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Annual Report of the Board of Directors and of the Superintendent
of the State's Prison, for the Year Ending December 31, 1894:

Electronic Edition.

North Carolina Penitentiary


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Source Description:
(binder) State's Prision: Reports 1873-96
(series) Annual Report of the Board of Directors and of the Superintendent of the State's Prison.
(title) Annual Report of the Board of Directors and of the Superintendent of the State's Prison, for the Year Ending December 31, 1894.
(caption) Annual Report of the North Carolina Penitentiary.
North Carolina Penitentiary
76 p.
Raleigh:
Josephus Daniels, State Printer and Binder. Presses of Edwards & Broughton.
1895.

Call number C365 N87p 1873-96 (North Carolina Collection, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill)



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ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
AND OF THE
SUPERINTENDENT OF THE STATE'S PRISON,
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1894.

NORTH CAROLINA PENITENTIARY.

RALEIGH:
JOSEPHUS DANIELS, STATE PRINTER AND BINDER.
PRESSES OF EDWARDS & BROUGHTON.
1895.


Page 2

        

        


Page 3

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE
NORTH CAROLINA PENITENTIARY.

REPORT OF DIRECTORS.

To His Excellency ELIAS CARR,
Governor of North Carolina:

        In accordance with the law, chapter 283, Acts of 1893, we respectfully submit our annual report of the State's Prison for the fiscal year ending December 31, 1894, showing the condition of the institution by the elaborate report of the able and efficient Superintendent hereto appended.

        The Board of Directors have, from time to time, compared the vouchers on file in Treasurer's office with Superintendent's report, and have approved same.

        The Board of Directors have made their semi-annual visits to the farms and camps, and find them under good discipline, and the prisoners well clothed and fed, and humanely treated in every particular.

We are, very respectfully,
Your obedient servants,

A. B. YOUNG,

D. N. BENNETT,

T. J. ARMSTRONG.



Page 4

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT
OF THE STATE'S PRISON FOR THE YEAR
ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1894.

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT,
RALEIGH, N. C., January 1, 1895.

To the Honorable The Board of Directors
of the North Carolina Penitentiary:

        Pursuant to Act of the General Assembly, chapter 283, of the Laws of 1893, creating the office of Superintendent of the State's Prison and defining the duties of the same, I have the honor to submit the following report for the year ending December 31, 1894:

GENERAL OPERATIONS.

        As indicated in my last annual report, the operations of the Penitentiary have been confined almost entirely to farming. About 80 per cent. of the prison population have been employed throughout the year upon the farms; namely, the Halifax, Northampton and Caledonia farms on the Roanoke River, and upon the Castle Hayne farm in New Hanover County, the force on this last farm being partly employed in mining phosphates.

        Small forces have also been engaged upon the works of the Roanoke Rapids Power Company above Weldon, and a small force for a short time upon work at the Rocky Monnt Mills. The remainder of the prisoners, being the life-sentence and some long-term convicts, and an ever-present number of feeble men and women utterly unavailable for any earning, are confined at the central Penitentiary, to the average aggregate of 150. Those here able to work are employed in brickmaking, shopwork, shoemaking, clothesmaking, laundering, gardening.


Page 5

        The farming operations being our main reliance for support, have been prosecuted with vigor and effect, in proportion to the means and forces in hand, and so far as the quantity of crops produced is evidence, they have accomplished good results.

        After gathering the crops of 1893, the forces were employed during the winter and early spring months, partly in strengthening and rebuilding the dikes injured or destroyed by the floods of the preceding fall, but mainly in clearing, ditching and reducing to cultivation large areas of forest land, both highland and lowland, the greater part of this work being on Caledonia farm. While the new area reduced to cultivation was not as much as we expected, new lands estimated at 1,600 acres were planted, leaving some 800 or 1,000 acres of forest land on the different farms yet to be reduced, and upon which the work is already well advanced.

AREA CULTIVATED.

        The area cultivated in 1894 on the different farms is estimated as follows:

        
Halifax farm, on Roanoke 1,350 acres.
Northampton farm, on Roanoke 2,150 acres.
Caledonia farm, on Roanoke 4,500 acres.
Castle Hayne farm, New Hanover Co 600 acres.

        Aggregating 8,600 acres in all crops.

        Upon this area about one thousand convicts were engaged in the work. There were used in the operations 226 mules and 37 horses.


Page 6

THE PRINCIPAL CROPS PRODUCED, COMPARED WITH THE
YEARS 1893 AND 1892.

Cotton, 2,012 450lb. bales, 905,213 lbs. 63 per cent. more than produced in 1893.
Cotton, 2,012 450lb. bales, 905,213 lbs. 200 per cent. more than produced in 1892.
Corn, 100,323 bushels 62 per cent. more than produced in 1893.
Corn, 100,323 bushels 81 per cent. more than produced in 1892.
Wheat, 11,301 bushels 258 per cent. more than produced in 1893.
Wheat, 11,301 bushels 438 per cent. more than produced in 1892.
Oats, 4,150 bushels 4,150 per cent. more than produced in 1893.
Oats, 4,150 bushels 21 per cent. more than produced in 1892.
Forage, 2,266,750 pounds 50 per cent. more than produced in 1893.
Forage, 2,266,750 pounds 17 per cent. more than produced in 1892.
Peas, 4,000 bushels 9 per cent. less than produced in 1893.
Peas, 4,000 bushels 5 per cent. more than produced in 1892.
Peanuts, 7,200 bushels 42 per cent. less than produced in 1893.
Peanuts, 7,200 bushels 40 per cent. less than produced in 1892.
Sorghum, 7,650 gallons 53 per cent. more than produced in 1893.
Sorghum, 7,650 gallons 7,650 per cent. more than produced in 1892.
Meat, 85,000 pounds 73 per cent. more than produced in 1893.
Meat, 85,000 pounds 143 per cent. more than produced in 1892.

        Possibly 33 per cent. can be added to the capacity of these farms, but that is about the limit, except it be by the improvement of soil and the increase of meat-producing animals.

        The result of the operations of each farm, as well as those of works other than farming, are exhibited by balance sheets appended herewith.

        For the work and management of the central Penitentiary, I beg to refer to the report of the Warden, and the balance sheet of the Penitentiary, herewith appended.

THE SANITARY CONDITIONS.

        It is especially gratifying to be able to report a considerable betterment of the sanitary condition of the different divisions and of the health of the population, and this notably in those places where there has been most suffering and loss from disease and mortality. The physicians say that the sickness of our people is mainly due to malaria. While it cannot be expected that this cause will ever be entirely removed, it is certain that great improvement has been made by the system of drainage already prosecuted to the extent of removing almost every lake and pool of stagnant water on the farms.


Page 7

        A further improvement may be, made, it is held by gentlemen of the medical profession, by a change of the supply of drinking water through deep-water wells or by cisterns. Some effort has been made in this direction by co-operation with the State Geological Board and otherwise, but so far without success. The effort should not be abandoned.

        For the details of health, disease and mortality, I beg to refer to the report of the Chief Physician and Surgeon, Dr. J. W. McGee.

THE GOVERNMENT OF THE PENITENTIARY.

        There probably never has been a period of two years during which the convicts have given less trouble. Some infractions of prison rules are always to be expected, and there have been some; but there has been no serious disorder, and no special difficulty in securing good conduct, orderly and efficient labor and safe control.

        While a consistent effort has been made to remove unnecessary asperities of prison life, it has not been forgotten that it was duty, first, to keep the prisoner at all hazards; second, to keep the prisoner employed at useful labor; third, in obedience to the Constitution, Article XI, Section II, to make the Penitentiary as nearly self-supporting as possible.

        As a rule, almost without exception, convict labor has been found well adapted and easy of control in the operations of farming, though at this business it is more expensive than at work within walls, on account of the greater number of employes required to guard and handle them.

RELIGIOUS PRIVILEGES.

        At the Central Penitentiary a religious service for the convicts is conducted by clergymen of the city four times every month on Sabbath afternoons. This is attended by


Page 8

all the convicts, and they seem to be careful and serious participants.

        A Sabbath School for the convicts is conducted every Sabbath afternoon the year round by a few self-denying gentlemen of the different churches in the city. This school has been maintained, it is learned, without interruption for about eighteen years, some of those now teaching in it having been with it during this entire period. It is believed that this work is not only helpful to the good order of the institution, but also influential to the moral improvement of individual prisoners.

        At the various outlying camps the religious opportunities have been neither regular nor sufficient. There is occasional preaching by the regular ministry of the different churches, and Bibles are furnished at the expense of the Penitentiary for those who can read. Books of religious songs, and some other literature, are provided.

        There ought to be a regular Chaplain to the Penitentiary, and one could with difficulty meet the requirements of the prison population, scattered as it is at present.

A REFORMATORY FOR JUVENILE CRIMINALS.

        There are convicts in the Penitentiary who came here at the age of nine years. There are here now fifty-five under the age of sixteen. Under the present almost unavoidable arrangements these juveniles associate with the older and hardened criminals, and may be expected to grow worse instead of better by such contact.

        Situated as the Penitentiary has been, engaged in a hard struggle for support, it has not been practicable to separate these boys and place them on a farm without ablebodied prisoners to supplement their labor. Many kinds of work they could not perform, and a farm for juveniles only would probably be an expensive charge. It seems greatly to be


Page 9

desired that this class of young criminals should be separated from the others, and that some systematic effort be made for the reformation of these youths who alone give much promise of success in that way.

WHAT THE PENITENTIARY NEEDS FOR 1895 AND 1896.

        We have raised large crops. We have increased the quantity of products to the utmost limit within the time. But we could not control the price of our products or prevent the loss in values. The decline in prices has reduced the value of our crops $30,000 at least. We have used $25,000 appropriated by the last General Assembly, and $25,000 only, in the last two years. This appropriation was expended mainly because of losses by floods in 1893, and to pay for ninety-six mules and other requisites for the equipment of our increased farming. With the exception of this $25,000 we have lived upon our own earnings, without another dollar of tax money, and are here at the end of 1894 with a debt of $14,188.71 now due. This is not a deficit, for our assets in surplus material, convertible into money at a reasonable valuation, together with our bills collectible, amount to $44,000. If our surplus stuffs, corn, cotton, forage, bricks, etc., could be converted into spot cash, and we could collect our bills at once, we could pay our debts and leave a balance to start us into the year 1895. But these stuffs, most of them, cannot be sold for cash now, except at a sacrifice; neither can our bills be all collected at once; and further, if our surplus were cash in hand it would suffice only for about three months' support.

        The Penitentiary should earn in work other than farming two month's support from January to October, when another crop will mature. This leaves four months in which to live only by creating a debt.

        The Penitentiary, on account of indebtedness now due, needs a special appropriation of $15,000, and in addition


Page 10

a regular appropriation of $35,000 to carry it without debt to October, 1895. Then if a good crop has been made, and there is not another decline in the price of products, or other similar disaster, that crop ought to support the institution till October, 1896. But disaster may come, flood, fire, or decline in prices, and, therefore, there should be a contingent appropriation for 1896.

PENITENTIARY APPROPRIATIONS AND PAY ROLLS.

        For the information of those concerned, I submit here tables of the appropriations and pay rolls of the Penitentiary for a series of years.

        
1883Appropriation$ 75,000 00
1884Appropriation75,000 00
1885Appropriation135,232 59
1886Appropriation121,900 00
1887Appropriation100,000 00
1888Appropriation100,000 00
1889Appropriation75,000 00
1890Appropriation75,000 00
1891An average of 37,500 00 for the four years, 1889-1892 
1892 
1893Appropriation12,500 00
1894Appropriation12,500 00

        
1885Pay Rolls$ 50,617 85
1886Pay Rolls56,780 61
1887Pay Rolls65,201 00
1888Pay Rolls71,079 99
1889Pay Rolls66,088 08
1890Pay Rolls63,302 89
1891Pay Rolls61,335 85
1892Pay Rolls56,884 43
1893Pay Rolls51,337 83
1894Pay Rolls48,565 70

        Appended you will find exhibits, statements and tables, giving information as to

        In the balance sheets, showing the profit and loss of each


Page 11

division, the value of machinery, tools and fixtures has not been estimated, because this is practically the same from year to year, the wear and tear being counterbalanced by the additional plant necessarily provided from time to time.

        In concluding this report, I desire to express my grateful appreciation of the assistance derived from the generous and wise counsel frequently given by His Excellency Governor Carr. I remember also with thanks the helpful and accommodating treatment accorded by the State Treasurer.

        In your capacity as members of the Board of Directors, I could not have desired a fuller or more efficient co-operation than you have given me.

        I do not forget that whatever of success has attended our efforts, very great credit is due to the faithful and efficient corps of officers and employes, who with rare exceptions have come up to the full measure of their duty.

Respectfully submitted,

A. LEAZAR.



Page 12

EXHIBIT A.

BALANCE SHEET OF THE PENITENTIARY FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 1894.

To bills audited for expenses from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 $137,741 36
To amount of farm products consumed during the year 40,302 37
To value of live stock January 1, 1894 21,277 00
To bills due and accruing January 1, 1894 14,985 08
To cash in Treasury, bank and drawer 4,767 35

BY RESOURCES BY OPERATIONS, BY SALE OF PRODUCTS, IN CROPS NOT SOLD, ETC., VIZ.:

Earnings during the year   $107,775 58
Value of farm products, excluding sales   95,110 97
Value of live stock January 1, 1895   29,438 00
Value of bricks made and for sale   9,675 00
Value of wagons made and on hand (1 dozen)   600 00
Bills due and accruing   16,430 65
Cash in bank and Treasury   4,250 61
To balance $ 44,207 65  
  $263,280 81 $263,280 81


        NOTE.--As a manifest of this balance, the Penitentiary has on hand surplus crops and other resources as follows:

        
Corn $18,000 00
Cotton 4,500 00
Peanuts 2,750 00
Forage 3,000 00
Brick and new wagons 10,000 00
Bills solvent beyond doubt 5,750 00
Total $44,000 00
Against this there is an outstanding debt now due of 14,188 71



Page 13

EXHIBIT B.

STATE TREASURY.

