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Twenty-Eighth Annual Report of the Board of Directors, Treasurer and Superintendent of the Oxford Orphan Asylum, Oxford, North Carolina to the Grand Lodge of North Carolina A. F. & A.M. for the Year Ending November 30, 1900:
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Oxford Orphan Asylum (Oxford, N.C.)


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(title page) Twenty-Eighth Annual Report of the Board of Directors, Treasurer and Superintendent of the Oxford Orphan Asylum, Oxford, North Carolina to the Grand Lodge of North Carolina A. F. & A.M. for the Year Ending November 30, 1900:
Oxford Orphan Asylum (Oxford, N.C.)
41 p.
Oxford, N.C.
Oxford Orphan Asylum
[1900]

Call number C362.7 098 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)



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TWENTY-EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
TREASURER AND SUPERINTENDENT
OF THE
OXFORD ORPHAN ASYLUM
OXFORD, NORTH CAROLINA
TO THE
GRAND LODGE OF NORTH CAROLINA
A. F. & A. M.
FOR THE
Year Ending November 30, 1900

PRINTED AT OXFORD ORPHAN ASYLUM
OXFORD, N. C.


Page 3

REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS.

To the Grand Lodge of North Carolina:

        It is with pleasure we have the honor to report to your Grand Body that the Oxford Orphan Asylum, the exponent of the principles of Masonry in North Carolina, has, at the close of the century, reached a state of efficiency never before attained in its history. Impelled by the very law of its being to preserve its place and power, the institution has steadily grown in merit until today there are few superior institutions of the kind in our Country. Every Mason should feel a pride in the work they are doing for the dependent children of their state, in that they own an institution which is caring for over two hundred lives, preparing them for life's work, strengthening their minds and bodies, building them up in all that is noble and great and good--feeding those who were unfed, comforting those who were uncomforted, teaching those who were untaught. Encouraged by what has already been done, we trust that your Grand Body will be the more determined to make the institution model in every respect. That the institution owes no one, being entirely out of debt, is cause for congratulation, especially in view of the fact that your property has increased in value more than $50,000 during the past eight years.

        There is more important work to be done, that of a more complete execution of the practical plans already begun in regard to the industrial training of the children at the Asylum. The Superintendent's annual report gives an idea of the work already being done along this line. The boys and girls are taught to work, but better equipment is necessary if they are to be taught as they should be. No one can do good work with poor tools, so no institution can accomplish its best results with poor equipment. Practically all the boys and girls will have to earn their living when they


Page 4

leave the Asylum. The fact that they are orphans counts for little if they don't know how to do something, how to do some one thing well. The business of the country is not conducted on sentiment, but a person must possess an earning power if he is to secure employment. A boy or girl with a common school education and trained in some mechanical or domestic art can always secure work, and generally at good pay, but the boys or girls who do not know these things too frequently go to ruin, become tramps, vagrants, anti-social, or extra-social beings. Idleness means licentiousness; inefficiency excludes from employment, produces poverty or crime. You are fortunate in owning a farm, which is cultivated in a great measure by the boys at the Asylum, and on which they may gain that superior intellect and sterling character which so frequently results from following plough handles. Aside from the better training of the children at the Asylum, it will reduce the operative expenses to have all the industrial work done near together and in buildings constructed for the purpose, instead of having them as now in widely separated, poorly equipped and constructed buildings. We beg that your Grand Body adopt measures which will secure the money necessary to accomplish this needed improvement. Under the agreement between the Grand Lodge and Mr. B. N. Duke to contribute $7500 to the Building Fund against a like amount given by him, there remains $2364.65 of your part yet to be subscribed and there is still $1577.39 unpaid of the amount which you have already subscribed, making a total of $3942.04 yet to be paid by the Grand Lodge. It would be gratifying could this obligation be paid in full during the ensuing year.

        Another urgent need of the Asylum is an electric light plant. It is unsafe, dangerous and running too great a risk of losing life and destroying your property to use lamps burning kerosene oil in buildings where so large a number of children live.

        The circulation and influence of the Orphans' Friend and Masonic Journal can be greatly increased with your hearty


Page 5

co-operation. It is the official organ of the Masonic order in North Carolina and its Masonic Department is ably edited by Past Grand Master John Nichols. A wider circulation would be helpful to Masonry and to the great work of caring for orphan children.

        We are pleased that a large number of persons from different parts of the state have visited the institution during the year and we would be especially glad if every Mason could go through its various departments, note the system and method with which the work is conducted, enquire into the detail of school work, the industrial training, the efforts at moral and religious instruction, see, as far as possible, how the children are cared for and trained. While we note with pleasure that the voluntary contributions by the Lodges has about doubled during the past three years, we regret that there are still a number of Lodges who do not contribute and we hope for a great improvement along this line during the present year. We herewith submit the annual reports of the Treasurer and Superintendent and, that there may be no backward move in the work you are doing, we respectfully ask for a continuation of the present appropriation for the ensuing Masonic year.

B. S. ROYSTER, W. G. M.
Chairman ex-officio.

J. M. CURRIN,
T. A. GREEN,
B. N. DUKE,
G. ROSENTHAL,
J. N. RAMSAY,
C. W. TOMS,
Directors present.


Page 6

REPORT OF TREASURER.

To the Board of Directors of the Oxford Orphan Asylum:

        I beg to submit my report as Treasurer of the Oxford Orphan Asylum for the twelve months ending the 30th of November, 1900.

        

RECEIPTS OF GENERAL FUND.

Balance on hand December 1, 1899 $ 2929 69
Balance Grand Lodge appropriation for 1899 500 00
On account Grand Lodge appropriation for 1900, 2000 00
Appropriation State of North Carolina 10000 00
Collection taken up in Grand Lodge 58 95
Lodges 2035 50
Individuals 784 70
Churches, Sunday schools, etc 830 86
Proceeds of concerts of singing class 3299 27
Rent of Minneapolis property 799 50
Wm. Campbell legacy 25 00
Miss Baird legacy 100 00
Interest of B. F. Moore legacy 80 00
For support of Mary Francis 39 40
Oak Alliance through M. O. Edge 8 00
Sale of brick 662 34
Building fund (transferred in error) 111 00
Orphans' Friend, subscriptions 1333 83
Orphans' Friend, job work 480 63
Orphans' Friend, advertisements 318 45
Total from printing office 2132 91
Received from sundries 282 68
Sash, Door and Blind Factory 3710 10
Shoe Shop 406 82
Total $ 30796 72
Disbursements 27837 41
Balance on hand November 30, 1900 $ 2959 31

        An itemized statement of receipts and expenditures is attached and I refer to it for particulars. The sum of $662.34 was received from the sale of brick and credited to the General Fund, but transferred to the Building Fund, where it properly belongs, on the 27th of November.


Page 7

        

RECEIPTS OF BUILDING FUND.

Balance on hand December 1, 1899 $ 60 40
From all sources (see statement) 1687 83
Total 1748 23
Disbursements as per statement 726 26
Balance on hand November 30, 1900 $ 1021 97

        I stated in my report one year ago that the unpaid subscriptions to this fund amounted to $2001.95, which sum has been reduced by payments and otherwise of $424.56, leaving unpaid at this date $1577.39. The debts due the Bank of Granville, aggregating $4300.00, have been paid and it affords me great pleasure to inform you the Asylum is free from debt and owes no one a single dollar with the exception of salaries and supplies for the current month. The money to meet every claim on presentation is on deposit in the Bank of Granville at Oxford.

        The total amount of rent received from the Minneapolis property in $799.50, but $636.22, of this has been due for the year 1898 and 1899 and only $163,28, has been received on account of this year. There is money due now, but I am unable to tell how much and it is for you to decide whether or not you will leave the property in the hands of the present agent. He is a lawyer and has so much other business to attend to that he does not seem to give proper attention to our affairs.

        It was my good fortune to receive some time ago through the courtesy of my friend, Dr. R. H. Lewis, Secretary of the State Board of Health, a copy of the report of Col. A. W. Shaffer, Sanitary Engineer of said Board, on the Asylum, with permission to use it in counection with my report. It is hereto attached and I have no doubt that it will be as gratifying to you as it is to me.

        In conclussion I desire to thank the Grand Master and each member of the Board for the uniform kindness received at their hands and to express the hope that the future of our institution will be as bright as its past has been.

Respectfully and fraternally submitted,

G. ROSENTHAL,
Treasurer.


Page 8

RALEIGH, N. C., October 25th, 1900.

Dr. R. H. Lewis Secretary, etc.

        DEAR SIR:--I passed through Oxford on my tour of inspection and sampling of municipal waters, September 20th, and took that opportunity to make a general inspection of the Orphan Asylum at that place, which has been ordered by the Board of Health, and I think it proper to make a separate report thereon, as follows:

        Reaching the Asylum early in the morning I found Miss Bemis, Lady Principal, in charge, Col. W. J. Hicks, Superintendent, being absent in town. He came in a few moments thereafter, and with these two and plenty of time on my hands we visited the study and recitation rooms, the chapel, sleeping rooms and closets, printing office and paper storerooms, dining rooms and kitchen, clothing manufactory and clothing store-rooms, some of the outside dormitories, the hospital, the garden, farm and campus, pumping station and water tank and about 210 pupils: in fact about everything on the grounds except the mechanical department, which is located out on the borders of the town like a pest-house, and train time was at hand.

        Critically speaking, I found the official residence of the Superintendent away down the hill, nearly out of sight and entirely beyond hearing of the campus and in the vicinity of the hospital, where neither ought to be; the printing office and paper store-room in the administration building, where they ought not to be; the water tank leaking badly in the teeth of a water famine, and the ground beneath the great oaks of the campus swept and garnished, while the trees were famishing for leaf-mulch-moisture and food.

