourteen rooms, including those in the hospital ward. Twenty-eight steel cells 7 × 8 feet. Never overcrowded. Ventilators besides windows. Steam heat. No suffering from cold. Cells have hammocks and two double blankets. Rooms have mattress, sheets and two double blankets on bedsteads. Sexes separated. Children in separate cell. Water at all times. Plenty of substantial food. Two meals a day. Scrubbed and disinfected. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Bath in each ward and adjoining each room. Required to clean cells daily and to bathe once a week. Regular religious services twice a week. No tuberculosis, but separate rooms are provided. No insane. Record kept. Superintendent of Health makes monthly inspection. Now confined, 7 white males, 3 white females; 36 colored males, of these, two under sixteen, 6 colored females. Total, 52.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND, Chm.

MRS. C. J. FOLTZ.

W. P. HILL.

H. M. FOLTZ.

Received May 24, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        It is a new building and there has been no change since the last report. No deaths. Tuberculosis cases kept in separate room and disinfectants constantly used. Religious services twice a week. Two colored insane in the jail--a man sixty-five years old and a boy. Now confined, 17 colored males, 11 colored women; 2 white males and 4 white women. Total, 34.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND.

MRS. C. J. FOLTZ.

H. M. FOLTZ.

W. P. HILL.

Received November 5, 1910.

GATES.

        The prison is built of brick. Two rooms containing two cells each, 8 × 8 in size. Two cells are exposed to three unobstructed windows.


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Stoves. No suffering from cold. Sufficient amount of bedding. Two daily meals with coffee. Scrub brooms and disinfectants used. Free of vermin. Excreta removed in buckets. Basins, towels and soap. Required to clean cells. No deaths. Now confined, one white and one colored male.

S. P. CROSS.

Received September 12, 1910.

GASTON.

        The jail is built of brick. Three rooms and four cells. Sometimes overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. Sufficient amount of bedding. Sexes separated. Drinking water as needed. Sufficient amount of food. Two meals with coffee. Free of vermin. Scoured. Sewerage. Tubs. Required to clean cells. Occasional religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No insane. Record kept. Monthly inspection by health officer. No prisoners now confined.

J. P. REID.

Received May 18, 1910.

GRANVILLE.

        The jail is built of brick. City fire department near. One room; five cells 8 × 10. Never overcrowded. Ventilated by windows and otherwise. Coal stove. As much bedding as needed. Mattresses. Sexes separated. Children in different cell. Drinking water at will and sufficient food. Two meals with coffee in the winter. Broom and disinfectants. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Tubs. Required to clean cells. Occasional religious services. One death, syphilis. No tuberculosis; precautions taken in such cases. No insane. Record kept. Monthly inspections by health officer. Now confined, three colored males.

        Remarks.--The waterworks in the jail have been remodeled and the sanitary condition seems to be good. The sheriff and jailer are clever and reliable men.

D. N. HUNT.

W. S. HESTER.

J. H. BULLOCK.

Received June 6, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. Confined, four negroes. Everything seems to be in good shape.

D. N. HUNT, Chm.

W. S. HESTER.

J. H. BULLOCK.

Received September 14, 1910.

HALIFAX.

        The jail is built of brick. Well in the yard. Eleven cells 8 × 10 feet. Never overcrowded. Bars and wire netting to the windows. Coal stoves. No suffering from cold. Plenty of bedding. Mattresses. Sexes separated. Children in different cell when there are any. Plenty of


Page 99

plain food. Coffee once a week except when sick. Drinking water twice a day. Sewerage. Free of vermin. Bowls for washing. Required to clean cells. No religious services but supplied with Bibles. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Two colored male epileptics in jail two months. Effort made to have them removed to the hospital but no provision for them. Record. Monthly inspection by health officer. Now in charge, 1 white male, 8 colored, one under sixteen.

D. R. ANDERSON.

W. F. COPPEDGE.

Received May 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the building. Ventilated from top as well as from windows. Now in charge, 1 colored male epileptic, 1 colored woman insane; 2 white prisoners and 13 colored.

D. R. ANDERSON.

W. F. COPPEDGE.

Received October 17, 1910.

HARNETT.

        The jail is as previously reported. None now confined.

Dr. J. H. WITHERS.

SECOND REPORT.

        The jail is built of brick; is fireproof. Four cells 6 × 8 feet. Netting and sash to the windows. Ventilated through top as well. Never overcrowded. Hot air. No suffering from cold. Mattresses, and from two to four blankets. Sexes separated. Drinking water three times a day. Three daily meals and as much food as they want. No coffee or warm drink. Free of vermin. Scoured and disinfectants used. Sewerage. Bathroom. Required to clean cells. Bible is furnished but no religious services. No tuberculosis. One insane colored woman. No inspection monthly by county physician. Record kept. Now confined, four colored males and one colored woman.

J. H. WITHERS.

H. T. FAUCETT.

Received November 12, 1910.

HAYWOOD.

        The jail building is as heretofore reported. Never overcrowded. Sexes separated. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. Sufficient bedding. Three regular meals and coffee. Swept and scrubbed. Sewerage. Occasional religious services. No deaths. One insane white man who has been confined for months. Record kept.

        Remarks.--I have sent good papers to the prisoners and was there last Sunday. I have spoken several times to the sheriff about the insane man in the jail, and was told that he was too violent to be kept at the Home, where I have often met him for years past. It seems to me that he should be sent to the Hospital. I made an effort to get several boys in the Jackson Training School and the judge promised to send them, but the principal wrote me that the institution was now full; so the


Page 100

boys had to be sent to the roads. It is a sad commentary upon the morals of young boys in our State.

MRS. M. J. BRANNER.

Received October 15, 1910.

HENDERSON.

        The prison is unchanged as to building. Never overcrowded. Steam heat. Ample bedding; no suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Drinking water at all times. Ample allowance of food. Three meals. Required to clean cells. No deaths; no tuberculosis. Monthly sanitary inspection. Record kept.

        Remarks.--Only two confined, a white woman and a colored woman. The jail is as clean as possible. Scrubbing is frequently done and the prisoners are under humane treatment.

MRS. LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received March 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the building. Absolutely free of vermin. Abundant amount of food and drinking water at all times. Occasionally religious services. Now confined, three whites and four blacks. It is just before the session of court, and this accounts for the unusual number in the jail. The building is in excellent condition and every kindness possible is shown the prisoners by the jailer.

MRS. LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received September 26, 1910.

HERTFORD

        The prison is built of brick and iron. Pump. Four rooms. Never overcrowded. Screens and bars to the windows. Ventilation is sufficient. Furnace. Sufficient bedding; no suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Good food. Drinking water three times daily. Three meals. Coffee in the winter. Scrubbed and disinfectants used. Sewerage. Basins. Required to clean cells. No religious services. No deaths. Now confined, one colored male.

W. P. SHAW, Chm.

J. A. NORTHCOTT.

Received September 9, 1910.

IREDELL.

        The jail is a new, modern, up-to-date building. It is strictly fireproof and is equipped with water, electric lights and steam heat. It is built of high-grade, light-colored pressed brick and finished with Indiana limestone and terra-cotta. Twelve rooms and several halls. Never overcrowded. Special ventilation from the top. Mattresses and blankets furnished. Sexes separated. Children in separate cell. All they can eat twice a day and coffee once daily. Soap, water and antiseptics used for cleanliness of the jail. Free of vermin. Shower bath. Required to clean cells. Seldom have any religious services. No deaths. One


Page 101

insane woman, colored. Think that she will be soon admitted to the Hospital. Monthly sanitary inspection. Record kept. Now confined, one white and seven colored.

        Remarks.--Prisoners have no employment, no recreation, no religious services.

MRS. A. L. COBLE.

Received November 10, 1910.

JONES.

        The prison is built of brick. Three cells 6 × 10 feet. Never overcrowded. Stove. Sufficient amount of bedding. Sexes separated. Drinking water twice a day. Two daily meals. Coffee. Free of vermin. deaths; No provision for bathing. Not required to clean cells. No deaths; no tuberculosis. No record kept. No monthly sanitary inspection. Now confined, two colored males.

F. W. FOSCUE.

JULIAN K. WARREN.

Received March 28, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the prison. No prisoners now confined. We have only a few just before court convene, which is twice a year. Our prisoners are sent to the Craven County camp.

J. K. WARREN.

Received August 31, 1910.

LEE.

        The jail is new. Fireproof. Four steel cells. Ventilated by windows. Steam heated. Sufficient amount of bedding. Bathroom and can bathe in the cells. Sewerage. Waterworks. Three daily meals. Upstairs for males; downstairs for females. Religious services. No deaths. Record kept. Monthly inspection by county physician. Now confined, one white man and four colored.

LYNN MCIVER, M.D.

Received September 12, 1910.

LENOIR.

        The prison is built of brick. Fire department near. Eight cells. Never overcrowded. Windows open; very well ventilated. Furnace. All the bedding they want. Sexes separated. All the food they need. Two daily meals. City water. Sewerage. Two bath tubs. Required to clean their cells. Religious services sometimes by the colored preacher. Weekly inspection made by county physician. Record kept. Ten colored males confined. Four of these are from Pitt County, and held here because of the burning of their jail.

REV. JOHN H. GRIFFITH.

GEO. V. COWPER, JR.

MRS. C. B. WOODLEY.

MISS MAY OETTINGER.

Received October 10, 1910.
Page 102

LINCOLN.

        The prison is built of brick. Not fireproof and no means for extinguishing one. Two rooms with two cells each. Never overcrowded. Stoves. Sufficient amount of bedding. Sexes separated. Water at all times. Sufficient amount of food. Three meals and coffee. Brooms used. Free of vermin. Sewerage. No provision for bathing. Required to clean cells. No deaths. No cases of tuberculosis in prison since I have been a visitor. Now in prison one white boy seventeen, sentenced to four months in jail for criminal carelessness in the use of a rifle which shot and killed a fellow sportsman.

MISS KATE C. SHIPP.

MRS. R. S. REINHARDT.

REV. W. R. MINTER.

DR. I. R. SELF.

Received March 13, 1910.

MACON.

        The prison is unchanged as to building. No prisoners now confined. No tuberculosis. No deaths. Three insane persons--one white woman and two white men recently sent to the hospital from the jail. They were in charge eight days, ten days and one night, respectively. Other items as previously reported.

REV. J. A. DEAL.

W. H. HIGGINS.

THEODORE ANDREWS.

Received April 8, 1910.

MADISON.

        The prison is built of brick. Two rooms, fourteen cells. Never overcrowded. Windows and vent pipes. Stove. Hammocks. No suffering from cold. All the bedding wanted. Sexes separated. Water in the cells. All the food they want and coffee. Free of vermin. Disinfectants; baths. Sewerage. Required to clean cells. Religious services. No deaths. Two insane temporarily, but now in the hospital. Record kept and regular monthly inspection. Now confined, two white males, one under sixteen for thirty days.

REV. W. E. FINLEY, Chairman.

J. H. WHITE.

DR. W. J. WEAVER.

Received September 6, 1910.

McDOWELL.

        The prison is unchanged. All the food they want. City water. No vermin. Sewerage. Bath tubs. Now confined, three colored and one white. Three who are serving sentence (eight and four years and six months) are sick; sent in from the camp for medical treatment. Died, one, during the six months; heart disease. General impression is favorable.

JOHN M. HOUCK.

Received February 21, 1910.
Page 103

MECKLENBURG.

        No new jail yet, and conditions as bad as before.

REV. FRANCIS M. OSBORNE.

Received July 21, 1910.

MITCHELL.

        The jail is built of brick and cement, 40 by 40 feet. There is a reservoir in case of fire. Windows barred. Heater. No suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Sufficient amount of food, coffee. Bath tub. Sewerage. Occasional religious services. Now confined, five white males. No deaths. General impression of management is favorable.

W. H. OLLIS.

Received January 5, 1910.

MARTIN.

        The prison is unchanged since the last report. One colored male confined. Ventilated by windows and otherwise. Stoves. Mattresses. Water as desired, and three meals per day. Sewerage. Occasional religious services. No tuberculosis. No insane. Record kept. Sanitary inspection by health officer.

WILLIAM E. WARREN, M.D.

Received March 7, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report.

DR. W. E. WARREN.

Received September 2, 1910.

MONTGOMERY.

        The jail is a frame building, two cells 6 by 8 feet. It is never overcrowded. Ventilated by windows and otherwise. Stove. Sufficient amount of food. Water as wanted. Excreta removed in buckets. No provision for bathing. No deaths. No tuberculosis. One idiot white man fifty years old. He is not confined, but remains with the jailer, helping him; has been there eleven years. Monthly report of sanitary condition made. Record kept. None now confined.

CHARLES DALIGNY, M.D.

Received July 1, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since last report. Only the idiot white man, who is not constantly confined. Sewerage not yet repaired.

R. T. POOLE.

CHARLES DALIGNY.

Received August 31, 1910.

MOORE.

        The prison is unchanged since the last report. It is never overcrowded. Furnace. Blankets and hammocks. Sexes separated. Drinking water as needed. Sufficient amount of food. Bath tubs. Free of


Page 104

vermin. Occasional religious services. No tuberculosis. One colered woman insane. Health official inspects jail monthly. Record kept. Now confined, one white and three colored.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received March 17, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is unchanged as to building. No death. No tuberculosis. One colored woman insane; has been in jail about five months. Prisoners are six colored males, one colored woman and three white males. Other items as reported.

JOHN CAMPBELL.

Received September 11, 1910.

NEW HANOVER.

        The prison is unchanged since the last report. Not crowded now. ventilated by windows. Hammocks and blankets. Two meals with coffee. Scoured and disinfected. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Shower-bath. Required to clean cells. Religious services twice a week. No tuberculosis; no deaths; no insane. Sanitary inspection made monthly. Record kept. Confined, nine blacks and three whites.

        Remarks.--Since the establishment of the Recorder's Court the prisoners are kept there only until tried. It is said to be quite a saving to the county. I visited the jail to-day and found it in fairly good condition as to cleanliness and comfort. Few prisoners; the number was much greater during the recent term of the United States Circuit Court.

A. G. HANKINS.

Received March 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The prison is the same as to building. It is not overcrowded. Bread, meat, vegetables and coffee. Two daily meals. Free of vermin. Shower baths. Regular religious services. Now confined, five whites and nine colored; two of these are women.

        Remarks.--We found the jail in good condition. Not overcrowded, and prisoners are well taken care of.

A. G. HANKINS.

J. T. KERR.

Received November 16, 1910.

ONSLOW.

        There is no change in the prison. It is never overcrowded. Free of vermin. No religious services. No tuberculosis; no insane. Now confined, two white men. Record kept. Monthly sanitary inspection made.

G. H. SIMMONS.

Received July 19, 1910.

ORANGE.

        The prison is built of stone. Two rooms; four cells 8×10. It is never overcrowded. Old-fashioned windows raised. Stove upstairs; fireplace on the lower floor. All the bedding necessary. Drinking


Page 105

water twice a day. Coffee. Jail is sprayed with disinfectant every morning. Free of vermin. Buckets for removing excreta. Bathtubs provided for a bath once a week. Required to clean their cells. No provision for religious services. None during the past six months. No deaths. Tuberculous prisoners are released from jail whenever it is possible. Disinfectants used. No insane. Monthly inspections of physician not made. Record kept. Now confined in the Durham camp from this county, four white males, ten colored males. Two of these under sixteen. None in jail.

MISS MARY I. TINNIN.

N. W. BROWN.

Received May 9, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the prison. Now confined, six black males.

MARY I. TINNIN.

N. W. BROWN.

Received September 29, 1910.