Balance in Treasury January 1, 1894 $ 3,545 25  
Deposited in 1894 103,531 49  
Transferred from bank 4,559 33  
Drawn on appropriation 15,000 00  
Total   $126,636 07
Vouchers audited in 1894, paid   123,552 65
Balance in Treasury January, 1895   $ 3,083 42
Vouchers audited in 1894, but unpaid Jan. 1, 1895 $ 14,188 71  

CASH.

Balance in drawer January 1, 1894 $ 124 55  
Collected in 1894 106,868 82  
Total   $106,993 37
Deposited in Treasury $103,531 49  
Deposited in bank 3,461 88  
Total deposits   $106,993 37

NATIONAL BANK OF RALEIGH.

Balance in bank January 1, 1894 $ 2,264 64  
Deposits in 1894 3,461 88  
Total   $ 5,726 52
Transfers to Treasury   4,559 33
Balance in bank January 1, 1895   $ 1,167 19


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WARDEN'S REPORT.

HON. A. LEAZAR, Superintendent State's Prison.

        SIR--I have the honor to submit the following report as Warden for the year ending December 31, 1894:

        The general conduct of the prisoners during the year has been good, and general quiet and good order have been maintained.

        We have a great many young prisoners who might be reclaimed, if separated entirely from the more hardened and vicious criminals and confined in a well-conducted Reform School.

        The operations here have been confined to the brickyard, shoe shop, machine shop, laundry and garden. We have made and burned about 1,400,000 brick, and have now on hand 1,500,000; we have, also, about 425,000 unburned. We have manufactured 4,328 pairs of shoes, enough for our whole prison population; we have, also, done a great deal in the repairing line. We have put up twenty-four two-horse wagons and twenty-five brick wheelbarrows for our own use. We have done, also, the general repairing. We have done the laundering for more than one hundred students of the A. and M. College, and for several private families of the city.

        We have about ten acres in garden, worked by the old and decrepit, on which has been produced vegetables enough to supply the prison population for several months, and worth, at least, fifty dollars per acre.

        I cannot conclude this report without acknowledging my sincere thanks for your uniform courtesy and kindness.

All of which is respectfully submitted.

JNO. M. FLEMING,
Warden.



Page 15

PHYSICIAN'S REPORT.

PENITENTIARY.

HON. A. LEAZAR, Superintendent State's Prison.

        I have the honor to submit my annual report of the medical department of the Penitentiary, and farms under its management, for the year 1894.

        There were 97 prisoners classed unsound when admitted into prison, and of this number the health of 23 was in such condition that it was necessary to place them in the hospital for treatment. There were, during the year, the following surgical operations, viz.: Extraction of ball, 1; perineal abscess, 1; scrotal fistula, 1; urethral stricture, 2; aspiration of chest, 3; incised wounds, 2.

        The following table will exhibit the class and number of cases of sickness treated, and the result. You will notice that there were very few cases of acute disease treated, and that all the deaths, except three, were from chronic incurable troubles. There were 36 returned from the farms broken down by constitutional and malarial diseases; 8 of these still remain in the hospital, 9 died, and 19 were sent out for light duty on the yard and in the buildings.

DISEASES.

Class of Diseases. No. Cases.
Malarial 44
Typhoid 1
Catarrhal 1
Consumption 13
Bronchitis 2
Pneumonia 1
Pulmonary Hemorrhage 3
Hæmoptisis 2
Chronic Pleurisy 3
Neuralgia 3
Rheumatism 13
General Debility 16
Dropsy 2
Ascitis 3
Bright's Disease 2
Diabetes 1
Heart Disease 7
Aneurism Aorta 1
Synovitis 2
Varicose Veins 1


Page 16

DISEASES.

Class of Diseases. No. Cases.
Syphilis 7
Gonorrhoea 1
Masturbation 1
Constipation 3
Diarrhoea 14
Dysentery 7
Dyspepsia 2
Ophthalmia 3
Anæmia 1
La Grippe 4
Biliousness 1
Skin Disease 4
Itch 4
Bromidrosis 1
Jaundice 2
Tonsilitis 1
Otalgia 1
Cholera Morbus 2
Child Birth 1
Malingering 6
Apoplexy 1
Hemorrhoids 1
Enlarged Spleen 1

SURGICAL.

  No. Cases.
Boil 1
Wounds incised and contused, 5
Extraction of ball 1
Fracture of fibula 1
Abscess of hand 2
Abscess of Perineal 1
Fistula Scrotum 1
Stricture Urethra 3
Aspiration of chest 3

DEATHS.

NAME. Sex. Color. CAUSE OF DEATH. REMARKS.
Callie Shoemaker F W Tumor of Brain  
Maggie Winn F C Pneumonia  
B. G. Cole M W Senile Debility  
D. Simmons M C Consumption Returned from Caledonia.
James Emmerson M C Diabetes Sick when admitted.
Ashley Hayes M C Consumption Returned from Castle Hayne.
Ed. Peden M C Consumption Returned from Castle Hayne.
Bill Dixon M C Apoplexy  
Bully Mills M C Ascitis Returned from Halifax farm.
Peter Wilson M C Senile Debility Sick when admitted.
Jere Hamilton M C Consumption Returned from Caledonia.
John Lindsey M C Consumption  
James Bell M C Bright's Disease Sick when admitted.
George Foreman M C Tuberculosis Returned from Caledonia.
Wm. Crowell M C Consumption Sick when admitted.
Finley Bell M C Bright's Disease Returned from Caledonia.
Randolph King M C Consumption Returned from Halifax farm.
John Ausbrook M C Consumption Returned from Caledonia.


Page 17

HALIFAX FARM.

        At Halifax farm the sanitary conditions have so markedly improved since its establishment several years ago that in the future we may confidently hope to see malarial diseases almost abolished from all the quarters on the river. The force here is made up of both male and female prisoners, many of them debilitated by disease. I append a table showing the number and class of diseases treated.

DISEASES.

Class of Diseases. No. Cases.
Tonsilitis 5
Rheumatism 5
Catarrh 7
Diarrhoea 9
Catarrhal Fever 20
Intermittent Fever 76
La Grippe 1
Asthma 6
Consumption 2
Remittent Fever 2
Bright's Disease 2
Bronchitis 2
Debility 3
Fracture of Femor 1
Biliousness 2
Miscellaneous 9
Neuralgia 1
Pneumonia 2
Dropsy 1
Epileptic 1
Dysentery 4
Amenorrhoea 2
Metrorhagia 1
Abscess 3
Incised Wound 1
Contused Wound 1
Bone Felon 1
Furuncle 1
Fractured Rib 1
Overheat 1
Childbirth 1

DEATHS.

Name, Sex and Color. Cause of Death.
Lewis Burton, colored male Pneumonia.
M. Ratliff, colored male Valvular Disease of Heart.

NORTHAMPTON FARM.

        The reports from the quarters at Northampton farm have also shown improvement. These quarters, and those at Halifax, were under the medical direction of Dr. Gee from


Page 18

their establishment until his death, in March, since which time they have had the supervision of Dr. G. H. West.

        Please see table of diseases as reported.

DISEASES.

Class of Diseases. No. Cases.
Abscess 10
Incised Wound 2
Colic 6
Boils 11
Tonsilitis 2
Vertigo 2
Catarrh 22
Chills 248
Remittent Fever 1
General Debility 1
Diarrhoea 19
Rheumatism 8
Scabies 1
Muscular Straining 5
Bronchitis 12
Neuralgia 5
Biliousness 27
Rupture 3
Phthisis 4
Cystitis 1
Congestion of Lungs 1
Dropsy 1
Sunstroke 1

DEATH.

Name. Cause of Death.
William Goss Phthisis.

DIKING FORCE.

        Bradshaw's diking force, about the first of March, was moved away from Northampton farm. During the two months they were here 142 cases of sickness were reported; no deaths.

GREAT FALLS CANAL.

        In June new quarters were established at the Great Falls Canal with a force of prisoners, most of whom were unaccustomed to the work required of them, and quite a severe epidemic of malarial, bronchial and intestinal troubles prevailed among them. Happily, this condition of affairs soon passed away. The appended table exhibits the class and number of cases treated.


Page 19

DISEASES.

Class of Diseases. No. Cases.
Chills 163
Dysentery 13
Abscess Palmar 7
Bilious 3
Torpid Liver 3
Incised Wound 1
Diarrhoea 35
Bronchitis 15
Neuralgia 4
Remittent Fever 3
Dropsy 1

CASTLE HAYNE.

        At Castle Hayne malarial troubles have prevailed to a considerable extent, and also La Grippe. Dr. Loftin says that "owing to an epidemic of grippe with which the force at this place suffered in January, and an unprecedented malarial season in the months of August, September and October, the percentage of sickness has been very great throughout the year. But while the percentage of sickness has been large the mortality has been very small, having had but one death which could in any way be attributed to locality or occupation."

        I append a table showing the cases, deaths, and cause of death as reported to me.

DISEASES.

Class of Diseases. No. Cases.
LaGrippe 27
Pneumonia 1
Malarial 195
Accidents 5
Conjunctivitis 1
Ulcer 1
Consumption 1
Cardiac Disease 2
Boils 1
Bronchial Trouble 6
Surgical 11
Rheumatism 1

DEATHS.

Name. Cause of Death.
Wm. McBayne Abscess of Kidney.
Miles Partee Continued Malarial Fever.
Wm. Pettaway Phthisis Pulmonalis.


Page 20

CALEDONIA FARMS.

        The Caledonia farms under the medical supervision of Dr. Furgerson have steadily improved in health conditions. The occupancy of the new quarters early in the year operated as a factor, as it always does, in causing quite a large sick list, and consequent large death roll.

        The accompanying table will show the class of cases, and the cause of death as reported to me by Dr. Furgerson.

DISEASES.

Class of Diseases. No. Cases.
Consumption 13
Contused Wounds 16
Abscess 15
Furuncle 10
Carbuncle 7
Incised Wounds 21
Gastritis 3
Chills 901
Pneumonia 44
La Grippe 66
Hemorrhoids 15
Rheumatism 12
Bronchitis 13
Diarrhoea 151
Abrasion 1
Malarial Fever 30
Surgical 1
Colic 4
Sprain 7
Debility 14
Erysipelas 1
Amblyopia 2
Hernia 5
Jaundice 3
Chilblains 4
Catarrh 9
Fracture of Hand 1
Hepatitis 1
Burn 1
Cramp 1
Scrofula 2
Tonsilitis 4
Dog-bite 1
Inflamed Jaw 1
Inflamed Arm 1
Extract Ball 1
Hydrocele 5
Conjunctivitis 7
Heart Disease 1
Dysentery 32
Shingles 3
Biliousness 419
Pleurisy 3
Bone Felon 2
Poison Oak 7
Dropsy 10
Locomotor Ataxia 1
Syphilis 2
Hernicrania 1
Ulcerated Sore Throat 1
Hemorrhage of Lungs 1
Neuralgia 8
Kidney trouble 1


Page 21

DEATHS.

Name. Cause of Death.
Lee Turner Consumption.
Freeman Howard Consumption.
Jul Forney Scrofula.
John Wood, alias Gibson Consumption, Syphilitic.
John Thomas Pneumonia.
John Phillips Pneumonia.
Wm. Johnson Continued Malarial Fever.
Ed. McPherson Continued Malarial Fever.
Charles Moore Suddenly.
Atwood Boney Continued Malarial Fever and Bronchitis.
J. E. Harrell Pneumonia.
Dock Howard Pneumonia.
John Stutz Broncho Pneumonia.
Marshall Glover Pneumonia.
Ed. Stanley Pneumonia.
Wm. Williams Pneumonia.
Dick Branch Pneumonia.
Marcus Bowman Pneumonia.
John Trexlar Pneumonia.
John Hunley Consumption.
John Robinson Consumption.
Joseph Fails Chronic Diarrhoea.
Ed. Davis Continued Malarial Fever.
Jiles Williamson Continued Malarial Fever and Pneumonia.
Frank Ferrebee Continued Malarial Fever.
Wm. Saunders Strangulated Hernia.
Finley Gragg Chronic Nephoitis.
A. Barnhardt Gunshot while attempting to escape.
James McPherson Pneumonia.

        In the official visit which I made to the several quarters on the Roanoke during the month of June I found the health of the prisoners very good, a few only being in the hospitals. Sanitary affairs were carefully attended to. The quarters were neat and clean and well ventilated, special care being taken to prevent the accumulation of dust on and under the bunks. I was specially impressed by the air of tidiness and comfort of the hospitals, and the intelligent interest manifested by the convict stewards in keeping


Page 22

them so. Since my connection with the Penitentiary, I have never seen hospitals and quarters so neatly kept.

        The medical service by competent physicians, Drs. West and Furgerson, is faithfully and well rendered, and I believe everything possible is being done to preserve the health and lives of the prisoners.

        I have met with only the kindest co-operation from the officers of the prison in the discharge of my duty as Penitentiary Physician, and from everyone connected with the hospital force the most faithful and considerate help.

With much respect,
Your obedient servant,

J. W. McGEE, M. D.,
Physician.



Page 23

STATEMENT A.

CALEDONIA FARM.

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 $ 49,700 45  
Value of articles received from Penitentiary and other divisions from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 10,022 19  
Pro rata share of general officers' salaries 3,472 81  
Total   $ 63,195 45
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1894.
1 Jack $ 100 00  
9 Horses, at $75 675 00  
60 Mules, at $100 6,000 00  
7 Milch Cows, at $15 105 00  
7 Calves, at $2 14 00  
10 Yearlings, at $5 50 00  
30 Sows and Boar, at $8 240 00  
75 Fat Hogs, at $7 525 00  
50 Shotes, at $3 150 00  
100 Pigs, at $1 100 00  
3 Colts (2 years old), at $75 225 00  
2 Colts (1 year old), at $40 80 00  
Total   $ 8,264 00
Crops, etc., on hand January 1, 1894.
2,000 bushels peas, at 50 cts $ 1,000 00  
13,642 pounds cotton seed, at 16½ cts 2,250 93  
16,000 pounds cotton, at 7 cts 1,120 00  
29,400 bushels corn, at 45 cts 13,230 00  
467,240 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 1,168 10  
75,000 pounds fodder (unbaled), at 50 cts 375 00  
472 bales fodder, at 60 cts 283 20  
2,900 bushels peanuts, at 50 cts 1,450 00  
500 bushels turnips, at 20 cts 100 00  
6 barrels molasses, at $12.50 75 00  
42,000 pounds hay, at 50 cts 210 00  
75,000 pounds seed clover, yielded 57 bushels seed, at $6 342 00  
60,000 pounds wheat straw, at 25 cts 150 00  
Carried forward $ 21,754 23  


Page 24

Brought forward $ 21,754 23  
4,000 pounds pork, at 7 cts 280 00  
2 beef hides, at $2.50 5 00  
Provisions and supplies 391 29  
100,000 feet lumber, at 50 cts 500 00  
Total   $ 22,930 52
Total debits   $ 94,389 97

CREDITS.

