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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Harriet Herring, February 5, 1976. Interview G-0027. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Violence stunts union organizing efforts

Efforts at organizing in the 1930s died down after furious opposition by the cotton mill owners, Herring recalls.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Harriet Herring, February 5, 1976. Interview G-0027. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

MARY FREDERICKSON:
What about organized labor? Did anyone in organized labor respond to it?
HARRIET HERRING:
I can't remember that any did. And I didn't see any because, you see, after that flurry of organization in the thirties, when the killing at whatever this other town is that I can't remember and the man dying in the jury box when this spectre came in, it died down for quite a while. Then when it came back it was on a little more solid ground. As far as that's concerned, Marshall Field mills (they still belonged to Marshall Field then), they opposed the union as hard as they could. As a matter of fact they had some sort of a hearing up there. I like a nut was always going wherever anything was happening about the mills, you know, and I pulled up there as hard as I could. I can't remember his name, one of the main people from the Labor Department was there and was going to testify. And they put him on the stand, and it took him all morning to tell all the different things he'd done. And then they began asking him about unionization, you see: they were trying again to unionize, and getting some opposition. He began telling about that.