PASQUOTANK.

        No change in the jail building. Never overcrowded. Stoves. No suffering from cold. As much bedding as needed. Sexes separated. No children now. Water as desired. Three meals. Coffee. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Bowls or pans for washing. Occasional religious services. No deaths; no tuberculosis. No insane. Monthly sanitary inspection. Record kept. Now confined, one colored man, two colored women.

REV. E. W. STONE.

Received March 11, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. Now confined, ten colored men and two colored women.

REV. E. W. STONE.

Received September 14, 1910.

PERSON.

        The prison is built of brick. No special means for fire protection. Four cells, 6×6 feet. It is not overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Stove. Hammocks and mattresses. Only one apartment. Drinking water three times a day. As much as necessary. Coffee if desired. Three daily meals. Sweeping and scrubbing. Jailer says the prison is free of vermin. Sewerage. No special provision for bathing. Required to clean their cells. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly sanitary inspection made. Record kept. None now confined.

REV. E. W. SNIPES.

Received September 6, 1910.

PERQUIMANS.

        The jail is new. Fireproof. Three rooms, six cells. Never overcrowded. Sufficient ventilation. Stove. Mattresses. Water twice a day. Sewerage. Bath room. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No insane. No


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religious services. Record kept. Monthly report of sanitary condition. Now confined, four colored men.

DR. T. S. McMULLAN.

Received March 10, 1910.

PITT.

        The jail was burned since the last report. Plans for new building not yet perfected, but we will have both a court-house and a jail the equal of any in the State.

J. W. SMITH.

ROBERT N. NICHOLS.

Received June 4, 1910.

ROBESON.

        The prison is built of brick and concrete. Waterworks. Eleven cells 7 by 9. Not often overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Steam heated. Sufficient amount of bedding and food. Sexes separated. Fresh water three times daily. Two meals. Washed and disinfected. Sewerage. Tub. No deaths; no tuberculosis. Two insane, both colored, a man and a woman. Monthly sanitary inspections. Record. Now confined, 26 colored and two whites.

J. P. McNEILL.

Received July 8, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the building, etc., since last report. Now in charge, 17 negroes, 2 whites and 1 Indian. Six of these serving sentence.

J. P. McNEILL.

Received September 21, 1910.

ROCKINGHAM.

        No change in the old building. No deaths. Building so old and so much out of date that they have almost quit patronizing it. One colored prisoner. New jail to be erected.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received March 12, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The new jail is in process of construction. It will be up-to-date and modern in every detail. Only one or two prisoners and they are in the Guilford County jail at present.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received September 1, 1910.

ROWAN.

        The jail is built of brick and steel and is fireproof. Hose. Six cells. Never overcrowded. Air vents besides the windows. Steam-heated. No suffering from colds. Hammocks. Water as needed. Coffee once a day and two meals. Hose, brooms and disinfectants used for cleanliness of the building. Sewerage. Bath rooms. Required to clean their cells. Occasional religious services. No deaths. Physician makes monthly sanitary inspection. Record kept.


Page 107

        Remarks.--The jail is naturally imposed upon. One day it can be free from all vermin and the next an inmate can infect the whole apartment in a short while. We insist upon cleanliness.

JAS. D. HEILIG.

W. W. TAYLOR.

J. B. COUNCILL, M.D.

Received October 17, 1910.

RUTHERFORD.

        The jail is brick. Two cells. Overcrowded at times. No ventilation except by window. Stoves. Sufficient bedding; hammocks. Drinking water three times a day. Good food. Three meals daily with coffee. Scrubbed; free of vermin. Excreta carried out. No provision for bathing. Required to clean cells. No religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No monthly health inspection. No complete record.

E. B. HARRIS, M.D.

Received June 6, 1910.

SAMPSON.

        The prison is built of brick. Two rooms. Four cells 8 by 10. Not often overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Hammocks and mattresses; sufficient bedding. Children are not confined in a separate cell. Plentiful supply of food. Three daily meals and coffee. Swept and disinfected. Free of vermin. Excreta removed to safe distance. Basins and hot water provided. Required to clean cells. Occasional religious services. One weak-minded white man for safe-keeping; three white prisoners. Occasional inspection and report by health officer. Record kept.

        Remarks.--The Board sent in recommendations to the grand jury that the blankets and comforts should be washed in bichloride, that a zinc bath tub and soap be supplied and prisoners be required to bathe; that sliding screens be used to separate the whites and blacks in the corridors.

REV. WALTER R. NOE.

REV. P. L. CLARK.

MRS. T. L. HUBBARD.

Received May 13, 1910.

SCOTLAND.

        The jail is built of brick. City waterworks. Three rooms, four cells. Prison is never overcrowded. Windows screened. Ventilated by windows only. Heaters. No suffering from cold. Blankets and hammocks. Upper cells for colored, lower for whites. Two meals. Drinking water as wanted. Disinfectants. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Bath tubs. Required to clean cells. Religious services. No death. No insane. Monthly inspection by physician. Record kept. Now confined, 2.

MRS. WALTER McEACHIN.

A. F. PATTERSON.

Received May 7, 1910.
Page 108

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the jail. Our sheriff is very efficient and looks well after the care of the prisoners.

MRS. W. McEACHIN.

MISS EFFIE McRAE.

Received November 16, 1910.

TRANSYLVANIA.

        The prison is built of rock with ceiled walls. It is not fireproof. City fire department. Four rooms 15 by 15 feet. It is never overcrowded. No sash to windows. Hang curtains in cold weather. Stove and open fireplaces. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. Mattresses. One separate room for women. Sufficient amount of food. Coffee. Three meals. Disinfected. Free of vermin. No bathroom, but water and soap. No religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No insane. Sanitary inspection. Record kept. Now confined, four colored males.

CHALMERS D. CHAPMAN.

C. S. KIRKPATRICK.

PAUL F. BROWN.

Received April 4, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. No death in six years. No tuberculosis. Now confined, three white males; of these two are serving sentence.

C. D. CHAPMAN.

PAUL F. BROWN.

C. S. KIRKPATRICK.

Received October 15, 1910.

TYRRELL.

        The jail is a new building, brick and cement. Tank and rubber hose in case of fire. Eight rooms; four steel cells. Never overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Mattresses. Separate rooms for the sexes. Drinking water as wanted. Three meals, sometimes coffee. No vermin. Bath tub and water tank. Excreta carried by pipe to cesspool. Prisoners required to sweep their cells. No deaths. No tuberculosis. No religious services. Superintendent of health makes inspection monthly. Record kept. Now confined, one colored man.

        Remarks.--The jail is a new building, well arranged and conforms to the requirements of the law.

J. C. MEEKINS, SR.

Received March 12, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        New prison. Only a few prisoners since September, 1909, and they were confined only a short time before going to the road camp. None now confined.

J. C. MEEKINS, SR.

Received September 26, 1910.
Page 109

UNION.

        The jail is fireproof. Waterworks. Ten rooms or cells 6 by 7. Never overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Furnace. Sufficient bedding. Sexes separated. Three meals and coffee once a day. Jail is washed out very often. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Bath tub. Required to clean their cells. No religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis. One insane colored woman confined five days; application sent to the Hospital. Superintendent of health makes monthly inspection.

A E. BIGGERS.

Received May 9, 1910.

VENCE.

        The jail is built of brick. Town fire system. Ten cells. Never overcrowded. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. Three to four blankets each. Hammocks. Sexes separated. Usual coarse food. Three meals and coffee. Swept and washed. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Wash tub. Required to clean cells. Very seldom have religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Record kept monthly sanitary inspection. None now confined.

DR. F. R. HARRIS.

Received June 8, 1910.

WAKE.

        The prison is unchanged since the last report. Sometimes at Federal court it is overcrowded. Hammocks provided. Sufficient bedding. Children confined in separate cell. All the food they want. No coffee or warm drink. Two meals a day. Disinfectants used. Not altogether free of vermin. Sewerage. Prisoners required to clean their cells. Regular religious services. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Now in charge, two insane, both colored. County physician makes monthly inspection. Record kept. Now confined, 10 white men, 28 colored men and 1 colored woman.

I. C. BLAIR, Chairman.

JOHN A. MILLS.

Received November 28, 1910.

WARREN.

        The prison building is unchanged. Four rooms for confining prisoners. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Sexes separated. Sufficient amount of food. Coffee. Two meals. Lime and clean sweeping. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Tubs. No religious services. No tuberculosis. County physician makes monthly inspection. Record kept. Now confined, 5 colored males.

P. H. ALLEN.

Received April 16, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in buildings, etc. Now confined, five colored prisoners. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly inspection by county physician. Record kept.

P. H. ALLEN.

Received September 26, 1910.
Page 110

WASHINGTON.

        The jail is fireproof. Four rooms for confining prisoners. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. No suffering in cold weather. Mattresses and blankets. Sexes separated. No children. Drinking water two or three times a day. Two meals. No coffee. Plenty of whitewash and water used. Free of vermin. Excreta removed to pit for the purpose. Tubs. Cells cleaned daily. No religious services. No deaths. County physician makes inspection. No record. Now confined, two colored males.

W. FLETCHER AUSBON.

COL. R. F. BEASLEY.

Received March 8, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since last report. Now confined, two colored males.

W. FLETCHER AUSBON.

COL. R. F. BEASLEY.

Received August 31, 1910.

WATAUGA.

        The prison is built of brick. No special means for extinguishing fire. Four cells. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. Sufficient amount of bedding. No suffering from cold. Sufficient amount of food. Coffee. Free of vermin. Excreta removed. Basins. Occasional religious services. One death. Now confined, one white male.

J. F. CHURCH.

Received May 25, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the building. Sufficient amount of bedding. Water at all times. Three daily meals. County physician makes inspections. Record kept. One white male now confined.

J. F. CHURCH.

Received October 10, 1910.

WILSON.

        It is built of brick. City fire department convenient. Not often overcrowded. Ventilation through the roof and the windows. Stoves. Sufficient bedding. Drinking water as wanted. Coffee. Three meals. Sewerage. Free of vermin. Tub. No deaths. No religious services. Two insane colored males will be removed to the Hospital to-day. Now confined, eight prisoners.

J. M. LEATH.

Received April 16, 1910.

YANCEY.

        Cement building. Running water. Sexes separated. Never overcrowded. Stoves. Sufficient bedding and food. Drinking water as wanted. Free of vermin. Sewerage. Bath tubs. No deaths. Now in charge, one white male.

H. B. ROBERTSON, M.D.

Received March 19, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Now confined, four white males.

H. B. ROBERTSON, M.D.

Received September 3, 1910.


Page 111

County Camps

ALAMANCE.

        The camp is a frame building 40 by 18 feet. Two rooms. Blacks and whites separated. Well near. Ventilated by doors and hallway. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Sufficient amount of bedding and as much as they want to eat. Three meals a day and coffee once. Fresh drinking water as wanted. Required to bathe. Blankets washed once a month. Mattresses changed as needed. Free of vermin. No punishment. Sick cared for in the jail or at the County Home. No tuberculosis. Ten hours of work. One foreman and one guard at present. Foreman receives $40 per month and guard $35. Seldom any religious services. In stockade on Sunday. No boys. Not chained together at night. Confined, five white and eight colored men.

REV. J. W. HOLT.

J. A. TURRENTINE.

P. H. FLEMING.

Received March 19, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report. Now in charge, two white and thirteen colored males.

REV. J. W. HOLT.

J. A. TURRENTINE.

P. H. FLEMING.

Received October 25, 1910.

ANSON.

        The camp building is frame and built in sections, so it is movable; 15 by 36 feet; one story high. Two rooms. Races separated. No means for extinguishing fire. Windows with iron bars. Heater. No suffering from cold. Sufficient amount of bedding. Water carriers. The camp is not free of vermin. No punishment to my knowledge. It is impossible under present conditions to care well for the sick. Cared for at the camp. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Working hours are from 6 to 12 and from 1 to 6. Five employees. Salary of superintendent is $60 and guards $5. No religious services. In camp on Sundays. Men and boys in the same room. They are not chained together at night. Now confined, 32 negroes, and 1 white man.

DR. J. M. BOYETTE.

Received March 11, 1910.

BERTIE.

        The county camp is at the Home. The prisoners work the county farm. No change in conditions since the last report.

J. H. MATTHEWS.

Received April 22, 1910.
Page 112

EDGECOMBE.

        There are tents at the camp. Races separated. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. All the food they want, three meals per day. Water as wanted. Required to bathe. Blankets washed once a month. Camp cleaned daily. Excreta hauled off and buried. Free of vermin. New mattresses bought as needed. Sick well cared for at the hospital. No deaths. No tuberculosis. County physician makes monthly inspection. Worked ten hours each day. Religious services. Kept in camp on Sunday. Chained together at night. Boys in a tent. Now confined, 22 negroes, three under sixteen. Longest term, six years and shortest six months.

F. H. PENDER.

Received July 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change since the last report.

F. H. PENDER.

Received August 29, 1910.

FORSYTH.

        The camp is frame with metal roof, 16 by 90 feet, one story, three rooms. Races separated. Well and buckets. Ventilated by windows and roof. Four large coal stoves. No suffering from cold. Straw tick and two double blankets for each two men. All the food they want. Three meals, and coffee for breakfast. Drinking water all the time. Required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed once in three months. Swept daily. Scoured and disinfectants used. Excreta removed to some distance from the camp. Straw changed in mattresses once in three months. All who break the prison rules are whipped by the superintendent, or the foreman in the presence of the superintendent. Sick well cared for at the camp and removed to the jail hospital if necessary. No tuberculosis. Leave camp at sunrise and return at sunset. Twenty-four employees. Salary of guards, $20 to $55 per month; supervisor, $75. Services once a month on Sunday afternoon by pastors from the city. Kept on the grounds and in the buildings on Sundays. Prisoners chained at night. Boys in the same room with the men. Now confined, 16 white men, 58 colored men, 4 colored boys, total, 78.

REV. E. S. CROSLAND, Chairman.

MRS. C. J. FOLTZ.

W. P. HILL.

H. M. FOLTZ.

Received May 24, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the camp. No suffering from cold. Monthly religious services, the city pastors alternating. Physician visits the camp weekly.


Page 113

Boys with the men. No death. No tuberculosis. Now in charge, 77 colored males and 16 whites; of these six are under sixteen.

REV. R. S. CROSLAND.

W. P. HILL.

MRS. C. J. FOLTZ.

H. M. FOLTZ.

Received November 5, 1910.

HENDERSON.

        The camp is unchanged. Stoves and no suffering from cold. Three meals and coffee twice a day. One unruly boy was whipped for disturbing religious services. Sick are well cared for. No tuberculosis. Regular inspection by health officer. Worked ten hours. Three employees, salaries $40, $35 and $30 respectively. Religious services. At camp on Sunday with privileges. Not chained at night. Boys in the camp.

        Remarks.--There are 28 in camp, about half of whom are hired from other counties. They are under good management and are well cared for. Three colored boys under sixteen.

MRS. LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received March 21, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        New quarters in excellent condition. No suffering from cold. Ample supply of bedding. Coffee twice a day. Required to bathe. Blankets washed often. Free of vermin. Punishment inflicted upon three for insubordination. Sick cared for in a separate house. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly inspection by county physician. Worked ten hours. Three employees. Occasional religious services. Now in charge, 22 blacks and 5 whites.

        Remarks.--Health of camp perfect; absolute cleanliness and humane treatment.

MRS. LILA RIPLEY BARNWELL.

Received September 26, 1910.

IREDELL.

