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A Short History of the Life of Christopher McPherson,
Alias, Pherson, Son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords: Containing a Collection of Certificates, Letters, &c. Written by Himself.

Electronic Edition.

McPherson, Christopher, b. 1763?


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First edition, 2003
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Academic Affairs Library, UNC-CH
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,
2003.

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(title page) A Short History of the Life of Christopher McPherson, Alias, Pherson, Son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords: Containing a Collection of Certificates, Letters, &c. Written by Himself.
McPherson, Christopher, b. 1763?
Second Edition, with the Original Dedication and Preface.
40 p.
Lynchburg, Va:
Published by Christopher McPherson Smith
Printed at the Virginian Job Office
1855.


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[Title Page Image]


A SHORT HISTORY
OF THE
Life of Christopher McPherson,
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
KING OF KINGS AND LORD OF LORDS:
CONTAINING
A Collection of Certificates, Letters, &c.
WRITTEN BY HIMSELF.

SECOND EDITION,
WITH THE ORIGINAL DEDICATION AND PREFACE.

LYNCHBURG, VA:
PUBLISHED BY CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON SMITH.
PRINTED AT THE VIRGINIAN JOB OFFICE,
1855.


Page 3

TO ALL THE
INHABITERS OF THE EARTH,
AND MORE ESPECIALLY TO THE
CITIZENS OF THESE UNITED STATES,
THE
FOLLOWING PAGES ARE MOST HUMBLY INSCRIBED
BY THEIR FRIEND AND HUMBLE SERVANT,
CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON.

        Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the the city of Richmond, and State of Virginia, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, 1811, the 35th year of Columbian Independence, and the 13th year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium of Christ Jesus our Lord.

CHRIST. McPHERSON, (Seal.)
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, (Seal.)


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PREFACE.

        I am well aware that, in a country where "the freedom of the press is one of the great bulwarks of liberty, and can never be restrained but by despotic governments," and also in an age of reason and light that mankind would readily detect and expose any attempt towards imposition. I, therefore, in the conscious rectitude of my heart, the more readily mean to declare to the world, in an open and candid manner, all that is proper and necessary of what Omnipotence has given me in charge to disclose; and any man like Jonah, who shrinks from the mandates of his God, deserves countenance from no quarter whatever.

        Can there exist a doubt in a thinking mind that the Great Almighty Creator, who saw from the beginning, throughout to the end, will not bring about His all-wise decrees in the very express manner and form he thinks proper? All nature is spread before us. The Grand Word of God, the Bible, contains minute descriptions of miracles upon miracles, as well as of those which are still to come. It, therefore, appears plain to me that the only enquiry now is, whether my words deserve credit or not. Let the folllowing pages determine that question.

CHRIST. McPHERSON,
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords,


Page 5

A Short History of the Author's Life.

        The endeavor to keep up a connected train of circumstances, must apologize for repetitions in this compilation, as the documents will follow in rotation to support that train.

        I was brought up and emancipated by David Ross, esq. In time of the Revolutionary war, I was clerk to the Commercial Agent for the State of Virginia, and clerk for one of the Commissary Generals at the seige of Yorktown, in Virginia. I afterwards remained store-keeper and clerk for David Ross, esq., now living, until the 15th day of February, 1799; when in his office, at Columbia Virginia, I was converted to the true Faith of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. I was shewn by the Holy Spirit in many visions, that these United States were the new Zion, the new Jerusalem of the Lord God, and he held them as the apple of his eye; and a new name was given me, and I was appointed a messenger to the world, and the word was to be given me from time to time. Soon after this, in the same year, the differences that subsisted between Mr. Ross' family and myself had grown to such a pitch, that I was obliged to leave his employ. I commenced suit against a son of his, which made it necessary for me to get certificates of my character, to be found herein, dated in 1799. On my leaving Mr. Ross, the Holy Spirit commanded me, and I cried aloud through the streets of Richmond, Williamsburg, Norfolk and Portsmouth, of the approach of Christ's Millennium, his reign in this world of 1,000 years. Whilst in Norfolk I wrote to several leading characters in the Union, advising of this event. (Copies of which letters are under cover of my letter of seven seals.) I was then commanded to go to Philadelphia and deliver a message from Omnipotence to President Adams and the Senate of the United States, which is of the utmost importance to the world, and particularly so to these United States, as well as to myself; they, however, did not act upon it. I remained in Philadelphia that winter, and wrote for the penitentiary there, and also enrolled for Congress; whilst there I was offered $1,000 per annum, board, &c., to school people of color, but I was commanded of the Holy Spirit, and in the spring of 1800 I returned to Virginia, and married a lady of my own color, named Polly Burgess, and sat in and worked with uncommon ardor, night and day, both for


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in and worked with uncommon ardor, night and day, both for public and private offices, &c., to be proved by the following list. In this way, ten years had nearly elapsed, when in the summer of 1810 the Holy Spirit commanded, and I sent into the common hall for the city of Richmond, a petition of the people of color, praying for a new burying ground, as the old one, in every respect, was perfectly unfit for the purpose, and to this day I have heard of no appropriation to this effect. The same day this petition was presented, the hall passed an ordinance, restricting free people of color from using hired carriages. I remonstrated by letter to four members of the hall; but getting no redress, I published in the Gazettes that I intended to petition the next general assembly for relief, and of course prepared certificates of my character, to be found under date of 1810, as well as the petition itself. The committee reported it reasonable, but it was lost in the assembly by a majority of three. I immediately bought me a hack and a pair of horses, and carried my invalid family to meeting to serve the Lord. Whilst before the committee of the general assembly of Virginia, I was commanded of the Holy spirit, and among other communications I delivered them a copy of the message which about ten years before I had delivered to President Adams, with the documents attending it, covered by a letter of seven black seals. This was not acted upon by them, and although the contents of this letter was of the highest consequence to the world, and especially to these United States, and to myself, yet some time after the rising of the assembly, none of these papers could be found, except a copy of the letter of seven seals which had been separately deposited. Being engaged in a mercantile line of life, and having made shipments of tobacco, &c., to Europe, I had repeatedly applied to the bank of Virginia for a loan towards the prosecution of my business, and although I offered several good endorsers, and one of them holding upwards of twenty-six shares in the bank, no discount was granted me. In the spring of 1811, I found in the city of Richmond a night school, chiefly for free male adults of colour, and obtained a competent white tutor on liberal wages to keep it, and, on the 10th of last March, recommended in the public prints, similar institutions throughout the Union. This advertisement was suppressed in the paper called the Argus, by some influential characters, and the editor on the 14th of the same month published an apology for the suppression. Two days after the tutor of the school published, in the same paper, his determination to stick by the school, unless it was put down by a verdict from


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a proper tribunal. A few days afterwards the sergeant of the city served me with a summons to appear before the court af hustings, to shew cause why an information should not be filed against me, on behalf of the commonwealth, for a nuisance, for publishing an encouragement for night schools for people of colour, &c.; I attended the April court, and got leave to plead my own cause; the case, however, was postponed 'till the next court in May; on coming out of court in April, I immediately advertised in the papers, that I intended to establish in the city of Richmond, a seminary of learning of the arts and sciences, and of the living languages, as soon as I could get proper tutors, for the benefit, chiefly, of free people of colour. About this time, there happened a small difference betwixt myself and wife, about my horses and driver of my hack; this however, was soon made up and when quiet in our own house, a neighbor opened the gate, came into our house with another person, and disturbed our quiet—he was requested to retire, and of course went off, but immediately brought the master of police with a constable, and without more ado, both myself and wife were sent to jail, where we remained the night, and could not get out 'till bail bonds were given for our appearance at next court. The court on trial cleared us immediately with eclat. But no satisfaction was offered for the insult and injury of imprisonment, &c. This transaction brought fresh to mind, the many foils experienced since the year 1800, in the repeated attempts I had made to obtain justice; and although "man is man, and all the sex are one;" yet I considered that under existing circumstances, in the State of Virginia, a man of colour at present, had but a slender chance of success, in going to law with weighty officers of the land. I therefore concluded to make an innocent noise in my own house, by singing, dancing, &c. and walking the streets harmlessly with my cane in hand, bareheaded, &c., in so conspicuous a manner, as to draw the attention of influential characters, who being induced to ask me the cause, might on hearing my complaint, have formed some plan towards palliating my grievances. In this manner, on the 23d of May, 1811, I was going through Richmond trying to raise money to pay into the bank, and refund some I had borrowed, to which end I offered double the amount wanted, of personal property in hand, to the money holders, and to the president and cashier, of the bank, as noted, all without effect; in the midst of my career, I was taken up by the mandate of the master of police, and carried before a called court. I told them I was extremely ill treated, and explained in what


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manner, and assured them on the word of a man of strict honor, that I had a new name, Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, and prevailed on them to read the 19th chapter of the Revalations, which contains my appointment. They, however, listened not to my argument, and doomed me a lunatic, and sent me forthwith to jail, where I remained three weeks, and then was sent to the hospital in Williamsburg, which by-the-bye, was a fortunate move for me, in many respects.

        I was very sick in jail, the tone of my stomach was so changed, that it would retain scarcely any thing. My estate was put into the hands of others—my notes were protested at bank—my other debts remained unpaid—my property seized by the sheriffs for pretended claims, and sold for less than half cost—my workmen in the country left their work—my family thrown into confusion, poverty and distress—myself buried alive, as it were, whilst I might have been earning by my labor, half a dollar or a dollar per hour—loss of bargains—my credit gone, and in fact, the whole of my affairs were in the high road, going fast to ruin. And this was the humane treatment which the magistrates of the city of Richmond shewed to a man who had faithfully served his country in every direction all his life, whilst as a messenger of the Great God, they should have fostered him, and cried out aloud, "Blessed is he that cometh in the name of the Lord: Hosanna in the highest"—for behold! I most positively declare, "I bring you good tidings of great joy, which shall be to all people," and more especially to these United States of Columbia. During my stay in jail, I appealed by letter to most of the respectable citizens of the city, and to the Chancellor of the State, as noted, without redress, and in the meanwhile I advertised that I intended to petition Congress for them to take my letter of seven black seals and its contents into their serious consideration. I also wrote messages from Omnipotence to the King of Great Britain, Napoleon Bonaparte, the Pope of Rome, and to other potentates, &c.

