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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Lyman Johnson, July 12, 1990. Interview A-0351. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Johnson opposed plan for segregated teacher's unions in Atlanta

Johnson criticized a plan to start segregated teacher unions in Atlanta, particularly because the man who suggested it was a northerner who assumed segregation was necessary in the South. Southern states had already started integrated unions by this point.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Lyman Johnson, July 12, 1990. Interview A-0351. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

LYMAN JOHNSON:
Tarleton Collier was as nice a person as we'd like to have for his time, for his time. I made the point quite often. For instance, at a national convention of Teachers' Federation, there were some teachers that came out from Atlanta who wanted to establish two chapters in Atlanta, one black and one white. I took the floor and I argued against it like everything. And this man, I had checked up on him, who was a big promoter, I said, "Ladies and gentlemen, there are some people who were reared in the South, who perhaps have gone out of the South on occasion but have gone back to the South to settle and establish themselves and their careers, but here's a man who comes from the City of Brotherly Love. He was reared, he spent most of his life in Pennsylvania, and now he's down here in Georgia, he's down here in Atlanta, and he's promoting a dead issue that the whites of the South are trying their best to eradicate." I said, "That's what I don't like about some of these northerners who go south and out-southern the southerners."