        The convict camp is built of wood, 80 feet long and 26 wide. One story and two rooms. Races separated. No special means for extinguishing fire. Ventilation by window and otherwise. Stoves and no suffering from cold. No women. As much food as desired. Three meals and coffee once a day. Drinking water as desired. Blankets washed frequently enough to keep them clean. Sink used for excreta. Free of vermin. Straw changed in mattresses once in three months. Sick well cared for at the camp and jail. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly reports of sanitary condition. Hours of work, ten per day. Three guards, salaries $45 and $35 per month. Occasional religious services. In and around the camp on Sundays. Prisoners chained at night. No boys in charge. Now confined, 9 white and 8 colored males.


Page 114

        Remarks.--A good dinner is usually sent to the convicts on Thanksgiving by the oldest boys' class of the Presbyterian church. The convicts are still chained while they work, except the trusties. This is very hard on them, but the excuse given is that if left unchained several more guards would have to be employed to watch them, at considerable extra expense to the county. It seems to me to be a serious reflection on the Christian communities living in the county seats of the various counties, that so few religious services are held in the jails and the county homes and convict camps. It would appear to all thinking persons that of all classes who need religious teaching and help, those in prison for their misdeeds, and the old and helpless at the homes would need it most; the first for instruction as to how to lead a better life, and the second for encouragement and for preparation for the life to come.

MRS. A. L. COBLE.

Received November 10, 1910.

McDOWELL.

        The camp is a frame building 20 by 40 feet, one story, several rooms. Races separated. Stream near. Sufficient ventilation. Heaters. No suffering from cold. Mattresses and blankets. As much food as they will eat. Water all the time. Prisoners wash in winter, bathe in warm weather. Excreta carried away by the stream. Free of vermin. Punishment inflicted. Sick cared for in the jail. No deaths. No tuberculosis. County physician makes monthly inspection. Supervisor and three guards. Pay, $40 and $30. No religious services. "I was in prison and ye visited me not." They march out for a stroll on Sunday, but most of the time are in camp. Chained together at night. No boys.

J. M. HOUCK.

Received February 21, 1910.

NEW HANOVER.

        The camp consists of frame buildings when in quarters, and iron cages are used when on the roads. Races are not confined together but work together. An extinguisher for fire protection. Heaters. I do not think that they suffer with cold. Four blankets each. No women. Plenty of food three times a day and coffee. Required to bathe. Blankets washed every two or three weeks. Quarters scoured. Free of vermin. Straw in mattresses changed every three months. Whipped for disobedience. No deaths. No tuberculosis. County physician makes monthly inspection. Worked ten hours. Three employees. Religious services. In the cage on Sundays. Not chained together at night. Boys with the men. Sick fairly well cared for. Now in charge, 72 colored and 8 white males.

        Remarks.--We visited the camp which is about half a mile from the city, and also the itinerary camp which is about four miles out. They are ditching and filling and making a regular railroad bed. They seem to be making fine progress.

A. G. HANKINS.

Received November 16, 1910.
Page 115

PASQUOTANK.

        The county camp is a canvas tent with shanty kitchen. It is really one room, but an apartment for white guards. No white prisoners at present. Ventilated. Wood stoves. No suffering from cold. As much good, substantial food as they want. Three meals and coffee. Drinking water as needed. Required to bathe. Free or comparatively free of vermin. Men sleep on quilts. No punishment. Seldom sick, but are cared for in camp when sick. No death; no tuberculosis. Sanitary inspection once a quarter. Worked from 7 a. m. to 6 o'clock. Four guards. Salaries: supervisor, $60; guards, $30. Occasional religious services. Kept in camp on Sunday. Chained at night. Boys with the men, a condition much to be regretted. The county judge hopes that the reform school will soon be in operation for the colored. Now in charge, 31 colored males; four under sixteen.

REV. E. W. STONE.

Received March 11, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        No change in the general arrangements. About twenty-five prisoners have been whipped. I have inquired into this and nothing seems to have been done but what was necessary; no cruelty. Sanitary inspection about once in three months. Boys are confined along with the men, which is a shame, but the supervisor is in no way responsible for this. He does as he has the means--a good man for the place. The tent is kept neat and clean; unusually so considering the class of people, all negroes. Thirty-six colored males, 7 under sixteen. Terms range from thirty days to three years.

REV. E. W. STONE.

Received September 14, 1910.

PERSON.

        The camp is frame, 32 by 32 feet. Two stories. Two rooms and a cook-room. Races separated. No special means for fire protection. Ventilated by windows. Wood heaters. No suffering from cold. As much bedding and food as needed. Three meals and coffee in the morning. Drinking water as wanted. Blankets washed once a month. Washed and scrubbed for cleanliness of camp. Required to bathe. Free of vermin. No special sewerage. Mattresses burned when unfit for use. One prisoner whipped a little until he would work. Sick cared for at the camp by physician and attendant. No death since the camp was established. No tuberculosis. Monthly sanitary inspection by county physician. Worked ten hours. Four employees. Superintendent receives $50 per month and guards $30. No religious services. In camp on Sundays. Prisoners chained at night. No boys. Now confined, two white and two colored.

REV. E. W. SNIPES.

Received September 6, 1910.
Page 116

PITT.

        The camp is built of wood and metal, three wagons 7 by 21 feet. Races separated. Ventilation. Buckets in case of fire. Heaters. No suffering from cold. Sufficient amount of bedding. Three meals. Drinking water. Required to bathe. Excreta removed in buckets. Not free of vermin. Blankets washed as needed. Whipping all who disobey rules by the superintendent. Sick cared for in camp. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Worked from sun to sun. One guard to every ten or twelve men. Supervisor receives $100 per month, guards $1.25 to $1.50 per day. Very seldom have religious services. Sundays spent in camp. Chained together at night. Boys with the men. Now confined, 34 colored males and 1 white. The white man is in for murder, term six years.

J. W. SMITH.

ROBERT N. NICHOLS.

Received August 22, 1910.

ROCKINGHAM.

        The camp is a frame building made in sections. It is 20 by 100 feet long. Two rooms and a hall. Races separated. Ventilated by windows and otherwise. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Three meals and coffee. Required to bathe once a week. Blankets washed once in two months. Free of vermin. Several whipped for escaping, by the superintendent. Sick cared for in a tent. No deaths, no tuberculosis. No monthly sanitary inspection. Fourteen employees. Supervisor receives $60 per month; guards receive $30, $20 and $18. No regular religious services; there are two preachers on the chain gang. In camp on Sunday. Chained at night. Boys are trusties and carry water.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received March 12, 1910.

SECOND REPORT.

        The camp is unchanged. The prisoners are whipped moderately when they run away from camp. It is almost impossible to give the offenses and terms. Prisoners are sent here by justices of the peace of Reidsville, and the Recorder often for a few days; also prisoners are received from Stokes, Surry, Ashe, Caswell and Rockingham.

IRA R. HUMPHREYS.

Received September 1, 1910.

ROWAN.

Camp No. 1.

        The building is frame with tin roof, 18 by 50 feet, one story. One room and annex. Races not together at night. Tubs and buckets for fire protection. Windows and doors. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. No women. Three daily meals and coffee for breakfast. Drinking water when called for. Required to bathe. Blankets washed when needed. Whitewash and disinfectants. Excreta buried.


Page 117

Free of vermin. Straw changed in mattresses as needed. Unruly are whipped; several have been punished. The sick are cared for at camp if slightly indisposed, otherwise at jail or County Home. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Monthly inspection by health officer. Worked from sun to sun. Six employees. Supervisor, $65 and guards receive, one $60, one $37.50 and one $35. Religious services. Out of the camp on Sundays if warm enough, in camp if damp, etc. Chained at night. Boys with the men.

Camp No. 2.

        Races separated. Buckets of water in case of fire. Windows. Stoves. No suffering from cold. All the food needed. Two women who cook, patch and wash. Three daily meals and coffee for breakfast. Water as wanted. Blankets washed four times a year. Disinfectants and lime used. A few bugs. Straw changed in the mattresses as needed. Two whipped (disobedience and stealing) by the superintendent. Contagious cases cared for at the jail, others at the camp. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Sun to sun. Six employees, salaries as follows: $65, $60, $40 and $35. Chained at night. Boys and men together.

SECOND REPORT.

No. 1.

        No change in the camps since report. A few bugs. One prisoner whipped for not working.

No. 2.

        No change in camp. One whipped for cursing and fighting.

        Remarks.--The camps are clean and the men are clean, and all show that they feel the importance of such a committee.

JAS. D. HEILIG.

W. W. TAYLOR.

J. B. COUNCILL, M.D.

SAMPSON.

        Tents are used at the camp. Races are separated at night. Ventilated by windows. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. Three daily meals, sufficient amount. No coffee. Regular water carrier. Required to bathe. Blankets washed twice a year. Excreta removed to a distance. Free of vermin. New mattresses at present. Whipped when disorderly by the overseer. Sick are cared for at the camp. No deaths. Physician makes an inspection once in three months. Sunrise to 12 and from 1 to 6 are the working hours. Four employees. Supervisor gets $40 per month and guards $20. No regular religious services. In camp on Sunday. Chained at night. No boys in charge.

REV. WALTER R. NOE.

REV. P. L. CLARK.

MRS. T. L. HUBBARD.

Received May 13, 1910.
Page 118

UNION.

        The camp is a frame building 20 by 45 feet. Divided in sections for the races. Well near by. Ventilated by open space the length of the building each side. Stoves. No suffering in cold weather. No women. All the food they want. Three meals; coffee for breakfast. Drinking water as wanted. Required to bathe. Prisoners are kept clean and disinfectants used. Free of vermin. When the straw gets old in the ticks they are refilled. Punishment with leather strap for disobedience. Sick cared for by physician and nurses. No deaths. No tuberculosis. Work about nine hours. Five employees. Superintendents receive $50 and guards $20 per month. Occasional religious services. Kept in the stockade on Sundays, taken out twice a day. Chained at night. No boys. Now in charge, 4 white men and 56 colored.

A. W. BIGGERS.

Received May 9, 1910.

WILSON.

        The camp is brick with steel cells. Races separated. Ventilators in the roof. Force pump. Stoves. No suffering from cold. Sufficient bedding. No limit to food. Drinking water as needed. Blankets washed once a month. Sewerage. Camp scalded and scrubbed. Hammocks. No punishment. Died, two, since August 1, 1909, to August 1, 1910, one from old age and one accidentally killed. Five employees. Supervisor $60 per month and board; guards, $30 per month and board. In stockade on Sundays. Now confined, 1 white and 42 blacks. Terms vary from two months to nine years.

J. M. LEATH.

Received April 16, 1910.


Page 119

REPORTS
OF
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.


Page 120

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.

County Homes. Number of Inmates. White. Number of Inmates. Black. Number of Inmates. Total. Insane. White. Insane. Black. Epileptic. Feeble-minded. Mental Defectives Confined. Children. White. Children. Black. Deaths, Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Buildings. Fire Protection.
Alamance 14 6 20 0 0 0 15 0 2 0 0 frame. well.
Alleghany 4 0 4 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 frame. spring, buckets.
Alexander 10 1 11 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 1 frame. none.
Anson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Ashe 17 1 18 1 0 ---- 8 1 0 0 1 frame. buckets.
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie 2 5 7 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 2 frame. well and Cashie river.
Bladen none in charge.                     frame. spring.
Brunswick 6 1 7 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 3 frame. cisterns.
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Burke ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus 14 10 24 1 1 8 2 1 0 0 3 frame. no.
Caldwell 6 0 6 1 0 0 1 0 1 0 1 frame. none.
Camden 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame. none.
Carteret no home.                        
Caswell 11 4 15 0 0 1 3 0 0 0 3 brick. none.
Catawba 18 5 23 0 1 0 0 0 1 0 1 frame. hose.
Chatham ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cherokee ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Chowan ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Clay ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cleveland 12 8 20 0 0 3 1 0 0 0 4 brick. wells.
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland 13 5 18 4 0 1 2 4 0 0 6 frame. none.
Currituck no home                        
Dare none in charge.     0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame. none.
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Davie 1 5 6 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 brick. none.
Duplin 4 0 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 3 brick. pumps.
Durham 15 11 26 5 1 1 2 6 0 0 8 brick and wood. well.


Page 121

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in Same Room with Others? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services. County Homes.
yes. open fires. well. no. no. yes. no. yes. Alamance
no. stoves. spring. yes. no. yes. no. no special provision. Alleghany
no. open fires. well. yes. ---- yes. no.   Alexander
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Anson
no. open fires. spring. yes. no. yes. no. occasional. Ashe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Beaufort
no. open fires. well and spring. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Bertie
yes. open fires. spring. ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Bladen
no. open fires, stoves. cisterns. yes. no. yes no. yes. Brunswick
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Burke
yes. grates. well. no. no. yes. locked up. church near. Cabarrus
no. open fires. spring. yes. ---- yes. no. no. Caldwell
no. open fires. well. yes. no. yes. no. churches near. Camden
                Carteret
yes. open fires. well. no. no. yes. locked up for a few hours. yes. Caswell
yes. open fires, stoves. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Catawba
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Chatham
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Cherokee
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Chowan
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Clay
yes. open fires. well. yes. no. yes. no. church near. Cleveland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Columbus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Craven
yes. open fires. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Cumberland
                Currituck
yes. stoves. pump. ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Dare
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davidson
no. open fires, stoves. well. ---- none. ---- no. no. Davie
no. stoves. pumps. sometimes. yes. yes. no. occasional. Duplin
yes. open fires, stove. wells. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Durham


Page 122

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Homes. Ventilation of Buildings. Food. Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspection and Report? Record Kept. Average Monthly Per Capita.
Alamance windows and doors. good and wholesome. yes. yes. $ 6.00
Alleghany windows and doors. all they want. with a commissioner monthly. yes 6.00
Alexander windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 6.00
Anson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Ashe windows and doors. good and wholesome. yes. no. 5.70
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 7.00
Bladen windows and doors. sufficient. ---- ---- ----
Brunswick windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 10.00
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Burke ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 8.00
Caldwell windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 6.00
Camden windows and doors. sufficient. yes. no. 5.00
Carteret ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Caswell windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 6.00
Catawba windows and doors. sufficient. weekly. yes. 5.00
Chatham ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cherokee ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Chowan ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Clay ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cleveland windows and doors. sufficient. ---- yes 7.00
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 2.50
Currituck windows and doors. ---- ---- ---- ----
Dare ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Davie windows and doors. sufficient. ---- ---- ----
Duplin windows and doors. sufficient. ---- ---- 6.00
Durham windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 4.00


Page 123

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm. Number Aided in their Homes? Average Monthly Per Capita of Outdoor Relief. Annual Amount. Total Annual Amount per County Exclusive of Farm. Remarks. County Homes.
$ 1,855.42 77 $ 1.50 $ 1,447.79 $ 3,303.21   Alamance
250.00 5 3.00 200.00 450.00   Alleghany
864.00 23 2.00 1,000.00 1,864.00   Alexander
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Anson
1,200.00 12 1.00 250.00 1,450.00   Ashe
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Beaufort
self-supporting. 59 3.00 2,124.00 2,124.00   Bertie
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Bladen
1,200.00 44 2.00 1,000.00 2,200.00   Brunswick
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Burke
1,500.00 57 1.60 1,094.40 2,594.40   Cabarrus
500.00 50 1.50 1,200.00 1,700.00   Caldwell
200.00 none. ---- ---- 200.00   Camden
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Carteret
1,200.00 70 1.50 1,300.00 2,500.00   Caswell
self-supporting. 86 1.59 1,640.00 1,640.00   Catawba
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Chatham
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Cherokee
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Chowan
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Clay
1,800.00 50 ---- 1,500.00 3,300.00   Cleveland
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Columbus
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Craven
400.00 90 2.00 2,160.00 2,560.00   Cumberland
---- 5 5.00 300.00 300.00   Currituck
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Dare
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Davidson
---- 40 2.00 960.00 960.00   Davie
300.00 100 2.00 2,500.00 2,800.00   Duplin
1,300.00 120 2.50 3,000.00 4,300.00   Durham


