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Title: Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007): Electronic Edition.
Author: Ethel Marshall Faucette, interviewee
Interview conducted by Tullos, Allen
Funding from the Institute of Museum and Library Services supported the electronic publication of this interview.
Text encoded by Mike Millner
Sound recordings digitized by Aaron Smithers Southern Folklife Collection
First edition, 2006
Size of electronic edition: 276 Kb
Publisher: The University Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
2006.
© This work is the property of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. It may be used freely by individuals for research, teaching and personal use as long as this statement of availability is included in the text.
The electronic edition is a part of the UNC-Chapel Hill digital library, Documenting the American South.
Languages used in the text: English
Revision history:
2006-00-00, Celine Noel and Wanda Gunther revised TEIHeader and created catalog record for the electronic edition.
2006-05-19, Mike Millner finished TEI-conformant encoding and final proofing.
Source(s):
Title of sound recording: Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978 and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007)
Title of series: Series H. Piedmont Industrialization, 1974-1980. Southern Oral History Program Collection (H-0020)
Author: Allen Tullos
Title of transcript: Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007)
Title of series: Series H. Piedmont Industrialization, 1974-1980. Southern Oral History Program Collection (H-0020)
Author: Ethel Marshall Faucette
Description: 242 Mb
Description: 68 p.
Note: Interview conducted on November 16, 1978 and January 4, 1979, by Allen Tullos; recorded in Glencoe, North Carolina.
Note: Transcribed by Stephanie M. Alexander.
Note: Forms part of: Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007): Series H. Piedmont Industrialization, 1974-1980, Manuscripts Department, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Note: Original transcript on deposit at the Southern Historical Collection, The Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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Original grammar and spelling have been preserved.
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Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, January 4, 1979.
Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007)
Ethel Marshall Faucette, interviewee


Interview Participants

    ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE, interviewee
    GEORGE, interviewee
    JOE, interviewee
    ALLEN TULLOS, interviewer

[TAPE 1, SIDE A]


Page 1
[START OF TAPE 1, SIDE A]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Your whole name.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Ethel Marshall Faucette. I was Marshall before I married.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When were you born.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I was born December the twentieth, 1897.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What was your mother and father's name.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
My mother was Mary Elizabeth Marshall and my daddy, he just had initials, M. M. Marshall.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You don't know what they stood for.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, no I never did, because he was a twin and they named his sister Alice and Granny wanted him named David and Grandpap wouldn't have it, so they just called him their little man. And that's as much as he ever had. And he just signed his name M. M. Marshall, that's the way he signed. It went that-a-way as long as he lived. [laughter] And it's that-a-way in the cemetery.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you know about your grandparents?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I don't. I never see'd but one of my grandparents, and that was Daddy's mother and she was Nancy Marshall. So I never did see my grandpap, Eli Marshall. I knew his name of course [laughter] , but I didn't know him, because I never see'd him. And my oldest sister and brother see'd him, but I didn't.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What did they do, the grandparents?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Grandparents? Well now, I don't know that. Granny Marshall never did anything when I know'd her—she was too old.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did she ever talk about. . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, she never did talk about what they did or none at all about it. So, I don't know but my daddy was superintendent of

Page 2
this mill, down here, for forty years. And my mother worked in the mill—she was a spinner, she spinned. And then my sisters, I, brothers, we worked in the mill.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, how did your father and mother come here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Now I don't know that. I don't know—the first—Daddy come from Randolph County. He was reared over there somewhere about Mount Zion Church—Mount Zion Baptist Church. His people all lived over there. And mother, the first I ever heard her say anything about coming to a cotton mill was to Carolina, down below here. She never did say much about that, she quilled and spinned. And that's all I know about her.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you know about when they were born?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, momma was born August the ninth but, I can't remember the year. But I'll tell you, she was sixty nine when she died, and she's been dead forty two years. [laughter] I do know that much.
ALLEN TULLOS:
O.K. What about your father, do you know about him.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
And daddy was seventy two when he died and he's been dead, thirty nine years.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you know how they met.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nope, I don't know a thing about that. Never heard nobody say nothing about that, whenever I was growing up.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Yes'm. Well one of 'em was working here and one was working at the Carolina.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, they both worked here. Whenever they married, why they worked here and when I was real small, they moved from here