        Truthfully and justly speaking, I found the buildings and grounds absolutely free from that bane of public institutions--visible vermin and filth; the neatest dressed, cleanest and most orderly children, and the best kept and cleanest rooms, furniture, beds, clothing, food, kitchen, closets, store-rooms, grounds and buildings I have encountered, officially or otherwise, in a public institution of this character any where. I did not tarry to determine whose was the master hand, or whether two were joined in "The Master's Grip", to so conduct and manage this loving duty to the memory of those who fell in "battle's magnificently stern array," but I did learn that it is an institution of which the noble Order that originated and maintains it, the people of the State, who, through their Legislature contribute to it, and the children and the friends of the children who are its beneficiaries, may well be proud.

I am very respectfully

(signed) A. W. SHAFFER,
Sanitary Engineer.



Page 9

RECEIPTS FOR TWELVE MONTHS, DECEMBER 1, 1899, TO NOVEMBER 30, 1900.

        

1899. December.

Balance on hand December 1 $ 2926 69
Rent from Minneapolis property 636 22
B. N. Duke on account Rogers' salary 120 00
Main Street M. E. Church, Durham 412 50
W. Simpson, Grand Treasurer, bal. on appropriation 500 00
Masons of Jewel Hill 6 50
Waynesville Lodge, No. 259 5 00
Hickory Lodge, No. 343 14 70
Jonesville Lodge, No. 227 3 00
Stanley Lodge, No. 348 37 40
Randolph Lodge, No. 309 3 75
Fulton Lodge, No. 99 83 25
Ingold Lodge, No. 448 5 00
Durham Lodge, No. 352 116 95
Catawba Lodge, No. 248 5 00
Person Lodge, No. 113 5 75
Oxford Lodge, No. 396 1 27
Cleveland Lodge, No. 202 25 00
Wayne Lodge, No. 112 98 25
Bayboro Lodge, No. 331 1 61
Spring Hope Lodge, 481 5 11
St. John's Lodge, No. 3, additional 1 00
Relief Lodge, No. 431 8 40
Liberty Lodge, No. 45 3 00
Aberdeen Lodge, No. 484 10 00
Kedron Lodge, No. 387 7 07
Selma Lodge, No. 320 3 00
Thomasville Lodge, No. 214 4 40
Rock Spring Lodge, No. 341 10 00
Gulf Lodge, No. 465 6 25
Joppa Lodge, No. 401 10 00
Bethel Lodge, No. 372 5 00
Enfield Lodge, No. 447 20 00
Winston Lodge, No. 167 15 00
Falling Creek Lodge, No. 325 5 00
Polenta Lodge, No. 450 1 00
Dunn's Rock Lodge, No. 267 3 44
Statesville Lodge, No. 487 5 75
Thomas M. Holt Lodge, 492 28 00
Sonoma Lodge, No. 472 5 00
Neuse Lodge, No. 97 13 75
Winston Lodge, No. 167 200 00
Orient Lodge, No. 395 42 65
Currituck Lodge, No. 463 10 00
White Hill Lodge, No. 321 10 00
J. W. Fitzgerald, Linwood 2 00
Thomasville M. E. Church 5 00
Friends at Asheboro 30 00
W. W. Ferguson, Tillery 1 00
Amount forwarded $ 5478 66


Page 10

        
Amount brought forward $ 5478 66
Mrs. A. Reynolds 1 00
Church Street M. E. Church, Salisbury 11 25
Newton M. E. Church 6 40
Edenton Street M. E. Church, Raleigh 6 10
M. E. Church, Ansonville 4 90
M. E. Church, Cedar Hill 3 05
Union Services, Bisco 19 20
Friends State Hospital, Morganton 13 50
Leasburg M. E. Church 5 00
Salem Boys' School 8 50
East Salem Public School 2 33
West Salem Public School 1 75
Beaufort M. E. Church 7 40
Union Meeting, Windsor 11 16
C. S. Winstead, Roxboro 2 25
Union Services, Roxboro 86
T. H. Taylor, Brinkleyville 3 50
Burlington M. E. Church 1 25
Sanford High School 2 35
Friends, Monroe, N. C. 16 10
Galatia Sunday School 3 72
Daughters of J. L. Whitmore, Durham 2 50
Grace M. E. Sunday School 1 96
F. L. Seeley, Asheville 25 00
Taylorsville M. E. Church 1 08
T. G. Bond, Windsor, Guardian of Mary Francis 39 40
Central M. E. Church, Mt. Airy 13 68
West Market Street M. E. Church, Greensboro 31 61
Bethel M. E. Church, Asheville 5 00
Epworth League, Franklin 5 80
Statesville M. E. Church 11 50
Baptist Church, Hendersonville 2 37
Centenary M. E. Church, Greensboro 3 75
Tryon Street M. E. Church, Charlotte 19 69
Concord M. E. Church, Farmer 10 00
Ayden Christian Church 6 78
H. C. Brooks, Ayden 1 00
Bethel M. E. Church, Asheville, additional 1 00
Concord M. E. Church, Concord 15 20
T. S. Franklin, Charlotte 1 00
J. B. Taylor, Henderson 5 00
"Little Workers," Roper 15 00
Main Street M. E. Church, Reidsville 8 30
M. E. Church, Cypress Creek 3 00
Friends, Wilmington 2 00
A friend, Winston 2 00
Callowhee High School, Painter 2 00
J. M. W. Hicks, New York 10 00
J. L. Huff, Gibsonville 1 00
Trinity Mission School, Leasburg 2 00
J. B. Flora, Elizabeth City 50 00
J. S. Carr, Durham 2 00
C. W. Toms, Durham, 2 00
Farmington M. E. Church 2 01
Amount forwarded $ 5914 86


Page 11

        
Amount brought forward $ 5914 86
Elkin M. E. Church 8 00
J. M. McMurray, Roanoke Rapids 2 00
L. C. & D. C. Lawrence, Roanoke Rapids 1 00
J. E. Kanoy, Star 2 00
J. L. Stuart, 1 00
Josiah Allen 50
N. P. Strass, Madison, Wisconsin 5 00
A. W. Kornegay, Goldsboro 1 00
W. A. Darden, Ormondsville 1 00
A. G. Headen, Pittsboro 4 00
Orphans' Box 1st National Bank, Washington, N. C. 2 50
Central M. E. Church, Monroe 15 44
Centre M. E. Church, Monroe circuit 3 37
Friend, Kinston 60
Marion and Snow Hill M. E. Churches 1 80
R. J. Southerland, Henderson 5 00
W. Market St. M. E. Sunday School, Greensboro 25 00
W. E. Cox, Mt. Airy 1 00
John Pearce, Polloksville 10 00
Nathan O'Berry, Goldsboro 5 00
R. C. Thrower, Durham 5 00
Singing Class 346 25
Farm 2 00
Machine Shop 134 28
Shoe Shop 26 10
Orphans' Friend, subscriptions 73 33
Job work 25 00
Sale of Stationery 1.05, Albums 68.85 69 90

        

1900. January.

State of N. C. Quarter ending December 31, 1899 2500 00
Collection in Grand Lodge 58 95
Lafayette Lodge, No. 83 4 00
Grand Lodge of N. C. on account of appropriation 2000 00
American George Lodge, No. 17 16 00
Winston Lodge, No. 167 20 75
Grassy Knob Lodge, No. 471 5 60
Knap of Reeds Lodge, No. 158 1 30
Corinthian Lodge, No. 230 25 00
Pineville Lodge, No. 455 9 00
Henderson Lodge, No. 229 5 27
Rich Square Lodge, No. 488 2 00
Franklin Lodge, No. 109 4 50
Mount Vernon Lodge, No. 359 2 20
Phoenix Lodge, No. 8 10 00
Lilly Valley Lodge, No. 252 5 00
Pigeon River Lodge, No. 386 10 00
Lebanon Lodge, No. 391 9 66
Hominy Lodge, No. 491 25
Royal Hart Lodge, No. 497 15 25
Shelby M. E. Church 8 00
Rocky Mount M. E. Church 8 45
Collection at Trinity, N. C. 6 38
Amount forwarded $ 11434 28


Page 12

        
Amount brought forward $ 11434 28
Entertainment at Roxboro 49 17
L. J. Steed, Oxford, N. C. 5 00
Lexington M. E. Church 2 50
Friend, Oxford, N. C. 1 00
Oak Hill Church, Table Rock, N. C. 3 28
Kernersville M. E. Church 3 00
Norwood M. E. Sunday School 5 00
Collection N. C. Conference at Washington 3 60
Proceeds entertainment, Halifax 1 85
Lumberton M. E. Sunday School 2 00
Young people's entertainment, Maxton 7 15
Work Shop receipts 415 26
Shoe Shop 21 60
Subscriptions to Orphans' Friend 44 93
Advertisements 37 14
Sale of Stationery and Clothing 4.20, meals 20c 4 40

        

February.

Chalmers Lodge, No. 151 5 00
Temperance Lodge, No. 389 3 15
Winston Lodge, No. 167 6 50
Joseph Warren Lodge, No. 92 2 10
Waxhaw Lodge, No. 442 5 00
Lexington Lodge, No. 473 4 81
Orr Lodge, No. 104 20 00
Skewarkey Lodge, No. 90 2 50
American George Lodge, No. 17 1 67
New Lebanon Lodge, No. 314 5 00
Zion Lodge, No. 81 11 00
Dr. E. S. Cudee, Pantego 1 00
C. C. Smith, Pantego 1 00
T. H. Whitley, Pantego 1 00
P. H. Johnson, Pantego 25
C. P. Aycock, Pantego 1 00
Machine Shop 39 56
Subscriptions to Orphans' Friend 111 38
Advertisements 8 50
Job Work 10 50
Stationery sold 95
Albums sold 85
Shoe Shop 21 25
Sale of clothing, provisions, meals 4 45

        

March.

