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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Clark Foreman, November 16, 1974. Interview B-0003. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

New Deal programs made more jobs available to African Americans

The New Deal agency overseeing Negro economic affairs helped increase the proportion of jobs available to black workers and integrate army offices. Yet several letters detailing discrimination against tenant farmers and other black workers continued to come to Foreman's office.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Clark Foreman, November 16, 1974. Interview B-0003. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JACQUELYN HALL:
What kind of information did you have about what kind of effect the New Deal agencies were having on blacks?
CLARK FOREMAN:
Well, the letters that I would get complaining about discrimination. I got one letter from Mississippi from some tenant farmer down there. He wrote to "Your Race Majesty" and he wanted to know if I couldn't do something about helping the situation down there.
JACQUELYN HALL:
Did you feel like you got any results for your efforts?
CLARK FOREMAN:
Well, I think we got some results from that regulation about employment. They had to employ on public works jobs a proportionate amount of Negro skilled and unskilled. I think there were some results in the CCC as a result of that Gettysburg job. Because once the army had to start eating with Negroes in one place they couldn't very well object to it in another.