Value of articles transferred to Penitentiary and other divisions $ 52 28  
Sales of crops charged as on hand Jan. 1, 1894 6,822 77  
Total   $ 6,875 05
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1895.
121 Mules, at $100 $ 12,100 00  
12 Horses, at $75 900 00  
2 2-year-old Mule Colts, at $75 150 00  
2 1-year-old Mule Colts, at $35 70 00  
1 Jack 100 00  
11 Milch Cows, at $15 165 00  
2 Bulls, at $15 30 00  
1 Steer 15 00  
5 Yearlings, at $5 25 00  
50 Sows, at $8 400 00  
1 Boar, at $8 8 00  
80 Shotes, at $3 240 00  
95 Pigs, at $1 95 00  
181 Fat Hogs, at $7 1,267 00  
Total   $ 15,565 00
Provisions and Supplies on Hand Jan. 1, 1895   1,230 32
Building Material.
300,000 feet lumber, at 50 cts 1,500 00  
30,000 cypress shingles, at $3 90 00  
Total   $ 1,590 00
Crops, etc., produced during the Year 1894.
527,779 pounds cotton, at 4.59 cts $ 24,247 45  
56,272 bushels corn, at 50 cts 28,136 00  
5,803 bushels wheat, at 51 cts 2,959 53  
1,175 bushels peas, at 60 cts 705 00  
Carried forward $ 56,047 98  


Page 25

Brought forward $ 56,047 98  
34,371 bushels cotton seed, at 16½ cts 5,671 21  
3,500 gallons molasses, at 25 cts 875 00  
581,506 pounds fodder, at 50 cts 2,907 53  
556,000 lbs. hay (orchard grass and clover),at 50c 2,780 00  
20,000 pounds hay (meadow), at 331/3 cts 66 67  
360,040 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 900 10  
92,800 pounds wheat straw, at 25 cts 232 00  
15 bushels clover seed, at $6 90 00  
9,000 pounds pork, at 5 cts 450 00  
1,000 pounds beef, at 5 cts 50 00  
2,500 bushels sweet potatoes, at 25 cts 625 00  
Total   $ 70,695 49
Garden Crops.
30 acres, at $70   $ 2,100 00
Growing Crops.
450 acres wheat, at $5 $ 2,250 00  
50 acres oats, at $5 250 00  
50 acres grass, at $5 250 00  
Total   $ 2,750 00
Work for North Carolina Lumber Company   551 06
Sundry earnings other than from sale of farm products   242 65
Total credits   $101,599 57
Total debits   94,389 97
Profit   $ 7,209 60


        NOTE--

Permanent Improvements.

3 new corn barns, at $300 $ 900 00  
3 sheds, to shelter men and animals on different parts of farm, at $50 150 00  
New quarters at Camp No. 2, including headquarters, overseers and guards' quarters, prison quarters, hospital, commissary, cook and washhouses, stables, cribs, etc 5,900 00  
1,200 acres forest land cleared, ditched and reduced to cultivation, at $15 18,000 00  
300 acres forest land cut down, at $5 1,500 00  
2,880 days' work on dike, at 39 cts 1,123 20  
1,060 days' work building roads outside farms to Halifax and Tillery 413 40  
Total permanent improvements   $ 27,986 60



Page 26

STATEMENT B.

NORTHAMPTON FARM.

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 $ 20,109 76  
Value of articles received from Penitentiary and other divisions from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 3,974 18  
Pro rata share of general officers' salaries 1,344 89  
Total   $ 25,428 83
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1894.
62 Mules, at $75 $ 4,650 00  
6 Horses, at $75 450 00  
1 Stallion 200 00  
4 3-year old Colts, at $75 300 00  
1 1-year old Colt 25 00  
34 Cows, at $12.50 425 00  
6 Steers, at $12.50 75 00  
1 Yoke Oxen 30 00  
10 Yearlings, at $5 50 00  
10 Calves, at $2 20 00  
37 Sows, at $8 296 00  
70 Other Hogs, at $6 420 00  
103 Pigs, at $1 103 00  
Total   $ 7,044 00
Crops, etc., on hand January 1, 1894.
143,722 pounds cotton, sold for $ 8,343 05  
3,700 bushels cotton seed, at 16½ cts 610 50  
1,500 bushels peas, at 50 cts 750 00  
50 bushels navy beans, $1.50 75 00  
2,416 bushels peanuts, at 50 cts 1,208 00  
1,250 bushels wheat, at 60 cts 750 00  
240,000 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 600 00  
70,000 pounds fodder, at 50 cts 350 00  
54,000 pounds hay, at 50 cts 270 00  
31,500 pounds wheat straw, at 25 cts 78 75  
10,355 bushels corn (good), at 45 cts 4,659 75  
7,650 bushels corn (damaged), at 25 cts 1,912 50  
Carried forward $ 19,607 55  


Page 27

        
Brought forward $ 19,607 55  
11,420 pounds pork, at 7 cts 799 40  
19 hides, at $1.50 28 50  
29 barrels molasses, at $12.50 362 50  
Provisions and supplies 923 17  
Total   $ 21,721 12
Total debits   $ 54,193 95

CREDITS.

Value of articles transferred to Penitentiary and other divisions $ 2,753 01  
Sales of crops charged as on hand Jan. 1, 1894- 10,690 11  
Total   $ 13,443 12
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1895.
62 Mules, at $75 $ 4,650 00  
6 Horses, at $75 450 00  
1 Stallion 200 00  
2 Colts, at $50 100 00  
34 Cows, at $12.50 425 00  
2 Bulls, at $15 30 00  
7 Oxen, at $15 105 00  
9 Yearlings, at $5 45 00  
16 Calves, at $2 32 00  
75 Fat Hogs, at $9 675 00  
25 Sows, at $8 200 00  
97 Shotes, at $3 291 00  
51 Pigs, at $1 51 00  
1 Boar, at $8 8 00  
Total   $ 7,262 00
Provisions and supplies on hand Jan. 1, 1895   1,402 15
Crops, etc., produced during 1894.
208,433 pounds cotton, at 4.55 cts $ 9,483 70  
28,400 bushels corn, at 50 cts 12,200 00  
4,398 bushels wheat, at 51 cts 2,242 98  
520 bushels peanuts, at 75 cts 390 00  
1,925 bushels peas, at 60 cts 1,155 00  
85 bushels navy beans, at $1.50 127 50  
1,500 bushels oats, at 40 cts 600 00  
13,652 bushels cotton-seed, at 14 cts 1,911 28  
59 barrels molasses, at $12.50 737 50  
Carried forward $ 28,847 96  


Page 28

        
Brought forward $ 28,847 96  
241,800 pounds fodder, at 50 cts 1,209 00  
99,000 pounds pea-vine hay, at 50 cts 495 00  
43,000 pounds grass and clover hay, at 50 cts 215 00  
170,400 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 852 00  
80,000 pounds wheat and oat straw, at 25 cts 200 00  
5,000 pounds peanut hay, at 25 cts 12 50  
15,840 pounds pork, at 5 cts 792 00  
2,133 pounds beef, at 5 cts 106 65  
1,500 bushels sweet potatoes, at 25 cts 375 00  
4 barrels pickles, at $5 20 00  
1,990 gallons milk, at 10 cts 199 00  
1,095 pounds butter, at 20 cts 219 00  
Total   $ 33,543 11
Garden Crops.
20 acres, at $70   1,400 00
Growing Crops.
250 acres wheat, at $5 $ 1,250 00  
80 acres oats, at $5 400 00  
Total   1,650 00
Sundry earnings, other than from sale of farm products   652 07
Total credits   $ 59,352 45
Total debits   54,193 95
Profits   $ 5,158 50


        NOTE--

Permanent Improvements.

Building corn barns $ 400 00  
Building ferry boat 150 00  
Repairing quarters 214 00  
Clearing, ditching and reducing to cultivation 50 acres forest land, at $12.50 625 00  
Cleaning up for cultivation 50 acres, at $5 250 00  
5,103 days' work on dike, at 41 cts 2,092 23  
Total permanent improvements   $ 3,731 23



Page 29

STATEMENT C.

HALIFAX FARM.

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 $ 13,388 76  
Value of articles received from Penitentiary and other divisions from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 2,543 41  
Pro rata share of general officers' salaries 884 64  
Total   $ 16,816 81
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1894.
9 Horses, at $75 $ 675 00  
3 Fillies, at $75 225 00  
2 Colts, at $50 100 00  
29 Mules, at $65 1,885 00  
23 Hogs, at $8 184 00  
35 Fat hogs, at $8 280 00  
59 Pigs and Shotes, at $2.50 147 50  
62 Sheep, at $3.50 217 00  
20 Lambs, at $1 20 00  
41 Head cattle 490 50  
Total   $ 4,224 00
Crops, etc., on hand January 1, 1894.    
76,055 pounds cotton (sold for) $ 4,811 07  
1,947 bushels cotton seed, at 16½ cts 321 25  
3,250 bushels corn (good) at 45 cts 1,462 50  
250 bushels corn (damaged) at 25 cts 62 50  
346 bushels wheat, at 60 cts 207 60  
16 bushels rice, at 50 cts 8 00  
62,750 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 156 87  
9,000 pounds fodder, at 50 cts 45 00  
406 pounds wool, at 15 cts 60 90  
4,683 pounds pork, at 7 cts 327 81  
11 hides, at $1.50 16 50  
Provisions and supplies 552 13  
Total $ 8,032 13  
Total Debits   $ 29,072 94


Page 30

CREDITS.

Value of articles transferred to Penitentiary and other divisions from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 $ 1,072 78  
Sale of crops, charged as on hand Jan. 1, 1894 5,071 32  
Total   $ 6,144 10
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1895.
26 Mules, at $75 $ 1,950 00  
9 Horses, at $75 675 00  
2 2-year old colts, at $60 120 00  
2 Mule colts (6 months old) at $35 70 00  
10 Oxen, at $15 150 00  
27 Cows, at $12.50 337 50  
9 Calves, at $4 36 00  
1 Bull, at $15 15 00  
70 Sheep, at $3.50 245 00  
40 Fat hogs, at $7 280 00  
53 Sows, at $8 424 00  
3 Boars, at $8 24 00  
87 Shotes and pigs, at $2.50 217 50  
Total   $ 4,544 00
Crops, etc., produced during 1894.
150,572 pounds cotton, at 4.76 cts $ 7,170 01  
12,272 bushels corn, at 50 cts 6,136 00  
1,100 bushels wheat, at 51 cts 561 00  
875 bushels peas, at 60 cts 525 00  
2,500 bushels oats, at 40 cts 1,000 00  
1,200 gallons molasses, at 25 cts 300 00  
10,038 bushels cotton seed, at 14 cts 1,405 32  
125,950 pounds fodder, at 50 cts 629 75  
20,000 pounds cut corn forage, at 40 cts 80 00  
50,000 pounds clover hay, at 50 cts 250 00  
20,800 pounds wheat and oat straw, at 25 cts 52 00  
6,696 pounds pork, at 5 cts 334 80  
1,035 pounds beef and mutton, at 5 cts 51 75  
250 pounds wool, at 15 cts 37 50  
3,000 gallons milk, at 10 cts 300 00  
650 pounds butter, at 20 cts 130 00  
1,200 bushels sweet potatoes, at 25 cts 300 00  
87,500 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 218 75  
Total   $ 19,481 88


Page 31

        
Garden Crops.
18 acres, at $70   $ 1,260 00
Growing Crops.
75 acres wheat, at $5 $ 375 00  
275 acres oats, at $5 1,375 00  
10 acres grass and clover, at $5 50 00  
Total   $ 1,800 00
Provisions and supplies on hand Jan. 1, 1895   473 46
Sundry earnings other than from sale of farm products   289 41
Total credits   $ 33,992 85
Total debits   29,072 94
Profit   $ 4,919 91


        NOTE:

Permanent Improvements.

Repairing quarters $ 300 00
Building ox barn 30 00
Building cookroom 50 00
Clearing, ditching and reducing to cultivation 125 acres forest land, at $13 1,625 00
Ditching and reducing to cultivation 75 acres waste land, at $6.50 487 50
Total permanent improvements $ 2,492 50


STATEMENT D.

CASTLE HAYNE FARM AND MINE.

        

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 $ 7,387 16  
Value of articles received from Penitentiary and other division from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 1,178 05  
Pro rata share of general officers' salaries 400 48  
Total   $ 8,965 69


Page 32

        
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1894.
18 Mules, at $75 $ 1,350 00  
1 Bull 15 00  
5 Cows, at $14 70 00  
5 Yearlings, at $4 20 00  
75 Hogs, at $3 225 00  
Total   $ 1,680 00
Crops, etc., on hand January 1, 1894.
7,250 bushels peanuts, at 40 cts $ 3,000 00  
3,540 bushels corn, at 45 cts 1,593 00  
200 bushels peas, at 60 cts 120 00  
75,000 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 187 50  
325,000 pounds peanut vines, at 25 cts 812 50  
40,000 pounds fodder, at 50 cts 200 00  
2,000 pounds hay, at 50 cts 10 00  
7,300 pounds pork, at 7 cts 511 00  
2 beef hides, at $1.50 3 00  
Provisions and supplies 278 38  
Total   $ 6,715 38
Total debits   $ 17,361 07

CREDITS.

Sale of crops charged as on hand Jan. 1, 1894   $ 4,193 66
Crops, etc., produced during 1894.
18,429 pounds cotton, at 4.98 cts $ 919 76  
3,379 bushels corn, at 50 cts 1,689 50  
6,600 bushels peanuts, at 40 cts 2,640 00  
100 bushels peas, at 60 cts 60 00  
1,250 bushels cotton seed, at 12⅘ cts 159 75  
1,100 bushels sweet potatoes, at 25 cts 275 00  
300 barrels Irish potatoes, at $2.64 792 00  
47,923 pounds fodder, at 50 cts 239 61  
360,000 pounds peanut vines, at 25 cts 900 00  
49,982 pounds shucks, at 25 cts 124 95  
3,750 pounds hay, at 50 cts 18 75  
3,492 pounds pork, at 5 cts 174 60  
466 pounds beef, at 5 cts 23 30  
Total   $ 8,017 22


Page 33

        

Garden Crops.