Mattamuskeet Lodge, No. 328 8 95
Salem Lodge, No. 289 11 00
Oxford Lodge, No. 396 52
Beaver Dam Lodge, No. 276 7 50
Charity Lodge, No. 5 6 75
Lilly Valley Lodge, No. 252 5 00
Rainbow Lodge, No. 479 2 60
W. G. Hill Lodge, No. 218 85 50
Knap of Reeds Lodge, No. 158 2 50
Eagle Lodge, No. 71 3 80
Amount forwarded $ 12443 70


Page 13

        
Amount brought forward $ 12443 70
Maxton Lodge, No. 417 4 90
Sanford Lodge, No. 469 2 35
Blackmer Lodge, No. 170 29 00
G. Rosenthal, Raleigh 20 00
Friends, Windsor 3 25
Friend, Guilford College 2 60
Mite Box St. Hubert's Inn, Newton 1 20
Whitehouse-Van Oppen Debate, Durham 13 50
Wm. Campbell, Germantown, N. C., Legacy 25 00
Receipts of Machine Shop 235 15
Orphans' Friend, subscriptions 68 53
Advertisements 4 20
Job Work 29 10
Albums 2 25
Shoe Shop 19 20
Railroad fare refunded 2 65
Provisions sold 3 60
Old clothing sold 2 40
Rebate freight on fertilizer 2 54

        

April.

Transfer for building fund error 111 00
State of N. C. 1st quarter appropriation 2500 00
Masons of Bessemer City 25 00
Durham Lodge, No. 352 10 00
Oxford Lodge, No. 396 25 53
Lone Oak Eodge, No. 449 1 00
Radiance Lodge, No. 132 10 00
Mount Hermon Lodge, No. 118 5 00
South Fork Lodge, No. 462 1 00
Pigeon River Lodge, No. 386 5 00
Hall Lodge, No. 53 5 00
Elkin Lodge, No. 454 5 00
Greensboro Lodge, No. 76 50 00
Granville Lodge, No. 380 4 00
Rush Lodge, No. 456 75
Bula Lodge, No. 409 4 50
Members of Fallston Lodge, No. 356 12 50
Kenley Lodge, No. 257 5 75
Franklinville Lodge, No. 128 10 00
Mount Holly M. E. Church 2 00
Collection Hertford M. E. Church 19 35
Davidson circuit M. E. Church 10 11
Friend, Oxford, N. C. 25
L. V. Morrill, Snow Hill, N. C. 1 00
Mite box, Lafayette Hotel, Fayetteville 4 00
Grand Jury, Hertford Superior Court 1 35
Wood shop $218.84, Shoe shop $19.45 238 29
Subscriptions to Orphans' Friend 119 93
Advertisements 25 75
Stationery sold 2 25
Sale organ 12.00, sale of calf 1.50, old clothing sold 1.03 14 53
Amount forwarded $ 16144 96


Page 14

        
Amount brought forward $ 16144 96

        

May

B. N Duke, on account Mr. Rogers' salary $ 120 00
Miss Baird legacy for 1899 100 00
Interest on B. F. Moore legacy 1899 80 00
St. John's Lodge, No. 3 25 00
Seaside Lodge, No 429 2 00
Oxford Lodge, No. 396 19
Grifton Lodge, No 452 4 11
Wayne Lodge, No. 112 25 00
Snow Lodge, No. 363 5 00
Scottsville Lodge, No. 385 2 00
Patterson Lodge, No. 307 5 00
Jonesville Lodge, No. 227 5 75
Mite box A. C. L. Hotel, Weldon 76
Mite box Arlington Hotel, Elizabeth City 2 00
Friends, Yadkinville, by A. J. Burrus 1 12
Miss M. Ferguson, Raleigh 1 00
Farm 23 00
Machine shop 246 59
Shoe shop 39 75
Singing class 339 74
Sale of blackboard 9 00
Subscriptions to Orphans' Friend 146 85
Advertisements 53 50
Job work 154 90
Gasoline 80

        

June.

Live Oak Alliance, through M. O. Edge 8 00
Weed Monroe, attorney, rent Minneapolis property 115 78
Mill Creek Lodge, No. 480 1 00
Zion Lodge, No. 81 6 15
Oaks Lodge, No 255 3 00
Charity Lodge, No. 5 10 00
Baltimore Lodge, No. 424 2 00
Biltmore Lodge, No. 446 3 20
Person Lodge, No. 113 10 75
Rich Square Lodge, No. 488 2 65
Neuse Lodge, No. 97 1 50
Unaka Lodge, No. 268 6 50
Potecasi Lodge, No. 418 5 00
Greenville Lodge, No. 284 9 00
Tobasco Lodge, No. 271 1 90
Scottsville Lodge, No, 385 3 00
Harmony Lodge, No. 340 10 00
Grimesland Lodge, No. 475 7 05
Columbus Lodge, No. 102 5 00
Union services, Aberdeen 6 10
John Pearce, Polloksville 4 00
L. F. Fentress, Franklinville 1 00
W. C. Russell, Franklinville 1 00
W. Moffit, Franklinville 5 00
W. M. Jones, Asheville 5 00
Amount forwarded $ 17771 60


Page 15

        
Amount brought forward $ 17771 60
R. C. Siler, Siler City 1 00
R. R. Pinkston, Henderson 2 00
Dr. R. J. Noble, Selma 25 00
Subscriptions Orphans' Friend 164 95
Advertisements 7 50
Stationery 2.00, provisions 1.80, clothing 6.00 9 80
Machine shop 437 72
Shoe shop 31 65
Farm 4.05, buckets 1.20 5 25
St. John's Day, net 45 98
Singing class 30 57

        

July.

State of North Carolina appropriation 2500 00
Minneapolis property on account rent 47 50
Cape Fear Lodge, No. 394 2 00
Franklin Lodge, No. 107 10 00
Marble Spring, Lodge, No. 439 1 00
Radiance Lodge, No. 132 4 10
Unanimity Lodge, No 7 6 85
Grifton Lodge, No. 452 2 16
A friend 10 00
Henry Dunn, Kinston 3 00
M. E. Sunday School, Roxboro 1 84
Sash, Door and Blind Factory 152 41
Subscriptions to Orphans' Friend 100 10
Advertisements 56 11
Job work 16 65
Shoe shop 21 57
Singing class 861 50
Sale of fish 2 00

        

August.

Perquimans Lodge, No. 106 3 10
Charity Lodge, No. 5 10 00
A brother Mason 1 00
Granite Lodge, No. 322 5 50
Hominy Lodge, No. 491 58
Ayden Lodge, No. 498 1 19
Dunn's Rock Lodge, No. 267 2 95
Mite box Arlington Hotel, Elizabeth City 1 13
G. Rosenthal 5 00
Caldwell Circuit M E Church 3 60
Singing class, T. H. King, Manager 345 00
Singing class, Yanceyville picnic 125 00
Singing class, Mocksville picnic 300 00
Singing class, Wilkesboro picnic 143 88
Singing class, Winston Lodge, 167 ½ receipts excur. 53 40
Singing class, Salem Lodge, 289 ½ receipts excursion 53 40
Machine shop 193 12
Shoe shop 25 15
Subscriptions Orphans' Friend 136 00
Job work 1.25, advertisements 33.00, stationery 5.25 39 50
Dining room (board) 1.65, sundry sales 3.62 5 27
Amount forwarded $ 23785 58


Page 16

        
Amount brought forward $ 33785 58

        

September.

Machine shop on acct. new buildings from sale of brick 662 34
Neuse Lodge, No. 197 1 91
Phalanx Lodge, No. 31 4 38
Gaston Lodge, No. 263 25 00
Beaver Dam Lodge, No. 276 13 43
W. Brinkley, Raleigh 65
J. Clyde Turner, Durham 10 00
Willie Crow, Raleigh 20
Mite box, Buford Hotel, Charlotte 6 64
S. J. Guyer, Sonoma 2 50
Machine shop 534 31
Shoe shop 37 00
Orphans' Friend, subscription 122 58
Job work 50 53
Advertisements 52 50
Singing class 700 53
Bread and terra cotta pipe 1 30

        

October.

Appropriation, State of North Carolina 2500 00
Charity Lodge, No. 5 10 00
Winton Lodge, No. 327 1 90
Grimesland Lodge, No. 475 5 25
Black Creek Lodge, No. 330 10 00
Winston Lodge, No. 167 16 00
Masons and friends of Roanoke Island 12 70
W. D. Pender 5 00
Mite box Hotel Ireland, Statesville 4 50
Roxboro M. E. Sunday school 1 00
Mite box Hotel Phoenix, Winston 2 70
Sash, Door and Blind Factory receipts 256 65
Shoe shop 57 35
Orphans' Friend, subscriptions 66 61
Job work 120 50
Advertisements 22 25
Stationery sold 5 00
Farm products, old clothing, old brick, etc 12 88
Labor of boys in Furniture Factory 7 50

        

November.

