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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Eulalie Salley, September 15, 1973. Interview G-0054. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Finding and making connections

Salley found ways to link her business acquaintances and her activist interests so that she broadened her base of connections for both pursuits.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Eulalie Salley, September 15, 1973. Interview G-0054. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

EULALIE SALLEY:
I'll tell you where I had it on the people in Aiken. Most of my clients were the big rich northern "winter colony" people. I had seven very wealthy northern clients, like Mrs. Winthrop Rutherfurd and Mrs. Peter Roberts. They are . . . They would speak to their friends for me. I remember Mrs. Munsell, the one who was in Columbia and was a suffragistwas a cousin of Mrs. Joseph Leiter, a very wealthy woman. She came down here and I was introduced to Mrs. Leiter. It was through those people that I met the other people, other wealthy people, that the rest of these Aiken realtors never had a chance to meet.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
Isn't that marvellous. The suffrage movement inspired you to go into business and then the suffrage movement provided you with leads that set you off.
EULALIE SALLEY:
Yes, yes, yes. That was it.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
Did your business connections then acquaint you with people in political life on the state level? Is this how you came to know the politicians?
EULALIE SALLEY:
Yes. Then you see, I lobbied in Columbia. I'd go up there and stay with Lottie Hammond and Clara Buchanan--they were my cousins, Lottie and Clara. We would lobby in the state house.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
This was for the suffrage amendment, wasn't it?
EULALIE SALLEY:
Yes.
CONSTANCE MYERS:
Then it was through suffrage rather than business that you came to know the politicians. Was it?
EULALIE SALLEY:
Yes, it was through suffrage that I knew the politicians.