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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Frances Farenthold, December 14, 1974. Interview A-0186. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Texas ahead of other southern states regarding women in politics

Farenthold talks about what she sees as the growing role of women in Texas politics. According to Farenthold, Texas was a bit ahead of the other southern states in terms of generating more equitable political conditions for women. As proof, she cites the adoption of an equal rights amendment in the Texas state constitution and the growing number of women serving on the state legislature.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Frances Farenthold, December 14, 1974. Interview A-0186. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

WALTER DE VRIES:
Has there been a change in the last twenty-five years in the role that women have been playing in Texas politics?
FRANCES FARENTHOLD:
Some. I think that you are going to see a good deal more. I guess, and I don't say that it is the be-all and end-all, and I that's why I don't particularly start with it, but since my first coming into elective politics in '68, I think that I have probably seen as much or more change there than any other area.
WALTER DE VRIES:
Is that going to continue?
FRANCES FARENTHOLD:
Oh, sure.
WALTER DE VRIES:
How about in the other southern states? How would you compare Texas to the other ten states of the old Confederacy?
FRANCES FARENTHOLD:
Well, I'm only in and out of those. For example, I would say that Texas . . . it's a generalization, but it's ahead of the southern states.
WALTER DE VRIES:
Ahead of all of them?
FRANCES FARENTHOLD:
Well, O.K., you know about North Carolina . . . well, all right, I'll take the number of . . . I guess that the first way that you could measure it is the Equal Rights Amendment. Now, we'll see if there is a serious recision . . .
WALTER DE VRIES:
It's under attack.
FRANCES FARENTHOLD:
Yes, it's under attack now and we will see. When a legislator started that in '73, he didn't get very far. But this is a much more organized attack and I suppose that in this state we had it in the state constitution because we passed that in '72, I don't know of any state of the old Confederacy that has an equal rights amendment in their own constitution.
WALTER DE VRIES:
What other indices would you cite?
FRANCES FARENTHOLD:
Well, I suppose those in public office. And I would have to go maybe to the legislature and I think there are now seven women in the Texas legislature . . .