Oxford Lodge, No. 396 26 51
Cary Lodge, No. 301 5 00
Mt. Hermon Lodge, No. 118 15 00
French Broad Lodge, No. 292 5 00
Jonesville Lodge, No. 227 3 00
South Fork Lodge, No. 462 5 00
Ayden Lodge, No. 498 5 00
Berea Lodge, No. 204 2 45
Statesville Lodge, No. 487 20 00
Dillsboro Lodge, No. 459 5 00
Knap of Reeds Lodge, No. 158 5 25
Hiram Lodge, No. 98 10 00
Amount forwarded $ 29236 38


Page 17

Amount brought forward $ 29236 38
Maxton Lodge, No. 417 24 00
American George No. 17 10 00
Columbia George No. 102 5 00
Phoenix George No. 8 10 00
Hanks George No. 128 2 00
St. John's Lodge, No. 3 60 00
Bingham Lodge, No. 272 5 00
Concord Lodge, No. 53 11 00
Person Lodge, No. 113 5 00
Salem Lodge, No. 289 28 25
Eureka, Lodge No- 317 25 00
Patterson Lodge No. 307 5 00
Atlantic Lodge, No. 294 10 00
Greenville Lodge, No. 284 29 33
Granite Lodge, No. 322 23 00
M. Fels, Philadelphia 25 00
John T. Pullen, Raleigh 5 00
Mite box, Hickory Inn, Hickory, N. C. 3 50
W. C. Johnston, Boydton, Virginia 1 00
M. L. Horton, Albemarle 2 00
Stephen Stroud, Kinston 25
The Thos. W. Price Company, Philadelphia 10 00
G. W. Kidder, Wilmington 5 00
S. M. Roland, Raleigh 2 00
Friend, Denver, North Carolina 25
J. P. Taylor, Henderson 2 50
D. Oettinger, Jr. Washington, D. C. 5 00
J. G. Cooley, Sandersville, Ga 2 00
J. C. Cooper, Jr., Henderson 1 00
Thomas W. Taylor, Brinkleyville 3 00
A. A. Bryant, Oxford 70
G. Rosenthal, Raleigh 10 05
C H. Belvin, Raleigh 10 00
Fleishman Yeast Company, Norfolk, Virginia 5 00
F. Ulrich, Newbern 2 00
R. R. Pinkston, Henderson 5 00
R. W. Gwynn, North Wilkesboro 2 50
M. Rathjen, Wilmington 2 00
Rev. J. S. Hardaway, Oxford 1 00
B. S. Royster, Oxford 5 00
D. Lichtenstein, Tarboro 5 00
W. E. Cox, Mount Airy 1 00
E. N. Howard, Mechanics 2 20
W. L. London, Pittsboro 5 00
M. T. Young, Dunn 3 00
Machine shop 846 21
Orphans' Friend, subscriptions 178 64
Advertisements 18.00, Job work 25c 18 25
Shoe shop 86 75
Farm products 3 71
Labor of 8 boys in Furniture Factory 23 00
Sundries 5 25
Rebate of freight on car coal 19 00
Total $ 30,796 72


Page 18

DISBURSEMENTS FOR TWELVE MONTHS. DECEMBER 1, 1899, TO NOVEMBER 30, 1900.

        

1899. December.

Pay rolls for November $ 941 50
Incidentals, W. J. Hicks, superintendent 160 46
Swindell Brothers, glass 64 55
Daniel Miller & Company, dry goods 268 92
J. F. White, groceries 44 35
Walsh & Weidner, boiler sundries 17 00
W. J. Hicks, corn and bunting 15 82
Stuart Draft Milling Company, bran 13 60
J. I. Triplett, flour 114 92
Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 13 62
Davenport, Morris & Company, groceries 42 91
Block & Rosenbaum, leather, etc 32 32
P. B. Glenn, shoe machine 40 00
J. T. Kerr 5 75
J. T. Brummitt, lumber 68 66
H. Hobgood, lumber 43 38
Spotswood Burwell, lumber 34 21
Carolina Rice Mills, rice 8 83
E. H. Crenshaw & Co., groceries 6 40
J. S. Brown, provisions 33 06
Edwards & Winston, hardware 82 76
Bertha Rosenthal, clerical services 10 00
C. W. Toms, director 2 00
J. M. Currin, director 4 20
J. N. Ramsay, director 11 80
T. A. Green, director 8 50
G. Rosenthal, director 3 70
J. S. Carr, director 2 00
Hotel Carrolina 10 75
G. Rosenthal, secretary and treasurer, salary, etc. 28 40
Clyde Ellington, copying reports 2 00

        

1900. January.

Pay rolls for December, 1899 906 61
G. L. Nightingale, typewriting report 5 28
G. Rosenthal, telegram 1 65
J. F. White, groceries, etc 31 31
J. E. Barnhill, wood 21 50
Landis & Easton, dry goods and notions 17 64
Ginn & Company, books 9 08
Dorman & Company, printing ink 8 00
Red C. Oil Company, gasoline 6 50
Dill & Collins, paper 192 82
J. W. Davis, lumber 11 06
Hirshberg & Company, caps 51 86
Blome & Company, candy 24 55
Stuart's Draft Mill Company, shipstuff 14 25
T. N. Burwell, logs 10 75
J. I. Triplett, flour 65 00
The Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 26 28
Amount forwarded $ 3541 11


Page 19

        
Amount brought forward $ 3541 11
S. E. Peed, lumber, 10 68
L. J. Steed, lumber 18 24
Edwards & Winston, wire, hardware, etc 153 81
Block & Rosenbaum, leather, etc 45 31
Swindell Brothers, glass 75 93
E. H. Crenshaw Company, flour 5 00
A. H. Williams, books 5 20
J. G. Hall, physic, etc. 27 62
F. A. Watson, pictures 10 80
J S. Brown, groceries 22 86
C. H. Landis, hardware 15 63
W. J Hicks, superintendent, incidentals Dec. '99 223 61
H. G. Cooper, cashier, note 1500 06
J. I. Triplett, flour, September 1899 32 80

        

February

W. J. Hicks, superintendent, pay roll for January, 828 17
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements January, 258 56
Educational Publishing Company, books 7 00
J. I. Triplett, flour 49 00
J. S. Brown, provisions 24 76
J. F. White, provisions 42 66
The Taylor & Bolling Company, provisions 13 38
Snow Steam Pump Works, repairs 13 08
Davenport, Morris & Company, soap 35 40
W L. Ragland, wood 39 93
Harvey Hobgood, lumber 8 80
J. W. Davis, lumber 10 32
W S. Hundley, grate bars 15 53
J. E. Barnhill, wood 27 20
Standard Oil Company, oil 8 88
R. P. Andrews & Co., stationery 29 60
The Thomas W. Price Company, paper 146 96
The Pelouze Paper and Type Company, rollers 4 40
American Type Founders Company, type 76 89
Worsham & Glenn, shoeing and repairs 14 90
T. A. Jacobs, leather, etc 30 07
St. Luke's Circle, board "Aunt Becky" 18 00
Edwards & Broughton, printing 49 05
Edwards & Winston, hardware, etc 104 28
H. G. Cooper, cashier, int. on note and stamps 20 20
Sundry deposits building fund July 1898 111 00

        

March.

W. J. Hicks, superintendent, pay rolls February 818 10
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements 213 57
Edwards & Winston, hardware, etc 76 15
John E. Hurst & Co., dry goods 11 17
J. G. Hall, drugs and sundries 5 95
Odell Hardware Company, hardware, etc 46 86
G. W Marrow, lumber 152 10
E. H. Crenshaw, lumber 18 36
J. W. Davis, lumber 9 19
The Thomas W. Price Company, paper 14 14
American Type Founders Co., printing material 2 47
Amount forwarded $ 9044 68


Page 20

        
Amount brought forward $ 9044 68
Standard Oil Company, gasoline 7 07
J. F. White Company, groceries and notions 75 83
J. I. Triplett, flour (20 bbls.) 78 21
Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 5 15
Parker & Hunt, molasses 74 80
Joseph S. Brown, provisions 24 41
Block & Rosenbaum, leather, etc 69 37
Long Brothers, notions 16 65
Daniel Miller & Company, dry goods 18 23
Stuart's Draft Milling Company, bran, etc 42 10
T. W. Wood & Sons, seeds 42 99
G. Rosenthal, secretary and treasurer, salary 25 00

        

April.

Pay roll for March 793 86
E. M. Uzzell, stationery 1 50
Mrs. J. W. Foy, board Rebecca Morrison 18 00
W. J. Hicks, superintendent; disbursements 201 12
American Type Founders Company 5 77
J. S. Brown, provisions 11 83
Bramhall, Dean & Co., repair to range 3 15
T. F. Brockwell, repairing gasoline engine 10 00
Block & Rosenbaum, leather 48 80
T. N. Burwell, wood 21 45
Binswanger & Company, glass 59 21
Spotswood Burwell, lumber 36 98
J. D. Brooks, seed, oats and potatoes 10 75
E. H. Crenshaw Company, groceries, etc 28 50
Davenport, Morris & Company, groceries 58 04
Edwards & Winston, hardware 31 01
H. Hobgood, lumber 27 60
J. S. Hall, notions 3 35
M Hessberg, leather 47 08
G. W. Marrow, lumber 120 12
N. C. Cotton Oil Company, cotton seed hulls 8 00
C. J. Parker, manager, school supplies 37 80
Parham & Dorsey, meal 13 32
Richmond Paper Manufacturing Company, paper, 6 43
Red C. Oil Company, Gasoline 6 63
Smith & Anthony Company, preserving kettle 6 59
Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 9 80
J. I. Triplett, flour 58 20
J. F. White Company, sundries 34 06
Wallace & Gregory Brothers, vinegar 8 38

        

May

Pay rolls for April 852 24
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements 226 79
Daniel Miller & Company, dry goods 12 82
S. H. Jones, lumber 34 10
Spotswood Burwell, lumber 22 10
Harvey Hobgood, lumber 36 51
The Thomas W. Price Company, paper etc 65 69
Dill & Collins, paper 231 26
Amount forwarded $ 12739 27


Page 21

        
Amount brought forward $ 12739 27
Red C. Oil Manufacturing Company, gasoline 6 63
Binswanger & Company, glass 19 37
Bingham Brothers Company, rollers 6 67
L. Thomas, wood 141 42
Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 9 32
Parham & Dorsey, meal 6 90
J. F. White Company, groceries, etc 40 01
Columet Tea and Coffee Company, coffee 13 75
J. I. Triplett, flour 64 81
Long Brothers, dry goods 23 55
Edwards & Winston, hardware 26 87
Tanner Paint and Oil Company, glass 102 62
John Wanamaker, books 11 27
John G. Hall. drugs and sundries 22 17
G. W. Marrow, lumber 108 58
R. L. Pitchford, lumber 19 94
L. L. Crews, lumber 109 64
The Dunlop Mills, bran and shipstuff 25 75
John M. Wyatt, collars and bridles 9 00
J. P. Wyatt & Brothers, cow feed 23 00
E. H. Crenshaw Company, bran 11 50
Rhode Island Brush Company, brushes 7 50
Edwards & Broughton, record book 4 50
Dr. S. D. Booth, medical services 93 65
J. S. Brown, groceries 12 10
The Taylor & Bolling Company, lard 21 83

        

June.

