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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Stanford Raynold Brookshire, August 18, 1975. Interview B-0067. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Idea of a conspiracy surrounding the consolidation effort dismissed

Brookshire discusses conspiratorial ideas looming around consolidation. Some talked of consolidation as being the smokescreen for suburban annexation. He argues that the North Carolina statute provides for the annexation of urban areas.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Stanford Raynold Brookshire, August 18, 1975. Interview B-0067. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

BILL MOYE:
It seems...You don't buy any sort of conspiracy? I mean, the idea has occured that perhaps that there were some people who realised that maybe the talk of consolidation was going to come up. So, perhaps, they said, "Well, we'll let them try to get consolidation. Probably figuring they're going to fail. Then...Now, we want those people out there in the suburbs. Annexation is really what we want. So, we'll let them try and fall on their face with consolidation. We'll sort of give some lip-service to it. Then, we'll hit those in the suburbs and the perimeter with annexation."
STANFORD RAYNOLD BROOKSHIRE:
I don't believe that's true. I think our annexations have come about since 1959 under the new state statute that allows a city, a City Council to annex any given area that has become urban in fact. Incidently, that's one of the finest state statutes you'll find in any one of the fifty states. It's been pointed out as being the finest by the U. S. Conference of Mayors and the National League of Cities.