4 acres, at $70   $ 280 00
Provisions and supplies on hand Jan. 1, 1895   98 64
Earnings by work in mine from January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895   8,280 32
Live Stock on hand January 1, 1895.
7 Mules, at $75 $ 1,275 00  
5 Cows, at $14 70 00  
1 Bull 15 00  
2 Yearlings, at $5 10 00  
6 Calves, at $2 12 00  
21 Fat Hogs, at $8 168 00  
41 Shotes, at $3 123 00  
20 Sows, at $5 100 00  
1 Boar 8 00  
34 Pigs, at $1 34 00  
Total   $ 1,815 00
Total credits   $ 22,684 84
Total debits   17,361 07
Profit   $ 5,323 77


Page 34

STATEMENT E.

CENTRAL PENITENTIARY.

        

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from Jan. 1, 1894, to Jan. 1, 1895 $ 42,219 05  
Value of articles received from other divisions from Jan. 1, 1894, to Jan. 1, 1895 1,577 06  
Live stock on hand January 1, 1894 448 00  
Provisions and supplies on hand Jan. 1, 1894 6,341 54  
Bricks on hand Jan. 1, 1894, 1,586,480 9,518 88  
Total debits   $ 60,104 53

CREDITS.

Value of articles transferred to other divisions from Jan. 1, 1894, to Jan. 1, 1895 $ 17,658 32  
Sale of products 15,316 39  
Live stock on hand Jan. 1, 1895 417 00  
Provisions and supplies on hand Jan. 1, 1895 8,076 82  
1,612,500 bricks on hand Jan. 1, 1895 9,675 00  
1 dozen wagons 600 00  
Pro rata share general officers' salaries charged to other divisions 6,446 50  
Total credits   $ 58,190 03
Loss   1,914 50

STATEMENT F.

GREAT FALLS CANAL.

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from June 1, 1894, to Jan. 1, 1895 $ 2,348 45  
Value of articles received from Penitentiary and other divisions 1,431 15  
Pro rata share general officers' salaries 167 36  
Total debits   $ 3,946 96

CREDITS.

Value of labor performed for Great Falls Canal Company $ 5,279 93  
Total credits   $ 5,279 93
Profit   1,332 97


Page 35

STATEMENT G.

ROCKY MOUNT CAMP.

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from October 18, 1894, to January 1, 1895 $ 266 52  
Value of articles transferred from Penitentiary and other divisions from October 18, 1894, to January 1, 1895 84 30  
Pro rata share general officers' salaries 14 94  
Total debits   $ 365 76

CREDITS.

Value of labor performed for Rocky Mount Mills Company $ 490 50  
Amount of bills charged to Rocky Mount Mills Company 137 90  
Total credits   $ 628 40
Profit   $ 262 64

STATEMENT H.

NORTHAMPTON DIKE.

DEBITS.

Vouchers audited from January 1, 1894, to March 1, 1894 $ 2,140 18  
Value of articles received from Penitentiary and other divisions 726 05  
Pro rata share general officers' salaries 161 38  
Total debits   $ 3,027 61

CREDITS.

6,217 days' labor on dike, at 48 7/10 cts   $ 3,027 61


Page 36

STATEMENT I.

TABLE SHOWING AVERAGE PRICES PAID PER MONTH FOR PRINCIPAL ARTICLES BOUGHT.

        
MONTH. Bacon. Beef and Mutton. Coffee. Flour. Lard. Sugar. Wool Cloth. Cot. Pant Goods. Shirting.
  Per Cwt. Per Cwt. Per Pound. Per Cwt. Per Cwt. Per Cwt. Per Yard. Per Yard. Per Yard.
December, 1893 $ 7 32+ $ 6 06+ 19 cts. + $ 1 65+ $ 8 15 $ 4 52+ 51 cents. 9½ cents 8½ cents
January, 1894 7 62+ none bo't 20 cts. 1 64+ 6 75 4 47+ 51 cents. 9½ cents 8½ cents
February, 1894 7 03 5 85+ 20 cts. 1 66+ 8 50 4 50+ 51 cents. 9½ cents 8½ cents
March, 1894 6 77+ 6 71+ 20 cts. + 1 60+ none bo't 4 52+ 51 cents. 9½ cents 8½ cents
April, 1894 6 33+ none bo't 19 cts. + 1 48+ 6 25 3 50+ 51 cents. 9½ cents 8½ cents
May, 1894 7 56+ none bo't 20 cts. + 1 61+ 6 55 4 39+ none bo't 9½ cents 8½ cents
June, 1894 6 83+ 4 20+ 19 cts. + 1 45+ 6 37½ 4 33+ none bo't 9½ cents 8½ cents
July, 1894 7 53+ none bo't 19 cts. + 1 70+ 6 25 4 38+ none bo't 9½ cents 8½ cents
August, 1894 8 16+ 5 00 20 cts. + 1 30+ 7 20 4 96+ 46½ cts. 9½ cents 8½ cents
September, 1894 7 96+ 5 05 20 cts. + 1 65+ 7 25 5 55+ 46½ cts. 8½ cents 5 cents
October, 1894 6 48+ 5 40 17 cts. + 1 48+ 8 50 4 77+ 46½ cts. 8½ cents 5 cents
November, 1894 7 21+ 2 50 21 cts. 1 15+ none bo't 4 50+ 46½ cts. 8½ cents 5 cents


Page 37

STATEMENT K.

AVERAGE PRICES RECEIVED PER MONTH FOR PRINCIPAL PRODUCTS.

        
MONTH. Corn. Wheat. Peas. Peanuts. Fodder. Hay. Cotton. REMARKS.
  Per Bushel. Per Bushel. Per Bushel. Per Bushel. Per Cwt. Per Cwt. Per Pound.  
January         55 cts. 60 cts.    
February         55 cts. 60 cts. 7 3/10  
March 46 cts.       55 cts. 60 cts.   Peanuts were all sold in April. The difference in price received was on account of difference in variety grown.
April 47½ cts.   62½ cts. 60½ &40c 55 cts. 60 cts. 6 4/10  
May 50½ cts. 52 7/10 cts.     55 cts. 60 cts.    
June 51 cts.       55 cts. 60 cts.    
July         55 cts. 60 cts.    
August         55 cts. 60 cts.    
September   49 cts.     55 cts. 60 cts.    
October   51½ cts.     55 cts. 60 cts. 5 2/10  
November 51½ cts.       55 cts. 60 cts. 4 6/10  
December         55 cts. 60 cts. 4 6/10  


Page 38

STATEMENT L.

CLASSIFIED REPORT OF DEPUTY WARDEN FOR 1894.

        
Bacon 262,119 pounds $ 18,593 19
Beef and Mutton 4,593 pounds 291 64
Butter 1,526½ pounds 342 06
Coffee 7,683 pounds 1,500 20
Eggs 612½ dozen 83 74
Flour 81,600 pounds 1,823 91
Lard 1,511 pounds 108 89
Meal 26 bushels 15 05
Molasses 3,882 gallons 673 71
Potatoes 247 bushels 188 70
Peas 5 bushels 3 00
Poultry 1,023 220 30
Provisions ---- 975 91
Rice 1,376 pounds 208 90.
Sugar 3,731 pounds 621 88
Dry Goods and Clothing ---- 9,161 64
Coal and Wood ---- 2,585 83
Commutation ---- 3,044 00
Forage ---- 43 96
Furniture ---- 8 05
Freight and Hauling ---- 6,662 62
Hardware ---- 5,603 41
Leather and Findings ---- 3,639 29
Liquors 248 gallons 319 35
Lye 80 cases 261 79
Lumber and Shingles ---- 286 35
Medicines ---- 2,156 28
Oil 7,753 gallons 786 06
Stamps ---- 331 25
Salaries and Wages ---- 48,565 70
Printing and Stationery ---- 73 79
Tobacco and Snuff ---- 866 89
Fertilizers ---- 5,576 92
Ministerial Services ---- 212 50
Rents ---- 8,081 95
Telephone and Postoffice Box Rents ---- 74 50
Transportation ---- 1,263 29
Mileage of Directors ---- 559 93
Mules and Horses ---- 9,056 20
Bagging, Ties, Burlaps and Bags ---- 1,362 44
Rents for Derrick, etc., to Rocky Mt. Mills ---- 63 50
Axle Grease ---- 10 95
Candles, Soap and Brooms ---- 170 20
Bricks, Barrels and Tallow ---- 72 16
Cattle and Hogs ---- 57 48
Expenses of Wm. Ledbetter taking inventory ---- 20 50
Rebates ---- 19 98
Seed Oats, Field and Garden Seeds ---- 592 26
Amount carried forward ---- $ 137,242 10


Page 39

STATEMENT L.--Continued.

Amount brought forward ---- $ 137,242 10
Subscription to Daily Papers ---- 20 00
Laundry Supplies ---- 85 31
Amount paid for use of Engine ---- 60 25
Telegrams ---- 34 61
Repairs on Penitentiary Building ---- 46 52
Advertising Forage for Sale ---- 8 75
Expenses of W. J. Hicks, Gen. Supervisor ---- 14 10
Attorneys and Protest Fees ---- 11 88
Expenses of Dr. I. E. Green to Moore County Court ---- 49 10
Amount paid for Beef Heads and for one Dog ---- 8 40
Cotton Seed ---- 33 69
Dynamite, Fuse, etc ---- 115 90
Expenses of Dr. J. W. McGee visiting Camps ---- 7 75
Tar for Pitching Ferry Boat ---- 3 00
Total ---- $ 137,741 36

        Above statement does not show bills for December, 1894, as they are not audited until January, 1895 ; but does show bills made and paid for December, 1893.


Page 40

TABLE NO. I.

RECORD OF CONVICTS,
Showing Number Received from Counties, Recaptures, Deaths, Discharges, Pardons and Escapes at the Different Camps.

        
  Penitentiary. Caledonia Farm. Northampton Farm. Halifax Farm. Castle Hayne Farm. Great Falls Canal. Rocky Mount Camp. Northampton Dike. Total. Grand Total.
No. convicts on hand January 1, 1894 124 456 214 145 75 ---- ---- 168 ---- 1,182
Recaptured 7 3 2 4 ---- ---- 2 ---- ---- 18
Received from counties 536 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 536
Total ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 1,736
Discharged 20 174 76 49 22 11 ---- 6 358  
Pardoned 5 12 1 7 ---- ---- ---- ---- 25  
Died 18 29 1 2 3 ---- ---- ---- 53  
Escaped 4 15 8 4 ---- 2 2 ---- 35  
Total loss ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 471
Remaining Jan. 1, 1895 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 1,265
White males 42 84 48 26 22 2 ---- ---- 224  
White females 6 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 6  
Colored females 26 ---- ---- 38 ---- ---- ---- ---- 64  
Colored males 76 495 204 81 60 50 ---- ---- 966  
Indian males 2 1 2 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 5  
Total remaining Jan. 1, 1895 152 580 254 145 82 52 ---- ---- ---- 1,265
Average No. convicts per day, 1894 149 581 225 148 67 56 20 165 ---- 1,234
  12 m 12 m 12 m 12 m 12 m 7 m 1½ m 2 m    
Total av'rage convicts per day in 1893 ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- ---- 1,148


Page 41

TABLE NO. II.

PRISONERS RECEIVED SINCE OPENING OF PENITENTIARY.

        
From January 6, 1870, to November 1, 1870 241
From November 1, 1870, to November 1, 1871 188
From November 1, 1871, to November 1, 1872 150
From November 1, 1872, to November 1, 1873 167
From November 1, 1873, to November 1, 1874 212
From November 1, 1874, to November 1, 1875 440
From November 1, 1875, to November 1, 1876 439
From November 1, 1876, to November 1, 1877 548
From November 1, 1877, to November 1, 1878 495
From November 1, 1878, to November 1, 1879 478
From November 1, 1879, to November 1, 1880 464
From November 1, 1880, to November 1, 1881 395
From November 1, 1881, to November 1, 1882 461
From November 1, 1882, to December 1, 1883 432
From December 1, 1883, to December 1, 1884 490
From December 1, 1884, to December 1, 1885 565
From December 1, 1885, to December 1, 1886 593
From December 1, 1886, to December 1, 1887 602
From December 1, 1887, to December 1, 1888 528
From December 1, 1888, to December 1, 1889 534
From December 1, 1889, to December 1, 1890 481
From December 1, 1890, to December 1, 1891 347
From December 1, 1891, to December 1, 1892 461
From December 1, 1892, to January 1, 1894 542
From January 1, 1894, to January 1, 1895 536
Total received to January 1, 1895 10,789


Page 42

TABLE No. III.

NATIVITY OF CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894.

        
Alabama 1
Arkansas 1
California 1
District of Columbia 2
Georgia 5
Illinois 1
Kentucky 1
Maryland 2
Missouri 2
Massachusetts 1
North Carolina 434
New York 5
New Jersey 1
Ohio 1
South Carolina 41
Tennessee 6
Virginia 24
West Virginia 2
Foreign--Canada 1
England 1
Ireland 1
Poland 1
Sweden 1
Total 536

PRESENT POPULATION--NATIVITY.

Alabama 5
Arkansas 2
Connecticut 1
California 1
District of Columbia 2
Georgia 17
Iowa 1
Indiana 1
Illinois 1
Kentucky 4
Louisiana 1
Maryland 5
Mississippi 5
Missouri 3
Massachusetts 3
North Carolina 1,029
New York 7
New Jersey 1
Ohio 4
Pennsylvania 4
South Carolina 86
Tennessee 16
Virginia 55
West Virginia 1
Foreign--Canada 1
England 2
Germany 2
Ireland 2
Poland 1
Sweden 2
Total 1,265


Page 43

TABLE No. IV.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894--EDUCATION.

        
Illiterate 287
Read 34
Read and write 206
Common 2
Fair 1
Academic 1
Good English 4
Collegiate 1
Total 536

PRESENT POPULATION--EDUCATION.

