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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Henry Ell Frye, February 18 and 26, 1992. Interview C-0091. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Attending law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Frye describes his decision to go to law school at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and he discusses what it was like to be the only African American student in his class. Frye recalls that he was not discriminated against by his teachers or fellow students, although he suggests that had he not been married already, his social life might have been affected by his status as the only African American student.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Henry Ell Frye, February 18 and 26, 1992. Interview C-0091. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

AMY E. BOENING:
What made you decide to go to UNC for law school?
HENRY ELL FRYE:
Several things. First all, by this time I was very conscious of the fact that we still had largely separate black and white institutions. In talking with other lawyers and people I found out first of all that a substantial number of the judges, legislators, and people who ran the state were graduates of Carolina Law School. So I said, "Well, maybe that's where I need to go." That, together with the fact that I could go there cheaper than I could to one of the private schools, of course. At that time, no black had started at Carolina and completed the three year course and graduated. All of the others had either started and not finished or had transferred from North Carolina Central which prior to that time had been the school for blacks - the law school for blacks in North Carolina. So I said, "Well, I'll try." I applied and was accepted and went on to law school.
AMY E. BOENING:
What was it like? You were the only black in your law school class, weren't you?
HENRY ELL FRYE:
Yes, yes. That was not a major problem for me. It would have been probably if I had been single. But I was married and by this time my interest really was solely in law and my social life was back in Greensboro; so I was interested in just going to school and getting my work and that type of thing. There was no real problem other than trying to get those tough cases and briefing those and that type of thing. So I thought that I was treated fairly by the instructors and things of that nature.