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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with George Wallace, July 15, 1974. Interview A-0024. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

De facto segregation will continue

Wallace insists that segregation was never equivalent to separation, and says that voluntary, de facto segregation may persist in the United States.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with George Wallace, July 15, 1974. Interview A-0024. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JACK BASS:
Do you think the days of segregation are gone forever?
GOV. GEORGE WALLACE:
Well, we never had segregation in the sense that we had separation ever. We had segregation in the school system but we didn't have it in working conditions. We didn't have it in where we lived. Always did live close together but they did have. . . . Yes, there will be no more segregated schools in the sense of compulsory segregation. There may be segregation by choice in some places. That is, some blacks may want to go to schools that are for blacks and some whites vice versa and all of that. But no, no more legal. . . .
JACK BASS:
Well, you had segregation also in public facilities, public accommodations.
GOV. GEORGE WALLACE:
No, there won't be any segregation