Pay rolls for May 915 82
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements 257 53
R. L. Pitchford, lumber 28 99
Parker & Hunt, shingles, etc 17 94
Parham & Dorsey, meal 13 80
J. F. White Company, flour, oil, etc 20 61
Davenport, Morris & Company, groceries 6 70
J. I. Triplett, flour 81 01
Carolina Rice Mills, rice 10 35
J S. Brown, groceries 28 89
Pelouze Paper and Type Company, paper 18 27
Edwards & Broughton, book-binding 29 60
The Baughman Stationery Company, books 6 25
T. A. Jacob, leather, etc 48 62
Hartford Woven Wire Mattress Company 27 55
Edwards & Winston, hardware 62 24
Landis & Easton, notions, etc 27 20
W. W. Tilley, lumber 48 34
H. Hobgood, lumber 18 48
D. E. Peed 14 28
Spotswood Burwell, lumber 17 59
T. M. Cash, lumber 25 32
L. L. Crews, lumber 15 00
T. N. Burwell, wood 112 00
W. L. Ragland, wood 57 75
W. F. Long, Tr. p. t. unpaid check 5 00
Amount forwarded $ 15592 25


Page 22

        
Amount brought forward $ 15592 25
H. G. Cooper, cashier, interest and stamps 15 20
G. Rosenthal, secretary and treasurer, salary 25 00
G. Rosenthal, postage and iucidentals 3 50

        

July.

Pay rolls for June 857 79
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements 209 09
Edwards & Winston, hardware, etc 111 63
Parham & Dorsey, meal 12 60
The Taylor and Bolling Company, groceries 2 72
Davenport, Morris & Company, groceries 30 22
J. F. White, groceries 50 78
J. S. Brown, groceries 25 65
T W. Wood & Sons, potatoes 5 50
The Dunlop Mills, shipstuff 17 50
C. C. Thomas Company. fruit jars 38 75
J. P. Stedman, drugs 7 36
T. A. Jacob, leather, etc 37 86
T. N. Burwell, wood 82 00
The Red C. Oil Manufacturing Go., gasoline 5 81
The Thomas W. Price Company, paper 59 25
American Type Founders Co., printing material 30 03
Harvey Hobgood, lumber 16 75
Oxford Furniture Company, lumber 52 10
S. P. Brummitt, lumber 24 30
Landis & Easton, dry goods 8 17
U. L. Alspaugh, sheeting 7 50
Randolph Manufacturing Company, sheeting 17 54
J. M. Currin, director 4 00
Dr. J. N. Ramsey, director 11 70
B. N. Duke, director 2 00
C. W. Toms, director 3 50
Carrolina Hotel, bill of directors 8 25
G. Rosenthal, director 6 20
St. Luke's Home, board R. Morrison 18 00

        

August.

Pay rolls for July 732 22
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, sundries 137 25
Long Brothers, notions 14 49
J. G. Hall, drugs and seeds 10 90
J. S. Brown, groceries 14 01
Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 21 69
J. P. Wyatt & Brother, groceries 76 75
The Wheat Hearts Company, provisions 7 38
G. B. Weiss & Sons, leather 30 81
T. A. Jacobs, leather and findings 35 17
J. I. Triplett, flour 112 76
Richmond Paper Manufacturing Co., paper 6 24
The Thomas W. Price Company, paper 33 71
The Dunlop Mills, shipstuff 17 60
Landis & Easton, dry goods 13 46
Binswanger & Company, glass 24 67
Amount forwarded $ 18689 61


Page 23

        
Amount brought forward $ 18689 61
J. T. Kerr, machine work 7 50
Bingham Bros. & Co., printing supplies 3 28
Parker & Hunt, lumber 76 62
J. S. Brown, lumber 4 80
L. J. Steed, lumber 7 21
W. H. Tilley, lumber 13 40
J. E. Hurst & Co., dry goods 210 32
Dr. S. D. Booth, medical services 1 50
G. W. Marrow, lumber 92 36
Dr. J. B. Williams, medical services 21 00
J. F. White, groceries 62 46
Edwards & Winston, hardware, etc 47 20

        

September.

Pay rolls for August 670 70
H. G. Cooper, cashier, note 1300 00
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements 160 17
The Dunlop Mills, shipstuff 33 20
J. F. Edwards, hardware 58 54
J. F. White, groceries 21 48
Parham & Dorsey meal 7 26
E. H. Crenshaw Company, flour, etc 9 03
Parker & Hunt, molasses 81 57
Red C. Oil Company, fluid 5 78
Richmond Paper Manufacturing Co., paper 8 76
T. N. Burwell, wood 80 00
J. S. Hall, sewing machine 37 50
Atlantic Refining Company, belt dressing 6 25
Job P. Wyatt & Brothers, chops 46 00
Worsham & Glenn, blacksmithing 18 40
R. A. Howard, lumber 80 37
Harvey Hobgood, lumber $ 10 39
H. G. Cooper, cashier, note and interest 1001 67
G. Rosenthal, secretary and treasurer 3d quarter, 25 00

        

October.

St. Luke's Home, 3 months board Aunt Becky 18 00
Pay rolls for September 830 82
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements 110 11
Parker & Hunt, coal and posts 21 62
L. Thomas, wood 71 77
Cohansie Glass Manufacturing Company, glass 82 51
Block & Rosenbaum, leather 45 20
T. A. Jacob, leather and findings 31 84
T. W. Wood & Sons, grass and clover seed 14 95
J. G. Hall, drugs, etc 18 45
J. F. Edwards, hardware 28 91
Montag Brothers, stationery 33 84
Thomas W. Price Company, paper 121 74
Davenport, Morris & Company, soap 37 43
Hartford Woven Wire Company, mattresses 3 05
Long Brothers, notions 13 30
Pearl Cotton Mills, sheeting 19 60
Amount forwarded $ 24402 47


Page 24

        
Amount brought forward $ 24402 47
Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 33 02
J. F. White, provisions 78 11
J. I. Triplett, flour 66 81
The Wheat Heart Company, cereal 8 00
J. S. Brown, provisions 39 32
E. H. Crenshaw Company, provisions 9 65
Wallace & Gregory Brothers, vinegar 8 64
Parham & Dorsey 14 88
Dr. J. N. Ramsey, director 12 40

        

November.

Pay rolls for October 821 99
W. J. Hicks, superintendent, disbursements 239 55
Randolph Manufacturing Company, sheeting 6 32
American Book Company, books 20 35
The Dunlop Mills Company, shipstuff 33 20
Job P. Wyatt & Brothers, cow chops 22 97
The Taylor & Bolling Company, groceries 73 73
J. F. White Company 89 12
J. I. Triplett, flour 67 13
E. H. Crenshaw Company, bran 2 40
Maynard, Merrill & Company, books 4 40
American Wood-working Machine Co., hardware, 12 00
The Seaman Printery, order books 7 00
Cohansie Glass Manufacturing Company, glass 7 12
T. W. Wood & Son, onion sets 4 90
Long Brothers, dry goods 5 68
W. L. Ragland, wood 114 67
Richmond Paper Manufacturing Company, paper, 3 80
Dr. T. L. Booth, medical services 47 00
Red C. Oil Manufacturing Co, gasoline 5 72
Daniel Miller & Co., hosiery, etc 84 48
Hirshberg & Co., caps 43 75
The Baker Glass Company, glass 36 07
Parham & Dorsey, meal, etc 16 40
Davenport, Morris & Company, lard 29 98
Landis & Easton, notions 2 55
Harvey Hobgood, lumber 19 40
E. A. Howard, lumber 8 91
J. F. Edwards, hardware 41 42
Thomas W. Price Company, paper 30 54
American Type Founders Company, type 190 96
J. S. Brown, supplies 10 30
Parker & Hunt, supplies 147 96
W. J. Hicks, supt., sundry disbursements 250 00
Building fund, credited in error September 14 662 34
Balance on hand 2959 31
Total $ 30,796 72


Page 25

        

RECEIPTS OF BUILDING FUND, DEC. 1, 1899 TO NOV. 30, 1900.

1899.      
Dec. 1 Balance on hand   $ 60 40
Dec. 2 Main Street M. E. Church, Durham $ 200 00  
Dec. 2 Buggaboo Lodge, No. 490 4 80  
Dec. 2 Sale of brick 47 43  
1900      
Jan. 3 Enfield Lodge, No. 447 50 00  
Jan. 8 Sale of brick 56 18  
Jan. 8 Oasis Temple N. M. S., Charlotte 25 00  
Jan. 23 Pigeon River Lodge, No. 386 13 25  
Feb. 3 Sale of brick 20 32  
Feb. 23 Wm. G. Hill Lodge, No. 218 150 00  
Feb. 29 Warren Lodge, No. 101 9 00  
April 2 Sale of brick 11 60  
April 6 Roanoke Lodge, No 203 12 00  
April 9 T. W. Dewey, Newbern 25 00  
April 18 Polloksville Lodge, No, 175 10 00  
April 18 King Solomon Lodge, No. 313 7 00  
April 28 Hickory Lodge, No. 343 50 00  
April 28 Elk Lodge, No. 373 25 00  
April 30 Excelsior Lodge, 261 50 00  
May 19 Mystic Tie Lodge, No. 237 12 25  
June 8 Bald Creek Lodge, No. 397 10 00  
June 21 Sandy Creek Lodge, No. 185 15 00  
June 26 Insurance received for fire loss 106 35  
Sep. 22 Lilly Valley Lodge, No. 252 20 00  
Oct. 23 Davie Lodge, No. 39 30 00  
Nov. 19 Fellowship Lodge, No 84 33 00  
Nov. 22 Davie Lodge, No. 39 18 00  
Nov. 27 Sale of brick Sept. 14 credited gen'l. fund, 662 34  
Nov. 28 Holly Springs Lodge, No. 115 14 31 1687 83
    $ 1748 23

        

DISBURSEMENTS OF BUILDING FUND, DEC. 1, 1899, to NOV. 30, 1900.