Page 124

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Homes. Number of Inmates. White. Number of Inmates. Black. Number of Inmates. Total. Insane. White. Insane. Black. Epileptic. Feeble-minded. Mental Defectives Confined. Children. White. Children. Black. Deaths, Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Buildings. Fire Protection.
Edgecombe 16 19 35 0 0 2 11 0 1 0 9 frame. wells.
Forsyth 28 21 49 2 2 2 2 3 0 2 5 brick. tank pressure.
Franklin 11 13 24 1 1 5 9 1 4 0 14 frame. well.
Gaston 14 3 17 0 1 0 6 1 0 0 6 brick. buckets.
Gates ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Graham no home.                        
Granville 9 10 19 0 0 0 19 0 0 2 4 brick. none.
Greene 4 0 4 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame. none.
Guilford ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Harnett 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame. well.
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson 6 2 8 1 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 frame. none.
Hertford 8 ---- 8 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 1 frame. pump.
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell 12 12 24 1 0 2 12 1 0 0 12 frame. none.
Jackson 8 0 8 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 frame. buckets, well.
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Jones 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 frame. pump.
Lenoir 9 5 14 0 0 1 1 0 0 0 5 frame. none.
Lincoln 11 6 17 0 0 2 7 0 0 0 ---- brick. tank.
Lee no home.                        
McDowell 5 3 8 1 0 0 3 0 0 0 1 frame. none.
Madison 16 0 16 5 0 0 7 1 0 0 3 frame. tank and hose.
Macon ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Martin 6 7 13 0 0 0 13 0 0 0 2 frame. wells.
Mecklenburg ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mitchell no home.                        
Montgomery ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Moore ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 125

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in Same Room with Others? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services. County Homes.
yes. open fires, heaters. wells. yes. no. yes. no. occasional. Edgecombe
yes. steam. well, gasoline engine. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Forsyth
no. open fires, stoves. spring, well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Franklin
yes. steam. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Gaston
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gates
                Graham
yes. open fires, stoves. wells. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Granville
yes open fires, heaters. well. no. none. yes. no. no. Greene
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Halifax
yes. open fires. well. yes. yes. yes. no. yes. Harnett
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Haywood
no. open fires. well. yes. yes. yes. no. yes. Henderson
yes. open fires, stoves. pumps. not as a rule. no. yes. light whipping. one colored woman. occasional. Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Hyde
no. open fires, stoves. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Iredell
yes. open fires. well, spring. yes. none. yes. no. occasional. Jackson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Johnston
no. open fires. well. yes. no. yes. no. no. Jones
yes. stoves. pump. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Lenoir
yes. steam. waterworks. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Lincoln
                Lee
yes. open fires. well and spring. yes. no. yes. no. occasional. McDowell
yes. hot air furnace. spring, well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Madison
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Macon
yes. open fires, heaters. wells. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Martin
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg
                Mitchell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Montgomery
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Moore
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash


Page 126

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Homes. Ventilation of Buildings. Food. Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspection and Report? Record Kept. Average Monthly Per Capita.
Edgecombe windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. $ 10.00
Forsyth windows, ventilators and doors. sufficient. yes. no. ----
Franklin windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 8.00
Gaston windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 10.00
Gates ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Graham ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Granville windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. ----
Greene windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 11.00
Guilford ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Harnett windows, transoms and doors. sufficient. yes. ---- 12.00
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 9.00
Hertford windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 6.90
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 5.00
Jackson windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 6.50
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Jones windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 12.00
Lenoir windows and doors. sufficient. weekly. no. 10.00
Lee ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Lincoln windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 5.00
McDowell windows and doors. sufficient. yes. no. 6.00
Madison flues and windows. sufficient. yes. yes. 5.00
Macon ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Martin windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 10.00
Mecklenburg ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mitchell no home.        
Montgomery ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Moore ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 127

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm. Number Aided in their Homes? Average Monthly Per Capita of Outdoor Relief. Annual Amount. Total Annual Amount per County Exclusive of Farm. Remarks. County Homes.
$ 3,600.00 100 $ 1.00 $ 1,200.00 $ 4,800.00   Edgecombe
12,000.00 none. ---- ---- 12,000.00   Forsyth
1,800.00 125 1.50 1,500.00 3,300.00   Franklin
1,600.00 ---- ---- ---- 1,600.00   Gaston
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Gates
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Graham
---- 100 1.00 1,200.00 1,200.00   Granville
520.00 26 1.87 660.00 1,180.00   Greene
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Guilford
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Halifax
300.00 42 4.00 1,000.00 1,300.00   Harnett
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Haywood
900.00 7 4.00 336.00 1,236.00 New buildings in course of construction. We are trying to work up the farm to a point where it will be self-supporting. Henderson
580.03 12 1.50 225.00 805.08   Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Hyde
1,300.00 100 1.00 1,200.00 2,500.00   Iredell
650.00 20 5.00 1,200.00 1,850.00   Jackson
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Johnston
288.00 17 3.00 600.00 888.00 Building new home. Jones
160.00 ---- ---- ---- 160.00   Lenoir
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Lee
1,000.00 32 2.50 900.00 1,900.00 New Building. Lincoln
30.80 25 1.75 600.00 630.80   McDowell
1,000.00 10 3.50 400.00 1,400.00   Madison
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Macon
1,800.00 100 2.00 2,500.00 4,300.00   Martin
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Mecklenburg
            Mitchell
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Montgomery
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Moore


Page 128

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Homes. Number of Inmates. White. Number of Inmates. Black. Number of Inmates. Total. Insane. White. Insane. Black. Epileptic. Feeble-minded. Mental Defectives Confined. Children. White. Children. Black. Deaths, Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Buildings. Fire Protection.
New Hanover 3 11 14 0 3 1 5 0 0 0 ---- brick. phoenix fire extinguishing compound.
Onslow no home.                        
Orange ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Pamlico 8 1 9 0 0 2 3 0 0 0 2 frame. none.
Pasquotank 8 9 17 0 0 3 5 0 0 0 5 frame. wells.
Pender ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Perquimans 2 9 11 0 0 1 5 0 0 0 5 frame. pumps.
Person 11 5 16 0 0 1 1 0 3 0 1 brick. pump.
Pitt 7 5 12 1 0 0 3 1 0 1 1 frame. buckets.
Polk 4 1 5 0 0 0 1 0 3 0 0 frame. none.
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Richmond ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Robeson 5 6 11 1 0 1 4 0 0 0 ---- frame. none.
Rockingham 23 10 33 3 2 0 4 1 0 1 7 brick. none.
Rowan 19 4 23 0 0 0 3 0 0 0 3 brick and frame. yes.
Rutherford 25 ---- 25 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 4 frame. buckets.
Sampson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Scotland 1 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 frame. wells.
Stanly ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Stokes ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Surry ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Swain 3 0 3 0 0 0 2 0 1 0 0 frame. buckets.
Transylvania ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Tyrrell ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Union 13 11 24 1 1 2 3 2 2 0 5 brick. fire company.
Vance 5 6 11 0 0 0 2 0 0 1 5 frame. well.
Wake ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Warren 17 10 27 0 1 0 3 0 0 1 5 frame. none.
Washington 0 2 2 0 0 0 2 0 0 0 2 frame. none.
Watauga 15 1 16 0 0 1 4 0 0 0 2 frame. buckets.
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 129

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in Same Room with Others? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services. County Homes.
yes. steam. pumps, cistern. yes. no. yes. confinement. yes. New Hanover
                Onslow
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Orange
yes. stoves. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Pamlico
yes. stoves, open fires. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Pasquotank
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Pender
yes. stoves. well. no. no. yes. no. no. Perquimans
no. open fires. well. no. no. yes. no. no. Person
yes. open fires, stoves. pump. no. no. yes. no. yes. Pitt
no. open fires. well. yes. none. yes. no. yes. Polk
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Randolph
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Richmond
yes. open fires. pump. no. two. yes. no. by the keeper. Robeson
yes. open fires. well. if possible. no. yes. no. yes. Rockingham
yes. open fires, and stoves. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Rowan
no. open fires, heaters. well. by superintendent. none. yes. no. no. Rutherford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Sampson
yes. open fires. pumps. some. none yes. no. no. Scotland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stanly
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stokes
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Surry
no. open fires. spring. yes. none. yes. no. no. Swain
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Transylvania
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Tyrrell
yes. open fires, heaters. city water. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Union
yes. open fires, stoves. well. yes. no. yes. no. church on the grounds. Vance
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake
no. open fires. well. no. no. yes. no. yes. Warren
no. stoves. pumps. no. no. yes. no. no. Washington
no. open fires, stoves. spring. yes. no. yes. no. occasional. Watauga
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wayne


Page 130

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Homes. Ventilation of Buildings. Food. Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspection and Report? Record Kept. Average Monthly Per Capita.
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- $----
New Hanover windows and transoms. sufficient. yes. yes. ----
Onslow ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Orange ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Pamlico windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 8.00
Pasquotank windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 10.00
Pender ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Perquimans windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 7.50
Person windows and doors. sufficient. yes. no. 5.00
Pitt doors and windows. sufficient. ---- yes 13.90
Polk ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Richmond ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Robeson windows and doors. sufficient. ---- ---- ----
Rockingham windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 7.00
Rowan windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. nearly self-supporting.
Rutherford windows and doors. sufficient. often as needed. ---- ----
Sampson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Scotland windows and doors. sufficient. yes. ---- 7.50
Stanly ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Stokes ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Surry ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Swain windows and doors. sufficient. no. no. 7.00
Transylvania ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Tyrrell ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Union windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 3.50
Vance windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 5.00
Wake ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Warren windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 7.00
Washington windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 6.00
Watauga ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 131

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm. Number Aided in their Homes? Average Monthly Per Capita of Outdoor Relief. Annual Amount. Total Annual Amount per County Exclusive of Farm. Remarks. County Homes.
$---- ---- $---- $---- $---- Nash
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   New Hanover
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Onslow
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Orange
864.00 ---- ---- ---- 864.00   Pamlico
2,500.00 50 2.00 1,300.00 3,800.00   Pasquotank
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Pender
1,500.00 20 1.33 320.00 1,820.00   Perquimans
self-sustaining. 100 1.00 1,200.00 1,200.00   Person
2,400.00 112 2.80 2,750.00 5,150.00   Pitt
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Polk
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Randolph
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Richmond
1,250.00 159 2.20 4,182.00 5,432.00 One Croatan Indian. Robeson
2,772.00 45 ---- 600.00 3,372.00   Rockingham
1,200.00 60 1.25 900.00 2,100.00   Rowan
650.00 15 3.00 300.00 950.00   Rutherford
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Sampson
800.00 33 1.75 550.00 1,350.00   Scotland
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Stanly
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Stokes
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Surry
250.00 15 6.00 1,200.00 1,450.00   Swain
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Transylvania
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Tyrrell
2,500.00 89 3.00 2,640.00 5,140.00   Union
750.00 41 1.82 750.00 1,500.00   Vance
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Wake
1,450.00 none. ---- ---- 1,450.00   Warren
400.00 12 3.00 400.00 800.00   Washington
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Watauga
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Wayne


Page 132

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Homes. Number of Inmates. White. Number of Inmates. Black. Number of Inmates. Total. Insane. White. Insane. Black. Epileptic. Feeble-minded. Mental Defectives Confined. Children. White. Children. Black. Deaths, Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Buildings. Fire Protection.
Wilkes ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wilson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yadkin ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yancey 6 0 6 1 0 0 2 0 0 0 0 frame. none.
Total 486 254 740 31 14 48 192 24 18 10 146    


Page 133

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Insurance. Heating. Water Supply. Christian Burial. Are Tuberculous Persons Allowed to Sleep in Same Room with Others? Are the Sick Well Cared for? Punishment. Religious Services. County Homes.
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wilkes
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wilson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Yadkin
no stoves. well. yes. no. yes. no. yes. Yancey
                Total


Page 134

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

County Homes. Ventilation of Buildings. Food. Does County Physician Make Monthly Inspection and Report? Record Kept? Average Monthly Per Capita.
Wilkes ---- ---- ---- ---- $----
Wilson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yadkin ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yancey windows and doors. sufficient. yes. yes. 7.75
Total ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 135

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--Continued.

Annual Expenditure Exclusive of Farm. Number Aided in their Homes? Average Monthly Per Capita of Outdoor Relief. Annual Amount. Total Annual Amount per County Exclusive of Farm. Remarka. County Homes.
$---- ---- $---- $---- $----   Wilkes
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Wilson
---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Yadkin
618.00 11 ---- 363.00 981.00   Yancey
$ 60,002.30 2,356 ---- $ 52,652.19 $ 112,654.49   Total

COUNTY HOMES.

        The following seven counties do not maintain Homes for the Aged and Infirm, but give outdoor relief: Carteret, Clay, Currituck, Graham, Lee, Mitchell and Onslow.

        Fifty-four counties give as present in the Homes at time of report 453 whites, 254 colored and 33 color not given--total, 740.

        Of these 31 white and 14 colored were insane; total, 45. Epileptics, 48; feeble-minded, 192; total mental defectives in these County Homes, 285. Of these 24 were confined.

        Children, 18 white and 10 colored; total, 28. Died during the year, 204. Cared for in the County Homes, 740, at a cost of $60,002.30. Outdoor relief to the poor in their own homes to 2,356 persons at a cost of $52,652.19. Grand total, $112,654.49.

        Twelve additional counties from the Visitors' report give in sixty-six Homes, 932. Insane, 59; epileptics, 66; feeble-minded, 225; total mental defectives, 350. Confined, 28. Children in charge, 31.

        As there are ninety-one counties maintaining Homes this leaves one-fourth not reporting number cared for, and only two-thirds have reported the cost of the county poor. The farms add materially to the support of the Homes and are not included in the above amount.


Page 136

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. White Men. Colored Men. White Women. Colored Women. Under 16 Years Old. Total. Material and Size. Number of Cells. and Size.
Alamance 1 0 1 0 0 2 brick, 3 rooms. 8 cells, 8×8.
Alleghany 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, 2 rooms. 2 cells, 7×10.
Alexander 0 1 0 0 0 1 brick, 3 rooms. 1 cell, 8×10.
Anson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Ashe 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, frame ceiling, 32×32. 3 rooms; 2 steel cells, 6½×10, 6½×7.
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie 1 3 0 0 0 4 brick and steel, 4 rooms. 4 cells
Bladen 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 6 cells.
Brunswick 1 2 0 0 0 3 brick, 6 rooms. 4 cells, 10×10
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Burke ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus 4 3 0 2 2 9 brick, 4 rooms 2 cells, 14×18
Caldwell 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 8 rooms.
Camden 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, concrete, 2 rooms. 4 cells.
Carteret 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 4 rooms.
Caswell 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, 2 rooms. 6 cells, 8×10.
*Catawba 3 1 0 0 0 4 brick, 3 or 4 rooms 3 cells, 6×8
Chatham 0 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 6 cells, 14×14, 8×10, 5×10.
Cherokee ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Chowan ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Clay ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cleveland 2 3 ---- ---- 1 5 brick, 4 rooms. 7 cells.
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland 0 4 1 0 0 5 brick. 10 cells, 6×10.
Currituck 0 3 0 0 0 3 brick. 4 cells, 8×8.
Dare 1 5 0 0 0 6 brick. 4 cells, 8×8.
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Davie ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Duplin 0 4 0 0 0 4 brick. 5 cells.


