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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with William Dallas Herring, February 14, 1987. Interview C-0034. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Governor Sanford brings higher education to the remote areas of North Carolina

Herring remembers Governor Terry Sanford as someone who brought higher education to the remote areas of North Carolina.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with William Dallas Herring, February 14, 1987. Interview C-0034. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

You want to hear about Sanford and the succeeding governors, I believe.
JAY JENKINS:
Yes. Just sort of a brief…
WILLIAM DALLAS HERRING:
Well, you know from your own experience how grateful I am to Sanford for what he achieved. He opened the door for the rank and file people for education beyond the high school. He opened the door for the expansion of higher education into the remote areas of the state, and I'm using Charlotte as a remote area because it was in the structure of higher education. Wilmington they considered to be a part of South Carolina. McLendon and Ramsey used to tell me that they couldn't have an institution down there. It's nothing but ocean on the other side [laughter]
JAY JENKINS:
And then Asheville of course…
WILLIAM DALLAS HERRING:
Asheville was in Tennessee [laughter] . Well, Sanford's such a tremendous person in the way he handles—well, I've been to the mansion so many times. We've had it full of youngsters from all over the state, black and white—creative discussions, musicians, artists, educators, philosophers, even got the taxi cab drivers from New York to come down there one time. You remember that.