1899.      
Dec. 23 B. N. Duke, balance $ 200 00  
1900.      
May 10 H. G. Cooper, cashier, on account note 500 00  
May 10 Interest 4 mos. on $1300 note and stamps, 26 26 726 26
Nov. 30 Balance on hand   1021 97
    $ 1748 23


Page 26

REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT.

To the Board of Directors of the Oxford Orphan Asylum.

        GENTLEMEN:--It is my duty and pleasure to report upon the operations of the Oxford Orphan Asylum from December 1, 1899, to December 1, 1900, and I shall follow the custom of taking up the work of each department separately, since I believe by this method a clearer idea of the year's work can be conveyed.

        First, let me call your attention to the fact that each child receives instruction in school half of each day and performs duty in the industrial departments of the institution during the other half day. Recreation periods are arranged so that school and general work does not become burdensome.

KITCHEN, SEWING ROOM AND LAUNDRY.

        The kitchen duties are performed by four of the larger girls, under the supervision and training and with the help of the matron, who is admirably fitted for her heavy and responsible duties. The kitchen always has a clean, tidy appearance and the food is well cooked, wholesome and abundant. Twenty-nine smaller girls are employed in the dining rooms, serving meals, waiting on the tables and doing the necessary work to keep their department neat and clean. The cleanliness, system and order in kitchen and dining rooms deserves more than passing mention. Strictest care is exercised in this and every other department to reduce waste to a minimum.

        The Masonic Hall over the dining rooms is still being used as a sewing room. Under the supervision of a competent matron and her assistant, twenty-three of the larger girls are engaged half of each day, some in the morning and others in the afternoon, in making the clothing for the boys and girls and in keeping it in repair. The sewing room is doing good work and the girls are receiving instruction and training which ought to be valuable in future life. The garments are carefully marked before being sent out. An accurate record is kept in the office of the clothing and each teacher keeps a record for the children under her care. The teachers are charged with the duty of reporting the clothing needs of their children and they perform conscientiously their duty. The garments from the laundry pass through the sewing room every week, are checked by the proper list, receive repairs needed and are sent to the several cottages to be again checked by the lists in the hands of the teachers. This department has been rather heavily taxed this year, as new winter and summer Sunday uniforms for the girls have been made.

        Ten girls do the immense amount of laundry work for the institution. The character of their work has greatly improved during the year, for which the matron and girls deserve great credit. The matron was formerly an Asylum girl.

SHOE SHOP.

        Five boys, with the instruction and assistance received from the efficient manager of this department, make and repair the shoes for children at the institution. In addition to this, considerable custom work is done and the increase in receipts from this source during the year is encouraging. The financial statement of the shoe shop, given later, shows that it has been conducted this year at a profit to the institution of $302.44.

FARM.

        About twenty boys are engaged in this healthful, important and commendable work on the farm. They are receiving excellent training. Considering the unfavorable season, the results from this department have been very satisfactory. Enough rough food for the stock this winter has been produced. The garden has usually furnished a sufficient supply of vegetables for our tables. The herd of cattle is in good condition and the supply of milk and butter has been unusually large.

        With the change now contemplated of turning the rocky,


Page 28

hilly portion of the farm into grass and only cultivating the smooth, clean lands, which can be worked largely by the boys, we hope for much better results from the farm than heretofore.

PRINTING OFFICE.

        Seven boys are now learning this excellent trade. They, with the instruction, supervision and assistance of the competent foreman, set all the type in the course of the ordinary work. The Orphans' Friend and Masonic Journal is printed each week and a large amount of job work is done. Boys from this department always find ready and remunerative employment. Two of our printers have recently reached the age of discharge from the Asylum and good positions were secured for them. The usual statement below shows the year's profit to be $1,327.58.

        We cannot urge too strongly the great importance of hearty co-operation from brethren and friends in our efforts to extend the circulation and influence of The Orphans' Friend and Masonic Journal. It merits a much wider circulation. Its Masonic department is ably edited by Bro. John Nichols, Past Grand Master, and it is the official organ of our Order in North Carolina. We endeavor to fill its columns for the general reader with pure, entertaining, helpful matter. It is published in the interest of Masonry and of our work for destitute, orphan children. Can we not during the coming year increase its subscription list from the three thousand which we now have to ten thousand names?

WOOD-WORKING SHOPS.

        The manager of this department has eleven boys in his charge and he is painstaking and faithful in his efforts to teach them a valuable trade. Two boys have gone from the shops this year and both have good positions. They are doing their work and conducting themselves well. We give later a detailed statement, showing financial results from this department. When we read this statement and remember that eleven bright boys are progressing nicely


Page 29

in acquiring a good trade, we will recognize that this stands among our most important industrial features.

        Near our shops the Oxford Furniture Factory has recently begun operations under the management of men of high character. Eight boys from the Asylum work half of each day in this factory, spending the other half day in school. We are pleased with this arrangement, as it enables more of our children to leave us better fitted to sustain themselves by their skilled labor. Some revenue is also brought to our institution from the employment of these boys.

SCHOOL.

        The progress of the children in school work has been marked and very encouraging. As before stated, each child attends school at least a half day and about sixty of the smaller children have advantage of both morning and afternoon sessions. Faculty meetings are held once a week, when matters pertaining to this department are thoroughly discussed. The work is well organized. It has been found practicable to add another grade this fall and we now have eight grades. As I see it, the purpose of our school is to give the destitute, orphan children in the institution an English education, which is so essential in their efforts to earn a livelihood and which should add so much to their best success and greatest usefulness. We do not go beyond a common school education, but a number of our ambitious, capable, deserving girls are obtaining a higher education in North Carolina Colleges. This is made possible partly by their own labor in the institutions they attend and partly through the assistance of friends.

        Eight teachers are employed in the Asylum and, with the counsel, direction and help of the efficient Lady Supervisor, they have done most excellent work.

        Manual training is a valuable feature of our school course. It is important that the hand and the eye of the child be trained to become obedient, accurate and skillful servants of the mind. The bi-monthly school reports, showing standing of each pupil in scholarship, deportment and attendance, are a great stimulus to good work.


Page 30

        Usual statement of receipts and expenditures under the several accounts of the institution, from December 1, 1899, to December 1, 1900, is here submitted:

        

CLOTHING ACCOUNT.

Cost of clothing, sewing room supplies and extra labor $ 1018 09    
Salaries of matrons 396 35    
    $ 1414 44  
Less clothing sold   23 28  
      $ 1391 16
(Value of donations in kind $803 43).      

        

PROVISION ACCOUNT.

Cost of provisions and kitchen supplies purchased $ 3054 55    
Salaries of matron and baker 503 37    
    $ 3557 92  
Less provisions sold, board, etc   58 81  
(Value of donations in kind $332 05).      
      $ 3499 11

        

FARM ACCOUNT.

Cost of labor, seed, fertilizer, etc $ 1566 66    
Salary of manager 425 00    
    $ 1991 66  
Less products sold   40 22  
      $ 1951 44
(Value of donations in kind $169 45).      

        

SHOE SHOP ACCOUNT.

Cost material, new machines, etc $ 609 10    
Salary of manager 283 50    
    $ 892 60  
Less cash for work   406 82  
      $ 485 78
(Value donations in kind $76.65).      

        

GENERAL EXPENSE ACCOUNT.

Cost supplies, postage, telephone, etc $ 670 61    
Salaries as shown below 1536 43    
    $ 2207 04  
Less sale sundry articles and labor 8 boys Furniture Factory since October 1900   46 55  
      $ 2160 49
Salary superintendent $ 100 00    
One-half salary lady supervisor 448 24    
Salary clerk and storekeeper 855 00    
Baker for extra work 78 59    
Proportion salary engineer at industrial building 54 60    
  $1536 43    
(Value donations in kind $109 65).      


Page 31

        
Amount brought forward               $ 9487 98

        

LAUNDRY ACCOUNT.

Cost supplies $ 67 49              
Salary matron and ⅓ salary engineer 213 58              
                     $ 281 07

        

HOSPITAL ACCOUNT.

Cost medicine, doctors' bills, etc $ 263 03              
Salary matron 192 50              
                     $ 455 53
(Value donations in kind $51 00).                     

        

WOOD AND COAL ACCOUNT.

Cost wood and coal $ 943 70              
⅓ salary engineer 78 57         
    $ 1022 27  
Less rebate freight on coal   19 00  
      $ 1003 27
Cost maintaining average of 212 children.     $ 11227 85

        

SCHOOL ACCOUNT.

Cost material, books, etc $ 186 20    
Salaries of teachers and ½ salary lady supervisor 2365 83    
    $ 2552 03  
Less old books sold   9 00  
      2543 03
(Value donations in kind $9 25).      
Cost maintenance and education     $ 13770 88

        

MACHINE SHOP ACCOUNT.

Cost of material, etc $ 2515 44    
Salary manager 900 00    
Extra labor 871 56    
    $ 4287 00  
Less cash received for work   3710 10  
      $ 576 90

        

PRINTING ACCOUNT.

Cost of material, postage, extra labor, gasoline, etc $ 1870 56    
Salaries manager and editor 1165 00    
    $ 3035 56  
Less cash received   2153 21  
      $ 882 35
(Accounts receivable $1829 65).      

        

REPAIRS AND IMPROVEMENT ACCOUNT.

Cost sundry repairs and permanent improvements including shop bill        $ 990 84       
Less sale old brick, pipe, etc        7 65       
                     $ 983 19
(Repairs and improvements to value of $203 25 paid by friends).      