Page 137

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Ever Over-crowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Bedding. Sexes Separated? County Prisons.
no. open. windows and doors. city water. stoves. sufficient for comfort. yes. Alamance
no. bars. windows and doors. buckets. open fires, stoves. sufficient. yes. Alleghany
no. bars. windows and doors. none. grates. sufficient. no women. Alexander
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Anson
no. bars. windows and doors. buckets wood stoves. sufficient. yes. Ashe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Beaufort
no. bars. windows and doors. fire department. stoves. sufficient. yes. Bertie
no. sash raises, bars. windows and doors. force pump. furnace. sufficient. yes. Bladen
no. bars. windows and doors. fire extinguisher. stoves. sufficient. yes. Brunswick
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Burke
no. bars. windows and doors. city water. furnace. sufficient. yes. Cabarrus
no. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Caldwell
no. bars. windows, doors and pipe. fireproof. stove. sufficient. yes. Camden
no. bars. windows and doors. city fire department. stoves. sufficient. yes. Carteret
no. bars. windows and doors. force pump and tank. stoves. sufficient. yes. Caswell
no. bars. windows and doors. buckets. stoves. sufficient. ---- *Catawba
no. screens. windows and doors. buckets. stoves. sufficient. yes. Chatham
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Cherokee
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Chowan
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Clay
yes. three sets of iron bars. windows and doors. none. hot air. straw bed and 2 blankets each. no arrangement for women. Cleveland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Columbus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Craven
no. open in summer. windows and doors. city fire department. furnace. four to six double blankets. yes. Cumberland
no. iron shutters. windows and doors. fireproof. stove. sufficient. yes. Currituck
no. bars. windows and doors. pump, buckets. stoves. sufficient. yes. Dare
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davidson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davie
no. bars. windows and doors. force pump. stoves. sufficient. yes. Duplin


Page 138

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. Children in SepaarateCells? How Often is Fresh Drinking Water Furnished? Food. Meals--Hours of Service. Coffee or Other Warm Drink?
Alamance none all the time. all they want. 2 meals, 8 and 2. no.
Alleghany yes. as wanted. sufficient. 3 meals, 6, 12 and 6. yes.
Alexander never had any. as wanted. all they want. 3 meals.  
Anson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Ashe never had one. all the time. all they want. 3 meals. yes.
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie never had any. twice or three times daily. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 6. yes.
Bladen none. twice daily. sufficient. 2 meals. no.
Brunswick yes. three times daily. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 4. yes.
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Burke ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus yes. at all times. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 2. no unless sick.
Caldwell yes. as wanted. sufficient. 3 meals. no.
Camden never had any. two or three times daily. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Carteret yes. twice a day. all they can eat. 3 meals. no.
Caswell never had any. three times daily. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Catawba none. as wanted. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 3.  
Chatham yes. three times daily. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 2. yes.
Cherokee ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Chowan ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Clay ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cleveland no. city water. sufficient. 2 meals, 7 and 12. no.
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland yes. waterworks. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 2. no.
Currituck none. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 7 and 3. yes.
Dare never had any. as wanted. sufficient. 3 meals, 8, 12 and 6.  
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Davie ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Duplin yes. three times daily. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 2. no.
Durham seldom have any. city water. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 2:30 no.
Edgecombe yes. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 10 and 3. yes.


Page 139

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Provisions for Bathing? Disposition of Excreta? Any Vermin? Prisoners Required to Clean their Cells? Means of Cleaning the Prison? Any Punishment? County Prisons.
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Alamance
usual country provision. buried. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Alleghany
---- ---- no. no. scouring, etc. no. Alexander
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Anson
yes. sewerage. no. yes. sewerage. no. Ashe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Beaufort
bath tubs, waterworks. sewerage. no. the jailer has it done. Supt. of Health looks out for this. no. Bertie
buckets. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. Bladen
yes. no. no. no, jailer cleans them. scoured. no. Brunswick
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Burke
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. scrubbing. no. Cabarrus
required to bathe. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Caldwell
bath room and bath tub. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Camden
none. buried and lime used. no. yes. disinfectants, scrubbing. no. Carteret
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. fumigated, all cells washed and cleansed twice a year; oftener if needed. no. Caswell
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Catawba
pans. buried. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Chatham
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Cherokee
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Chowan
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Clay
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Cleveland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Columbus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Craven
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. scrubbed regularly. no. Cumberland
yes. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. Currituck
no. sewerage. no. yes. scrubbing. no. Dare
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davidson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davie
tubs and pans. sewerage. no. usually. scrubbed. no. Duplin
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. scrubbed. no. Durham
bath tub. sewerage no. yes. disinfected weekly. no. Edgecombe


Page 140

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. Any Intoxicating Liquors Allowed? Religious Services? Insane. White Men. Insane. Colored Men. Insane. White Women. Insane. Colored Women.
Alamance no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Alleghany no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Alexander no. none. 0 0 0 0
Anson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Ashe no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie no, except when prescribed by doctor. no. 0 0 0 0
Bladen no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Brunswick no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Burke ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Caldwell no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Camden no. any minister is allowed to visit the prison. 0 0 0 0
Carteret no. if wanted, yes. 0 0 0 0
Caswell no. no. 0 0 0 0
Catawba no. yes. 0 1 0 0
Chatham no. no. 0 0 0 0
Cherokee ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Chowan ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Clay ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cleveland no. no. 0 0 0 0
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland no.   0 0 1 0
Currituck no. no. 0 0 0 0
Dare no. no. 0 0 0 1
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Davie ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 141

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Deaths from Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Any Tuberculous Prisoners? Superintendent of Health Inspect and Report Monthly? Is a Record Kept? Remarks. County Prisons.
none. none. yes. yes.   Alamance
none. none. when there are prisoners. yes. one prisoner during the year, and he was confined four days. Alleghany
none. none. yes. no.   Alexander
---- ---- ---- ----   Anson
none. none. no. no. no one in jail for some time. Ashe
---- ---- ---- ----   Beaufort
none. none. yes. yes.   Bertie
none. none. yes. yes.   Bladen
none. none. yes. no.   Brunswick
---- ---- ---- ----   Buncombe
---- ---- ---- ----   Burke
none. none. yes.     Cabarrus
none. none. yes. yes.   Caldwell
none. none. yes. no.   Camden
none. none. yes. no.   Carteret
none. none. yes. yes.   Caswell
none. none. weekly visits. yes. idiotic negro man, about one year; application rejected. Catawba
none. none. yes. yes.   Chatham
---- ---- ---- ----   Cherokee
---- ---- ---- ----   Chowan
---- ---- ---- ----   Clay
none. none. yes. yes.   Cleveland
---- ---- ---- ----   Columbus
---- ---- ---- ----   Craven
1 none. yes. yes. heart failure. Cumberland
0 none. no. no.   Currituck
0 none. no. yes. no supt. of health. Dare
---- ---- ---- ----   Davidson
---- ---- ---- ----   Davie


Page 142

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. White Men. Colored Men. White Women. Colored Women. Under 16 Years Old. Total. Materia and Size. Number of Cells and Size.
Durham 9 12 0 1 0 22 brick. 12 cells, 7×10.
Edgecombe 1 0 0 0 0 1 brick, 2 rooms. 4 cells, 8×12, 20×20.
Forsyth 2 17 4 11 0 34 concrete. 24 cells, 8×8.
Franklin 0 0 0 0 0 0 stone. 6 cells, 8×8.
Gaston 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, 4 rooms. none.
Gates ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Graham 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, 2 rooms. 4 cells.
Granville 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 5 cells, 6×8.
Greene 0 5 0 0 0 5 brick. 5 cells, 9×9.
Guilford ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax 2 6 0 0 0 8 brick. 11 cells, 8×10.
*Harnett 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 4 cells, 8×6.
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson 3 3 0 3 0 9 brick. 2 cells, 12×12.
Hertford 0 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 4 cells.
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, 10 rooms. 10 cells, 6½×7.
Jackson 1 4 0 0 0 5 brick. 4 cells, 10×10.
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Jones 0 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 3 cells.
Lenoir 0 10 0 0 0 10 brick, 7 rooms. 4 cells, 10×10.
Lee 1 4 0 0 0 5 brick. 4 cells, 8×12.
Lincoln 1 1 0 0 0 2 brick, 4 rooms. cell room is 15×30; 2 small rooms, 15×15.
McDowell 1 3 0 1 0 5 brick. 6 cells.
Madison 2 0 0 0 0 2 brick, 2 rooms. 16 cells, 8×10×8.
Macon ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Martin 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick, 6 rooms. 4 cells, 10×12.
Mecklenburg ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mitchell 4 0 0 0 0 4 brick. 3 cells, 10×14, 8×12.
Montgomery ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 143

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Ever Over-crowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Bedding. Sexes Separated? County Prisons.
no. bars. windows and doors. hose, waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Durham
no. screens. windows and doors. hydrant. stoves. sufficient. yes. Edgecombe
no. screens. windows, doors and ventilator in the top. fire department. furnace. sufficient. yes. Forsyth
no. bars. windows and doors. fire department. stove. sufficient. no women. Franklin
sometimes. bars. windows and doors. buckets. stove. sufficient. ---- Gaston
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gates
no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. sufficient. yes. Graham
no. bars. windows, doors and otherwise. fire department. stoves. sufficient. yes. Granville
no. bars. windows and doors. chemical engine. stoves. sufficient. yes. Greene
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford
not often. bars. windows and doors. no special means. stoves. sufficient. yes. Halifax
no. bars. windows, door-ventilator. force pump. stoves, furnace. sufficient. yes. *Harnett
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Haywood
no. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. furnace. sufficient. yes. Henderson
no. screens, bars. windows and doors. pump. furnace. sufficient. yes. Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Hyde
no. rods. windows and doors. waterworks. furnace. sufficient. yes. Iredell
no. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. stove. sufficient. no women. Jackson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Johnston
no. bars. windows and doors. none. stove. sufficient. yes. Jones
no. bars. windows, doors and otherwise. city fire department. steam heat. sufficient. yes. Lenoir
no. bars. windows, doors and otherwise. waterworks. steam heat. sufficient. yes. Lee
no. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Lincoln
no. bars. windows and ventilator in the top. waterworks. heaters. sufficient. yes. McDowell
no. bars. windows, doors, vent-pipes. none. stove. sufficient. yes. Madison
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Macon
no. grated. windows, doors and ventilator. waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Martin
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg
sometimes. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Mitchell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Montgomery


Page 144

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. Children in Separate Cells? How Often is Fresh Drinking Water Furnished? Food. Meals--Hours of Service. Coffee or Other Warm Drink?
Forsyth no. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals. yes.
Franklin no children. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 1. no.
Gaston yes. as wanted. sufficient. 2 meals. yes.
Gates ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Graham no. all the time. sufficient. 3 meals yes.
Granville none. all the time sufficient. 2 meals, 7 and 2. in winter.
Greene no. children. twice a day. sufficient. 2 meals. no.
Guilford ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax yes. twice daily. plenty of meat and bread. 2 meals, 10 and 3. sometimes, if sick.
Harnett none. all the time. all they want. 3 meals. yes.
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson none. all the time. sufficient. 3 meals, 7, 12:30 and 6. yes.
Hertford yes. three times daily. sufficient. 3 meals. yes, in winter.
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell yes. all the time sufficient. 2 meals, 7 and 1. yes.
Jackson never any children. all the time. sufficient. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. yes.
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Jones none. as required. sufficient. 2 meals, 9, and late afternoon. yes.
Lee no. children. all the time. sufficient. 3 meals, 7:30, 12 and 6:30. milk.
Lenoir yes. as required. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 3. no.
Lincoln no. water all the time. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
McDowell yes. all the time. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Madison yes. daily. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Macon ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Martin yes. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 3. yes.
Mecklenburg ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mitchell no. three times daily. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Montgomery ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Moore ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover no. children. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 2. no.
Onslow no. children. as wanted. sufficient. 3 meals, 6, 12 and 6. yes.
Orange ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 145

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Provision for Bathing? Disposition of Excreta? Any Vermin? Prisoners Required to Clean their Cells? Means of Cleaning the Prisons? Any Punishment? County Prisons.
bath tubs, shower bath. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Forsyth
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Franklin
tubs. buckets. no. yes. scoured. no. Gaston
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gates
tub. sewerage. no. no. waterworks. no. Graham
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Granville
buckets. buckets. no. yes. scoured. no. Greene
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford
buckets. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. Halifax
yes. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. Harnett
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Haywood
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants, scrubbed. no. Henderson
basins. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Hertford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Hyde
shower bath and bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. soap and water. no. Iredell
bath tub. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. Jackson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Johnston
wash basins. sewerage. no. yes. sewerage. no. Jones
bath room. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Lee
two bath rooms. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Lenoir
yes. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Lincoln
bath tub. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. McDowell
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Madison
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Macon
bath tub. sewerage. no. yes. hose and water tank. no. Martin
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg
bath tub. sewerage. no. yes. sewerage. no. Mitchell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Montgomery
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Moore
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
hot and cold water. sewerage. no. yes. cleaned daily. no. New Hanover
tubs. sewerage. no. jailer does this. scoured. no. Onslow
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Orange


Page 146

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. Any Intoxicating Liquors Allowed? Religious Services? Insane. White Men. Insane. Colored Men. Insane. White Women. Insane. Colored Women.
Duplin no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Durham no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Edgecombe no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Forsyth no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Franklin no. no. 0 0 0 0
Gaston no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Gates ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Graham no. no. 0 0 0 0
Granville no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Greene no. no. 0 0 0 0
Guilford ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax no. Bibles furnished. 0 2 0 0
Harnett no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Hertford no. no. 0 0 0 0
Hyde ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Iredell no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Jackson no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Jones no. no. 0 0 0 0
Lenoir no. no. 0 0 0 0
Lee no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Lincoln no. yes. 0 0 0 0
McDowell no. no. 0 0 0 0
Madison no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Macon ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Martin no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Mecklenburg ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mitchell no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Montgomery ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Moore ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 147

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Deaths from Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Any Tuberculous Prisoners? Superintendent of Health Inspect and Report Monthly? Is a Record Kept? Remarks. County Prisons.
0 none. yes. yes.   Duplin
0 none. yes. yes.   Durham
0 none. yes. yes.   Edgecombe
1 none. yes. no.   Forsyth
0 none. yes. yes.   Franklin
0 none. yes. yes. new jail will be ready by December. Gaston
---- ---- ---- ----   Gates
0 none. no. no.   Graham
1 none. yes. yes.   Granville
0 none. yes. yes. regret to say, our jail is not what I would like it to be. Greene
---- ---- ---- ----   Guilford
0 none. yes. yes.   Halifax
0 none. yes. yes. we don't place children in jail. Harnett
---- ---- ---- ----   Haywood
0 none. yes. yes.   Henderson
0 none. yes. yes.   Hertford
---- ---- ---- ----   Hyde
0 none. yes. yes. new building, 3 padded cells for insane. Iredell
0 none. yes. yes. of the prisoners, three are Indians. Jackson
---- ---- ---- ----   Johnston
0 none. no. yes.   Jones
0 none. weekly. yes.   Lenoir
0 none. yes. yes.   Lee
0 none. yes. yes.   Lincoln
0 none. yes. yes.   McDowell
0 none. yes. yes.   Madison
---- ---- ---- ----   Macon
0 none. yes. yes.   Martin
---- ---- ---- ----   Mecklenburg
0 none. yes. yes.   Mitchell
---- ---- ---- ----   Montgomery
---- ---- ---- ----   Moore