        
Illiterate 640
Read 105
Read and write 501
Common 5
Academic 3
Good English 7
Collegiate 4
Total 1,265

TABLE No. V.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894--OCCUPATION.

        
Baker 1
Banker 1
Brick-masons 2
Carpenter 3
Cook 1
Laborer 525
Machinist 1
Physician 1
Stenographer 1
Total 536

PRESENT POPULATION--OCCUPATION.

        
Baker 2
Banker 1
Barber 4
Blacksmith 2
Boilermaker 1
Bookkeeper 1
Brickmason 5
Carpenter 5
Civil Engineer 1
Cook 6
Jeweler 1
Laborer 1,215
Machinists 2
Mattressmaker 1
Merchant 1
Miner 1
Painter 4
Physician 2
Sailor 1
School-teacher 1
Shoemaker 1
Stenographer 1
Stonecutter 1
Tailor 1
Tobacco-roller 2
Dentist 2
Total 1,265


Page 44

TABLE No. VI.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894. AGE WHEN RECEIVED.

        
Under 16 years45
From 16 to 20 years147
From 20 to 30 years214
From 30 to 40 years55
From 40 to 50 years40
From 50 to 60 years25
From 60 to 70 years6
From 70 to 80 years4
  
Total536

PRESENT POPULATION. AGE WHEN RECEIVED.

Under 16 years99
From 16 to 20 years324
From 20 to 30 years528
From 30 to 40 years175
From 40 to 50 years74
From 50 to 60 years49
From 60 to 70 years10
From 70 to 80 years5
From 80 to 90 years1
Total1,265

TABLE No. VII.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894.
SEX AND COLOR.

White Males111
White Females3
Colored Males401
Colored Females21
Total536

PRESENT POPULATION.
SEX AND COLOR.

White Males224
White Females6
Colored Males966
Colored Females64
Indian Males5
Total1,265

TABLE No. VIII.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894--SOCIAL RELATION.

Single326
Married179
Widowed31
  
Total536

PRESENT POPULATION--SOCIAL RELATION.

Single
Married
Widowed
Divorced
 
Total


Page 45

TABLE NO. IX.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894--TERMS OF SENTENCES.

Six months 35
Seven months 1
Eight months 7
Nine months 3
Ten months 1
One year 131
One and one-fourth year 10
One and one-third year 2
One and one-half year 32
Two years 94
Two and one-half years 5
Three years 59
Three and one-half years 1
Four years 29
Five years 51
Six years 8
Seven years 9
Eight years 3
Nine years 1
Ten years 28
Twelve years 3
Fifteen years 10
Twenty years 3
Twenty-five years 3
Thirty years 4
Life 3
Total 536

PRESENT POPULATION--TERM OF SENTENCE.

Six months 14
Seven months 1
Eight months 3
Nine months 2
One year 111
One and one-fourth year 10
One and one-third year 2
One and one-half year 47
Two years 157
Two and one-half years 9
Three years 162
Three and one-half years 1
Four years 86
Five years 186
Five and five-twelfth years 1
Six years 23
Seven years 61
Seven and three-twelfth years 1
Eight years 24
Nine years 6
Ten years 165
Ten and one-fourth years 1
Twelve years 22
Thirteen years 1
Fourteen years 5
Fifteen years 54
Sixteen years 1
Twenty years 41
Twenty-five years 7
Thirty years 12
Sixty years 1
Life 48
Total 1,265


Page 46

TABLE NO. X.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894--COUNTIES FROM WHICH SENTENCED.

        
Alamance 2
Alexander 2
Alleghany 0
Anson 13
Ashe 0
Beaufort 12
Bertie 5
Bladen 5
Brunswick 7
Buncombe 4
Burke 2
Cabarrus 4
Caldwell 4
Camden 0
Carteret 2
Caswell 7
Catawba 5
Chatham 13
Cherokee 4
Chowan 4
Clay 1
Cleveland 17
Columbus 15
Craven 13
Cumberland 17
Currituck 0
Davidson 15
Dare 0
Davie 2
Duplin 6
Durham 1
Edgecombe 12
Forsyth 2
Franklin 6
Gaston 8
Gates 3
Graham 0
Granville 7
Greene 2
Guilford 19
Halifax 10
Harnett 1
Haywood 3
Henderson 1
Hertford 2
Hyde 3
Iredell 7
Jackson 0
Johnston 13
Jones 2
Lenoir 4
Lincoln 1
Macon 0
Madison 3
Martin 4
McDowell 4
Mecklenburg 3
Mitchell 2
Montgomery 2
Moore 12
Nash 5
New Hanover 27
Northampton 6
Onslow 2
Orange 10
Pamlico 3
Pasquotank 3
Pender 2
Perquimans 1
Person 6
Pitt 6
Polk 5
Randolph 8
Richmond 18
Robeson 16
Rockingham 8
Rowan 5
Rutherford 3
Sampson 8
Stanly 1
Stokes 4
Surry 3
Swain 1
Transylvania 0
Tyrrell 0
Union 13
Vance 6
Wake 6
Warren 6
Washington 4
Watauga 3
Wayne 7
Wilkes 4
Wilson 16
Yadkin 2
Yancey 0
Total 536


Page 47

TABLE No. X--Continued

PRESENT POPULATION--COUNTIES FROM WHICH SENTENCED.

        
Alamance 7
Alexander 4
Alleghany 2
Anson 20
Ashe 2
Beaufort 25
Bertie 8
Bladen 11
Brunswick 12
Buncombe 14
Burke 7
Cabarrus 6
Caldwell 8
Camden 1
Carteret 4
Caswell 12
Catawba 16
Chatham 15
Cherokee 5
Chowan 10
Clay 1
Cleveland 31
Columbus 20
Craven 26
Cumberland 34
Currituck 1
Davidson 25
Dare 1
Davie 10
Duplin 9
Durham 14
Edgecombe 31
Forsyth 16
Franklin 17
Gaston 18
Gates 10
Graham 1
Granville 14
Greene 3
Guilford 40
Halifax 32
Harnett 4
Haywood 4
Henderson 8
Hertford 9
Hyde 5
Iredell 28
Jackson 1
Johnston 26
Jones 6
Lenoir 11
Lincoln 3
Macon 3
Madison 7
Martin 10
McDowell 5
Mecklenburg 38
Mitchell 6
Montgomery 2
Moore 29
Nash 10
New Hanover 75
Northampton 10
Onslow 4
Orange 18
Pamlico 4
Pasquotank 5
Pender 7
Perquimans 3
Person 11
Pitt 24
Polk 8
Randolph 20
Richmond 31
Robeson 34
Rockingham 21
Rowan 30
Rutherford 13
Sampson 12
Stanly 5
Stokes 11
Surry 7
Swain 2
Transylvania 2
Tyrrell 1
Union 19
Vance 16
Wake 16
Warren 9
Washington 17
Watauga 3
Wayne 20
Wilkes 9
Wilson 29
Yadkin 6
Yancey 5
Total 1,265


Page 48

TABLE NO. XI.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894--CRIME FOR WHICH SENTENCED.

        
Accessory to murder 1
Arson 1
Attempted arson 3
Attempt to burn 1
Attempted rape 18
Attempt to steal 1
Attempt to kill 1
Attempt to play husband 1
Bigamy 3
Buggery 2
Burglary 20
Crime against nature 1
Concealing birth 2
Embezzlement 4
False pretense 7
Felonious slaying 6
Forgery 13
Highway robbery 1
Housebreaking 13
Houseburning 5
Incest 1
Larceny 321
Larceny and receiving 57
Manslaughter 15
Maiming 1
Murder 11
Malicious assault 1
Perjury 15
Poisoning 1
Rape 1
Retailing liquor 2
Secret assault 4
Stealing ride 1
Wrecking train 1
Total 536

PRESENT POPULATION--CRIME FOR WHICH SENTENCED.

        
Abduction 1
Attempted murder 2
Accessory to murder 1
Arson 9
Assault and battery with d. w 1
Accessory to arson 2
Attempted rape 77
Attempted arson 4
Attempt to play husband 2
Attempt to kill 2
Attempt to poison 1
Attempt to burn 4
Bestiality 1
Bigamy 7
Burglary 82
Buggery 5
Castration 1
Crime against nature 2
Concealing birth 4
Embezzlement 4
Entering dwelling 2
False pretense 12
Felonious slaying 44
Forgery 20
Felony 1
Highway robbery 6
Housebreaking 14
Houseburning 33
Incest 1
Infanticide 2
Injury to building 1
Injury to railroad 1
Larceny 600
Larceny and receiving 132
Maiming 1
Malicious assault 1
Manslaughter 71
Murder 49
Obstructing railroad 4
Perjury 23
Poisoning 1
Rape 7
Receiving 4
Retailing liquor 2
Robbery 9
Secret assault 10
Shooting at train 1
Wrecking train 1
Total 1,265


Page 49

TABLE NO. XII.

CONVICTS RECEIVED IN 1894. NUMBER OF IMPRISONMENTS.

        
First472
Second55
Third6
Fourth3
Total536

PRESENT POPULATION. NUMBER OF IMPRISONMENTS.

        
First1,076
Second154
Third26
Fourth8
Fifth1
Total1,265


Page 50

LIST OF OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES OF THE NORTH CAROLINA PENITENTIARY ON DECEMBER 31, 1894, WITH RATE OF PAY.

        
A. Leazar Superintendent $208 33
J. M. Fleming, Warden 75 00
William Ledbetter, Deputy Warden 65 00
J. W. McGee, Physician 41 67
J. J. Bernard, Clerk 75 00
Shelby Froutis, Hospital Steward 40 00
I. H. Rogers, Kitchen Steward 40 00
J. N. Waddell, Overseer 25 00
F. G. Davidson, Overseer 25 00
Burbon Pool, Gardener 25 00
A. O. Wadford, Hall Clerk 25 00
S. W. Johnson, Gate Keeper 22 50
G. Noble Ennett, Corporal 20 00
M. E. Kennedy, Matron 17 50
Nina Atkinson, Assistant Matron 17 50
W. O. McFarland, Doorkeeper 20 00
John Holderfield, Guard 18 00
C. A. Maynard, Guard 18 00
Henry Holderfield, Guard 18 00
J. W. McIntosh, Guard 18 00
James Busbee, Guard 18 00
Walter Einry, Guard 18 00
W. A. Ferrill, Guard 18 00
George Young, Guard 18 00
B. C. Glover, Guard 18 00
Jabez Jamison, Guard 18 00
W. Utley, Guard 18 00

GREAT FALLS CANAL.

        
J. M. McMurray, Supervisor $50 00
George W. West (one-seventh time), Physician 10 00
T. H. Griffis, Steward 18 00
R. H. Conley, Guard 14 00
E. A. Smith, Guard 14 00
T. A. Moore, Guard 14 00
William Hudson, Guard 14 00
William Collins, Guard 14 00
R. A. McCullock, Guard 14 00
E. A. Harp, Guard 14 00
Peter Harris, Guard 14 00


Page 51

CALEDONIA FARM NO. 1.

        
J. H. McIver, Supervisor $75 00
H. B. Furgeson (one-half time), Physician 40 00
J. E. Hoskins, Steward 25 00
J. A. Conley, Overseer 25 00
S. G. Hayes, Overseer 25 00
E. W. Herring, Overseer 25 00
C. U. Skinner, Overseer 25 00
N. L. Stedman, Overseer 25 00
J. A. Campbell, Overseer 25 00
L. L. Hardy, Overseer 25 00
W. J. Hodges, Overseer 25 00
A. E. Wadford, Gardener 25 00
A. Bishop, Overseer 20 00
C. C. Bryant, Wagoner 17 00
James Sears, Guard 15 00
R. P. Alston, Guard 15 00
J. M. Ferrall, Guard 15 00
E. T. Smith, Guard 15 00
W. F. Brewer, Guard 15 00
P. S. Shaw, Guard 15 00
W. D. Tyson, Guard 15 00
C. T. Watson, Guard 15 00
M. T. Hargrove, Guard 15 00
W. T. Boseman, Guard 15 00
I. N. Thomas, Guard 15 00
J. W. Swinson, Guard 15 00
M. D. Gulley, Guard 15 00
J. D. Bunn, Guard 15 00
J. H. Marks, Guard 15 00
S. D. Harp, Guard 15 00
Bruce Boykin, Guard 15 00
Don Campbell, Guard 15 00
G. A. Tumbill, Guard 15 00
R. L. Arnold, Guard 15 00
R. H. Sorrell, Guard 15 00
W. H. Gilliam, Hostler 15 00

NORTHAMPTON FARM.

        
C. J. Rhem, Supervisor $70 00
G. H. West (five-sevenths time), Physician 37 50
W. D. Brooks, Steward 20 00
W. T. Burnett, Overseer 25 00
D. E. Hopkins, Overseer 17 50


Page 52

        
F. M. Toushee, Overseer $17 50
W. J. B. Smith, Overseer 17 50
G. B. Barkley, Overseer 17 50
W. H. Daniel, Overseer 17 50
A. F. Bradshaw, Overseer 22 50
R. B. Ivey, Overseer 17 50
J. A. Pardue, Dog Trainer 15 00
J. M. Wilson, Lot Man 15 00
J. G. Jeffreys, Guard 15 00
S. G. Wright, Guard 15 00
S. A. Richards, Guard 15 00
S. R. Jeffreys, Guard 15 00
J. P. Hicks, Guard 15 00
B. W. Chaviss, Guard 15 00
J. W. Brandam, Guard 15 00
A. J. Jordan, Guard 15 00
John Daniel, Guard 15 00
Jack Bennett, Guard 15 00
H. M. Allen, Guard 15 00
T. C. Johnson, Guard 15 00
W. L. Brooks, Guard 15 00
W. M. Whitehurst, Guard 15 00
C. L. Whitehead, Guard 15 00
F. P. Lawhon, Guard 15 00
Peter Strausburg, Guard 15 00
F. P. Rainey, Guard 15 00
N. W. Warren, Guard 15 00
W. F. Ireland, Guard 15 00
W. J. Harris, Guard 15 00
J. R. Lynch, Guard 15 00
J. W. Riggs, Guard 15 00
E. D. Wilcox, Guard 15 00
Drew Browning, Guard 15 00
J. T. Fuller, Guard 15 00
James Brown, Ferryman 10 00
John Boyd, Ferryman 10 00

CALEDONIA FARM NO. 2.