        After being confined a while in the hospital at Williamsburg, I was introduced to the court of directors. They very politely asked me to seat myself, and spoke in such terms of tenderness, and with such a fellow feeling, as would have done high honor to the several Judges of the twelve tribes of Israel. They questioned me upon many points, and patiently heard my answers and arguments, and at length discharged me with eclat, as noted, "an honest man is the noblest work of God." Let them be asked what construction


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they placed on the decision of the court at Richmond, Then, thought I, as justice in all its dignity hath appeared at the old capitol of the Old Dominion, it will surely soon find its way to the new capitol of the Old Dominion, and from thence spread itself, in all directions, all over the world, coincident with ancient holy writ, which expressly says, that the law of the world was to go from the Old Dominion. Search the Scriptures and see this land, and the present time emphatically pointed out by Isaiah and others. Therefore, like a large stone dropped from an eminence into the middle of a spacious round pond of still water, it will make a frill from the centre, which will reach each bank all round, at one and the same time; or in other words, it may appear similar to the origin, growth and fullness of the Christian religion.

        Happy, happy, thrice happy land! thought I, now I begin to see the dawn of New Zion. New Jerusalem begins to rise to my view; and the sincere prayer of my heart is, that it may speedily mount to its zenith of glory, and spread its divine rays all over the terraqueous globe!

        From Williamsburg I went to Norfolk, and had printed many copies of the note of my conversion and commission, and pasted them up in Norfolk and Portsmouth. Whilst in Norfolk, I was singing one evening in my lodgings, and two watchmen of the borough pulled me out of bed, and threw me into the cage, and caused loss of the silver seals of my appointment. I mean to try at their next district court if I cannot obtain some degree of justice from the borough for this inhospitable outrage. As I passed through Hampton, where I again stuck up my notes, a certain pilot by the name of William Parish, whom I did not know, came on board of Robert Thomas' packet boat, where I had taken lodgings, because I could not get any in the town, on Sunday night, the 23d of June, 1811, and without any provocation whatever on my part, gave me a most unmerciful drubbing, and bruised me in such a manner, that next morning it was judged proper, and there was let from me a quart of blood. A companion of his, is witness to this affair—another pilot named James Hicks; there were also present two black men on board. Next morning I indicted Parish, and sued him in $1,000 damages, to be tried in Hampton, at September term. I left my printed notes in every public place, 'till I reached the city of Richmond, where, on my arrival, I pasted them through the city, and at the same time made a great outcry of the commission I bore. Next day I fixed them up


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in the most public places in Manchester, and the day following, I went to Petersburg, and there pasted them up at the most public places, and whilst I was detained there by sickness, a few days, I wrote several letters, which are noted. On my return, I commenced suits in the District Court of Richmond, for September term next, viz: against the Commonwealth of Virginia, levied on the Attorney General for the State, for the recovery of my letter of seven black seals, with all its contents, damages 10,000 times 10,000 millions of dollars; against a certain doctor, by the name of James Drew McCaw, for entering my gate and house without being called for, and disturbing the peace of my family, and afterwards causing the master of police for the city of Richmond to come to my house without a just cause, damages $20,000; against the master of police for entering my gate and door, and imprisoning myself and wife without a just cause, damages $50,000; against Dr. John Adams, one of the called court, who, after he had heard my protestations, and read at my request, the 19th chapter of Revelations, where I showed him I was King of Kings and Lord of Lords; he first gave it as his opinion, that I was a lunatic, and was at the instance of my imprisonment, &c., damages $100,000; and against every magistrate of the city of Richmond, who sat on the bench on my trial, as to the charge of lunacy, and acquiesced in my imprisonment, &c., &c., damages $100,000 each.

        I now most particularly call the attention of the public to this grand point: that I sue not for the justice that is due me in my private and individual character, as a citizen of these United States, under certain restrictions, as in that case I should scarcely have made any stir in the affair at all; but I sue for justice to be established, and to be rendered to the Great Creator Almighty God, thro' his embassador Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, and the amount of damage is fixed to satisfy the insult and injury offered the dignified personage represented, on a ratio similar to an indignity offered through an embassador, by one potentate of the earth to another.

        When the honorable courts, and the gentlemen of the jury see the humble Christopher McPherson standing before them, they positively and most unequivocally see the true, real-established, and declared representative of Christ Jesus the Lord of Glory, in the actual stead of himself, petitioning them for justice—who wants nothing more from them than pure and impartial justice, and justice only. God the Son and


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God the Holy Ghost, have complied with their part of the contract, and as this is the time, they have desired me to demand publicly of God the Father, to yield them the kingdom of this world, in peace, love and justice. The seat of government is New Zion, New Jerusalem, the United States of Columbia, where the Jews are restored, as was promised, and by a copious view it will be found that the wife hath made herself ready, for the true Jew is the one who is made so by the Holy Spirit of Christ Jesus our Lord; and thank God, that spirit in the heart of man, is at present, more prevalent in this land than elsewhere, as is fully evinced by the flourishing state of Christ's Church, throughout the Union.

        Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, Virginia, on the 4th day of August, and 35th year of Columbian Independence, and the 13th year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRIST. McPHERSON,
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords.


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Certificates, &c.

        The bearer hereof, Christopher McPherson, a free man of color, having applied to me to say what I know respecting him, this may certify that I remember the said Christopher McPherson since he was a child, and have understood that he was the son of Mr. Charles McPherson, a Scotish gentleman, formerly in the business of Alexander Baine, esq.; his mother a black woman, named Clarinda, and at the time of his birth, I've understood, she belonged to Judethan Harper, then a resident in Louisa county.

ELIZABETH PRICE.

8th May, 1799.

        I, Francis Clarke, of Fluvanna county, do hereby certify, that between the years 1760 and 1764, I was well acquainted with a very shining black woman, by the name of Clarinda, said to be the mother of a man of color who is well known in Virginia, by the name of Christopher McPherson, clerk to David Ross, esq. The said woman was slave to the widow Winston, who, at that time, lived in Louisa; and a certain Judethan Harper, shop-joiner, married the said widow. Mr. Alexander Baine had a store at the residence of the said widow Winston's, and a certain Charles McPherson, a Scotchman, was the manager of it, and it was currently reported, and generally believed, that the said Charles McPherson was the father of the before named Christopher McPherson, son to the afore-mentioned Clarinda, who afterwards became the property of the aforesaid David Ross, esq.

Given under my hand, in Fluvanna county, the 12th of May, 1799.

FRANCIS CLARKE.

Teste—BECKY QUARLES.

        To all to who these presents may come, or in any manner concern: Know ye, that I, David Ross, of the city of Richmond, as a reward for the fidelity and integrity of Christopher McPherson, well known to me from his earliest years to this date; although doomed to slavery, under the laws of this State, I have long since emancipated him, and this day give it all the forms required by law; Whereof, in consideration aforesaid, and the further consideration of five shillings to me in hand paid, by the said mulatto man Christopher MePherson, aged twenty-nine or thereabouts, I do, by these presents, emancipate and set free the said Christopher, and I, for myself, my heirs, executors and administrators, do relinquish all my right, title, interest and claim, whatsoever, as a slave, to the said Christopher, either to his person, or to any estate he may acquire, without any interruption from me, or any other person or persons claiming by, from, or under me, hereby acknowledging the said Christopher McPherson to be henceforth entitled to all the privileges of a free born person. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand, and affixed my seal, this second day of June, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two.

DAVID ROSS, Seal.]

Teste—WILLIAM PASTEUR,

WILLIAM VANNERSON,

LEWN. JONES.


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RICHMOND, 1st January, 1805.

        Christopher McPherson, you are hereby authorized to adjust and collect, from time to time, as occasion may require it, the debts due to myself, as well as those due to John Lesslie & Co.

JOHN LESSLIE.

Teste—JOHN ENNES.

        We, the undersigned, did agree with Christopher McPherson, on the 28th day of November, 1809, to pay him half a dollar per hour, for posting our books.

BOHN & HUBNER.

RICHMOND, Dec. 8th, 1809.

The above is a true copy.

SAMUEL SUBLETT.

List of Gentleman who have employed Christopher McPherson as clerk, since his
return, in the year 1800, from Philadelphia.

        Wm. W. Hening; Peter Tinsley; Henry Banks; Edward Carrington; Edmund Randolph; John Wickman; Magee, Watkins & Co.; Bartlett Still; John Lesslie; Brown, Rives & Co.; Nathaniel Anderson; James Currie; Gen. John Marshall; William Hay; Samuel Clarke; John Brown; Wilson Allen; George Wythe; James Gibbon; John Cringan; J. & W. Friend & Co.; Kewen & Allen; James Shippard; William Marshall; Archibald Freeland; William Fenwick; Brown & Rives; John Warden; James Brown; Pickett, Pollard & Johnston; George Pickett; Robert Pollard; Charles Johnston; Bryson & Parkhill; Bohn & Hubner; Bream & Follett; James Bream; Daniel Call; Wm. C. Williams; John Campbell; Gen. Andrew Moore; David Barclay; John Lesslie & Co., &c., &c.

Petition presented to the General Assembly, session of 1810,
1811, with extracts from the documents and certificates that
accompained the same.

