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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Eulalie Salley, September 15, 1973. Interview G-0054. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Costs of being allied with other groups

Though Salley had earlier advocated greater involvement in partisan politics, she also asserts that the suffrage movement's association with specific issues, particularly prohibition, slowed their progress.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Eulalie Salley, September 15, 1973. Interview G-0054. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

EULALIE SALLEY:
Yes, and so many were against it in the beginning because they connected us with Carrie Nation. Remember Carrie Nation and her hatchet, how she went around?
CONSTANCE MYERS:
Yes. I understood that some of the other personalities in the suffrage movement had been interested in temperance too.
EULALIE SALLEY:
Mrs. Catt was originally interested in temperance. That's true, she was. Well, I never was. I'm of French descent and I was raised on wine instead of water. My grandfather thought the water on the plantation was contaminated. So every morning we were getting our allowance of wine for the day. I didn't know any different.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
It makes for longevity, doesn't it?
EULALIE SALLEY:
Yes, it looks like it. (laughing) I guess when you're raised that way you have to get knocked in the head with a hammer.