        
J. H. McIver, Supervisor $15 00
W. L. Chaffin, Assistant Supervisor 40 00
H. B. Furgeson, Physician ½ time 40 00
C. R. Blake, Steward 25 00
C. N. Christian, Overseer 25 00
W. A. Sater, Overseer 25 00


Page 53

        
John Johnson, Overseer $25 00
E. M. Grizzard, Overseer 20 00
E. M. Perkins, Overseer 20 00
J. C. Howe, Overseer 20 00
Dunk McGill, Overseer 20 00
John Halls, Overseer 20 00
G. B. Blackburn, Overseer 20 00
Herbert Herron, Guard 15 00
J. T. McKernan, Guard 15 00
W. J. Moore, Guard 15 00
G. S. Moore, Guard 15 00
K. B. Irvy, Guard 15 00
J. D. Honeycutt, Guard 15 00
J. W. Howe, Guard 15 00
G. S. Ellis, Guard 15 00
H. L. Wall, Guard 15 00
W. A. Taylor, Guard 15 00
C. D. Shaw, Guard 15 00
W. M. Shaw, Guard 15 00
F. C. Carraway, Guard 15 00
C. H. Tatum, Guard 15 00
L. A. White, Guard 15 00
J. R. Hardee, Guard 15 00
W. D. Barham, Guard 15 00
S. W. Belcher, Guard 15 00
J. W. Rook, Guard 15 00
T. J. Lewis, Guard 15 00
D. L. Jones, Guard 15 00

HALIFAX FARM.

        
W. J. Bradshaw, Supervisor $55 00
George H. West, 2-7ths time, Physician 22 50
J. S. Turner, Steward 20 00
E. F. Sater, Overseer 25 00
S. R. Bennett, Overseer 17 50
J. T. Hux, Overseer 17 50
Edward Gay, Overseer 17 50
G. H. Wilkie, Overseer 17 50
E. P. Hubbard, Dog Trainer 17 50
W. J. Garner, Guard 14 00
J. T. Briggs, Guard 14 00
J. R. Matthews, Guard 14 00
John Jenkins, Guard 14 00
C. E. Kelly, Guard $14 00


Page 54

        
W. J. Dickens, Sr., Guard 14 00
W. J. Dickens, Jr., Guard 14 00
N. N. Worthington, Guard 14 00
W. J. Greene, Guard 14 00
Morgan Keeter, Guard 14 00
C. H. Wortham, Guard 14 00
T. J. Stallins, Guard 14 00
W. L. Frazier, Guard 14 00
Henry D. Ponton, Hostler 17 50

CASTLE HAYNE FARM.

        
J. C. Lashley, Supervisor $55 00
I. C. M. Loftin, Physician 35 00
J. M. Perkins, Steward 25 00
E. P. Smith, Overseer 25 00
J. W. Johnson, Overseer 22 50
C. G. Jones, Overseer 17 50
A. W. Lashley, Teamster 15 00
M. E. Shields, Guard 14 00
Robert Martin, Guard 14 00
E. G. Griffin, Guard 14 00
F. B. Pelletier, Overseer 14 00
H. W. Smith, Overseer 14 00
P. J. Goodman, Overseer 14 00
Samuel Busbee, Overseer 14 00
L. F. Womble, Overseer 14 00


Page 55

INVENTORY OF THE PROPERTY OF THE PENITENTIARY,
JANUARY 1, 1895.

CENTRAL PENITENTIARY.

OFFICERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
3 bedsteads, 3 wardrobes,
4 mattresses, 4 clocks,
6 pairs blankets, 6 tables,
6 pillows, 7 bookcases,
12 pillow cases, 5 desks,
8 pairs sheets, 3 lounges,
42 chairs, 4 carpets,
4 bureaus, 6 spittoons.
3 washstands,  

OVERSEERS AND GUARDS' DEPARTMENT.

        
12 bedsteads (double), 17 washstands,
8 bedsteads (single), 20 chairs,
27 mattresses (double), 20 buckets,
14 mattresses (single), 5 washbasins,
20 pairs blankets, 12 bowls,
20 quilts, 8 pitchers,
85 sheets, 35 towels,
34 pillows, 6 mirrors,
70 pillowcases, 1 bureau,
19 tables, 1 desk.

        

DINING-ROOM.

6 tables, 2 butter knives,
2 safes, 1 small bell,
2 refrigerators, 3 buckets,
40 cups and saucers, 2 knife boxes,
14 soup plates, 31 teaspoons,
51 dinner plates, 46 tablespoons,
12 deep dishes, 6 stone jars,
13 flat dishes, 5 fly fans,
7 butter bowls, 1 jug,
14 ice cream plates, 1 coffee urn
1 ice cream freezer, 2 pairs balances,
12 goblets, 1 half bushel measure,
8 glasses, 3 tin basins,
8 pitchers, 6 dippers,
7 sugar dishes, 1 funnel,


Page 56

        
20 napkins, 1 quart measure,
47 tablecloths, 1 half gallon measure,
11 cruets, 8 salt cellars,
2 castors, 5 napkin rings,
20 plate cloths, 10 catsup bottles,
51 knives and forks, 9 wineglasses,
4 tin waiters, 7 lamps,
36 chairs, 25 small side-dishes.

KITCHEN DEPARTMENT.

        
1 clock, 1 kettle,
1 desk, 1 coffee mill,
1 coffee roaster, 1 pepper mill,
10 coffee pots, 1 set muffin rings,
150 tin plates, 1 pair waffle irons,
12 dishpans, 2 tables,
7 milk buckets, 1 hammer,
1 milk strainer, 2 coal buckets,
1 sausage mill, 1 inkstand,
1 water bucket, 1 cook-book,
1 potato grater, 1 small shovel,
54 pie plates, 1 broom,
7 carving knives, 6 dinner pots,
3 meat pans, 8 stew pans,
1 oven, 9 dippers,
5 flesh forks, 4 steam jacketed kettles,
2 dinner cans, 1 large cooking range.
2 sieves,  

PRISONER'S DEPARTMENT.

        
12 large bread pans, 37 molasses cans,
4 tables, 109 tin cups,
1 clock, 20 vinegar bottles,
2 large trays, 4 lamp frames,
2 sieves, 3 brooms,
1 spade, 105 knives and forks,
17 buckets, 1 table,
2 large heating stoves, 1 tub,
66 benches, 193 mattresses,
3 dinner trays, 145 cups,
4 dinner boxes, 204 washbasins,
1 large bell and chain, 185 camp stools,
1 small bell, 176 water buckets,
3 lamps, 183 slop buckets,
36 salt cellars, 123 pairs blankets.


Page 57

MACHINERY, TOOLS, ETC.

        
2 engines and boilers, 2 cross-cut saws,
4 circular saws, 5 whitewash brushes,
1 jig saw, 1 carriage (old),
1 iron lathe, 1 buggy (old),
1 wood lathe, 1 new buggy,
1 bolt machine, 12 two-horse wagons (new),
1 drill press, 4 two-horse wagons (old),
1 machine for cutting and punching iron, 1 four-horse wagon (old),
  23 dump-carts (old),
50 feet three-inch shafting, 1 set two-horse wagon harness,
1 set machinist's tools, 1 set buggy harness,
1 set tinner's tools, 134 tray wheelbarrows (new),
2 sets carpenter's tools, Pieces dressed for 55 new wheelbarrows,
2 sets blacksmith's tools,  
24 new shovels, 20 new brick wheelbarrows,
14 old shovels, 13 old brick wheelbarrows,
8 paving hammers, 40 pieces dressed for new brick
23 striking hammers, wheelbarrows,
6 spawling hammers, 336 wheelbarrow hubs,
14 picks, Lot oak lumber,
6 mattocks, Small lot pine lumber,
5 heating stoves (old), 23 wheelbarrows (in use),
1 cook stove (old), 482 wheelbarrow felloes,
2 large kettles (old), 227 wheelbarrow boxes,
4 stove pots (old), 1 barrel wheelbarrow spokes,
600 pounds gang chain, 42 sets brick moulds,
1 corn sheller, 2 barrels lime,
2 cutting knives, 1 lot wagon axles,
6 sets skeins and boxes, 1 pair large balances.

HOSPITAL.

        
12 tables, 26 towels,
51 chairs, 1 register for patients,
45 stools, 1 register for physician,
47 bunk frames, 1 prescription book,
52 mattresses, 3 medical books,
57 blankets, 2 kettles,
80 sheets, 1 bell,
38 pillows, 5 stoves,
75 pillowcases, 2 hammers,
76 pillowticks, 1 hatchet,
32 spittoons, 1 clock,
11 buckets, 2 coffee pots,


Page 58

        
46 dinner pans, 2 milk cans,
7 washpans, 5 brooms,
2 dish pans, 5 molasses cups,
6 lamps, 3 salt cellars,
4 tablecloths, 34 tin cups,
1 bedstead, 23 knives,
15 empty bedticks, 44 forks,
2 window curtains, 12 spoons,
1 quilt, 1 pill board,
1 carpet, 1 pill plate,
1 rug, 2 mortars and pestles,
3 dippers, 2 prescription scales,
2 washstands, lot surgical instruments,
3 washbowls, 1 rubber hose,
1 refrigerator, 1 inkstand,
2 bookstands, 2 desks,
1 bed mug, 1 tub,
1 bed pan, stock of drugs.

LAUNDRY.

        
1 stove, 7 stools,
46 sad-irons, 17 iron-rests,
20 buckets, 1 pitcher,
8 racks, 1 glass,
1 clock, 1 ladder,
9 tables, 8 baskets,
4 tubs, 1 barrel soap-chips,
7 washboards, 2 chairs,
12 ironing-boards, 1 tin dipper,
3 press-boards, 1 fluting machine.

FEMALE DEPARTMENT.

        
65 blankets, 2 towel-racks,
65 sheets, 7 sewing-machines,
46 pillows, 170 dozen spools cotton,
6 pairs pillowcases, 1 gross shirt buttons,
12 towels, 1 great gross pants buttons,
6 papers needles, 1 gross coat buttons,
3 bedsteads, 2 pairs cards,
5 bureaus, 6 pairs scissors,
1 wardrobe, 1 pair tailor shears,
6 chairs, 6 machine oilers,
2 rocking-chairs, 3 tables,
3 tables, 47 stools,


Page 59

        
11 window-shades, 70 buckets,
1 pitcher, 30 washpans,
3 glasses, 1 tub,
1 carpet, 2 clocks,
3 double mattresses, 7 iron bunks,
3 feather pillows, 2 stoves,
2 feather beds, 24 books,
6 pairs sheets, 33 single mattresses,
6 pairs pillowcases, 35 spoons,
3 bolstercases, 35 knives and forks,
4 pairs blankets, 37 cups,
2 inkstands, 2 tin dippers.

GUNS.

        
6 double-barrel shot guns 20 Springfield rifles.
35 Winchester rifles.  

STOCK.

        
1 horse, 5 sows,
2 mules, 12 shotes,
3 cows, 12 pigs,
2 oxen, 1 fat hog.

SHOE SHOP.

        
40 dies for cutting soles, heels, etc., 6 jacks for lasting in trimming,
16 tables (old), 1 set collar tools,
lot mallets (old), 2 saddlers benches,
1 rivet machine, 60 shoelasts,
2 wax-thread machines, lot old lasts.
1 pegging machine,  

PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES.

        
195 pounds bacon, ½ dozen men's undershirts,
20 pounds butter, 45 citizen suits,
45 pounds coffee, 1 pair new blankets.
9 chickens, 16 sheets.
10 dozen eggs, 20 prisoners towels,
225 pounds flour, 56 pounds sewing cotton,
60 pounds lard, 11 hats,
30 gallous molasses, 2 tent walls,
3,750 pounds meal, 3 pounds bag twine,
10 pounds rice, 125 yards citizen pants goods,
200 pounds salt, 1,450¼ yards wool stripes,
160 pounds sugar, 70 yards ducking,
65 pounds soap, 80 yards women's citizen dress plaids


Page 60

        
55 gallons vinegar, 35 yards bleaching,
75 pounds white beans, 30 yards sheeting,
1,250 pounds peas, 10 yards cotton,
19 pounds baking-powders, 750 yards AA domestic,
45 pounds candles, 1,120 pounds sole leather.
8 pounds soda, 120 pounds harness leather,
410 pounds peanuts, 10 pairs women's shoes,
4 bushels sweet potatoes, 482 pairs men's shoes,
70 pounds black pepper, 31 sets cart harness,
1 box mass licorice, 5 collar pads,
10 pounds snuff, 817 horse-collars,
4 dozen boxes matches, 8 lamp chimneys,
7 yard brooms, 6 lantern globes,
8 house brooms, 33 lamp burners,
7 bath-tubs, 3 gross lamp wicks,
7 washstands, 14 grate bars for range,
7 new water-buckets, 600 pounds tool steel,
603 boxes lye, 1½ kegs nails,
150 pounds starch, 7 bushels charcoal,
3 cans okra and tomatoes, 1,800 pounds 1¼ O iron,
797 pounds tobacco in boxes, 125 sheets tin,
750 pounds tobacco in rolls, 85 tobacco boxes,
1,700 pounds tobacco in leaf. 22 shoe boxes,
550 prisoners coats, 3 tons smith coal,
580 pairs prisoners wool pants, 30 gallons cylinder oil,
870 prisoners shirts, 20 gallons machine oil,
110 pairs cotton pants, 3 gallons linseed oil,
6 vests, 2 barrels kerosene oil,
200 pairs suspenders, 2 gallons spirits turpentine,
2,805½ yards convict cottonade, Lot peg-wood, pegs, rivets, buckles and rings,
12 bed-ticks,  
700 yards women stripes, Lot bridle-bits, thread and nails.
13 dozen women hose, Lot shoe tools.
19½ dozen men's half-hose.  

INVENTORY OF PROPERTY AT CALEDONIA, JANUARY 1, 1895.

OFFICERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
8 mattresses, 4 large dishes,
15 pairs blankets, 1 cream pitcher,
4 pillows, 2 sugar bowls,
4 pillowcases, 1 molasses pot,
1 desk, 6 teaspoons,
9 chairs, 6 tablespoons,
1 provision safe, 6 knives and forks,


Page 61

        
2 washstands, 1 vegetable dish,
2 tables, 1 coffeepot,
3 bedsteads, 1 teakettle,
6 sheets, 1 griddle and pan,
2 towels, 2 dishpans,
1 pitcher, 3 2-gallon tin buckets,
2 washbowls, 4 4-gallon jars,
3 water buckets, 1 milk bucket,
6 napkins, 1 heating stove,
2 tablecloths, 1 churn,
7 tumblers, 2 lamps,
23 dinner plates, 1 bed-chamber.
10 cups and saucers,  

OVERSEERS AND GUARDS' DEPARTMENT.

        
1 cook stove and vessels, 7 dishes,
3 dishpans, 24 cups,
1 coffeemill, 43 saucers,
1 peppermill, 1 provision safe,
9 tables, 6 sugar bowls,
1 coffeepot, 1 dishpan,
84 pairs blankets, 28 knives,
74 sheets, 41 forks,
62 pillowcases, 3 salt cellars,
46 pillows, 6 tablespoons,
44 mattresses, 12 teaspoons,
12 water buckets, 12 dinner-buckets,
10 washpans, 2 molasses pots,
4 lamps, 6 heating stoves,
40 plates, 1 clock.

HOSPITAL.

        
12 pairs blankets, 7 spoons,
17 sheets, 1 heating stove,
12 pillows, 12 bedticks,
12 pillowcases, 1 clock,
16 tin cups, 2 water buckets,
10 tin plates, stock of drugs.

PRISONERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
384 tin plates, 150 pairs blankets (good),
250 tin cups, 350 pairs blankets (much worn),
50 spoons, 122 bedticks (good),
5 heating stoves, 48 bedticks (much worn),
17 baking pans, 13 tubs,


Page 62

        
5 cauldrons, 15 washpans,
3 butcher knives, 29 lanterns,
1 flesh fork, 9 lamps,
4 dinner-cans, 4 lantern frames.

MACHINERY AND TOOLS.

        
15 two-horse wagons (good), 30 double-trees,
3 two-horse wagons (old), 6 Thomas smoothing harrows,
2 log carts, 4 Acme harrows,
13 sets wagon harness, 40 bull tongue plows,
1 buggy and harness (old), 50 Boy Dixie plows (old),
1 road cart (old), 25 Boy Dixie plows, No. 11 (old),
20 railroad carts (old), 1 South Bend plow, No. 3.
25 sets cart harness (old), 50 corn and cotton plows,
65 sets plow harness, 6 corn planters,
17 halters, 10 grub plows,
17 scythes and cradles, 20 cultivators (old),
2 corn shellers (old), 70 axes,
1 feed cutter (old), 50 mattocks,
1 fan mill, 1 set blacksmith tools,
1 30-horse power engine and boiler, 1 set carpenter tools,
1 10-horse power engine and boiler, 2 mowers,
2 sixty-saw Pratt gins, 1 hay rake (old),
1 power press, 6 pitchforks,
1 endless wire rope (200 feet), 3 peanut planters,
6 grass blades, 12 pumps (old),
1 sorghum mill, 1 five-ton wagon scales,
1 evaporator, 1 pair beam scales (old),
1 peanut thresher, 11 spring balances,
1 wheat thresher and clover huller combined, 1 sausage cutter (old),
  1 seed sower,
1 hay press (old), 8 riding saddles,
1 corn mill, 6 riding bridles,
50 cotton hoes (good), 15 guano distributors,
100 cotton hoes (old), 70 wheelbarrows,
75 corn hoes, 10 R. R. plows,
60 railroad picks, 2 garden rakes,
10 long-handle shovels, 2 potato diggers,
60 short-handle shovels, 20 iron wedges,
5 spades, 1 set cobblers tools,
10 briar hooks, 1 sawmill.
125 single-trees,  

GUNS.

        
18 double-barrel shotguns, 1 Winchester rifle.
13 Springfield rifles.  


Page 63

STOCK.

        
10 milch cows, 1 boar,
7 yearlings, 181 fattening hogs,
2 bulls, 68 mules,
1 steer, 7 mares,
4 calves, 3 horses,
50 sows, 2 2-year old mule colts,
80 shotes, 2 1-year old mule colts,
95 pigs, 1 jack.

POULTRY.

        
40 chickens, 4 guineas.
8 turkeys,  

FARM PRODUCTS.

        
50,250 pounds lint cotton, 3,000 bushels cotton seed,
23,147 bushels corn, 180,000 pounds hay,
181,506 pounds fodder, 80,000 pounds wheat straw,
650 bushels peas, 123,274 pounds shucks.

PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES.

        
1,375 pounds bacon, 319 pounds sugar,
345 pounds flour, 58 pounds soda,
185 pounds lard, 46 pounds soap,
70 boxes lye, 57 gallons vinegar,
659 gallons molasses, 8 pounds baking powders,
135 gallons oil, 100 shirts,
3,600 pounds potatoes, 50 pairs shoes,
136 pounds pickles, 218 pairs pants,
4,127 pounds pork, 22 citizen suits,
65 pounds rice, 50 pounds leather.
5,335 pounds salt,  

CALEDONIA INVENTORY, CAMP NO. 2.

OFFICERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
2 bedsteads, 9 chairs,
4 mattresses, 1 set knives and forks,
9 pairs blankets, 1 set cups and saucers,
4 pillows, 8 plates,
12 pillowcases, 4 tumblers,
12 sheets, 1 mirror,
2 water buckets, 1 clock,
1 bowl, 2 lamps.


Page 64

OVERSEERS AND GUARDS.

        
36 mattresses, 2 dozen knives and forks,
64 pairs blankets, 15 teaspoons,
32 pillows, 12 tablespoons,
64 pillowcases, 2 heating stoves,
76 sheets, 4 dishes,
7 washpans, 1 coffeepot,
24 plates, 7 tin buckets,
30 cups and saucers, 4 dish-pans,
1 sugar dish, 4 tablecloths,
1 molasses pot, 1 cook stove and vessels,
1 water bucket, 3 lamps.

PRISONERS.

        
300 tin plates, 4 heating stoves,
300 tin cups, 5 caldrons,
275 spoons, 12 bread-pans,
24 waterbuckets, 24 lamps,
164 bedticks, 18 lanterns (good),
347 pairs blankets, 15 lanterns (bad).

HOSPITAL.

        
10 bedticks, 9 tin cups,
18 pairs blankets, 5 tin buckets,
27 sheets, 1 dozen spoons,
9 pillows, 19 pillowcases, 2 dozen knives and forks,
2 stoves, stock of drugs,
13 tin plates,  

MACHINERY AND TOOLS.

        
13 2-horse wagons, 65 mattocks,
1 set wagon harness, 6 3-horse grub plows,
1 set buggy harness (single), 1 set blacksmith tools,
1 set buggy harness (double), 1 set carpenters tools,
1 buggy, 17 No. 3 South Bend plows (2-h.),
66 sets plow harness, 75 shovels,
2 extra collars, 116 wheelbarrows,
7 riding bridles, 75 picks,
2 riding saddles, 20 doubletrees,
38 B. D. plows, 75 singletrees,
13 cotton plows, 10 pumps,
5 cotton planters, 24 rakes,
2 corn planters, 6 pitchforks,
15 scythes and cradles, 2 briar-hooks,
106 hoes, 1 platform-scales,
28 bull-tongue plows, 1 farm bell.
68 axes,  


Page 65

GUNS.

        
15 double-barrel shotguns, 18 Springfield rifles.

STOCK.

        
53 mules, 1 cow,
2 mares, 1 calf.

POULTRY.

        
125 chickens.  

FARM PRODUCTS.

        
25,125 bushels corn, 248,000 pounds fodder,
480 bushels peas, 196,726 pounds shucks.

PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES.

        
120 pounds lard, 24 pounds baking powder,
34 boxes lye, 6 citizen suits,
29 gallons molasses, 80 pounds harness leather,
100 gallons oil, 87 pairs shoes,
1,200 pounds pickles, 156 pairs cotton pants,
500 pounds rye, 20 pairs woolen pants,
5,180 pounds salt, 3 coats,
40 pounds sugar, 4 brooms.
12 gallons vinegar,  

INVENTORY NORTHAMPTON FARM, JANUARY 1, 1895.

OFFICERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
3 bedsteads, 12 knives and forks,
1 desk, 12 spoons,
12 chairs, 3 vinegar and pepper cruets,
4 tables, 12 tumblers,
2 washstands, 2 tablecloths,
1 provision safe, 2 sugar bowls,
1 heating stove, 2 pickle dishes,
1 cook stove and vessels, 1 molasses pot,
1 clock, 1 bowl and pitcher,
5 mattresses, 1 churn,
9 pairs blankets, 1 milk bucket,
4 pairs sheets, 16 milk pans,
3 pillows, 2 dish pans,
6 pillowcases, 2 glass lamps,
3 water buckets, 2 tin lamps.
3 flat dishes, 1 lantern,
2 covered dishes, 2 sets andirons,


Page 66

        
2 butter dishes, 1 fire shovel,
2 pitchers, 1 feather bed,
18 plates, 5 sadirons,
19 cups and saucers, 1 wardrobe.

OVERSEERS AND GUARDS' DEPARTMENT.

        
88 pairs blankets, 5 lanterns,
35 mattresses, 13 dinner buckets,
40 pillows, 2 frying pans,
4 pillowcases, 2 coffeemills,
2 bedsteads, 10 chairs,
12 tablecloths, 60 sheets,
14 stoves, 1 washbowl,
2 clocks, 8 tables,
60 plates, 4 sausage cutters,
18 cups and saucers, 1 sausage stuffer,
24 knives and forks, 6 lard pans,
2 cook stoves, 20 water buckets,
5 pots, 2 sugar dishes,
6 kettles (or cauldrons), 4 brooms,
6 baking pans, 1 provision safe,
2 coffee pots, 16 wash pans,
4 large dishes, 11 milk buckets,
8 lamps, 1 coffee roaster.

PRISONERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
281 tin plates, 24 lanterns,
238 tin cups, 9 lamps,
4 dinner kettles, 2 coffeemills,
7 baking pans, 15 water buckets,
327 pairs good blankets, 12 wash pans,
47 pairs much worn blankets, 9 lantern frames,
200 mattress ticks, 2 platform scales,
4 stoves, 2 spring balances.

HOSPITAL DEPARTMENT.

        
30 sheets, 2 dippers,
7 pillowcases, 2 graduates,
7 pillows, 2 wash pans,
26 pairs blankets, 3 lamps,
7 mattresses, 4 disinfectant dishes,
1 tablecloth, 1 kettle,
2 towels, 2 tubs,
2 chairs, 2 tables,
7 stools, 1 pitcher,
5 buckets, Stock of drugs.


Page 67

GUNS.

        
10 Springfield rifles, 1 pistol.
17 double-barrel shotguns,  

STOCK.

        
62 mules, 9 yearlings,
6 horses, 16 calves,
1 stallion, 75 fattening hogs,
2 colts, 25 sows,
24 cows, 97 shotes,
2 bulls, 51 pigs,
7 oxen, 1 boar.

POULTRY.

        
213 chickens.  

MACHINERY AND TOOLS.

        
2 ten-horse power engines and boilers, 42 grub hoes,
  18 picks,
1 sorghum mill, 130 weeding hoes,
1 evaporator, 30 mattocks,
1 sixty-saw Eagle gin, 80 shovels,
1 power cotton press, 16 spades,
1 corn mill, 42 bush hooks,
1 endless wire rope (200 feet), 3 grass blades,
1 five-ton wagon scales, 12 pitchforks,
2 beam scales, 74 axes,
9 two-horse wagons (new), 10 guano distributors,
11 two-horse wagons (old), 2 cross-cut saws,
1 four-horse wagon (bad order), 2 seed sowers,
2 one-horse wagons (old), 6 handsaws,
11 dump-carts, 3 augers,
2 ox carts, 5 braces and bits,
9 sets two-horse wagon harness, 3 chisels,
2 sets one-horse wagon harness, 5 hammers,
10 sets cart harness, 4 spoke augers,
82 sets plow harness, 2 draw knives,
8 riding saddles, 5 planes,
6 riding bridles, 3 squares,
1 buggy (old), 2 hatchets,
2 road carts (old), 1 level,
3 sets buggy harness (old), 1 set blacksmith tools,
26 two-horse plows, 16 iron wedges,
52 one-horse plows, 1 fan mill,
33 cotton plows, 1 corn sheller,


Page 68

        
22 cultivators, 2 feed cutters,
24 cotton harrows, 25 scythes and cradles,
3 Acme harrows, 2 potato diggers,
3 smoothing harrows (Thomas), 60 wheelbarrows,
10 cotton planters, 10 drivenwell pumps,
2 peanut planters, 1 farm bell,
8 corn planters, 65 cotton sheets,
3 mowers (1 old), 7 cotton baskets,
3 reapers (1 old), 1,541 pounds plow castings,
2 horse rakes, 32 empty barrels.
1 hay tedder,  

FARM PRODUCTS.

        
22,000 pounds cotton, 45 barrels sorghum,
20,475 bushels corn, 241,800 pounds fodder,
500 bushels peanuts, 99,000 pounds peavine hay,
106 bushels oats, 43,000 pounds crab-grass hay,
106,900 pounds cottonseed, 238,400 pounds shucks,
1,856 bushels peas, 60,000 pounds wheat straw,
81 bushels navy beans, 4,000 pounds oat straw,
500 bushels sweet potatoes, 50 bushels Irish potatoes,

PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES.

        
8,721 pounds bacon, 270 pairs cotton pants,
1,725 pounds lard, 30 pairs wool pants,
540 pounds sugar, 15 coats,
1 barrel vinegar, 163 shirts,
14 barrels flour, 36 pairs men's shoes,
146 pounds rice, 12 pairs women's shoes,
120 pounds coffee, 6 citizen suits,
15 pounds soda, 2 citizen coats,
120 pounds tobacco, 2 citizen vests,
14 dozen boxes lye, 10 citizen shirts,
18 pairs blankets, 8 citizen drawers.

INVENTORY HALIFAX FARM, JANUARY 1, 1895.

OFFICERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
9 mattresses, 1 sugar bowl,
3 spring mattresses, 2 pickle dishes,
4 bedsteads, 12 dessert dishes (glass),
17 pairs blankets, 1 butter dish,
9 pillows, 4 soup dishes,
14 pillowcases, 1 molasses pitcher,
2 bolster pillows, 1 cream pitcher,
29 sheets, 5 milk pitchers,
18 towels, 5 salt cellars,
6 curtains, 2 vinegar cruets,


Page 69

        
14 chairs, 5 goblets,
2 rockers, 12 tumblers,
2 chamber sets, 1 coffeepot,
3 bowls and pitchers, 1 brass kettle,
2 chambers, 2 dish pans,
4 sets andirons, 1 large table,
2 pairs tongs, 1 small table,
2 fire shovels, 4 tablecloths,
3 washstands, 12 napkins,
4 combs and brushes, 1 waiter,
4 tables, 1 cook stove and vessels,
2 mirrors, 1 provision safe,
1 desk, 9 fruit jars,
4 soapstands, 6 milk pans,
1 water bucket, 1 Buckeye churn,
1 dipper, 1 old churn,
1 glass lamp, 1 large cream jar,
2 brooms, 1 milk strainer,
16 plates, 1 milk bucket,
12 cups and saucers, 2 milk cans,
3 large dishes, 4 earthen jars,
3 steak dishes, 2 crocks.

OVERSEERS AND GUARDS.

        
24 mattresses, 2 butter dishes,
11 bedsteads (home-made), 2 deep dishes,
49 pairs blankets, 1 steak dish,
50 sheets, 10 teaspoons,
40 pillowcases, 10 tablespoons,
7 towels, 2 molasses pots,
8 chairs, 2 salt cellars,
1 mirror, 2 biscuit pans,
2 brooms, 8 tin pans,
4 water buckets, 2 frying-pans,
6 washpans, 1 spider,
4 dippers, 1 stove and vessels,
4 tables, 1 clock,
5 heating stoves, 4 dinner boxes,
18 cups and saucers, 2 brooms,
17 plates, 2 clocks,
4 dishpans, 2 tablecloths,
18 knives and forks, 1 coffee mill,
3 dishes, 1 pepper mill.


Page 70

HOSPITAL.

        
13 bedsteads, 1 clock,
14 bedticks, 8 towels,
12 pillows, 2 stoves,
10 pillowcases, 1 water bucket,
32 sheets, 1 dipper,
34 pairs blankets, Stock of drugs.

PRISONERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
150 tin cups, 1 coffee mill,
150 tin plates, 7 dippers,
4 dishpans, 13 lanterns,
50 knives and forks, 38 lamp cups,
4 molasses jugs, 4 heating stoves,
4 vinegar bottles, 5 large boilers,
5 dinner cans (old), 1 small boiler,
8 baking pans, 250 pairs blankets,
17 water buckets, 88 bedticks,
1 cauldron, 20 washtubs,
1 cook stove, 7 sadirons.
4 brooms,  

MACHINERY AND TOOLS.

        
8 2-horse wagons, 1 fan mill,
1 1-horse wagon, 1 five-ton wagon scales,
1 4-horse wagon, 1 beam scales,
2 log carts, 1 small scales,
1 buggy (old), 1 counter scales,
2 ox carts, 1 platform scales,
3 dump carts (old), 3 small spring balances,
1 road cart, 3 drivenwell pumps,
3 sets double-wagon harness, 1 forcewell pump,
1 set single-wagon harness, 20 feet pump piping,
1 set buggy harness (double), 1 grindstone,
3 sets buggy harness (single), 1 emory stone,
27 sets plow harness, 1 set blacksmith tools,
4 riding bridles, 6 hand-saws,
5 riding saddles, 2 cross-cut saws,
4 cart saddles, 5 hammers,
2 halters, 2 hatchets,
29 Boy Dixie plows (single), 1 smooth plane,
8 Boy Dixie plows No. 11, 1 jack plane,
4 newground plows, 2 chisels,
13 cultivators, 3 draw-knives,
20 bull-tongue plows, 3 squares,


Page 71

        
6 cotton planters, 1 oil stone,
13 cotton plows, 1 spoke shave,
5 corn planters, 1 foot adz,
1 cutaway harrow, 2 stocks and dies,
2 smoothing harrows, 2 cart hubs,
3 Acme harrows, 2 augers,
2 mowers, 2 gimlets,
1 horse rake, 1 brace and bits,
3 grass blades, 1 set cobbler's tools,
10 scythes and cradles, 2 heating stoves (in shoe shop),
18 pitchforks, 1 wheat thresher,
6 garden rakes, 1 25-horse power engine and boiler,
1 corn sheller, 1 6-horse power engine and boiler,
1 feed cutter (new), 1 saw mill,
1 feed cutter (old), 1 sorghum mill,
2 corn planter openers, 1 evaporator,
9 short-handle shovels, 1 sixty-saw Pratt gin,
18 long-handle shovels, 1 power cotton press,
5 spades, 1 endless wire rope,
52 mattocks (old), 1 bell,
89 hoes, 7 lantern frames,
26 grubhoes, 21 horse collars,
75 axes, 6 briar hooks,
14 cotton plow standards, 1 extra bridle,
29 singletrees, 147 pounds cotton plow castings,
9 doubletrees, 203 pounds Boy Dixie plow castings.
10 wheelbarrows,  

GUNS.

        
8 Springfield rifles, 10 double-barrel shotguns,
3 Springfield rifles (bad order), 6 double-barrel shotguns (bad order),
1 Winchester carbine, 1 pistol.

STOCK.

        
26 mules, 9 calves,
9 horses, 1 bull,
2 two-year-old colts, 70 sheep,
2 six-months-old mule colts, 60 fattening hogs,
10 oxen, 53 sows,
11 milch cows, 3 boars,
16 dry cows, 87 pigs.

POULTRY.

        
160 chickens, 2 ducks.
27 turkeys,  


Page 72

FARM PRODUCTS.

        
27,417 pounds cotton, 19,800 pounds wheat straw,
10,000 bushels corn, 125,950 pounds fodder,
35 bushels wheat, 10,000 pounds clover hay,
788 bushels peas, 87,500 pounds shucks,
2,971 bushels cotton seed, 12 bushels rice (rough),
675 gallons molasses, 600 bushels sweet potatoes.
180 bushels oats,  

PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES.

        
116 pounds coffee, 2,900 pounds salt,
5,145 pounds flour, 611 pounds sugar,
530 pounds lard, 28 pounds soap,
324 pounds meal, 39 pounds tobacco,
70 gallons oil, 119 pounds soda,
11 pounds pepper, 9 citizen suits,
3,500 pounds pork, 39 pounds baking powder.
158 pounds rice,  

INVENTORY GREAT FALLS CANAL CAMP, JANUARY 1, 1895.

OFFICERS AND GUARD'S DEPARTMENT.

        
35 pairs blankets, 3 steak dishes,
8 mattresses, 2 butter dishes,
3 empty ticks, 2 sugar dishes,
26 sheets, 2 pitchers,
6 pillows, 2 molasses pots,
15 pillowcases, 14 knives and forks,
18 towels, 5 salt cellars,
1 bedstead, 6 teaspoons,
4 chairs, 1 potato grater,
2 tables, 1 sausage mill,
1 cook stove and vessels, 12 tin buckets,
4 dishpans, 7 tin dippers,
1 churn, 6 tin washbasins,
3 coffeepots, 5 water buckets,
1 coffeemill, 2 baking pans,
17 plates, 2 seives,
12 cups and saucers, 2 sadirons,
2 tumblers, 3 small heating stoves.
2 large dishes,  

PRISONERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
37 prisoners' bed ticks, 1 steelyards,
110 pairs blankets, 1 balances,
70 shackle chains, 26 Bibles,


Page 73

        
2 gang chains, 9 hymn books,
6 locks, 1 clock,
2 kettles, 1 bell,
2 cauldrons, 1 hammer,
6 bread pans, 1 cross-cut saw,
2 dishpans, 1 hand saw,
53 tin plates, 1 monkeywrench,
48 tin cups, 2 large heating stoves,
24 tablespoons, 2 coffee mills,
36 knives and forks, 14 washpans,
6 molasses pots, 10 water buckets,
12 lanterns, 2 axes,
28 lantern globes, 1 washboard,
6 tin lamps, 4 wash-tubs,
55 lamp chimneys, 1 one-horse spring wagon,
1 glass lamp, 1 buggy and harness,
1 oil can, 1 guard tent,
1 counter scales, 1 cell tent.

GUNS.

        
1 double-barrel shotgun, 8 Springfield rifles.

STOCK.

        
1 horse, 2 hogs.

PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES.

        
70 pounds bacon, 47 pounds pork,
90 pounds beans, 70 pounds salt,
25 pounds coffee, 220 pounds sugar,
69 pounds fish, 38 pounds soap,
551 pounds flour, 31 pounds tobacco,
13 pounds lard, 2 citizen suits,
43 gallons molasses, 46 pounds soda,
38 gallons oil, 75 pounds wheat,
160 pounds potatoes, 43 hats,
130 pounds peas, 6 pairs shoes.
20 pounds sausage,  

CASTLE HAYNE INVENTORY, JANUARY, 1, 1895.

OFFICERS' DEPARTMENT.

        
1 water set, 1 coffeepot,
5 mattresses, 13 knives and forks,
15 pairs blankets, 1 butter dish,
6 pillows, 4 tablespoons,


Page 74

        
12 pillowcases, 10 teaspoons,
8 sheets, 2 dippers,
4 bedsteads, 4 water buckets,
6 towels, 11 chairs,
2 bowls and pitchers, 6 jars,
8 plates, 2 tables,
6 cups and saucers, 1 desk,
7 dishes, 1 teapot,
1 sugar bowl, 8 goblets,
1 pitcher, 1 coffeepot,
1 molasses pot, 2 lamps,
5 salt cellars, 1 provision safe,
2 vinegar and pepper cruets, 3 bed springs.

OVERSEERS AND GUARDS.

        
16 plates, 3 baking pans,
15 cups and saucers, 1 coffee roaster,
3 dishes, 1 bread tray,
1 sugarbowl, 3 sifters,
2 milk pitchers, 3 butcher knives,
2 molasses pots, 1 measure,
2 salt cellars, 2 lamps,
2 vinegar and pepper cruets, 2 lamps, swinging,
1 coffeepot, 4 milk pans,
14 knives and forks, 2 milk buckets and strainers,
6 tablespoons, 1 sausage mill,
10 teaspoons, 1 sausage stuffer,
6 dippers, 1 clock,
6 water buckets, 2 yards oil cloth,
2 dish pans, 11 mattresses,
2 stew pans, 8 pillows,
5 wash pans, 20 pillowcases,
2 tin buckets, 20 sheets,
1 cook stove, 22 pairs blankets,
4 pots and kettles, 6 towels.
5 frying pans,  

PRISONERS.

        
4 dippers, 4 cauldrons,
94 plates (tin) 8 water buckets,
98 cups (tin), 33 tin basins,
10 knives and forks, 19 lanterns,
12 vinegar bottles, 2 lantern frames,
24 spoons, 6 wash tubs,


Page 75

        
7 stoves, 46 bedsticks,
7 baking pans, 86 pairs blankets,
1 coffeemill, 30 towels.
5 flesh forks,  

MACHINERY AND TOOLS.

        
4 wagons, 2 furnace fronts,
10 carts, 1 pump,
10 sets cart harness, 1 set blacksmith tools,
4 sets wagon harness, 1 set carpenter tools,
49 wheelbarrows, 1 platform scales,
50 shovels, 2 pairs balances,
10 mattocks, 1 feed cutter,
13 picks, ½ dozen curry combs,
18 axes, 24 kegs powder,
55 hoes, 350 pounds dynamite,
1 harrow, 2,300 feet fuse,
6 cultivators, 1,100 caps,
2 peanut planters, 4 crowbars,
4 guano distributors, 4 driving hammers,
2 railroad plows, 6 sprawl hammers,
36 farm plows, 20 feet 1¼ inch steel,
5 saddles, 26 horse collars,
5 riding bridles, 29 bridles,
1 bell, 2 Cox cotton planters,
1 road cart and harness, 1 8-horse power boiler and engine.
20 pairs harness and traces,  

STOCK.

        
18 fattening hogs, 1 bull,
41 shotes, 2 yearlings,
20 sows and boars, 6 calves,
34 pigs, 17 mules,
5 cows, 20 chickens,

FARM PRODUCTS.

        
100 bushels peas, 326,000 pounds peanut hay,
49,982 pounds shucks, 6,600 pounds peanuts,
2,679 bushels corn, 600 bushels sweet potatoes.
47,923 pounds fodder,  

PROVISIONS AND SUPPLIES.

        
16 pairs wool pants, 558 pounds bacon,
68 lamp chimneys, 51 pounds coffee,
12 lampwicks, 25 pounds fish,


Page 76

        
18 spools thread, 501 pounds flour,
60 balls thread, 27 boxes lye,
33 hats, 32 gallons molasses,
130 shirts, 1,215 pounds meal,
54 pairs shoes, 52 gallons oil,
10 coats, 1,912 pounds pork,
200 pounds copperas, 17 pounds salt,
35 gallons vinegar, 213 pounds sugar,
24 pounds soda, 11 pounds soap,
3 citizen suits, 55 pounds tobacco,
12 pounds baking powders, 11 pounds leather (sole),
325 pounds lard, Stock of drugs.

INVENTORY OF PROPERTY AT GREYSTONE, JANUARY 1, 1895.

        
1 cookstove (improved Lee), 6 window sash,
2 stove pots, 1 stoveback for improved Lee, No. 9 stove,
2 post-hole diggers,  
1 plow, 22 joints stovepipe,
2 picks, 1 Fairbanks scales,
2 cauldrons, 1 small counter scales,
6 washbasins, 8 water buckets
3 small stoves, 6 lamps and chimneys,
4 bread pans, 1 coffeepot,
3 chairs, 9 cups and saucers,
6 camp stools, 6 shackles.

        

I, A. Leazar, do solemnly swear that the above inventories include all the property of the North Carolina Penitentiary, to the best of my knowledge and belief: So help me, God.

A. LEAZAR,
Superintendent of the State's Prison.

        

Sworn and subscribed to before me, this the 4th day of January, 1895.

J. J. BERNARD,
Clerk State Penitentiary.