        To the honorable, the General Assembly of the State of Virginia: The petition of Christopher McPherson humbly sheweth: That by an ordinance for the corporation of the city of Richmond, passed on the 18th June, 1810, entitled an ordinance to amend an ordinance for regulating wagons, drays and carts, and for other purposes, it is provided that no person shall keep for hire, any gig, chair or other carriage, without causing the same to be registered, and taking out a license therefor; and it is provided, that previously to registering and granting such license, bond and security in the penalty of two hundred dollars, shall be given with condition, that no negro or mulatto shall be permitted to use the same, except in the capacity of maid or servant to some lady or gentleman, hiring and riding therein. Your petitioner further sheweth, that he is a free person, and a native of Virginia, and has a family; that being a mulatto, he and


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his family come within the provision of the said ordinance, and a house-keeper and owner of real property of considerable value in the said city, acquired by a life of long and laborious industry. He further begs leave, humbly to represent, that during the revolutionary war, he was employed as clerk for the commercial agent for the State of Virginia, and clerk of one of the Commissary Generals at the siege of Yorktown—that he afterwards was employed by the clerk of Congress as an enrolling clerk, and has since been employed as a clerk in different public offices, both under the general and State governments—and by merchants and others, in examining and settling accounts, and other business of that nature which requires fidelity, industry and a knowledge of accounts. Your petitioner trusts he may say, without fear of contradiction, that he has given general satisfaction to his employers, and that he has uniformly sustained and deserved the character of an honest, industrious man; that your petitioner and his wife, being both advanced in life, and occasionally subject to disease; it has happened, and may again happen, that the occasional use of a carriage, when they are unable to walk, may be necessary not only for their comfort but their health; and for the carrying on the business of your petitioner, which lays in various parts of the said city. Your petitioner submits without a murmur to those laws of the commonwealth which impose disabilities on that class of people to which he belongs, and as he is not disposed to deny that there may be persons with respect to whom the ordinance aforesaid might properly apply, but he humbly conceives that the said ordinance is unjust as it respects himself and family, and that it deprives him of rights to which he is entitled under the laws and constitution of this commonwealth. Your petioner humbly begs leave to state, that he has represented his case to a number of the members of the corporation of the city of Richmond, by letter, requesting that his case might be laid before the Common Hall, and that he might be exempted from the provisions of the said ordiance; but hath not been able to obtain a decision thereon. Your petitioner is and always has been disposed to conform to all such laws and rules as the public good might be thought to require by those placed in authority; nor would he now complain, did he not sustain real inconvenience from the said ordinance, and were he not apprehensive, that as he and his wife grow older and more infirm, this inconvenience will be greatly heightened. Wherefore your petitioner humbly prays that your honorable body will be pleased to take his case into consideration, and that he may


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be protected in the enjoyment of such rights, as are given him by the general laws of this commonwealth; and that your honorable body will be pleased to enact such regulations as will prevent those rights from being infringed. And your petitioner, as in duty bound, will ever pray, &c.

        With the above petition, was presented a vast number of certificates and letters, relative to the character, usefulness and talents of the petitioner, a very few of which are here extracted.

A certificate obtained in the county of Fluvanna, dated 6th May, 1799, signed by
the principal citizens of the county.

        Certificate of the Chancellor of State.—Of Christopher McPherson I have heard said many good words, and never an ill word; from my own observation I believe him to have deserved well.

G. WYTHE.

May 20th, 1799.

        We have been acquainted with Christopher McPherson, a free man of color for a long time past, he having resided many years in the city of Richmond, of which we are inhabitants, and having been generally employed during that time as clerk in different public and private offices, and counting-houses in said city, and have ever considered him as a person of integrity, industry, and general good conduct. His skill in accounts, and general knowledge of business, in addition to his other qualifications, have occasioned his being much employed in the line of his business, in matters of difficulty, that required skill, care and attention. And we have every reason to believe that he has given great satisfaction to his employers.

RICHMOND, 11th Nov., 1810.

        William W. Hening, Payton Drew, Charles Blagrove, has not had occasion to employ in his service the above named Christopher McPherson, but has known him for several years, and believes him to deserve the reputation and character herein stated.

        William Dabney, Samuel Greenhow, James D. McCaw, Robert Pollard, George Pickett, sr., Edmund Randolph, George Fisher, H. Dance, John D. Blair, as to his good behavior, the rest he believes from report.

        John Wickham, Thomas Marshall, Benjamin Botts, William Wirt, John Warden, William Forester, J. B. Dandridge can confidently testify as to the extraordinary industry and fidelity of Christopher McPherson, having known him first in the employment of the late most worthy clerk of the Chancery Court, and there been an eye witness of his labors, day and night, and last in the late office of the Supervisor for Virginia, where he received the enormous wages, of from 23 shillings to four dollars per diem, which was thought to be judiciously paid by the best officers. C. McP. at one time, accomplished in about three days, a piece of work assigned by the clerk of the C. C. for two weeks' labor; this that officer often told with astonishment. J. B. D., William Robertson, William Dandridge, William Nekervis, Thomas Norvel, Miles Selden, has been acquainted with Christopher McPherson, for twenty years, and coincides in opinion with the above subscribers.


Page 16

        Creed Taylor, A. B. Venable, James Brown, John Graham, William Brown, James Innes, John Lesslie, James Kirby, Norman Stuart, George Greenhow, Benjamin Stetson, Isaac Webster, William Moncure, C. J. Macmurdo, Daniel Warwick, T. Gwathmey, jr., John G. Smith, James Shiphard, James Scott, Samuel Clark, William McKenzie, Wm. Galt, Wm. Prichard, Robert Gamble, Henry Tompkins, J. Gibbon, has had C. McP. in his employ, and was well satisfied of both his capacity and good conduct.

        Archibald Denholm, Edwin James Harvie, Wm. Temple, William Young, Nathaniel Staples, Wm. Foushee, Gervas Storrs. Benjamin Shippard, Wm. Wardlaw, Wm. H. Fitzwhylsonn, D. Lambert, Henry S. Shore, Alexander Kerr, Robert Graham, George Dabney, Philip N. Nicholas, Wm. Fenwick, Robert Mitchell, Samuel Pleasants. J. Darmsdatt, Edmund Taylor, Joseph Trent, John Price, John Buchanan, Daniel L. Hylton, John Brockenbrough; J. Preston has heard a very favorable report of the talents and integrity of Christopher McPherson.

        J. Marshall, Wm. Murphy, Peter Crutchfield, David Bullock, Anderson Barrett, Mary Randolph, Thomas Wilson, has been many years acquainted with Christopher McPherson, and has employed him in his office occasionally, much to his satisfaction.

        Robert Quarles, Richard Adams, Richard C. Wortham, George Marx, C. Copland, Jos. Marx, Wm. Rawleigh, F. Wiatt, Wm. B. Page, Wm. Oden, Thomas Baker, Martin Baker, jr., Alexander Quarles, E. Smock, James S. Smithers, Wm. Ross, Thos. Pulling, John Craddock, Richard Young, William Rowlett, Samuel White, Thomas Burton, jr., Hugh Davis, William Cook, Cassper Fleisher, Samuel Myers. Bently Anderson was an assistant clerk for Mr. Tinsley, in the Chancery office, when Christopher McPherson did a great deal of writing in said office, and believes he was the first who suggested the convenience of an alphabet to the court docket, which is made out in his own hand-writing.

        I do hereby certify, that some time about the year 1798, while Christopher McPherson resided near to the town of Columbia, in Fluvanna county, and acted as chief clerk in the office of David Ross, esq., I resided in the said town, and then commanded a battalion of the militia; that some time on a Sunday's evening, notice was given to me that a large number of negroes had collected near to Mr. Ross's office, in a most riotous manner, and that it was apprehended some of them would be murdered, as they had taken sides, and were on the point of engaging in battle, with sticks, clubs, &c. I instantly mounted my horse and rode in haste, with my sword and pistols to the place; when I came near the spot, I found that the information I had received was correct; and seeing about 30 or 40 negroes collected, and having only one or two white men with me, I was apprehensive it would be difficult to reduce them to order, as most of them appeared to be drunk and violently enraged. I, however, rushed in among them, and having ordered the first I came up with to be silent, and not move a step from the spot until I could have the whole collected and brought into town for trial before a magistrate, and not being obeyed, proceeded to strike two or three of them; just at this moment I perceived Christopher McPherson at some small distance from me in the edge of ths woods, with a sword drawn, (and he being a mulatto,) I did not know, (notwithstanding his general good and peaceable behavior,) but he might be concerned in the riot. I rode instantly towards him, and as soon as I could hear distinctly what he said, I heard him declare that he would cut off the arm of the first negro who should strike a blow; and endeavoring by every means in his power to suppress the riot, which, with his assistance, was shortly done, and the principals punished.


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        I have been acquainted with Christopher McPherson, about 15 or 16 years, and always found him a well-behaved, orderly and peaceable man. And in the instance above mentioned he acted in a most exemplary and courageous manner, exposing his own person to imminent danger to preserve peace and order.

Given under my hand, this 25th day of November, 1810.

JOHN QUARLES.

Outlines of the life of Christopher McPherson, born in
Louisa county, Virginia, as well as can be recollected.

        
1770. I was sent to school, in Goochland, near the court-house—remained 1¾ years.
1772. Went behind the counter in the Elk Horn store at Petersburg.
1775. Commerce stop'd—at the end of the year retired from the store.
1776-7. Schooling children, &c.
1778. to 1781 Clerk for the commercial agent for this State; during this time, and at the siege of York Town, was also Clerk for one of the Commissary Generals, and otherwise rendered essential serivce for the Continental Army.
1782-3. Clerk for David Ross, esq.
1784. Principal store-keeper for David Ross, esq., 'till the end of the year 1787, when the store was closed. Whilst 8 or 10 white gentlemen were under my directions, (I mustered in this time, which I disliked.)
1788. to 1799. Was principal clerk to D. Ross, esq., whilst 2 to 6 white gentlemen were under me. (In summer '99, I quitted Mr. Ross.) 'Twas, I think, in 1797 that a riot was passing in the road by my door near Columbia, of a number of slaves. I turned out with my sword, in order to suppress it, without expecting any help. Major John Quarles' certificate goes to prove that with my help mischief was prevented.
1799. (Winter,) enrolled for Congress 'till spring 1800.
1800. (Spring,) Mr. Jefferson introduced me by letter to Mr. Madison. I sat at table, evening and morning with Mr. Madison, his lady and company, and enjoyed a full share of the conversation.
1800. Clerk for Mr. W. W. Hening—investigating British claims, &c.
1800. Nominated by Mr. James Ross, brother to D. Ross, esq., his principal executor by will, as per probate obtained from the court of Fluvanna county.


Page 18

        
1800. Clerk in the office of the high court of chancery.
1801. Clerk for Col. Carrington, as supervisor, and in the office of H. C. Chancery.
1802. Clerk in H. C. Chancery, and for others; and I then invented an index for the court docket of the H. C. Chancery, which index, 'twas said by several attorneys at the bar, expedited the business every session, to about three days more business than would have been done without it. (Query, what did this save the public at large?)
1802. I was witness for a man of colour, when my oath was taken by the jury in the district court, in preference to the opposite oaths of two white witnesses.
1803. to 1810 inclusive: Clerk for all the principal offices both under the general and State governments, and for judges, lawyers, merchants, &c., &c., &c. in this city.

