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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with William W. Finlator, April 19, 1985. Interview C-0007. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Industrialization has not helped the working class in North Carolina

Industrialization in North Carolina has yet to bring its residents more rights, Finlator thinks, and it is unlikely to do so in the future.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with William W. Finlator, April 19, 1985. Interview C-0007. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JAY JENKINS:
Do you think the so-called "industrialization" of the state will exert influences for good or ill on this question in the future? Bringing in new people and management cadres, from other parts of the country?
WILLIAM W. FINLATOR:
Well, I think that perhaps we have not always tried to recruit the best kinds of industries to North Carolina. I'm not sure how to respond to that. There are so many people who say, "All we need are more Baptist churches to make us a better society." Well, the Baptist churches have been in the South for all these years and did not change the South in its attitudes towards labor, poor people, towards black people, towards disenfranchised people. It has never preached the gospel of social concerns. And to multiply all those Baptist churches over and over again would not make any difference if they're all the same way. And if you bring in industries that are not enlightened, that are repressive and insensitive of the people who work for them, who are inimical to unionism, and so on, I can't see that's a great blessing to us.