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        The per capita cost of maintaining each child during the past year has been $52.96. As will be noted, the receipts from the singing class have more than covered the amount charged to school account this year. Without the customary deduction of these receipts from cost of maintenance and education, per capita expense was $64 96 over and above the earnings of the institution.

        I submit usual printing office, wood-working shops and shoe shop statements:

        

PRINTING OFFICE.

CR.    
Cash from subscriptions Orphans' Friend and Masonic Journal $ 1333 83  
Cash from advertisements Orphans' Friend and Masonic Journal 318 45  
Cash from job work, including sale of albums 480 63  
(Note accounts receivable for job work $1381.88).    
Cash from sale of stationery 20 30  
Received in trade for advertisements 72 50  
Work for Asylum 219 23  
Accounts receivable (jobs $1381.88, ads. $447.77) 1829 65  
Paper and stock on hand 244 77  
New outfit type purchased during year, on hand 200 00  
    $ 4719 36
DR.    
Material on hand December 1, 1899 $ 282 45  
Expended for paper, material, stationery, fr't., etc 1542 44  
Salaries 1165 00  
Extra labor 182 30  
Postage 101 68  
Gasoline 44 14  
Oil from wood-working shops 1 57  
Accounts payable 72 20  
    $ 3391 78
Profit   $ 1327 58

        

WOOD-WORKING SHOPS.

CR.    
Cash received for work $ 3710 10  
Asylum work 549 96  
Accounts receivable 2134 05  
Material on hand 1178 94  
    $ 7573 05
DR.    
Material on hand last report $ 953 04  
Expended for wood, lumber, etc 2515 44  
Salary manager 900 00  
Extra labor 871 56  
Accounts payable 239 00  
    $ 5479 04
Profit   $ 2093 91


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SHOE SHOP.

CR.    
Cash received for work $ 406 82  
231 pairs shoes and slippers, $110 254 10  
Repairing for Asylum 422 20  
Accounts receivable 86 35  
Material on hand 77 19  
53 pairs shoes purchased and donated, on hand 37 10  
1 shoe machine purchased during the year, on hand 37 50  
    $ 1321 26
DR.    
Material on hand last report $ 78 30  
Cost of material, etc., this year 609 10  
Salary manager 283 50  
Accounts payable 47 57  
Work machine shop 35  
    1018 82
Profit   $ 302 44

        Below I give report of children received and dismissed during the year:

        
  Girls. Boys. Total.
In our institution December 1, 1899 107 104 211
Received during the year 31 32 63
Readmitted 3 3 6
  141 139 280
Discharged during the year 30 35 65
In Asylum December 1, 1900 111 104 215

        
6 girls and 12 boys went to mothers 18
22 girls and 14 boys went to approved homes 36
1 girl and 8 boys secured employment on salary 9
1 boy ran away 1
1 girl died 1
Total 65

        The principal permanent improvements of the year have been the erection of a badly needed, brick smoke house, located at a convenient point near the kitchen. The water from several additional springs has been conducted to a new spring house which we have built, and our water supply has been more than doubled. Lattice work has been placed underneath the porches of the four boys' cottages. This adds to the appearance of the cottages and gives a convenient, dry, safe place for the storage of wood. Permanent improvements for the year have cost about $540.00.

        Seventy-six children spent the months of July and August


Page 34

with relatives or friends. We consider this a wise measure. It affords pleasure to the children who go and to their friends and, we believe, is of real benefit to them and to our institution. The boys and girls go out into various sections of the State and the majority of them by their reports, their appearance and conduct, arouse greater interest in their home here. Then too, it is a saving to our institution. Four cottages are closed during these two months. The children do not enter homes, even for the summer, unless we are satisfied that they will be properly cared for. We strive to render the time of the children who remain at the Asylum as pleasant and improving as possible, and seldom see signs of discontent among them.

        Liberal donations in kind have again, during the past twelve months, materially aided us in curtailing expenses. The value of these donations is $1,754.73.

        The singing class tours this year were successful in every respect. The receipts from this source were $3,299.27. Deducting $380.25, expenses paid from the Asylum office and the printing office bill, we have a net profit from the tours of $2,919.02. Masons and friends extended cordial invitations to the children, received and entertained the class with the greatest hospitality and kindness, and worked for the success of the concerts.

        As you will see from our Treasurer's report, voluntary contributions from Masonic Lodges and friends in general have been very liberal. Some of our subordinate Lodges have made it a rule to give systematically and regularly. We recommend this course. It will prove less burdensome to the Lodges and a blessing to our institution.

        Every friend of the orphan child has cause for congratulation and great gratitude to God that, with His favor and blessing, our institution has paid off its old indebtedness. It now stands as a monument to our noble Order, free from any incumbrance whatsoever.

        There are other much needed permanent improvements, which have been delayed in our great anxiety to economize in every way possible and use every available dollar to discharge


Page 35

the old debt of the institution. Now, that having been accomplished, it would seem wise to give some serious thought to other pressing needs of the institution, which are: A general wood-working and sash, door and blind factory, 54×120, one story, with basement under one portion for painting, glazing, etc., and for general stock. (The location would be favorable for such construction.) Printing office 32×54 feet and two stories high, 1st floor for printing office and 2nd floor for stock room and shoe shop. Laundry 32×54 feet and two stories high, 1st floor for laundry and 2nd floor for drying room for laundry and sewing room for mending all clothing. Boiler house and wood saw, etc., 32×64 feet, one story, in which would be located the boilers, wood saw, splitters, etc. We believe it would be wise to erect these buildings as early as possible at a convenient point on the Asylum grounds, and in the most convenient shape for economical and satisfactory management. This would save much time now consumed in the long walks to the present locations and obviate many other grave objections to the present arrangement. By this arrangement the power now available for the wood-working shops only could be utilized for laundry, wood saw and printing office; the industrial departments would be under better supervision; the children would receive more thorough training; several other important changes would be made possible, which would save money and labor and give very much more satisfactory results. The land where the wood-working shops are now located in town might be sold to best advantage.

        I feel that it is safe to state that by a careful use of all the materials in the old boys' building and in the present shop, this entire work might be done, including needed machinery for shop and laundry, for about eight thousand dollars ($8000.00). I think it would be very wise that this should be done at once, provided special funds can be secured for that purpose without risk of getting the institution in debt again.

        In the expenditure of money for the institution, as in


Page 36

every other act, may we seek wisdom from the great source of all wisdom.

        We feel the improvements and changes above suggested would put the institution in better shape for a more thorough industrial training of the children than ever before. We regard it as one of our most imperative duties to teach the children, both boys and girls, to work, not at play-house work, but hard, honest labor. We want to lead them to love work. Some of them do not seem to regard work with special favor on first acquaintance, but think very much more of it as they begin to understand and realize its benefits. Many grow up to be industrious, good, reliable workers. Children well trained from their youth to work industriously, systematically and faithfully at any branch of honest labor, mechanical or otherwise, will always find ready employment at remunerative pay. There is always a good demand for capable, faithful and honest labor, so we feel that it is our Christian duty to try to train boys and girls to work at such industries as will give each one opportunity to earn an honest living. They must work at something, and whatever they do, try to do it well.

        But in all this and other matters worthy of mention, we are only unworthy imitators of the grand and good man, Bro. J. H. Mills, who taught the first child to work in an Orphan Asylum in the State and laid the foundation of Asylum management, true, plumb, and square. Each one, in succession following, has endeavored to build well on that solid foundation laid by Brother Mills, while he has gone to the great beyond, there to receive the rich reward of all his labors, and so mote it be.

        We have had quite a number of visitors during the past year, many of them from other States, and we have received many good suggestions and much encouragement in our work. We do hope that the Masons and others will continue to give us frequent visits and always give us freely and fully their suggestions as to what is wrong in the management and how to improve the conditions for the advancement and benefit of our orphan boys and girls.

        The health of our boys and girls has been very good indeed during the past year and for this great blessing also


Page 37

we are profoundly grateful to our Heavenly Father. Seldom have we had a case of serious sickness. The family seems quite healthy and happy.

        Only one death has occurred since my last report. Willie Freeman, of Oxford, a sweet little girl nearly seven years of age, passed into the great beyond after a few days sickness with fever. Willie's mother was with her child when the hour of death came. After impressive services in the Asylum chapel, the remains were followed by a number of our boys and girls to the Oxford Cemetery, the last resting place of our little friend. The same loving Father who has so long guarded the health of His children here, took this little one unto Himself. In this too, we know that He was wise, merciful and loving. Every such dispensation of Providence bears to us a lesson of life and its responsibility, of our duty to God and to our fellow-man, of the eternal life upon which we have already entered.

        If the boys and girls in the Oxford Orphan Asylum were simply fed, clothed, taught and trained to make a living, the work would not appeal so strongly to all lovers of God and humanity. Moral and religious instruction is of greatest importance. Man cannot live by bread alone. There is a higher life which must be nourished. May these our children be led up to truer conceptions of the meaning of their existence, to higher ideals and nobler purposes, to lives of unselfish, loving service. In the words of another, making a living is important, but making a life is more important.

        We hope and believe the work of the year has been greatly blessed to the furtherance of the interest of orphan children, to the progress of our institution, to the advancement of the kingdom of our Lord and Master.

        The almighty Father of the fatherless led to the inauguration of this work of rescue by the Masons of North Carolina. Under God's blessing the institution has attained its present proportions and beneficent influence. The co-operation and support given to the work by brethren and friends has been impelled by Him. Thanking Him for His protection and guidance in the past and, praying earnestly for His continued blessing, with more faith and hope and love, let us plan and strive and sacrifice to carry forward this great and important work for the orphan boys and girls of our State.

Respectfully submitted,

W. J. HICKS,
Superintendent.



Page 38

    Nanes of Children in the Asylum in 1900, and from what County

    • ALAMANCE COUNTY (5).