        I have paid voluntarily, out of my own pocket, near $100 towards improving the two streets on which I live, and have given $30 as a donation towards building a seminary of learning, in the suburbs of this city.

        Throughtout the whole course of my life, I have been considered by my numerous white acquaintance as one of their number, and they have uniformily treated me as such.

        I can prove all the above by very many substantial witnesses.

        After all these testimonials of my character, and what has been unthinkingly done by the common hall, I leave the honorable the general assembly to judge, that if they have, in former laws, overlooked my rights, or never knew of the services I have rendered my country, whether it would not now be an act of justice towards me to pass a special law, granting me the rights and privileges which may appear to them that I merit.

CHRIST McPHERSON.

RICHMOND, 23d December, 1810.

(COPY.)

RICHMOND, April 6th, 1810.

        I do hereby certify, that the writings on the nine pages preceding this, are true copies of the original documents filed in my office.

WM. MUMFORD,
Keeper of the rolls for the Commonwealth of Virginia.

(COPY.)

RICHMOND, Monday, 10th Dec., 1810.

        Christopher McPherson, to the honorable the committee for courts of justice, of the General Assembly of the Old dominion and State of Virginia.


Page 19

        I beg leave to introduce myself to you, as being that very express personage, who is set forth in the Revalations of St. John, the Divine, in the 11th and 16th verses of the 19th chapter, and the first verse of the 20th chapter. To the truth of this assertion, I take my Almighty God to witness, and he will prove the same if you require it of him.

        I have the happiness to announce to you and to the world, that the glorious Millennium was planted on this earth on the 15th day of February, in the year of our Lord 1799.

        Omnipotence, out of his great goodness and peculiar distinction towards you, desires me to inform you, that now, it is his wish, that the first acts of his reign on earth shall emanate from you; and that you are to enact laws, founded upon the pure and sacred principles of truth and justice, reason and religion, peace and harmony, and love and unity, which no doubt will be crowned with faith and power and glory.

        John Adams, late President of the United States, and the Senate of the same, failed to pay the attention which was due to his most gracious message, as is contained in the inclosed address. Our Almighty and most glorious Father, therefore, now delegates that message to you; and after mature deliberation, he wishes you to make a solemn and earnest prayer, for his Almighty will to be forthwith done and he will, to your perfect satisfaction, that moment confirm this embassy. Inclosed are documents respecting this businesss, agreeable to the list stated.

I am, gentlemen,
Your friend and servant,

PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
ALIAS
FIERCE SON OF CHRIST.

A list of copies and originals herewith enclosed.

        
No. 1. C. McP's letter to the President of the U. States of America, dated 26th June, 1799.
2. C. McP's letter to John K. Reid, Mayor of Norfolk, dated 4th July, 1799.
3. Certificate of P. Herbert, James Taylor and James Lewelling, dated 5th July, 1799.
4. Certificate of William King, magistrate in Portsmouth, dated 5th July, 1799.
5. C. McP's letter to King, magistrate in Portsmouth, dated 5th July, 1799.
6. C. McP's letter to the mayor and alderman of Norfolk, dated 8th July, 1799.
7. C. McP's letter to Samuel Mosley and Samuel Coleman, aldermen of Norfolk, dated 16th July, 1799.
8. J. K. Reid's (mayor of Norfolk) letter to David Ross, dated 31st July, 1799.
9. C McP's letter to Gen. George Washington, dated 15th Oct. 1799.
10. Certificate of John K. Reid, mayor of Norfolk, dated 21st July, 1799.
11. C. McP's letters to John Adams, President of the United States, dated 27th and 29th Nov., 1799.
12. C. McP's letters to Stephen T. Mason and Wilson C. Nicholas, senators of the U. States, dated 29th January, 1800.
13. C. McP's address to the President of the U. States, and the Senate of the same, dated 28th January, 1800.
14. C. McP's letters to John Adams, President of the United States, dated 29th and 31st January, 1800.
15. C. McP's letters to Thomas Jefferson, of Monticello, dated 20th Oct. 1800.

RICHMOND, April 8th, 1811.

        The writings on this and the preceding page, are true copies from a document (which is itself filed, a copy) filed in my office.

WM. MUMFORD,
Keeper of the rolls for the Commonwealth of Virginia.


Page 20

Endorsed on the back of the letter:

        Papers respecting the affairs of Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, and those of the Old Dominion, and State of Virginia, as well as those of the U. States of America—and in fact they specially regard the affairs of all the world. Addressed to the honorable the committee for courts of justice, of the General Assembly of the Old Dominion, and State of Virginia.

        Now in session—Richmond.

        Sealed with seven black seals.]

        Nimrod Hughes of Washington county, Virginia, published a pamphlet in Richmond, the 3d day of April, 1810, prophecying a dreadful event, as set forth in the Revalations, in the 15th and 18th verses of the 9th chapter; which he says, is to happen on the 4th day of June, 1812. Altho' to my knowledge, I never saw the man, yet I give the fullest belief to his prophecy. It is, therefore highly necessary, that this honorable committee should see the contents herein, in order, both to avert an awful impending doom and to gain a most distinguished and glorious blessing from the Lord our God. Yet, as it perhaps would not, all at once, suit the public ear I would in the first instance, advise privacy, then to act upon it as prudence may suggest.

C. McP. alias P. S. of C.

(COPY.)

RICHMOND, April 8th, 1811.

        The writing on the opposite side of this leaf, is truly copied from a paper filed in my office.

WM. MUMFORD,
Keeper of the Rolls for the Commonwealth of Virginia.

RICHMOND, Friday, 21st Dec., 1810.

        General Peter Johnston, and others, members of the Committee for Courts of Justice, of the Assembly of Virginia, esqrs: Permit me gentlemen, to address you in your private characters as gentlemen; perceiving by this day's debate, that I have not that liberty (which I thought I had) of speaking on my case before the honorable the committee, I beg leave to state, that my wife is now, and has been for some time past, so lame with pains in her limbs that at times she can only rise with great difficulty, when she is down. And that she is a member of the Baptist Society here, and has a wish regularly to attend worship. During the association here last fall, Mr. Wickham, knowing all the circumstances of my case, politely loaned me his carriage and servant, and carried my wife to attend the association. And that I could not get redress against the common hall, by law, will readily be seen by reference being had to the two certificates, refusing to hire me a carriage.. Had a carriage been hired me, and I was stoped by the master of police, or an officer under him, I then could have sued them, and thereby have tried the legality of the power which the hall assumed, in preventing me the use of a carriage; as this was not to be done as above, I saw no proper way of getting redress, but in an appeal to the honorable the General Assembly, and of this, I took the first counsel in the land. And my being engaged in a mercantile line of life, I cannot spare funds, with convenience, to buy me a carriage and horses. I also beg leave, humbly to advance here cogent reasons for the letter with seven seals to be


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opened by, or before the committee, because the enclosures, and especially the address to the President and Senate of the United States, regards the justice that is due to myself, yourself, &c., &c., &c.

        All I want and all I ask for is complete justice; and I trust, in the candor and justice of the honorable board, that no act of theirs will, in the least degree, tarnish or sully the fair character which they have an indubitable right to maintain, correspondent with their fundamental laws and constitution—independent of the influence which bodies, corporate or incorporate, may claim of them over my just and unalienable rights and privileges. And in fact, whose acts are equally under their cognizance.

        In the first place, I shall expressly waive any kind of comment whatever, upon the serious injuries I have sustained by the management of a public pecuniary institution here, which chiefly fosters men of opulence, and indeed strangers who own no real estate, in preference to many a needy, worthy, revolutionary character, who assisted to estabiish the freedom of Columbia; and strangers too, whom, as soon as they are enriched, retire with their booty to nerve foreign climes; and to some of those very strangers my exigencies have obliged me to pay uncommon usury; altho I waded thro the revolutionary war, and some debts of the rich, yet God has been pleased to bless my exertions with lots and houses in and about the city, a farm near this city,* and part of a ship, upwards of 300 ton burthen, in which last spring, I shipped to Europe 40 hhds. tobabco on my own account, and am now putting corn aboard her, for my part of her present outward bound cargo; but I shall hasten to a very great grievance indeed.

        * My partners are white men of the first respectability.


        On the 16th day of June, 1810, the free people of color in this city, petitioned the common hall to grant them a new and eligible burying ground, and to this day, a lapse of more than six months, I have never heard of any report of the committee on the case. Several who signed the memorial, and others, have since died, and were buried in that disgustful old burying ground, whose names I have inserted on a copy of a memorial which I have, and in which is a copy of the proceedings of the hall, with the courses of 28½ acres of land, in the suburbs, belonging to the corporation, towards which, no doubt, the people of colour paid a part in the taxes levied upon them.

        I had an inspection, the other day, made of the present burying ground. It lies directly east of the Baptist meeting house, uninclosed, very much confined as to space, under a steep hill, on the margin of Shockoe Creek, where every heavy rain commits ravages upon some one grave or another, and some coffins have already been washed away into the current of Shockoe stream, and in a very few years the major part of them will no doubt be washed down into the current of James river; added to this, many graves are on private property adjoining, liable to be taken up and thrown away, whenever the ground is wanted by its owners, (this is owing, either to confined space, or want of knowledge of what was public ground;) and furthermore, we may add the humiliating circumstance, that this is the very express gallows ground where malefactors are interred. I ruminated on this ghastly scene; and now, thought I, were I in a barbarous land, and such a sight like this was to present itself to my view, I should exclaim to myself, these are a poor, ignorant people. The blessing even of a solitary ray of gospel light has never shone upon them, neither has civilization, nor the age of reason, made any approaches towards their savage habitations.

        Notwithstanding they had perfect knowledge of the situation of this offensive place, the rulers of the city had taken up out of her grave, last spring, a woman, a poor widow, the second day after she was buried, in her own bona fide ground on an eminence, and carried down to this mock of a grave yard. Shocking to humanity! O! God, is it thus, the bodies of the heirs of heaven, my beloved brethren are treated in this land of light and liberty! Avert it, I most fervently beseech thee, my Lord and my God. And


Page 22

even whilst all this was staring him in the face, one of the honorable members of the common hall, undertook to reason with me, and said that the present yard might be extended, and that the gallows might be moved a little further off, and that the poor house ground contemplated for the new burying ground, was too valuable for the purpose, (when at the very self same time, it was bought for that express, and other purposes.) I replied to him, that the free people of color in Richmond, never would, by any means, consent to be buried in that wasting gallows ground. I therefore hope, that these serious injuries may fully impress themselves on the minds of the honorable committee; and as these things could not well be brought before the honorable body of the assembly, I hope the honorable the committee for courts of justice, will see the propriety of granting me ample justice, and have the letter with the seven seals opened. As I have already said, I now say again, that the contents thereof regards the justice due me, them and others.

