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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Aaron Henry, April 2, 1974. Interview A-0107. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Persistent work for change despite threat of violence

Henry describes his reaction to the assassination of Martin Luther King. He tries not to worry about being a target of violence himself.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Aaron Henry, April 2, 1974. Interview A-0107. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JACK BASS:
Where were you when Martin Luther King was killed?
AARON HENRY:
In Memphis.
JACK BASS:
You were in Memphis with him. Were you at the motel?
AARON HENRY:
No, I'd gone to church.
JACK BASS:
How'd you feel when you got the news?
AARON HENRY:
Well, you know, heartbroken, of course. I had the same feeling when John Fitzgerald was killed. Just, you know, heart ache, real broken, real. . . . Wondering where do we go from here so to speak. How are we going to make it? unknown . I had about the same response when Malcolm X was killed, when Martin was killed, John Fitzgerald. Same kind of thing. See I've had to live with it. So many people that I've worked closely with being killed. You know, I don't know what bullet got my name on it, you know. But I know one thing, I ain't going to get out of this life alive and I don't worry about that part of it.