    • Groves, Ella
    • McPherson, Annie
    • McPherson, Robert
    • Thompson, DeWit
    • Thompson, James
    • ANSON COUNTY (5).

    • Jordan, William
    • Jordan, Visa
    • Jordan, Rosina
    • BEAUFORT COUNTY (1).

    • White, Clyde
    • BERTIE COUNTY (6).

    • Frances, Mary
    • Gillikin, Donald
    • Hopkins, Maud
    • Hughes, Cottie
    • Mitchell, Willie
    • Mitchell, Harry
    • BURKE COUNTY (6).

    • Abee, Carl
    • Abee, Eugene
    • Branch, Maggie
    • Branch, James
    • Kaylor, Lizzie
    • Wynn, Ned
    • CABARRUS COUNTY (7).

    • Barringer, Addie
    • Barringer, Georgia
    • Burris, Jonah
    • Harvell, Leroy
    • Lowder, Justice
    • Lowder, Dawson
    • Lowder, Nonie
    • CALDWELL COUNTY (4).

    • Medlock, John
    • Saunders, Adolphus
    • Saunders, Marshall
    • Saunders, Harrison
    • CARTERET COUNTY (4).

    • Hardesty, Grover
    • Stevens, Thomas
    • Stevens, Rubie
    • Stevens, Charlie
    • CASWELL COUNTY (2).

    • Tate, Maud
    • Warren, Bessie
    • CATABWA COUNTY (3).

    • Beard, Fred
    • Beard, Leroy
    • Daughtery, Willie
    • CHOWAN COUNTY (2).

    • Newbern, Sumter
    • Newbern, Ellington
    • CLEVELAND COUNTY (3).

    • Hays, Bertha
    • Hays, Julius
    • Pagenstacker, Bernard
    • CRAVEN COUNTY (1).

    • Pittman, Lizzie
    • COLUMBUS COUNTY (2).

    • Chauncey, Daisy
    • Rhorer, Mabel
    • CUMBERLAND COUNTY (2).

    • Branch, Lilia
    • Branch, Katie
    • CURRITUCK COUNTY (3).

    • Flora, Virginia
    • Flora, Bettie
    • Flora, Sadie
    • DARE COUNTY (2).

    • Ethridge, Virginia
    • Green, Mary
    • DAVIDSON COUNTY (2).

    • Lowe, Mabel
    • Lowe, Roscoe
    • DURHAM COUNTY (12).

    • Bordeaux, James
    • Bordeaux, Sudie
    • Bordeaux, Addie
    • Cole, Maggie
    • Cole, Dora
    • Cole, Willie
    • Cole, Frank
    • Faulkner, Willie
    • Partin, Mary
    • Partin, Odie
    • Ragan, Barnabus
    • Ragan, Hezekiah

    Page 39

    • DAVIE COUNTY (4).

    • Hellard, Willie
    • Hellard, Wiley
    • Hellard, Fred
    • Moore, Craft
    • DUPLIN COUNTY (1).

    • Saunders, Mary
    • FORSYTH COUNTY (6).

    • Barbee, Harry
    • Barbee, Samuel
    • Barbee, Seddon
    • Bowers, Eddie
    • King, Gilbert
    • McKnight, Frank.
    • GASTON COUNTY (5).

    • Clinard, Walter
    • Elmore, Henry
    • Elmore, Sue
    • McCall, Ernest
    • McCall, Annie
    • GRANVILLE COUNTY (10).

    • Blackley, Emma
    • Blackley, Foster
    • Freeman, Emily
    • Freeman, Willie
    • Harris, Maud
    • Harris, Roxie
    • Harris, Mary
    • Harris, William
    • Piper, Joe
    • Piper, Atlas
    • GUILFORD COUNTY (6).

    • Carroll, John
    • Otterbourg, Augusta
    • Otterbourg, Edna
    • Otterbourg, Raymond
    • Otterbourg, Leland
    • Wallace, Charles
    • HAYWOOD COUNTY (5).

    • Hines, Charlie
    • Renno, Tima
    • Renno, Eston
    • Renno, Cecil
    • Renno, Georgia
    • HALIFAX COUNTY (2)

    • Browne, Willie
    • Goswick, Willie
    • HERTFORD COUNTY (2).

    • Bazemore, Tulie
    • Bazemore, Sarah
    • IREDELL COUNTY (8).

    • Bailey, Victoria
    • Branch, Ivey
    • Branch, Jugurtha
    • Freeze, Frank
    • Hudson, Annie
    • Hudson, Cordie
    • Hudson, Fannie
    • Sherrill, Rector
    • JACKSON COUNTY (1).

    • Kirkendoll, Tarshy
    • JOHNSTON COUNTY (8).

    • Lancaster, Henrietta
    • Lancaster, Sallie
    • Lancaster, Boaz
    • Pool, May
    • Talton, Luna
    • Talton, Nettie
    • Talton, Cora
    • Wilson, Jesse
    • LENOIR COUNTY (15).

    • Benton, Nonie
    • Croom, Willie
    • Croom, Dennie
    • Croom, Netwood
    • Croom, Earl
    • Foy, Vivian
    • Grew, Rubie
    • Grew, Susie
    • Grew, Salem
    • Nobles, Auline
    • Oast, Bessie
    • Oast, James
    • Ward, Eva
    • Ward, Nellie
    • Ward, Irene
    • MECKLENBURG COUNTY (8).

    • Benton, Ruth
    • Benton, Chester
    • Harris, Osmyn
    • Jennings, Ola
    • Richardson, Pearl
      Page 40

    • Swicegood, Roy
    • Swicegood, Ben
    • Wehner, Otto
    • MOORE COUNTY (10).

    • Anderson, Josie
    • Buchanan, Winfred
    • Buchanan, Annie
    • McBride, Gertie
    • McPherson, Mollie
    • McPherson, Janie
    • Troutman, Cleo
    • Wicker, Tessa
    • Wicker, Ella
    • NASH COUNTY (4)

    • Barnes, Nannie
    • Barnes, Lillie
    • Pope, Mary
    • Pope, Ronald
    • NEW HANOVER COUNTY (2)

    • Howie, Jennie
    • Howie, Bessie
    • NORTHAMPTON COUNTY (4).

    • Mulder, Rachel
    • Mulder, Mary
    • Pope, Johnnie
    • Pope, Velma
    • ONSLOW COUNTY (1).

    • Frazelle, Hugh
    • ORANGE COUNTY (2).

    • McBride, Mittie
    • McBride, Maud
    • PAMLICO COUNTY (2).

    • Gibbs, Elma
    • Gibbs, May
    • PERSON COUNTY (8).

    • Frances, Joseph
    • Frances, Annie
    • Frances, Alex
    • Snipes, Ollie
    • Snipes, Hallie
    • Snipes, Calvin
    • Tapp, Ed
    • Tapp, George
    • PASQUOTANK COUNTY (2).

    • Giffin, John
    • Griffin, Raleigh
    • PERQUIMANS COUNTY (2).

    • Goodwin, Calla
    • Powell, Bessie
    • PITT COUNTY (11).

    • Blow, Thomas
    • Braxton, Janie
    • Braxton, James
    • Braxton, Pattie
    • Braxton, Nannie
    • Brown. Ben
    • Brown, Louis
    • Brown. Frank
    • Rawls, Hyman
    • Rawls, Claud
    • Rawls, Clara
    • RANDOLPH COUNTY (13).

    • Fentress, Lilla
    • Fentress, Joseph
    • Forrester, Nora
    • Forrester, Clem
    • Forrester, Clyde
    • Myrock, Ada
    • Myrock, Fred
    • Myrock, James
    • Parsons, Frances
    • Parsons, Willie
    • Parsons, Wesley
    • Russell, Corrina
    • Widdows, Lawrence
    • RICHMOND COUNTY (3).

    • Knight, Mary
    • Knight, Fannie
    • Knight, Earl
    • ROCKINGHAM COUNTY (10).

    • Barber, Mabel
    • Barber, Lottie
    • Barber, Iola
    • Ferguson, Archie
    • Ferguson, Robert
    • Howerton, James
    • Howerton, Peter
    • Howerton, George
    • Stevens, Hunter
    • Wilson, James
    • ROWAN COUNTY (4).

    • Brown, Mary
    • Brown, Agnes
    • Harrison, Floyd
    • Norris, Eva

    Page 41

    • SAMPSON COUNTY (1).

    • Herring, Annie
    • STOKES COUNTY (1).

    • Shaffer, Jerry
    • UNION COUNTY (6).

    • Fowler, Hoyle
    • Kee, Hiram
    • Kee, Frank
    • Kee, Eliza
    • Kee, James
    • Kee, John
    • VANCE COUNTY (6).

    • Hudson, Henry
    • Hudson, Robert
    • Wortham, Gholson
    • Wortham, Fannie
    • Wortham, Mary
    • Wortham, Kate
    • WAYNE COUNTY (9).

    • Creel, Laura
    • Cotton, John
    • King, Willie
    • Oliver, George
    • O'Berry, Margaret
    • O'Berry, Preston
    • Pike, Cora
    • Pike, Lillian
    • Pike, Lucile
    • WASHINGTON COUNTY (5).

    • Ausbon, Neva
    • Beasley, Clarence
    • Hardison, Sarah
    • Hardison, Theodore
    • Hardison, Golden
    • WAKE COUNTY (12).

    • Beemer, Walter
    • King, Ethel
    • King, Willie
    • Nixon, Nicholas
    • Porter, Nellie
    • Suggs, Nellie
    • Saunders, Judge
    • White, Will
    • White, Dave
    • White, Etta
    • White, Blanch
    • White, John
    • WILKES COUNTY (2).

    • Wiles, Shober
    • Mayberry, Maggie
    • WILSON COUNTY (4)

    • Graham, Lilla
    • West, Stella
    • West, Henry
    • West, Maggie
    • YADKIN COUNTY (1)

    • Ray, Everett
  • Total 280