I am, with great respect and regard,
gentlemen, your very ob't servant,

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON.

(A copy of the memorial, &c. on hand.)

RICHMOND, Sunday evening, 27th Jan., 1811.

Christopher McPherson to Robert B. Semple, esq.

        SIR: In consequence of what passed between us at Mr. Sheppard's gate to-day, I have taken the liberty of now inclosing papers from No. 1 to 6, which are copies of part of my papers before the committee for courts of justice of the General Assembly, and I hope on the perusal of them, you will be convinced that I am a convert to the true faith of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, which took place on the 15th day of February, 1799, and which, however, will still more fully appear under cover of the letter of seven seals. As I verbally mentioned to you to-day, the Holy Spirit of my Almighty Father requests that you may get two or three members of the Genetal Assembly, who are of our profession, (Baptists,) to go with you to the clerk of the committee for courts of justice, at your leisure, to-morrow or next day, the sooner the better, whenever the committee is not sitting, and the members who accompany you are unengaged, and he will show you my papers. You will be pleased, in the first place, to look over, minutely, all those which regard my moral character, including the report of the committee on my case; then be so good as to peruse regularly the contents of the letter of seven seals, and then to act as the Almighty Spirit may direct thee; afterward to return under cover the inclosed papers. Doubt not, in the least, it is now as it was in the beginning. The Almighty arm is ever the same, and he bringeth about his decrees as he thinks proper.

I am your friend and brother laborer under God,

PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST.

N. B.—There are about thirty members on the committee for courts of justice, and not one that I know of is of the Holy Spirit, which is the cause of this address to you, &c.

P., S. OF C.

RICHMOND, Monday, 11th Feb., 1811.

Christopher McPherson to John Courtney, esq.

        SIR: Inclosed is a copy of my letter to Mr. Semple. Mr. Robert McKim informed me just now, that Mr. Semple took my letter with him. I will thank you, If you will be so good as to put this copy of his letter (with the


Page 23

other six papers of mine now in your possession) under cover, and seal it and direct it to me, and deliver it to the bearer.

I am your friend and brother laborer under God,

PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST.

N. B.—Nothing was done by any of these gentlemen.

        On the 23d day of May the author was taken up, in the city of Richmond, on a charge of lunacy, and was tried before a called court, who committed him to jail, and ultimately sent him to the hospital, under the following decision:

IN RICHMOND HUSTINGS COURT, June 12th, 1811:

        John Lesslie, who was yesterday appointed committee of the estate of Christopher McPherson, who has been adjudged a lunatic, refusing to give bond as the law directs, it is ordered that David Ross, Judediah Allen, and Charles J. Macmurdo, gentlemen, or any one of them, who will enter into bond in the clerk's office, with sufficient security in the penalty of five thousand dollars, conditioned according to law, be appointed committee of the estate of the said lunatic; and until such bond shall be given the said estate is committed to the sergeant of this city, as curator. And it is further ordered, that the sergeant of this city do forthwith remove the said lunatic hence to the lunatic hospital, in Williamsburg, to be dealt with as the law directs.

        Robert Greenhow, gentlemen, dissenting to the foregoing proceedings as to Christopher McPherson, enters his protest thereto in the following words, to-wit: "Robert Grenhow, under the conviction that Christopher McPherson is under the hand of the law, in a civil process, cannot consent that any proceedings should be had with him, until the law is satisfied; and thus impressed, dissents from the opinion of the court, and wishes it to be entered of record."

A copy—Teste,

TH. C. HOWARD, Clerk.

Part of the Author's defence is in the words following, viz:

        A letter sealed with seven black seals, delivered by Christopher McPherson, in his case before the Assembly of Virginia, to the committee for the courts of justice of the last Assembly is missing, and no one can give any account of it. Christopher McPherson spoke to the clerk, Mr. John Robinson, to write to the different members who composed that committee, and he refused to do it; Mr. Stevenson knew nothing of it. McPherson, upon this, wrote to six members of that committee, the most likely, Mr. Robinson told him, might give the best information of them. This was about a month ago, and no answer has been received. That letter, and its contents are worth to the said McPherson, ten thousand times ten thousand millions of dollars, and millions upon that.

        Virginia, Richmond, Thursday the 23d day of May, 1811, the 35th year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year of the Millennium of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST, Seal.]


Page 24

        The court at Williamsburg, finding he had done no violence, and being perfectly innocent and rational, discharged him as follows:

At a Court of Directors of the hospital for the maintenance and cure of persons of unsound mind, held at the hospital, in Williamsburg, the 14th day of June, 1811.

        "CHRISTOPHER MCPHERSON, who was brought to the hospital, by warrant, under the hands and seals of Benjamin Tate, Robert Greenhow, and Henry S. Shore, gentlemen, Aldermen of the city of Richmond, was brought before the court, and examined, and the court being of opinion, as well from his examination before them, as from the depositions taken and returned, that he ought not to be confined in the said hospital: It is ordered, THAT HE BE FORTHWITH DISCHARGED FROM CUSTODY."

        The foregoing is a true copy of the original papers, in the case of Christopher McPherson, sent to the hospital, upon a supposition that he is a person of unsound mind, and also the proceedings of the court of directors thereupon.

Teste,

WILLIAM RUSSELL, C. C. D.

        Whilst the author was in jail, he wrote the following piece and letters to different potentates, &c., viz:

Substance of the conversion and commission given to Christopher
McPherson.

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, the 4th day of June, 1811.

        I had for many years been principal store-keeper and then principal clerk for David Ross, esq., well known in this State who had removed his office a little above Columbia, a small town on James river, about fifty miles above the city of Richmond, where I remained between three and four years. Like almost all other young men, I was gay and frolicksome; but in all my wild, though inoffensive tricks, I ever paid the utmost adoration to truth, honesty, honor, and good manners. Early in the year 1798, some incidents in life induced me to begin to think seriously about the times and things past, those present, and that which was to come; and of the glorious and awful eternity hereafter. I soon discovered that I had spent my life in great folly, in the height of vanity; indeed I thought I had gone so far the wrong way, that then there was no help for me—for it seemed that I dare not throw up a supplicating eye towards heaven. I spurned at the idea of looking down towards the lower regions, and the world, I thought, was, as it were, entirely lost to me. In this dilemma I flew to the Bible, and for at least six months this consoling book was my constant companion, at every leisure moment from


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business, before I had the least glimmering of light. The first dawn was at dusk, sitting by my fire side, I was ruminating whether I should step to Columbia and spend the evening with some gentlemen of my acquaintance, or remain at home and read the Bible; I suddenly fell into a small transient doze, and in that moment there was placed visibly before my eyes, in large letters, ROMANS, 12th chapter, 3d verse. I instantly sprang up, ordered a candle, opened the book, turned up and read the chapter, and there found conviction and sweet consolation. This spurred me on afresh. I was now more constant both in reading and studying, 'till the 15th of February, 1799, when Mr. Ross slept at the office, which he never did before nor since that time, that I know of, and I wrote late that night, preparing papers for the Holston Iron Works, and Kentucky, and for the superior courts of this State. A little after 11 o'clock, I was steadfastly imploring the mercies and blessings of the Lord Jesus Christ; there came all at once a rushing noise from above, and like a thunderbolt it struck me on the head and ran through me like lightning or an electrical touch, and left a long, tinkling sound within me, similar to the dying note of the last touch of a musical instrument, the toll of a bell, or the fillip of a china or glass bowl. I was that moment relieved of a very heavy load or burden which had long oppressed and flattened my spirits. I felt myself a new made man, altogether cheerful and lively; my heart was filled with pure and perfect love; I opened the door, the moon shone bright; I looked around, all nature seemed to be clothed anew; I seemed to love every thing I saw, and would fain have gone out and thrown myself flat on the ground, and kissed the grass and even the dust of the earth. I came to a little, and considering there had subsisted for some time, a difference between Mr. Ross's family and myself, which then I most ardently wished to make up, I sat down about 12 o'clock at night, and wrote to him a note, requesting him to let me go over the river to Cobham, about three miles off, in the morning to see them, and carried a light into his room and awoke him on the occasion; he waived the subject however, and I did not go. I now doubled my dilligence in reading and prayer, and without detailing here small manifestations of the spirit, which I always afterwards had when perfectly awake, such, for instance, as the figure of an elegant woman, in the height or acme of her charms, sitting in a chair, ogling at me and rolling herself at ease in lovely and bewitching attitudes before me—the cups and glasses rolling, and heads of jesters


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laughing and grinning at me when reading the Bible; and the appearance of a terrible large monster of a serpent spread himself over my head, and large flashes of lightning darting before me, just at my feet, whenever I was going aside to prayer; but soon after, about nine o'clock of a moonlight night, with broken clouds and little rain, I was going to bed and got on my knees to prayer on the bedstead, and leaned my elbows on the sill of the window, with my head reclined between my hands—I was instantly taken in the spirit—my ears, hands, arms and knees, became as it were like stone. Heaven was brought down little above the tops of the trees, and the glorious attributes of heaven, in the dress of women, were formed in a large circle, and the trumpet most harmoniously sounded, and they moved gently and most graciously around as in a dance, to the heavenly sound of the trumpet. The communion of Saints at table was then brought down to my window and passed along before me in beautiful rotation. Then in the field, close by me, I saw the Lord Jesus Christ on the cross, in apparent agonizing torture. Afterwards, in the same field, appeared a great red dragon, who seemed to defy the host of heaven: Our Saviour came from heaven with a two-edged sword and chain in his hands, seized and chained the dragon, and carried him lo a large pine tree directly opposite to me, and clinched him to it, and then went up to heaven. During the whole of these views, one-half the world appeared to be in a gulph of blazing fire. Soon after this our Savior returned with sword in hand, and cut off the dragon's head, and cast him, head and all, with a whirling motion, into that dismal gulph of fire, where he quickly sunk entirely out of sight. Our Savior then came down to me, and took my heart out of my side, he cut it open, and as he carried it up to heaven he washed it thoroughly, and when there, he held it open in his hand, and every attribute of heaven, in rotation, poured in it a portion out of their vials, and as they poured in, I heard distinctly each of their names called—Grace, Mercy, Peace, Love, Truth, Justice, Faith, Charity, Courage, Magnanimity, Hope, &c., &c. He then closed it, and brought it down, and put it to my lips, and I swallowed it. While each of these views were accomplishing, I was made to say the Lord's prayer, the creed, and another prayer and song, not yet fully made known to the public; and during the whole process, my ancles and joints of my toes seemed to be pierced, as if a gimblet was boring through them; and although the house was as tight as common, I felt the rain dropping on me, in like manner were I out of doors. After all these manifestations,


