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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Kathrine Robinson Everett, April 30, 1985. Interview C-0005. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Description of participation in local politics in the 1930s and 1940s

Everett talks about her involvement in various organizations in the 1930s and 1940s. After her son was born in 1928, she "took a hiatus from the law" and instead devoted her time to family and participation in local politics. During World War II, she was in charge of selling war bonds in Durham and she held leadership roles in the United Daughters of the Confederacy (UDC) and the Business and Professional Women's Club. In another excerpt, Everett discusses combining work and family and here she emphasizes again that although she was very active during this time, she always made it "back home at night."

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Kathrine Robinson Everett, April 30, 1985. Interview C-0005. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

PAMELA DEAN:
You weren't actually working as a lawyer when your son was young, but you were very busy.
KATHRINE ROBINSON EVERETT:
I took a hiatus from the law. You see, I had married and it was about two years later that I had this son, 1928. And I stopped. Well, I did a lot of work in the city; I was on the Welfare Board and I was on the Air Defense Filter Center, I had been head of the Women of the Church. I had a lot of jobs and I had some political jobs. Then during the war I was in charge-for Durham and also for the district-of selling War Bonds.
PAMELA DEAN:
Went up and gave speeches and so forth for that, did you?
KATHRINE ROBINSON EVERETT:
I did that for about four years and before that, even before I was married in World War I, before I went to Washington we had formed a little club to make sweaters for the soldiers and do things for them. So I've done a lot of war work. I was interested in the Daughters of the Confederate Veterans, and the DAR, all the veterans I think are important, from way back. So I've really been right active. I've had state jobs. I was state president of the UDC, and of the Business and Professional Women's Club. Itravelled around right much making talks for them too. So at times, I was away maybe as much as if I had been working. But I'd get back home at night.