Page 148

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. White Men. Colored Men. White Women. Colored Women. Under 16 Years Old. Total. Material and Size. Number of Cells and Size.
Moore ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover 2 1 0 1 0 4 brick, 6 rooms. 12 cells, 6×8.
Onslow 0 0 0 0 0 0 frame. 2 cells.
Orange ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Pamlico 0 3 0 0 0 3 brick, 2 rooms. 2 cells, 6×8.
Pasquotank 1 2 0 2 0 5 brick. 4 cells, 10×12
Pender ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- brick. 8 cells, 8×10.
Perquimans 0 3 0 1 0 4 brick. 8 cells, 8×10.
Person 1 1 0 0 0 2 brick, 5 rooms. 2 cells.
Pitt 1 14 2 1 0 18 brick. 3 cells, 6×8.
Polk 0 2 0 1 0 3 brick. 2 cells, 8×8.
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Richmond ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Robeson 1 23 0 1 3 25 brick. 13 cells, 16×8.
Rockingham ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rowan 6 7 0 2 10 15 brick. 21 cells, 8×8.
Rutherford 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 6 cells.
Sampson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Scotland 2 6 0 0 0 8 brick, 7 rooms. 4 cells, 6×10.
Stanly ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Stokes ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Surry ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Swain 0 0 0 0 0 0 brick. 4 cells.
Transylvania ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Tyrrell ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Union 3 1 0 0 0 4 brick. 8 cells, 5×6.
Vance 1 1 0 0 0 2 brick. 12 cells, 6×8.
Wake 5 28 0 1 0 34 brick. 16 cells, 8×10.
Warren 0 3 0 0 0 3 stone. 4 cells, 12×12.
Washington 0 1 0 0 0 1 brick. 2 cells, 7×6.
Watauga 4 0 1 0 0 5 brick. 4 rooms, 10×12
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 149

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Ever Over-crowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Bedding. Sexes Separated? County Prisons.
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Moore
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
no. bars. windows and doors. fire extinguisher. steam heat. sufficient. yes. New Hanover
no. bars. windows. fire department. heaters. sufficient. yes. Onslow
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Orange
no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. sufficient. yes. Pamlico
no. bars screens. windows and doors. city fire department. stoves. sufficient. yes. Pasquotank
no. bars. windows and doors. none. ---- ---- ---- Pender
no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. sufficient. yes. Perquimans
no. bars. windows and doors. city waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Person
yes. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Pitt
no. grating. windows and doors. none. heaters. sufficient. yes. Polk
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Randolph
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Richmond
not often. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. steam heat. sufficient. yes. Robeson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Rockingham
no. bars. windows, doors and ventilator. waterworks. steam. sufficient. yes. Rowan
no. bars. windows and doors. buckets. heaters. sufficient. yes. Rutherford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Sampson
no. bars. windows, doors and ventilator. waterworks. stove. sufficient. yes. Scotland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stanly
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stokes
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Surry
at time of court. bars. windows and doors. waterworks. stoves. sufficient. yes. Swain
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Transylvania
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Tyrrell
no. bars. windows and doors. city department. furnace. sufficient. yes. Union
no. screens. windows and doors. city department. stoves. sufficient. yes. Vance
yes. bars. windows, doors and vent-pipe city department. furnace. sufficient. yes. Wake
no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. sufficient. yes. Warren
no. bars. windows and doors. city department. heater. sufficient. yes. Washington
no. bars. windows and doors. water. stove. sufficient. yes. Watauga
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wayne


Page 150

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. Children in Separate Cells? How Often is Fresh Drinking Water Furnished? Food. Meals--Hours of Service. Coffee or Other Warm Drink?
Pamlico none. twice daily. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Pasquotank yes. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 3. yes.
Pender ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Perquimans no. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 3. yes.
Person yes. as required. sufficient. 3 meals. sometimes.
Pitt yes. as wanted. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 4. no.
Polk yes. as required. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Richmond ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Robeson no. three to five times. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 1. no.
Rockingham ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rowan no. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals. yes.
Rutherford none. as wanted. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.
Sampson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Scotland yes. as wanted. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 2. no.
Stanly ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Stokes ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Surry ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Swain no. all the time. sufficient. 3 meals, 7, 12 and 6. yes.
Transylvania ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Tyrell ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Union yes. all the time sufficient. 3 meals.  
Vance never had any. as wanted. sufficient. 2 in summer, 3 in winter. yes.
Wake yes. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 8:30 and 2:30. no.
Warren yes. all the time. sufficient. 2 meals, 8 and 2. yes.
Washington have none. twice daily. sufficient. 2 meals, 9 and 4. ----
Watauga yes. all the time. sufficient. 3 meals yes.
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wilkes have no children. twice daily. sufficient. 2 meals, 8:30 and 1. yes.
Wilson ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yadkin ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yancey no children. as wanted. sufficient. 3 meals. yes.


Page 151

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Provisions for Bathing? Disposition of Excreta? Any Vermin? Prisoners Required to Clean their Cells? Means of Cleaning the Prison? Any Punishment? County Prisons.
basin. buried. no. yes. scoured. no. Pamlico
bath tub. sewerage. no. yes. waterworks. no. Pasquotank
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Pender
bath tub. sewerage. no. yes. special means. no. Perquimans
tub. sewerage. no. yes. fumigation. no. Person
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. anti-germine used. no. Pitt
tubs. buried. no. jailer does this. disinfectants. no. Polk
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Randolph
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Richmond
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. insecticide. no. Robeson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Rockingham
bath rooms. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. Rowan
basins. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Rutherford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Sampson
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Scotland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stanly
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stokes
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Surry
none. sewerage. no. yes. sewerage. no. Swain
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Transylvania
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Tyrell
no. sewerage. no. yes. spraying disinfectant. no. Union
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Vance
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Wake
tubs. sewerage. no. yes. disinfectants. no. Warren
basins. buried. no. yes. scoured. no. Washington
none. sewerage. no. yes. scoured. no. Watauga
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wayne
none. ---- no. yes. scoured. no. Wilkes
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wilson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Yadkin
bath tubs. sewerage. no. yes. waterworks. no. Yancey


Page 152

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. Any Intoxicating Liquors Allowed? Religious Services? Insane. White Men. Insane. Colored Men. Insane. White Women. Insane. Colored Women.
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover no. three times a week. 0 0 0 0
Onslow no. no. 0 0 0 0
Orange ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Pamlico no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Pasquotank no. when requested. 0 1 0 0
Pender ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Perquimans no. no. 0 0 0 0
Person no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Pitt no. none. 1 0 0 0
Polk no. occasional. 0 0 1 0
Randolph ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Richmond ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Robeson no. not often. 0 0 0 0
Rockingham ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Rowan no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Rutherford no. no. 0 0 0 0
Sampson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Scotland no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Stanly ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Stokes ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Surry ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Swain no. no. 0 0 0 0
Transylvania ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Tyrrell ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Union no. no. 0 0 0 0
Vance no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Wake no. yes. 0 0 0 0
Warren no. no. 0 0 0 0
Washington no. no. 0 0 0 0
Watauga no. occasional. 0 0 0 0
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----


Page 153

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Deaths from Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Any Tuberculous Prisoners? Superintendent of Health Inspect and Report Monthly? Is a Record Kept? Remarks. County Prisons.
---- ---- ---- ----   Nash
0 none. yes. yes.   New Hanover
0 none. yes. no.   Onslow
---- ---- ---- ----   Orange
0 none. yes. yes.   Pamlico
0 none. yes. yes.   Pasquotank
---- ---- ---- ----   Pender
0 none. yes. yes.   Perquimans
0 none. yes. yes.   Person
0 none. no. yes.   Pitt
0 none. yes. no. we are having an asylum of our own built. Polk
---- ---- ---- ----   Randolph
---- ---- ---- ----   Richmond
0 none. yes. yes. two of these are Indians. Robeson
---- ---- ---- ---- building new jail. Rockingham
1 none. yes. yes. death of insane person; general break-down. Rowan
0 none. yes. yes.   Rutherford
---- ---- ---- ----   Sampson
0 none. yes. yes.   Scotland
---- ---- ---- ----   Stanly
---- ---- ---- ----   Stokes
---- ---- ---- ----   Surry
0 none. no. yes.   Swain
---- ---- ---- ----   Transylvania
---- ---- ---- ----   Tyrrell
0 none. yes. yes.   Union
0 none. yes. yes.   Vance
1 none. yes. yes. died, one insane man. Wake
0 none. yes. yes.   Warren
0 none. yes. no.   Washington
1 none. yes. yes. one died from result of beating before he came to jail. Watauga
---- ---- ---- ----   Wayne


Page 154

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. White Men. Colored Men. White Women. Colored Women. Under 16 Years Old. Total. Material and Size. Number of Cells and Size.
Wilkes 5 0 0 0 0 5 brick. 2 cells, 10×15.
Wilson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yadkin ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yancey 3 1 0 0 0 4 concrete. 4 cells, 7×8.
Total 75 194 9 28 16 306    

COUNTY PRISONS.

        Sixty-two reports of jails from County Commissioners give as present at date of report the following: White men, 75; colored men, 194; white women, 9; colored women, 28; total, 306. Under sixteen, 16. Insane, 9. Died during the year, 6.

        Sixteen additional counties taken from the Visitors' reports give 23 whites and 39 blacks, with three of these insane. Total in seventy-eight county prisons, 107 whites, 261 blacks; grand total, 368. Insane confined, 12.



Page 155

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Ever Overcrowded? Are Windows Obstructed? Ventilation. Fire Protection. Heat. Bedding. Sexes Separated? County Prisons.
for short periods. bars. windows and doors. tank in jail. stoves. sufficient. yes. Wilkes
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wilson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Yadkin
no. bars. windows and doors. none. stoves. sufficient. yes. Yancey
              Total


Page 156

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Prisons. Any Intoxicating Liquors Allowed? Religious Services? Insane. White Men. Insane. Colored Men. Insane. White Women. Insane. Colored Women.
Wilkes no. none. 0 0 1 0
Wilson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yadkin ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Yancey no. yes. 0 0 0 0


Page 157

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Deaths from Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. Any Tuberculous Prisoners? Superintendent of Health Inspect and Report Monthly? Is a Record Kept? Remarks. County Prisons.
0 none. yes.   the insane woman will go to Morganton in a few days. Wilkes
---- ---- ---- ----   Wilson
---- ---- ---- ----   Yadkin
0 none. yes. yes.   Yancey


Page 158

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Convict Camps. Number of White Men. Black Men. Boys under 16. Any Women? Total Number. Are Whites and Blacks confined in the same room at night? Are the Sick well cared for?
Alamance 2 13 0 0 15 no. yes.
Anson 1 32 0 0 33 no. not well cared for.
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie 0 6 0 0 6 no. yes
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus 3 20 0 0 23 no. yes.
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland 2 22 0 0 24 no. yes.
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Durham 18 55 0 0 73 no. yes.
Edgecombe 0 36 6 0 36 no. yes.
Forsyth 16 62 4 0 78 no. yes.
Franklin 0 9 0 0 9 no. yes.
Gaston ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Granville, No. 1 0 14 0 0 14 no. yes.
Guilford ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Guilford, no. 2 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax 1 43 0 1 45 no, but under same tent. yes.
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson 4 21 0 0 25 no. yes.
Iredell 6 18 0 0 24 no. yes.
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Lenoir 2 12 1 1 15 no. yes.
McDowell 7 9 0 0 16 no. yes.
Mecklenburg, No. 1 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mecklenburg, No. 2 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover, No. 1 8 58 0 0 66 no. yes
New Hanover, No. 2 0 24 0 0 24 no. yes.
Pasquotank 0 43 0 0 43 no. yes.
Person 0 4 0 0 4 no. yes.


Page 159

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Deaths from Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. How many known to have tuberculosis? Are they confined at night with other Prisoners? If punished, give offense. Punishment. By whom? County Convict Camps.
0 none. ---- none. ---- ---- Alamance
0 none. no. no. ---- ---- Anson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Beaufort
0 none. no. none. ---- ---- Bertie
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
0 none. ---- several. whipped. foreman. Cabarrus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Columbus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Craven
1 none. no. yes. whipped. superintendent. Cumberland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davidson
1 none. no. yes. whipped. foreman. Durham
0 none. no. no. ---- ---- Edgecombe
1 none. no. yes. whipped. foreman. Forsyth
0 none. no. yes. ---- superintendent. Franklin
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gaston
0 none. no. no. ---- ---- Granville, No. 1
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford, no. 2
2 2 in separate tent. yes. whipped. superintendent. Halifax
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Haywood
0 none. no. yes. whipped. superintendent. Henderson
0 1 yes. one. whipped. superintendent. Iredell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Johnston
0 none. no. yes. whipped. guards. Lenoir
0 none. no. yes. two meals per day for fighting. superintendent. McDowell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg, No. 1
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg, No. 2
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
2 none. no. yes. whipped. foreman. New Hanover, No. 1
0 none. no. yes. whipped. foreman. New Hanover, No. 2
1 none. no. several. ---- superintendent. Pasquotank
0 none. no. no. ---- ---- Person


Page 160

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Convict Camps. Are Prisoners chained together at night? Religious Services. Where are they kept on Sundays? Material and size of camp.
Alamance no. yes. stockade. frame and stone 40×14.
Anson no. no. in camp. frame, 15×36.
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie no. yes. in the camp. frame, 24×36.
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus yes. once a month. stockade. frame, 20×80.
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland in the tents, not in cage. occasional. in camp. tents and steel cage, cage, 19×7×8.
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ----
Durham yes. yes. in camp. frame, 18×20, 16×100.
Edgecombe yes. no. in the tent. canvas tents.
Forsyth yes. yes. camp. frame, 90×20.
Franklin no. yes. in stockade. stone and frame, 16×48, 16×18.
Gaston ---- ---- ---- ----
Granville no. yes. in camp. frame and steel, two rooms, 14×24, 10×20.
Guilford ---- ---- ---- ----
Guilford, No. 2 ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax all chained to one long chain. yes. tent or in the yard. canvas, 24×45.
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson chained to long chain. occasional. in open yard at camp. frame and iron, 10×20 3 tents, 14×16.
Iredell yes. yes. in camp. frame, 24×90.
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ----
Lenoir yes. no. in stockade. frame, 20×40.
McDowell on a long chain. yes. at camp. frame, 16×42.
Mecklenburg, No. 1 ---- ---- ---- ----
Mecklenburg, No. 2 ---- ---- ---- ----
Nash ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover, No. 1 no. yes. at camp. frame, 60×24.
New Hanover, No. 2 no. yes. in cage. iron portable cage, 21×9×8.
Pasquotank yes. whenever requested. at camp or in in yard. tents, 24×50.