Page 27

which lasted till about day-break, my Saviour cheered me up, and told me I had gone through manfully; that I was now his son and had a new name, Pherson, son of Christ, and had on my vesture, and on my thigh a name written, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, and I was to represent him on earth, and was to establish the millennium, his kingdom in the world, and desired me to rise from my posture and go to bed, and he would accompany me, and if I would hearken to him, he would always be with me, and in me, and would constantly converse with me as if we were face to face, and would from time to time advise me what to do. He then came with me into the bed, and within me, and gave me a full internal view of the most horrid tortures and torments justly due to, and inflicted upon the wicked. He then allowed me to take some repose. I awoke a little after sun-rise, and the Holy Spirit, now in social converse, desired me, after washing, to take some wine to revive me and not to breakfast with Captain George Holman, the steward of Mr. Ross' estate, and the young gentlemen clerks of the office, but wait, and Humphrey Easton, a Baptist, a black man, slave to Mr. Ross, who lived about three miles off, would bring me eggs and something else for my breakfast. I thought it droll to be promised so uncommon a present. I was very much pressed by those gentlemen, though I did not breakfast with them as usual. I waited for Humphrey, who made it late, and I began very much to doubt, but at length he hove in sight; I asked him what had detained him; he said he was unavoidably stopped in town. I then told him all that had happened to me; he rejoiced greatly, and gave me counsel how to walk in my new birth; and this was all the preaching I ever heard during my travel of experience; he brought me some eggs and dried apples, of which I made my breakfast. I occasionally attended as a physician in Mr. Ross' estate, and that morning the steward carried me to see a young black man, very valuable, who was extremely low with the pleurisy, and had been given out by the doctor; as I approached the house where the sick man lay, a very large round flower like those called the snow-ball, dropped from heaven, just before me, and instantly vanished; this encouraged me greatly; I went in and saw him; he was truly very far spent, indeed; however, I set to, and in course of a few days he got quite well and hearty again. The difference that subsisted between Mr. Ross' family and myself continued to increase, and in a short time I was obliged to leave his office and business; and being commanded of the Spirit, I went through the towns of Richmond, Williamsburg, Norfolk and Portsmouth,


Page 28

in Virginia, and sang out aloud, "glory be to God, who reigns on high!" and cried aloud, "O! all ye inhabiters of the earth, repent ye, repent ye, for the kingdom of heaven is at hand!" And on the 4th day of July, 1799, I had myself baptized in Elizabeth river, at Portsmouth. In these days the Holy Spirit told me, that these United States of Columbia, were the blessed land, the New Zion, the New Jerusalem of the Lord God, and were esteemed as the apple of his eye. That although other nations had imposed upon them, and for a little while would continue so to do. He would oblige the whole of them to repay fully, very fully all such ravages and depredations. Then I was shewn two caps going from the earth to the clouds; one was taken up entire into the clouds; this was caled the Liberty Cap of Columbia; the other approached near the cloud, fell back, came tumbling down, and vanished into air; this was called the French Cap of Liberty. I now began to account for a crowned serpent, I had ever seen since my rememberance, chained on his back in the direct sight of my right eye, which would move and wrythe itself about in many attitudes, but can't get off its back; and since my commission, I constantly see moving or dancing before the naked eye, numbers of brilliant and glorious sights, as well as huge serpents, half man, half monster, &c., &c., greatly beyond my feeble powers of description.

        In the fall of 1799, I was commanded of the spirit, and went to Philadelphia and delivered a message in writing to John Adams, the then president, addressed to himself and the Senate of the United States, requesting them to do a certain thing, which, by-the-bye, they did not do. I remained there during the winter, and enrolled for Congress. In the spring of 1800, I was commanded of the spirit, to return again to Virginia, and set in steadily to work. I was then offered one thousand dollars per annum, board, &c., to remain at Philadelphia, and school the people of color, which I refused. I immediately returned to Virginia, and since then, in the course of eleven years, have written with unabated ardor, in all the superior offices under both the federal and State governments, in the city of Richmond; as well as for most of the leading characters in that city and town of Manchester; by which industry I have laid up a tolerable decent support for my family. In the summer of 1810, the Holy Spirit desired me, and I took a particular view of the grave yard in Richmond, set apart for the free people of color and slaves. It is very much confined as to space, inaccessible to a carriage by a steep hill, and it is on the


Page 29

margin of the Shockoe Creek, which has already washed away some of the graves, and will continue to wash them away; and to crown the whole, it is the express gallows ground where all the malefactors are interred. I was commanded, and did draft a petition to the common hall, on behalf of the free people of color, and got them to sign it, requesting a more eligible burying ground; and although the corporation owns about twenty-eight acres of ground within the city, and on which the poor house is built, yet I have not to this day, heard of any appropriation for this purpose. The same day this petition was presented, the hall passed an ordinance that no person of color should use a hired carriage, except in the capacity of maid or servant to some lady or gentleman hiring and riding therein. As soon as I knew of this, I remonstrated by letter, to four members of the hall; but getting no redress, I advertised in the public papers, that I meant to petition the next General Assembly for redress. Of course I prepared certificates of my character, and of the services I had rendered my country, as well in peace, as in time of war. My petition was unanimously referred to the committee for courts of justice. Whilst I was before this committee, the Holy Spirit commanded me, and I brought before them the copy of the message presented to President Adams, for the Assembly of Virginia to act upon it; and to impress more strongly the idea of its importance, I put with it all the documents belonging to it, and sealed it with seven black seals. The committee reported my petition as reasonable, but it was lost in the Assembly, by a majority of three. And so far from their acting on the message, that some time afterwards, when looking among my papers, which are in custody of the master of the rolls of the Assembly, the letter and all its contents were missing, and no one could give any account of them. Since then, myself and wife have been wrongfully and shamefully imprisoned, and otherwise I have, myself, been very roughly handled by public officers of this State. After all this, the Holy Spirit says to me, "arise, my son, go forth and proclaim that the Great I AM—the Lord God of Heaven and of earth—the Almighty Creator hath commanded, and I will have peace, love and justice established throughout the world, and man shall be made to render justice to man—and this is my DECREE. Advertise in the public papers, that you mean to petition next Congress for them to take into consideration the message I sent by you in the year 1800, and not acted upon by President Adams nor by the last Assembly of Virginia—and a postscript addressed to the different potentates of the earth,


Page 30

requesting the printers in all languages to re-publish the same Then write to every potentate or ruler on earth that yon can hear of, dated the 4th of June, '11, and tell them from myself, the Great I AM, to sheathe their swords, and let peace, love and justice reign instead thereof, and couch each in terms as I shall advise thee. And go thou and make public this thy Imperial commission."

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, Virginia, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRIST. McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday the 4th June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the King of Great Britain and Ireland, &c., &c., &c.

        SIRE: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereigh Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th February, 1799, I have it now in special command to apprize you, that it is His supreme wish and desire that you immediately, on behalf of yourself and your nation, relinquish to the respective inhabitants, all conquests you have made in all parts of the world, as well on continents as islands; that the whole of them may establish the Government of their own choice by ballot, in quietness, peace, love and justice, even to the smallest isle; and you are forthwith to call home your troops and officers of all distinctions whatever, from all parts of the world; and from henceforth and for evermore, you are to sheathe your sword, and cease from war and bloodshed of your neighbor, and as far as in your power lays, let all the inhabiters of the world remain in peace, love and justice; and for this end, I am now addressing every potentate on earth that I know of. I have it further in express command to desire that you take a retrospective view of the Columbian revolutionary war, and as soon as the matter can be properly ascertained, you are to make a complete remuneration in gold, silver, and other articles, that may be accepted in lieu thereof, for all the blood that was spilled, and the expense in carrying on that war, on the part of the United States, defending their just and unalienable rights against an unnatural and predatory war, waged against them by an unjust ambition, and overbearing power, contrary to the true intent and meaning of the original characters of planting or settlement. You are to pay a stated price per head for all those who were killed, as may be agreed upon by commissioners appointed by both parties for that purpose, and all the expenses of carrying on the war, and establishing the peace; also, you are to make a full and complete restitution and payment for all the spoliations committed on her commerce since that period, to the present day, as well for bloodshed of her citizen to be settled by former valuation, as for produce and for vessels; and all of which that may now be detained, to be forthwith released and returned with full satisfaction for all such detention. Separate


Page 31

accounts are to be kept for the amount of the warfare and for that of the spoliations. For these United States are the New Zion, the New Jerusalem, spoken of in Holy Writ, and is considered the apple of the Lord's eye. And your sovereign people will find it their true interest to form a similar government. I shall, this day, write to the President of the United States of Columbia, and enclose him a copy of this letter. I must again impress it strongly on your mind, that it is desired you should render complete justice to all your neighboring nations, without the smallest aid of a single implement of war. I herewith send you Nimrod Hughes' prophecy, and I think you will do well to pay the utmost attention to what is therein set forth, saying that one third of mankind will certainly be destroyed on the 4th day of June, 1812; also my character under the seal of this date, and you will see my commission registered in the nineteenth chapter of the Revelations of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the 35th year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday, the 4th June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, to Napoleon Bonaparte, ruler of France, Italy, Netherlands, &c., &c., &c.

