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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Charles M. Lowe, March 20, 1975. Interview B-0069. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

The Democratic Party splintered in the 1970s over its commitment to inclusion

Lowe attributes the Democratic Party splintering of the mid-1970s to its commitment to inclusion. By including a wide range of people, the Democratic Party includes a range of differing viewpoints.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Charles M. Lowe, March 20, 1975. Interview B-0069. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MOYE:
For a number of years it's been pretty much splintered. Without necessarily mentioning any names, would you say that is because of personalities or because of real philosophical conflicts.
LOWE:
Because of philosophical conflicts. The Democrats don't fence anybody out. They fence everybody in. The Republicans just take a few people in who are conservatives and are for things. The Democrats are for people. When you take everybody in and let everybody speak, well, naturally, you're going to have some wide differences of opinion, but, after it all shakes down, the Democrats do get together and work at things and work well and effectively. This is America. It's not like a dictatorship. In the long run, it's far and away the best form of government we know of.