Page 161

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Number of Rooms. Fire Protection. Ventilation. Heat. Bedding. How often is Drinking Water Provided? County Convict Camps.
2 buckets. windows and doors. stove. sufficient. as wanted. Alamance
2 buckets. windows and doors. heater. sufficient. as wanted. Anson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Beaufort
4 wells, buckets. windows and doors. stove. sufficient. as wanted. Bertie
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Buncombe
3 buckets. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Cabarrus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Columbus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Craven
3 buckets. latticed cages. heaters. sufficient. as wanted. Cumberland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davidson
4 buckets. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Durham
---- none. tent flaps. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Edgecombe
3 none. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Forsyth
5 fire co. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. all the time. Franklin
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gaston
3 none. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient all the time. Granville
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford, No. 2
2 water. tent openings. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Halifax
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Haywood
3 none. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Henderson
2 buckets. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Iredell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Johnston
5 buckets. windows and doors. heaters. sufficient. as wanted. Lenoir
2 none. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. McDowell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg, No. 1
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg, No. 2
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
5 extinguishers, barrels of water. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. New Hanover, No. 1
1 barrels of water and bucket. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. New Hanover, No. 2
---- buckets. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Pasquotank


Page 162

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Convict Camps. Food. Number of Meals. Coffee or other warm Drink? Required to Bathe? When are the Blankets washed? How often is the Straw of Mattresses changed? Free of Vermin?
Alamance sufficient. 3 yes. yes. as needed. as needed. yes.
Anson sufficient. 3 ---- no. ---- ---- no.
Beaufort ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Bertie all they can eat. 3 yes. yes. once a month. as needed. yes.
Buncombe ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cabarrus all they want. 3 yes. yes. as needed. as needed. yes.
Columbus ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Craven ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Cumberland all they want. 3 yes. yes. once or twice a month. new straw mattresses bought each year. yes.
Davidson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Durham all they want. 3 yes. yes. twice a year. as needed. yes.
Edgecombe all they want. 3 yes. yes. weekly. as needed. yes.
Forsyth all they want. 3 yes. yes. every quarter. every quarter. yes.
Franklin all they want. 3 ---- yes. twice a month. buy new ones. yes.
Gaston ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Granville all they want. 3 yes. yes. as needed. as needed. yes.
Guilford, No. 1 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Guilford, No. 2 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Halifax all they want. 3 yes. yes. three times a year. new ones three times yearly. yes.
Haywood ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Henderson all they want. 3 yes. yes. every two weeks. as needed. yes.
Iredell all they want. 3 yes. yes. quarterly. quarterly. yes.
Johnston ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Lenoir all they want. 3 no. yes. monthly. twice a year. yes.
McDowell all they want. 3 yes. yes. monthly. bi-monthly. yes.


Page 163

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Disposition of Excreta. Means of cleaning the Camp. Hours of Work. Number of Employees. Salary of Supervisor. Salary of Guards. Do county Physicans inspect monthly and report? Where are Boys Confined? County Convict Camps.
sewerage. disinfectants. sun to sun. 3 $65.00 $40 or 35.00 yes. none. Alamance
---- ---- 6 to 12. 1 to 6. 5 60.00 15.00 ---- with the men. Anson
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----   Beaufort
removed. water, soap, lye. sun to sun. 1 50.00 ---- yes. in the same place. Bertie
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- no boys. Buncombe
buried. disinfectants. all day. 6 70.00 foreman, 70.00 1.25 per day. yes. none. Cabarrus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Columbus
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Craven
buried disinfectants. scouring. sun to sun, 2 hours for dinner in summer, one in win-winter. 4 60.00 25 to 30.00 yes. none. Cumberland
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Davidson
buried. sand-soap, lye. from 8 to 12 hours. one guard to every ten men. 60.00 30.00 yes. at the county home. Durham
buried. cleaned daily. 10 ---- ---- ---- yes. with the men. Edgecombe
removed. daily. soap and water 10 20 75.00 20 to 30.00 yes. with the men. Forsyth
waterworks. disinfectants. 8 to 12 hours. 2 60.00 30.00 yes. in outside cottage. Franklin
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Gaston
removed. soap and water. sun to sun. 3 50.00 ---- yes. in the camp. Granville
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford, No. 1
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Guilford, No. 2
buried. soap and water. sun to sun. 7 or 8 60.00 1.00 per day. yes. with the men. Halifax
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Haywood
buried. scoured. 10 3 45.00 40.00 inspection, but not monthly. no boys. Henderson
removed. scoured. sun to sun. 4 45.00 35.00 yes. with the men. Iredell
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Johnston
buried. hot water and soap. sun to sun. 3 50.00 30.00 yes. with the men. Lenoir
sink. scoured. 7 to 6. 4 45.00 22.50 yes. no boys. McDowell


Page 164

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Convict Camps. Number of White Men. Black Men. Boys under 16. Any Women? Total Number. Are Whites and Blacks confined in the same room at night? Are the Sick well cared for?
Pitt 1 41 0 0 42 no. yes.
*Robeson

        * Three Indians.


2 21 0 0 23 no. yes.
Rockingham 9 26 0 0 35 no. yes.
Rowan 13 51 0 0 64 ---- yes.
Stanly (Town of Albemarle) ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Sampson ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- no. yes.
Union 4 56 0 0 60 same room, separate sect. yes.
Wake ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wilson 1 42 0 0 43 no. yes.
Total 100 738 10 2 840    

COUNTY CAMPS.

        There are thirty-nine counties which maintain camps, some of these more than one. Twenty-one Commissioners' reports have been received and four are added from the Visitors' reports, making twenty-five camps reporting as follows: White men, 100; black men, 738; black women, 2; total, 840. Ten boys under 16. Died during the year, 10. Several of these were accidentally killed and some shot while attempting to escape.



Page 165

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Deaths from Aug. 1, 1909 to Aug. 1, 1910. How many known to have tuberculosis? Are they confined at night with other Prisoners? If punished, give offense. Punishment. By whom? County Convict Camps.
0 none. no. yes. whipped. superintentendent. Pitt
0 none no. yes. whipped foreman. *Robeson

        * Three Indians.


0 none. no. several. whipped. superintendent. Rockingham
0 none. no. yes. whipped. superintendent. Rowan
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stanly (Town of Albemarle)
0 1 yes. yes. whipped. supervisor. Sampson
0 none. yes. yes. whipped. supervisor. Union
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wayne
2 none yes. no. ---- ---- Wilson
10 3         Total


Page 166

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Convict Camps. Are Prisoners chained together at night? Religious Services. Where are they kept on Sundays? Material and size of camp.
Person yes. no. in camp. no special building, rent one near the work.
Pitt yes. no. in camp. frame and iron with tents.
Robeson yes. occasional. in camp. tents, 15×30.
Rockingham yes. occasional. in their cells. frame, 74×20.
Rowan no. yes. around camp. frame, 16×60, 16×20.
Stanly (town of Albemarle.) ---- ---- ---- ----
Sampson yes. occasional. in camp. tents.
Union on a long chain. occasional. in camp, out twice a day. frame, 20×45.
Wake ---- ---- ---- ----
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ----
Wilson no. occasional. in camp. brick, 35×90, frame, 35×32.


Page 167

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Number of Rooms. Fire Protection. Ventilation. Heat. Bedding. How often is Drinking Water Provided? County Convict Camps.
---- buckets. windows and doors. ---- sufficient. all the time. Person
3 buckets. windows and roof. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Pitt
2 ---- tent. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Robeson
3 tank. ventilators in the roof. heaters. sufficient. as wanted. Rockingham
2 tubs of water. gratings, doors. stoves. ---- as wanted. Rowan
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stanly (town of Albemarle.)
---- buckets. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Sampson
1 well. windows and doors. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Union
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wayne
room and cell. force pump. ventilator in roof. stoves. sufficient. as wanted. Wilson


Page 168

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

County Convict Camps. Food. Number of Meals. Coffee or other warm Drink? Required to Bathe? When are the Blankets washed? How often is the Straw of Mattresses changed? Free of Vermin?
Mecklenburg, 1 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Mecklenburg 2 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Nash ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
New Hanover, 1 meat and bread vegetables 3 no. yes. twice a month. twice a month. yes.
New Hanover, 2 sufficient. 3 no. yes. twice a month. as needed. yes.
Pasquotank all they want. 3 no. yes. as needed. no mattresses but blankets. yes.
Person sufficient. 3 yes. yes. monthly. several times a year. yes.
Pitt sufficient. 3 no. yes. as needed. no mattresses blankets. yes.
Robeson sufficient. 3 ---- yes. as needed. ---- yes.
Rockingham sufficient. 3 yes. yes. monthly. monthly. yes, except some bed bugs.
Rowan sufficient. 3 yes. yes. as needed. as needed. yes.
Stanly ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Sampson sufficient. 3 no. yes. twice a year. mattresses renewed. yes.
Union sufficient 3 yes. yes. once a month. as needed. yes.
Wake ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wayne ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ----
Wilson sufficient. 3 yes. yes. once a month. as needed. yes.


Page 169

        

REPORTS OF COUNTY COMMISSIONERS--CONTINUED.

Disposition of Excreta. Means of cleaning the Camp. Hours of Work. Number of Employees. Salary of Supervisor. Salary of Guards. Do County Physicians inspect monthly and report? Where are Boys Confined? County Convict Camps.
---- ---- ---- ---- $---- $---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg, 1
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Mecklenburg 2
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Nash
buried. disinfectants. 11. 12 50.00 20.00 weekly. none. New Hanover, 1
buried. disinfectants. 11 4 ---- 20.00 yes. ---- New Hanover, 2
buried. disinfectants. 9 in winter. 5 60.00 30.00 yes. no boys. Pasquotank
---- disinfectants. 10 2 50.00 30.00 yes. no boys. Person
removed daily. disinfectants. sun to sun. one guard to 10 men. 100.00 foreman, 1.50 a day. 1.25 per day. yes. with the men. Pitt
removed. disinfectants. 7 to 6. hour for dinner. 3 75.00 20 to 25.00 no. ---- Robeson
buried. disinfectants. sun to sun. 7 60.00 foreman, 40.00 20 to 25.00 yes. with the men. Rockingham
buried. disinfectants. 10 8 to 12 65.00 35.00 yes. with the men. Rowan
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Stanly
removed. disinfectants. sun to sun, hour for dinner. 4 40.00 20.00 yes. none. Sampson
removed. disinfectants. 9 5 50.00 20.00 yes. none. Union
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wake
---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- Wayne
sewerage. disinfectants. according to distance from work. 5 60.00 30.00 and found. yes. none. Wilson


Page 170

Conclusions of the International Prison Congress Held
in Washington, D. C., October 2 to 8, 1910

(Resumé prepared by Mr. J. J. Kelso, Toronto, Canada.)

        The Congress representing the nations of the world meets once in five years, and in 1910 was the guest of the United States. It was divided up into committees which met each morning and considered a series of questions, the consensus of opinion being crystallized into resolutions, which were submitted to the General Assembly in the afternoon, and finally adopted as the view of the Congress. These resolutions are as follows:

JUVENILE OFFENDERS.

        I. Young delinquents should not be subjected to the penal procedure now applied to adults.

        II. The principles that should guide the procedure applied to young delinquents are as follows:

        1. Those who are entrusted with the cognizance of the cases of young delinquents should be primarily chosen for their ability to understand and sympathize with children, and should have some special knowledge of the social and psychological sciences.

        2. They should have the assistance of probation officers to make preliminary examination in each case and to watch over and help those put on probation.

        3. There should be made, in connection with the cases of young delinquents, such examinations as will contribute to the fund of information on juvenile delinquency and the results should be used wherever practicable to help in the disposition of the case. Medical examinations should be made only by physicians who have some special knowledge of the social and psychological sciences. The personal information obtained in these examinations shall not be made public.

        4. Whenever possible, in the case of young delinquents, arrest should be avoided in bringing them before the authorities and orders for arrest should be issued only in exceptional cases.

        5. When necessary to detain young delinquents, the detention should not be in quarters used for adults.

        6. In those countries where a court is entrusted with the cognizance of the cases of young delinquents--

        (a) Such cases should never be heard at the same session with cases of adults, and

        (b) It should be the tendency, in the trial of juveniles, to proceed as far as practicable by way of conference for the good of the child, instead of contest about and over the child.

        III. Those who are entrusted with the cognizance of the cases of young delinquents should also have the cognizance of the measures needed in the interest of abandoned or maltreated children.


Page 171

IDLE AND VAGABOND CHILDREN.

        "What measures should be taken to correct the idleness and vagabondage of children in large cities?"

        "It is Resolved, That to prevent habits of vagrancy and idleness among children in large cities there should be--

        "1. Laws making parents responsible for the wrongdoing of their children; to compel deserting fathers to return to their duty or to support their children; allowing children to be taken from unfit homes and properly placed for training and care.

        "2. Greater co-operation between school authorities and the public, better adaptation of school curricula both in interest and in practical use to the individual needs of the children; and there shall be more kindergartens and greater recognition of training in hand work for the children.

        "3. Vast additions to playgrounds, wholesome recreation centers, gymnasiums and athletic fields, as the surest preventatives of juvenile mischief and crime and as affording young people places where they may learn to bear defeat with courage and success with modesty.

        "4. Lectures to parents on practical subjects that shall tend to make better and happier homes, as the wisest way to keep children from the idle, wandering life.

        "5. A stronger influence on the part of the press and the pulpit to enforce the sentiment that the best bulwark against juvenile delinquency is to care for the children in such a way as to prevent them from becoming vagrants and idlers."

CHILDREN BORN OUT OF WEDLOCK.

        "Are special measures necessary for the protection of children born out of wedlock, and if so, what measures?"

        "Resolved, 1. That in the opinion of this Congress, legislative measures and moral and social propaganda are necessary for the protection of illegitimate children.

        "2. That the object of legislative action should be so to modify existing laws as to make the care, support and inheritance of illegitimate and legitimate children as near as possible identical.

        "3. That, after the nursing period is over, the decision as to which parent shall have the future care of an illegitimate child should be based upon the child's best interests and its needs as a future citizen.

        "4. That whichever parent has not the care of the child should contribute toward its support and education.

        "5. That as illegitimacy is often the result of ignorance, it shall be the object of a moral propaganda--

        "(a) to instruct young people in matters of sex and its relation to the life and welfare of the State.

        "(b) To help build up a single moral standard applicable to men and women alike.


Page 172

        "6. That as girl-mothers often attempt abortion, abandonment of their child, or drift into prostitution, it shall be the object of a social propaganda to have connected with hospitals and all institutions where such girl-mothers may go for advice and care, a trained staff of workers whose duties shall be--

        "(a) To instruct said girl-mother in the care of herself in view of her child's needs before and after birth.

        "(b) To secure from the child's father acknowledgement of paternity and the necessary financial provisions.

        "(c) To act as friend to the mother and guardian or trustee for the child."

PROBATION.

        "What is the effect upon criminality of the legal measures taken in different States in the form of probation or suspension of sentence, etc., to avoid the necessity of imprisonment, especially at the time of first conviction, taking account of the age, character and antecedents of the person? And is it desirable that these and similar laws should be extended?"

        "Resolved, 1. That the effects of probation are beneficial when applied with due regard to the protection of the community, and to persons who may reasonably be expected to reform, without resorting to imprisonment; and when the probationers are placed for a reasonable length of time under the supervision of competent officers.

        "2. That the effects of suspended sentence, without probationary oversight, are difficult, if not impossible, to ascertain.

        "3. That it is desirable to introduce and extend laws providing for probation, and to provide, in each State or country, some central authority which will exercise general supervision over probation work."

THE MODERN REFORMATORY.

        "A. The essential principles on which the modern reformatory method is based are--

        "1. That no person, no matter whatever his age or past record, should be assumed to be incapable of improvement.

        "2. The conviction that it is in the interest of the public not merely to impose a sentence which is retributive and deterrent, but also to make an earnest effort for the reformation of the criminal.

        "3. That this reformation is more likely to be accomplished by religious and moral instruction, mental quickening, physical development, and such employment as would place the prisoner on a good industrial basis.

        "4. That the reformatory system is incompatible with short sentences, and a relatively long period of reformatory treatment is more likely to be beneficial than repeated short terms of imprisonment under severer conditions.

        "5. That reformatory treatment should be combined with a system of


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liberation on parole under suitable guardianship and supervision on the advice of a suitable board.