        SIR: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire, that you immediately reinstate the King of Spain on his throne, and withdraw all your troops and men, not only from Spain and Portugal, but from every other place that is not comprized within the old limits of France. You are to refund to all nations an equivalent to what you have with violence taken from them, and especially these United States, the New Zion and New Jerusalem of the Lord God. And for all the spoliations you have committed on her commerce, you are to pay her full value, in gold and silver, and to release and return every vessel and man there may be in the domains under your control, and for every citizen of these United States, who may have been killed, or died by confinement, or otherwise, by your interfering with their trade; you are to pay full value on each head, as may be agreed upon by the parties concerned. For the Great God is about to avenge her cause, and the cause of the righteous and just. I shall, this day, write to the President of the United States of Columbia, and enclose him a copy of this letter. I am now addressing every potentate on earth that I know of, to establish peace, love and justice. You are to depose every King or Prince you have set up, and the sovereign people of those countries are to have the government of their choice by ballot, in quietness, peace, love and justice. You are not to have any influence whatever in any nation or island. The sword is to be sheathed, and peace completely restored. You are then to lay down all your crowns and titles, and stand your chance with others for any elevation in the commonwealth of France, by a quiet, peaceable and general bollot of the whole of the sovereign people of France. All nations and isles are to be independent of each other, and to have the government of their choice, in peace, love and justice. The prophecy of Nimrod Hughes accompanies this, which I think is greatly worthy the highest marks of your attention; he said that


Page 32

one-third of mankind will certainly be destroyed on the 4th day of June, 1812; also, my character under the seal of the State, and my commission is registered in the nineteenth chapter of the Revelations of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, to the King of Spain, Europe; to the care of the Spanish Junto, at Cadiz.

        SIRE: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire that, as soon as you are placed upon your throne again by your friend Napoleon Bonaparte, to which end I have this day directed him, you are, in the same manner in whieh you laid down your crown at the feet of Napoleon, so in like manner you are to lay it down at the feet of the sovereign people of Spain, and recommend them to form a government similar, or as near as possible, to that of these United States, being the nearest approach to perfection of any other under heaven; and balloting without control is by far the most eligible mode of election. Fear not to do it, for the surrounding nations are all advised to be under the like model. If you love the Spaniards, and have their true interest at heart, you will not hesitate a moment in doing it. They, however, are to have the government of their choice in quietness, peace, love and justice, and in the event of an election, no doubt you will stand a fair chance of filling an elevated station in the commonwealth. The sword is now to be sheathed and war to be at an end; and as all nations and isles are now to be under no foreign yoke, and to have the government of their choice, the Spaniards in South and North Columbia will, of course, be free of the mother country.

        I herewith send you the prophecy of Nimrod Hughes, to which you will do well to pay the utmost attention; he says that one-third of mankind will certainly be destroyed on the 4th day of June, 1812. See my commission registered in the nineteenth chapter of the Revelations of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the King of Portugal, now in Brazil, South Columbia.

        SIRE: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire, that as soon as Napoleon Bonaparte


Page 33

withdraws his troops from Spain and Portugal, which I have this day directed him to do, you are immediately to repair to Portugal and there lay down your crown at the feet of the brave and sovereign citizens of the commonwealth, for them to form a constitution suitable to a great and free people. The constitution of these United States meets the smile of Heaven, above any other on earth, and should the Portuguese form a similar government, balloting without control, is the most eligible mode of election, which is to be done in quietness, peace, love and justice, you will, no doubt, have their suffrages, to fill a conspicious place in the administration. The sword is now to be sheathed, and of course, war to be at an end. All nations are to consider and treat each other as brothers, with a frankness and love that becomes members of one large family. As all nations and isles, even to the smallest, are now to be independent of each other, the Brazil or Portugese, Columbia will, of course, form to themselves a government of their own choice, and although they will not have a crowned head, yet the attachment they have for their mother country will throw the balance of trade chiefly in favor of Portugal. You will have the satisfaction of seeing your neighboring nations on a like establishment; and their greatest ambition will be industry, improvements, and a friendly intercourse with each other, which is the surest pledges of happiness on earth. The whole world is now to be established in peace, love and justice. You will be so good as to pay the utmost attention to the prophecy of Nimrod Hughes, herewith sent you; he says that one-third of mankind will certainly be destroyed on the 4th day of June, 1812; and you will see my commission recorded in the nineteenth chapter of the Revelations of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the 13th year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday, the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the Pope of Rome, Italy, &c.

        SIR: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, I have it now in special command to apprize you, that it is His supreme wish and desire, that you immediately lay down your insignia of pontif, and formally resign to the Holy Spirit of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, the sole right of granting absolution, who alone can grant it. The immortal soul of your scullion, is of equal value to the Lord our God as that precious part of your high and mighty holiness. Then, why, sir, hast thou been a stumbling block so long, and thus wilfully have misled the ignorant world, when you well know that each poor soul must, forsooth, work out its own salvation, awfully trembling in perfect humiliation at the footstool of the high throne of Grace and Mercy, and when it is converted to the spirit of faith, then John's outward baptism should be made a public avowal of the same. However, your reward is laid up for you. The proper ministers of the Gospel give their admonitions gratis, purely for the glory of the cause in which they are engaged; and their flock or audience freely give them, for their support, whatever they think proper; and as no temporal emolument was attached to the primitive establishment or preaching of the Gospel, even so it must now be conducted in spirit and in truth, which will shortly pervade the terraqueous globe. The free people of Italy are to have the government of their choice in quietness, peace, love and justice, as I have this day advised Napoleon, or rather Appollyon, which, perhaps is Bonaparte's right name in English. If they prefer a representative


Page 34

constitution, which is by far the best for their independence and happiness, an uncontrolled ballot is the most eligible, done in quietness, peace, love and justice. The sword is to be sheathed and universal peace to reign. All nations and isles, even to the smallest, are to have the government of their choice, independent of any foreign yoke, in peace, love, and justice, and all mankind are to treat each other in friendship and love as members of one large family. I am now addressing all the potentates of the earth that I know of, to this effect, and they will find it to their interest to attend to it. Accept the prophecy of Nimrod Hughes, accompanying this. He says that one-third of mankind will certainly be destroyed on the 4th day of June, 1812; and my commission may be seen in the 19th chapter of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the Emperor of Germany and his Liege Princes.

        SIRE: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th day of February, 1799, I have it in special command to apprize you, that it is His supreme wish and desire that you immediately convoke a general diet of the whole Empire, and form, by ballot, in quietness, peace, love and justice, a constitution and government consonant to that of these U. States of Columbia; which establishment is the most likely to ensure the happiness of the sovereign people of Germany. Crowns are to be thrown altogether aside, armies are to be dissolved and the men are to be engaged in improving the face of their respective countries. This is the general charge given to all nations. The repeated wars, excited by the pride and ambition of kings and princes, will no longer be suffered by the great Creator. These wars, besides their other great attendant evils, cut off, prematurely, thousands and tens of thousands of poor souls in the midst of their sins, when, at the same time, the precious soul of each of these poor men is of equal value to the Lord our God as that of your imperial majesty. The sword is now to be sheathed, and universal peace to reign. Mankind are all one family, and are to treat each other as beloved brethren. I say again, man is to render justice to man and live with each other in a state of perfect harmony. The tenets of the Holy Gospel are to be implicitly followed in that plain and simple manner as was ordered by our Savior the Lord Jesus Christ. I desire you may strictly attend to these admonitions, or abide by the woeful consequences. These United States are the New Zion, the New Jerusalem of the Lord God. (See the law issuing forth as promised in the fourth chapter of Micah.) Nimrod Hughes's prophecy accompanies this, which says the third of mankind will certainly be destroyed as foretold in Holy Writ, and is to happen on the 4th day of June, 1812. I now warn you to be prepared to meet the judgments of the Lord God Almighty. My commission is contained in the 19th chap. of Revelations.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the 13th year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]


Page 35

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday, the 4th June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the Emperor of the Russias.

        SIRE: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th of February, 1799, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire that you immediately render ample justice to your neighbors, withdraw your troops from their territories, disband your armies, cease from war and bloodshed, and employ those men you are leading to slay and be slain in beneficial occupations, to better the situation of the Empire by canals, high roads, manufactures, bettering the houses and the like, so as to alter completely the wild face of your extensive dominions. You will forthwith call a general diet of the Empire and form a constitution and government similar to that which is established in these United States, it being the most approved of by Heaven than any on earth, as it secures to the sovereign citizens their unalienable rights and precludes the probability of those repeated wars, instigated by the pride and ambition of potentates who seldom study the happiness of the sovereign people. Dost thou not know, sire, that the soul of the poorest of thy numerous citizens is as precious in the sight of God as your own soul? Then why, sire, hast thou been the cause of so many men, in unnecessary wars, being cut off in their sins, whilst the precious soul of each of those unfortunate men is of equal value to our God as that inestimable part of your imperial majesty? In order, therefore, to do away these wars, the sovereign citizens of Russia should form an elective government similar to that of the United States, which protects the rights and insures the happiness of the citizen. Heaven approves and directs the plan to be done by ballot, in peace, love and justice. Universal peace is now to be established, and the Holy Spirit of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ is to reign throughout the world. Man must render justice to man and treat each other as members of one large family. Attend to these warnings or the consequences will be truly lamentable. I herewith send you Nimrod Hughes's prophecy, saying that the third of mankind is to be destroyed on the 4th day of June, 1812; and my commission is in the 19th chapter of the Revelations.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday, the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, to the Kings of Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Prussia and Switzerland.

        SIRES: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th day of February, 1799, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire, that you immediately desist from war, call in your troops, and disband your armies, and render ample justice to your neighbor. Let the attention of the men be pointed towards agriculture and manufactures, the arts and sciences, and the improvement of the face of your respective countries, in perfect harmony with each other. The Millennium of our Lord


Page 36

and Savior Jesus Christ is about to be established in the world, and universal peace to reign. The pride and ambition of princes, which have so long been the destruction of mankind, is now to be put down, and governments similar to that of these United States, by ballot, are to be formed for the protection and happiness of the sovereign people of each country, in peace, love and justice. Every nation of the world is advised to be under the same model, and you will all do well to attend to it.

        I herewith send to each of you, respectively, Nimrod Hughes's prophecy, wherein he says that the certain destruction of one-third of mankind, as foretold in the Scriptures, must take place on the 4th day of June, in the year of our Lord, 1812. I now warn you to be prepared to meet that great day; my commission is in the 19th chapter of the Revelations.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the 35th year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday the 4th June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the Grand Seignior or Sultan of the Turkish Empire.

        SIRE: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th day of February, 1799, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire that you immediately cease from all war, render complete justice to your neighbor, and dissolve your armies. Instead of the destruction of mankind by warfare, let their happiness be consulted by encouraging all the improvements necessary to enrich and embellish the Empire, in peace, love and justice. The kingdoms of this earth are now to become the kingdom of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, and He is to reign in the hearts of men in universal peace. These United States are the New Zion, the New Jerusalem of the Lord our God, and He holds them as the apple of His eye. The law is to go hence throughout the world; and you will do well to have your extensive government formed on a like model. You will receive herewith Nimrod Hughes's prophecy, who says, one-third of mankind will certainly be destroyed on the 4th day June, in the year of our Lord 1812; therefore I warn you to prepare for this great event. The commission I bear is to be found in the 19th chapter of the Revelations of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday, the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the Kings and Bashaws of the States of Barbary.

        SIRES: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th day of February, 1799, I


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have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire that you immediately cease from warfare and desist from making any reprisals whatever, and render complete justice to all nations, and especially to these United States, which are the New Zion, the New Jerusalem of the Lord, and He holds them very dear to Him, even as the apple of His eye. The Holy Spirit of the Savior of Mankind, the Lord Jesus Christ, is to spread itself throughout the world, and universal peace is to reign. Let those be aware of condign punishment whoever resists the heavenly impulses of the Holy Spirit. The law is to go forth from these United States, and you will meet the smile of Heaven by forming your governments on their model, so as to secure the happiness of the sovereign people of your countries, in peace, love and justice. Nimrod Hughes's prophecy will be sent to each of you along with this, and you will please attend to it. He therein says that the certain destruction of one-third of mankind, as foretold in the Scriptures, must take place on the 4th day of June, in the year of our Lord 1812. My commission will be seen in the 19th chapter of the Revelations of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRIST. McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday, the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord of Lords, to the Emperors, Kings and Potentates of every nation on the Earth.

        SIRES: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th day of February, in the year of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, 1799, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire that you immediately leave off all warfare, sheathe your swords, disband your armies, render ample justice to your neighbor, turn your thoughts to the encouragement of agriculture, manufactures, merchanism and the arts and sciences, and in fact to every useful improvement conducive to intercourse, commerce, and the happiness of the sovereign citizens of the world, and be at peace with all mankind. The constitution and government of these United States meets the smile of Heaven above any other on earth, and it is recommended to all of you to copy after that model, by ballot, in peace, love and justice. This system retards the approach of destructive war and secures the rights and happiness of its respective citizens. These United States are the New Zion, the New Jerusalem of the Lord God, and whoever injures them hurts the apple of the Lord's eye, Isaiah 54th chap. Micah 4th chap., "For the Lord shall go forth of Zion," &c.—and the Lord shall reign over His peculiar people. The Jews are now restored to Zion and Jerusalem, as foretold by the prophets, in this way: The Lord and Savior Jesus Christ was a Jew and an Israelite without guile; and the moment he was crucified by the ancient Jews, that moment they forfeited their title as Jews, and lost their claim of inheritance as children of Israel; the true Jews and Israelites are those who believe in Christ Jesus, the Lord of Glory, and have been converted to the true faith in Him by the Spirit of God the Holy Ghost. In the United States the fullness of Christ's Church is accepted; the wife hath made herself ready, and the marriage of the Lamb is come, Rev., chap 19th. Universal peace is to reign. Man is to render justice to man, and to treat each other as members of one large family. Every nation and isle is to be


Page 38

independent of each other, and the sovereign people are to have the government of their choice by ballot, in peace, love, and justice. The seas are by no means to be for the exclusive privilege of any, but for the common benefit of all. It cannot but excite the utmost astonishment that rational beings should be so extremely blind as to hurl destruction on their neighbor, or rather brethren, and deluge fertile plains with human blood, for the sake of, or, to gain a little paltry power and earthly trash, which, shortly after, sinks the only valuable thing in the world—their precious souls—into everlasting ruin. In order, therefore, to perpetuate amity, let each nation send a representative to the congress that is to be formed in each quarter of the globe, and the decision of the court is to be law between nation and nation without a resort to war. The battle now will not be to the strong nor the race to the swift, for the Lord God will establish impartial justice.

        Nimrod Hughes, Washington county, Va., a citizen of the United States, published in Richmond, the 3d day of April, 1810, a pamphlet, wherein he solemnly declares "that the certain destruction of one-third of mankind, as foretold in the Scriptures, must take place on the 4th day of June, in the year of our Lord 1812," (see Revelations, chap. 9th, and verses 15th and 18th;) I therefore entreat you to attend to this timeous warning. My commission may be found in Holy Writ, registered in the 19th chapter of the Revelations of St. John the Divine.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

UNITED STATES OF COLUMBIA, VIRGINIA,
RICHMOND, Tuesday, the 4th of June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to the President of the United States of Columbia.

        SIR: By the Imperial commission which I bear on earth, from the Sovereign Lord of the universe, under date of the 15th day of February, 1799, I have it now in special command to apprize you that it is His supreme wish and desire that I should inform you that these United States are the New Zion, the New Jerusalem of the Lord God, and he views them as the apple of His eye. That the value of the vast ravages and depredations committed on her blood and treasure by the Europeans, the Algerines, &c., ever since the commencement of the Columbian revolutionary war, are to be remunerated by them, to her, in gold, silver, &c., as may be settled by commissioners to be appointed for that purpose. The warfare in separate account from that of the spoliations, the proper appropriations whereof, when received, will be directed.

        I also have the happiness to announce to you that the Millennium is about to take place; concerning which event, I delivered President Adams a message from Omnipotence, with documents, addressed to himself and Senate, in Jannary, 1800, going on 12 years ago, requesting them to do a certain thing, which, by-the-bye, they did not do. The only copy I had of the same message was presented to the committee for courts of justice of the last General Assembly of Virginia, on which they also did not act, but withheld the whole of the papers. I have advertised, that I mean to petition the next Congress, for them to take into their serious consideration that message; and I have now to depend on certain members of the Assembly for those papers. I wish to give it word for word; but a lapse of eleven years will completely defeat my purpose, unless I can get them from those members, or obtain the


Page 39

original from the late President, Mr. Adams. I herewith transmit you a manuscript copy of the credentials of my character, &c., under the hand of the keeper of the rolls for this State; also, a pamphlet, containing my history, &c., and my letters of this date, to the different potentates of the earth, along with Nimrod Hughes's pamphlet, wherein he prophecies that the third part of mankind is certainly to be destroyed on the 4th day of June, 1812; see the 20th page of his pamphlet, and Rev., 9th ch., 15th and 18th vs. For the certain prosperity and happiness of these United States, the New Zion, the New Jerusalem of the Lord God, see Isaiah, Micah, &c., &c. May the Great Almighty Ruler of the universe keep these United States in peace, love, prosperity and happiness, under your Presidential care, and forever after, is my most fervent and sincere prayer.

Given under my hand, and the seals of my appointment, in the city of Richmond, on Tuesday, the 4th day of June, and in the thirty-fifth year of Columbian Independence, and in the thirteenth year after planting in Columbia the seed of the Millennium.

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON, Seal.]
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords, Seal.]

VIRGINIA, RICHMOND, 28th June, 1811.

Christopher McPherson, alias Pherson, son of Christ, King of Kings and Lord
of Lords, to Jas. Dunlop, esq., of London.

        MY VERY DEAR SIR: Having had but a moment's warning of your brother's sailing for your place, I hasten to forward you the inclosed pamphlet of Nimrod Hughes's prophecy; also, my defence against the charge of insanity before the court of directors, for the lunatic hospital, at Williamsburg, and their decree acquitting me of the charge, as well as several copies of the decree for my acquaintance in England; and as there may be others in Scotland and Ireland, I cannot at present recollect, I send a dozen blank copies to be directed in the same way. I mean to present the copy-right of these and other papers of mine, to some young men, my friends, in this place, to endeavor to make something handsome for themselves. You will, therefore, enjoin your printer to strike off no more copies than will answer the purpose of our friends, with the like injunction to them; as these young men here will furnish a sufficiency shortly, for all parts of the world. I do assure you, my friend, it is my candid opinion, that London is the Babylon alluded to in the 17th and 18th chapters of the Revelations of St. John the Divine; and I am positively and declaredly the character that is set forth in the 19th chapter, and the three first verses of the 20th chapter of the same book. I therefore most earnestly beg and beseech of you, O! all ye, my friends, and those who have a lively hope in the salvation of Jesus Christ our Lord, come out of her; come out of her, and save your souls alive! And without repetition, I say unto you all, the very words which are contained in the 18th chapter of the Revelations.

        I hope to my great and good God, that you may all profit by this caution, given to you in the sincerity of pure love and friendship.

I am, my dear James, your old friend and servant,

CHRISTOPHER McPHERSON,
ALIAS
PHERSON, SON OF CHRIST,
King of Kings and Lord of Lords,

To the World.

        It will, no doubt, be readily admitted, that when the Savior of mankind, the Lord Jesus Christ, was on earth, it was an age of great darkness. He


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therefore was induced to say, "a prophet is not without honor but in his own country, and among his own kin, and in his own house."*

        * Matt., 13th chap. 57th vs.; Mark, 6th chap. 4th vs.; Luke, 4th chap. 24th vs., and John, 4th chap. 44th vs.


But as this is now the age of reason and light, it is perfectly rational to expect that a prophet may be encircled within a robe of honor, and every where be received in like respect; and more especially when the credentials of his character warrants that countenance. The time is at hand for glorious and wonderful works to be done. And soon after some correction, universal peace, love and justice will reign throughout the world. These United States are the New Zion, the New Jerusalem, and the nations of the earth will send their riches, their glory, to the mountain and house of the Lord God. The Great Ruler of the universe will appoint whom he will; therefore, as the word may hereafter be given me, it will faithfully be communicated, in order, as in duty bound. Now, may the Almighty Spirit of the Lord Jesus Christ have you all in His holy keeping, is the sincere prayer of your humble servant,

THE AUTHOR.