        "B. It is strongly to be desired that a system of special treatment be adopted for adolescent criminals, whether recidivists or not.

        "C. Tribunals should be able to sentence to special treatment, which (a) should be sufficiently long to permit of the full application of all possible means of reformation, (b) shall admit the right of conditional liberation as mentioned above for prisoners awaiting trial, and for prisoners serving short sentences there should be separate confinement.

RELEASE ON PAROLE.

        "Accepting the principle of conditional liberation on parole as an indispensable aid to the reformation of the prisoner, the Congress approves of the following resolutions:

        "1. Conditional release should be given not by favor but in accordance with definite rules. Prisoners of all classes, including workhouse prisoners, should be eligible for conditional release after serving for a definite minimum period.

        "2. Conditional liberation should be given on the recommendation of a properly constituted board, but reserving always the control of the government. This board should have the power of recalling the prisoner in case of unsatisfactory conduct.

        "3. The duty of caring for conditionally liberated prisoners should be undertaken by State agents, specially approved associations, or individuals who will undertake to befriend and supervise them, and to report on their conduct for a sufficiently long period.

        "4. Where the ordinary rules for parole are not applicable to life prisoners, their cases should be dealt with by the supreme government as a matter of clemency."

THE INDETERMINATE SENTENCE.

        "The Congress approves the scientific principle of the indeterminate sentence.

        "The indeterminate sentence should be applied to moral and mental defectives.

        "The indeterminate sentence should also be applied as an important part of the reformatory system to criminals, particularly young delinquents, who require reformation and whose offenses are due mainly to circumstances of an individual character.

        "The introduction of this system should be conditioned upon the following suppositions:

        "1. That the prevailing notions of guilt and punishment are compatible with the principle of the indeterminate sentence.

        "2. That an individualized treatment of the offender be assured.

        "3. That the 'Board of Parole' be so constituted as to avoid outside influences, and consist of a commission made up of at least one representative


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of the magistracy, at least one representative of the prison administration, and at least one representative of medical science.

        "It is advisable to fix the maximum duration of the sentence only during such a period as it may be necessary because of the novelty of the institution and lack of experience with it."

THE CRIMINAL ABROAD.

        It was also resolved that the following propositions be comprised in an International Code, to be adopted by the next Congress:

        "1. Incapacities pronounced in one country should be given effect in every other (non-political).

        "2. Crimes and misdemeanors of which a person is guilty in one country should, as touching conditional liberation, be recognized with reference to establishing recidivism in every other country.

        "3. A bureau should be created for international exchange of criminal sentences."


COMPLICITY IN CRIME.

        "To resist the tendency of criminals to band themselves together, is it not desirable to make participation in criminal acts or agreements a distinct offense, or at least to make complicity an aggravating circumstance?

        "1. It does not appear to be in conformity with the spirit of penal law to make of every preliminary agreement to break the law, a special crime.

        "2. Noting the increase of offenses for which several persons are responsible, and that these offenses are committed chiefly by habitual criminals, i. e., those most dangerous to society, it is desirable to consider participation as an aggravating circumstance and to augment the power of the judge to increase the penalty for such offenses."

THE NEXT CONGRESS.

        It was decided to hold the next Congress in London, England, in 1915. Sir Evelyn Ruggles-Brise, President; Secretary, Prof. S. Von der Aa, of Croningen, Holland.


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List of State Institutions, Private Hospitals, Orphanages
and Other Benevolent Institutions.

        

STATE INSTITUTIONS.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Dangerous Insane Department Thomas M. Jordan, M.D. Raleigh.
Epileptic Colony (State Hospital) Chas. L. Jenkins, M. D. Raleigh.
North Carolina Soldiers' Home Capt. W. S. Lineberry Raleigh.
Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children Henry P. Cheatham Oxford.
Oxford Orphanage for White Children R. L. Brown Oxford.
School for the Deaf and Dumb Prof. E. McK. Goodwin Morganton.
School for the Blind and Deaf Prof. John E. Ray Raleigh.
State Hospital at Goldsboro Dr. W. W. Faison Goldsboro.
State Hospital at Morganton Dr. John McCampbell Morganton.
State Hospital at Raleigh Dr. Jas. McKee Raleigh.
State's Prison J. J. Laughinghouse Raleigh.
Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial School Walter Thompson Concord.
Tuberculosis Sanatorium Dr. J. E. Brooks Montrose (near Aberdeen).

        

HOSPITALS (PRIVATE AND THOSE RECEIVING MUNICIPAL AID).

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Asheville Mission Hospital Miss Mary P. Laxton Asheville.
Atlantic Coast Line -- Rocky Mount.
Billingsley Hospital Miss E. B. Flynn Statesville.
Charlotte Sanatorium Dr. Register Charlotte.
Central Carolina Hospital Dr. J. P. Monroe Sanford.
Cragmont Sanatorium Dr. I. J. Archer Black Mountain.
Clarence Barker Memorial Miss Mary Trise Biltmore.
Davidson Hospital ---- Davidson.
Dr. Long's Sanatorium Dr. Henry Long Statesville.
Goldsboro Hospital ---- Goldsboro.
Good Samaritan (colored) Miss Anna Robinson Charlotte.
Highsmith Hospital Co. ---- Fayetteville.

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James Walker Memorial Hospital Dr. Ralph B. Seem Wilmington.
Junior Order Hospital ---- High Point.
Leonard Medical School Hospital (colored) Shaw University Raleigh.
Lincoln Hospital (colored) Dr. C. H. Sheppard Durham.
Mercy General Hospital Sister M. Dolores Charlotte.
Pickford Sanatorium (colored) Dr. L. A. Scruggs Southern Pines.
Pittman Hospital Miss M. T. Shackleford Tarboro.
Presbyterian Hospital Miss Ella H. MacNichols Charlotte.
Rex Hospital Miss Helen Orchard Raleigh.
Rutherford Hospital Miss A. D. Belt Rutherfordton.
St. Agnes (colored) Mrs. A. B. Hunter Raleigh.
St. Leo's Hospital Sister Veronica Greensboro.
St. Luke's Hospital Drs. T. M. West and E. B. Hayes. Fayetteville.
St. Peter's Hospital Mrs. John Wilkes Charlotte.
Salisbury Hospital ---- Salisbury.
Sanitarium ---- Kinston.
Slater Hospital (colored) A. J. Brown Winston-Salem.
S. R. Fowle Memorial Hospital Dr. J. L. Nicholson Washington.
Stewart Sanatorium Miss M. Covington New Bern.
Thermal Belt Sanitarium Dr. W. R. Engel Tryon.
Twin-City Hospital Miss Eugenia Henderson Winston-Salem.
Watts Hospital Miss Mary Wyche Durham.
Wilson Sanitarium Miss Cleone Hobbs Wilson.
Winyah Sanatorium ---- Asheville.

        

LICENSED HOSPITALS FOR CARE OF INSANE AND INEBRIATES.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Broadoaks Sanatorium Dr. Isaac M. Taylor Morganton.
Dr. Carroll's Sanitarium and Highland Home Dr. Robert S. Carroll Asheville.
Dr. McKanna's Sanitarium Dr. J. J. McKanna Reidsville.
Telfair Institute Dr. W. C. Ashworth Greensboro.
Williams' Private Sanatorium Dr. B. B. Williams Greensboro.


Page 177

        

ORPHANAGES AND CHILD-CARING INSTITUTIONS.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Alexander Home Mrs. Rowland Charlotte.
Allen Industrial Home and School ---- Asheville.
Baptist Orphanage M. L. Kesler Thomasville.
Buncombe County Children's Home J. P. Howatt, Chairman Asheville.
Charlotte Day Nursery ---- Charlotte.
Christian Orphanage Rev. J. L. Foster Elon College.
Colored Orphan Home of Western Carolina J. Perry Winston-Salem.
Crittenton Home Mrs. H. L. Cadet Charlotte.
Elhanan Institute Miss Mattie Perry Marion.
Eliada Orphanage and Rescue Home Lucius B. Compton Asheville.
Faith Cottage Lucius B. Compton Asheville.
Falcon Orphanage (private) ---- Falcon.
Lindley Training School Miss Belle Whittier Asheville.
Methodist Orphanage Rev. J. N. Cole Raleigh.
Methodist Orphanage, W. C. Rev. H. A. Hayes Winston-Salem.
Nazareth Orphans' Home Rev. J. M. L. Lyerly Crescent.
North Carolina Children's Home Society W. B. Streeter Greensboro.
Odd Fellows Orphan Home E. Leff Wagoner Goldsboro.
Presbyterian Orphans' Home Rev. W. T. Walker Barium Springs.
Pythian Orphanage ---- Clayton.
Rest Cottage Mrs. W. R. Cox Greensboro.
Roman Catholic Orphanage for Boys Rev. Thos. Price Raleigh.
Sacred Heart Orphanage Mother Teresa Belmont.
The Thompson Orphanage and Training School Rev. Walter Smith Charlotte.

        

PERMANENT HOMES FOR THE OLD.

Name. Superintendent. Location.
Catherine Kennedy Home Mrs. Roger Moore, Pres. Wilmington.
Odd Fellows Home for Aged Odd Fellows E. Leff Wagoner Goldsboro.
Salem Home (for women) ---- Winston-Salem.
St. Luke's Home (for women) Mrs. B. F. Dixon, Pres. Raleigh.


Page 178

        

ORGANIZATIONS FOR RELIEF OF THE POOR IN THEIR HOMES.

Name. Secretary. Location.
Associated Charities Mrs. F. P. Wild Asheville.
Associated Charities Mrs. R. D. Blacknall Durham.
Associated Charities L. B. Myers Charlotte.
Associated Charities J. B. Gunter Greensboro.
Associated Charities W. E. Bowers High Point.
Associated Charities Rev. R. S. Stephenson Raleigh.
Associated Charities Mrs. A. L. Coble, Pres Statesville.
Associated Charities Miss Carrie L. Price Wilmington.
Associated Charities Miss Annie Grogan Winston-Salem.
Associated Charities ---- Salisbury.
Ladies' Benevolent Society Mrs. Weil, President Goldsboro.



Page 179

INDEX.

  • Acknowledgments 13
  • Associated Charities:
    • Associated Charities (Asheville) 58
    • Associated Charities (Durham) 58
    • Associated Charities (Charlotte) 59
    • Associated Charities (Raleigh) 59
    • Associated Charities (Statesville) 60
    • Associated Charities (Wilmington) 60
    • Associated Charities (Winston-Salem) 60
  • Change of Fiscal Year Recommended 7
  • Colored Youthful Delinquents 6
  • Conclusions of the International Prison Congress 170
  • County Convict Camps 12
    • Reports of visitors 111
    • Statistics of 158
  • Crippled Children (also see Private Hospital Reports) 7
  • Epileptic Colony, report of 18
  • Epileptic Village, need of 6, 7
  • Feeble-minded and Epileptic 7
  • General Work of the Office 12
  • Home, North Carolina Soldiers' (Raleigh) 7
    • Report of 26
  • Homes, the County (for Aged and Infirm), condition of 10,38
    • Expense of 11
    • Outdoor Relief to Poor 11
    • Reports of Homes (alphabetically), for 1910 69
    • Statistics 120
  • Homes (Private for Aged Women):
    • Catherine Kennedy Home (Wilmington) 57
    • St. Luke's Home (Raleigh) 57
  • Hospitals, the State, for Insane (Morganton) 5, 8
    • Report of, for 1910 16
    • Raleigh Hospital 7
    • Report of, for 1910 17
    • Goldsboro Hospital (for colored insane) 5,7
    • Report of, for 1910 19
    • Dangerous Insane, State's Prison, Raleigh, report of, 1910 20
  • Hospitals, Private, licensed by the Board of Public Charities 12
    • Broad Oaks Sanatorium (Morganton) 34
    • Highland Home and Dr. Carroll's Sanitarium (Asheville) 34
    • McKanna Three-day Liquor Cure (Raleigh) 36
    • Telfair Sanitarium (Greensboro) 35
    • Williams' Private Sanatorium (Greensboro) 37

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  • Hospitals, Municipal, Church, etc., list of 175
    • Asheville Mission (Asheville) 64
    • Billingsley Memorial Hospital (Statesville) 62
    • Charlotte Sanatorium (Charlotte) 62
    • Cragmont Sanatorium (Black Mountain) 67
    • Clarence Barker Memorial (Biltmore) 62
    • James Walker Memorial (Wilmington) 65
    • Pittman Memorial (Tarboro) 65
    • Presbyterian Hospital (Charlotte) 66
    • Rutherford Hospital (Rutherfordton) 66
    • S. R. Fowle Memorial (Washington) 63
    • St. Leo's (Greensboro) 64
    • St. Luke's Hospital (Fayetteville) 64
    • Stewart Sanatorium (New Bern) 67
    • Twin-City (Winston-Salem) 67
    • Watts (Durham) 63
  • Hospitals Exclusively for the Colored:
    • Leonard Medical School, Shaw University (Raleigh) 68
    • Pickford Sanitarium 68
  • Insane 7
    • Observation Building Recommended at Morganton Hospital 5
    • In County Homes and Jails 135, 154
  • Indebtedness of Institutions 15
  • Inspections and Meetings 12
  • Jails, County 11
    • Condition of 38
    • Counties Needing New Jails 14
    • Reports of (alphabetically), for 1910 92
    • Statistics 136
  • Letter of Transmittal 4
  • List of State, Charitable and Penal Institutions and Private Charities 175
  • List of Superintendents and Location of Institutions 175
  • Maintenance Desired for 1911-1912 15
  • Members of the Board of Public Charities 3
  • Normal Capacity of State Institutions 14
  • North Carolina School for the Blind and Deaf (Raleigh), report for 1910 23
    • Ophthalmia Neonatorum, Prevention of 6
  • North Carolina School for the Deaf (Morganton), report for 1910 22
  • Orphanages and Child-caring Institutions 6,47
    • List of 177
    • Alexander Home (Charlotte) 51
    • Baptist Orphanage (Thomasville) 48
    • Buncombe County Children's Home (Asheville) 54
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    • Christian Orphanage (Elon College) 50
    • Elhanan Orphanage 53
    • Eliada Orphanage (Asheville) 52
    • Methodist Orphanage (Raleigh) 49
    • N. C. Children's Home Society (Greensboro) 53
    • Nazareth Orphans' Home (Crescent) 52
    • Oxford Orphanage for White Children (Oxford) 27
    • Oxford Orphanage for Colored Children (Oxford) 29
    • Pythian Orphanage (Clayton) 50
    • Presbyterian Orphans' Home (Barium Springs, Iredell County) 56
    • Sacred Heart Orphanage for Girls (Belmont) 51
    • Southern Orphanage and Industrial School for Colored Youth (Sanford) discontinued 54
    • Thompson Orphanage and Training School (Charlotte) 50
  • Orphanages and Rescue Homes:
    • Crittenton Home (Charlotte) 55
    • Faith Cottage (Asheville) 56
    • Lindley Training School (Asheville) 55
  • Parole 9
  • Per Capita Cost in State Institutions for 1910 14
  • Population of State Institutions, How Distributed 13
  • Private Benevolent Institutions 16, 55, 69
  • Recommendations of the Board of Public Charities 5, 7, 8
  • State Farm 6
  • State's Prison, report of for 1910 30
    • Railroad Convict Camps 32, 33
    • State Tuberculosis Sanatorium (Montrose), report of, for 1910. 21
  • Stonewall Jackson Training School, report of, for 1910 27
  • Visitors of Charities in the Counties, list of 41
    • Referred to 13
  • Voluntary Commitment of Insane 12