Page 3
to Elmira. And then, they stayed there about three years, and daddy went to Greensboro and started up a little mill up there, for, I believe it was Cones. And they called it the Hukey Nukey Mill. [unknown] [laughter] I can remember that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Who called it that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
The people up there. [laughter] It was just a little plant, you know, but now you see what it is now. Cones Mills are all everywhere. We stayed up there a long time—two or three years. Then he decided he'd come back here. My mother didn't want to come, and she thought he'd coming back to Elmira. And when we come, he had had the things moved out here in that house, right up there. Well she stopped in Burlington and stayed over there over a week and he finally got her to come over here.
From then, he bought a acre of ground up there back of the Baptist Church—well, there wasn't no church up there then. And, built the house in nineteen two—that's when we came back from Greensboro, back here. We lived in that house up there until they got the house built up there on that acre of ground that he had bought. `Course there was a little log house up there, but he had a big house.
And after he and mother died, I had two sisters and two brothers that lived up there at the old home place. And the old home place burned down. We never did learn how it caught `cause the chimney had burned down whenever the firemens got here. So we never did learn how it burned down, but we know'd it burned. [laughter]

Page 4
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, when your father wanted to come back here and your mother didn't, why didn't she want to come back here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, she just didn't like back here, she liked it in Burlington. Momma was a great talker, she loved to talk. [laughter] And she just had so many friend there at Elmira that she wanted to stay there. She didn't even want to move to Greensboro. But still, he moved up there. Then he come back to Burlington and he come on out here. And he quit one time and went to Burlington and started up a little old mill for Finley Williamson and they called it Need More, 'cause it was just a little place. Then, Bob Holt, he got him to come back here again. Of course we never moved to Burlington. When he started that mill up he just come backwards and forwards because we had our own home.
Now mother and daddy, daddy said he had eight children of his own—and he took one little child and raised it—he said nine wouldn't be any more than eight.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You mean, your mother and father had eight children.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where were you in all these eight.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, I was there. I was about the, let's see, there was three younger than I so. . . .
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you know what their names were and how much older each one is than the other one.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Right around two year old.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Every one of 'em.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Right around two and some three, so, there was a crowd

Page 5
of us. I know when he first built the house, he built five rooms. He built three down and two up—built five rooms. And as children came along, he just kept adding to it until we had a big old ten room house, when it burned down.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That's the one that was over here and burned down.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. That's the one that was up there and burned down.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well now, how was it that your father got started working in the mills, do you know?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know.
ALLEN TULLOS:
But he became the superintendent here, you say.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, he was the superintendent of this mill forty years, when he died.
ALLEN TULLOS:
He worked his way up through the different jobs?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. He never went to school a day in his life.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What would be some of the different jobs that he would have had. What would they have been called, or how long would he have stayed at each one, do you know?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I couldn't tell you that. The first time I remember, he was sitting in the Glencoe Mill, so I don't remember nothing about what he did before that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Now what about your mother, do you know how she began to work?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
My mother never worked after she was married.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I see. So when you all came back here she didn't work here.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, she didn't work here, nor she didn't work in Elmira and she didn't work at Greensboro. She never worked after she was married.

Page 6
ALLEN TULLOS:
What would she do most every day.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, she done housework like any housewife.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What would some of the things be that she would have done?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, she cleaned the house, and washed and ironed, and different things. 'Course after mother had so many children, why daddy hired a white woman, first to stay with us.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would it have been someone who lived around the area.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How old would the woman have been.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I couldn't tell you how old she was for I was little.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would she seem like a young woman or an older woman.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, she was a older like woman. He hired her as long as she was able, and after she just couldn't do much, we kept her. And then he hired a colored woman.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did the woman, the first woman that he hired, did she live in the house with the family.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, she stayed with the family. We all called her Aunt Becky, every one of us.
ALLEN TULLOS:
She didn't have a family?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, she didn't have no family—she had some people in Caswell County, but she didn't stay with them. She just stayed at, you know, in different ones, that needed her until she come to stay with us. And when she come to stay with us, she stayed with us.
ALLEN TULLOS:
About how long do you reckon that was, how many years?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh lord, I couldn't tell you that. It was a long, long time.

Page 7
ALLEN TULLOS:
And what about the black woman, where did she live?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, she lived back up in there—you know where the Green Acres is? [laughter] Well it's back up the road yonder, about a mile from here.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How would she come and go.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well she didn't go, she stayed there too all the time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
She stayed at the house.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, she stayed there with us.
ALLEN TULLOS:
She slept in the house.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes. she had a room upstairs. And when daddy finished building we had ten rooms to that house.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That's a big house.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes it is. Two big hallways. We had plenty of room because when we got big enough to play and run through the house, he built him a room at the back—said he couldn't sleep of the night for us cutting up and playing. We didn't go to bed early like he did.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What time would he go to bed.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He'd go to bed about eight thirty—between eight thirty and nine o'clock. Well, we didn't. So he built him a room at the back where he could go to bed and shut it off and couldn't hear what we was doing. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
What time did he get up?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, I think it was around five o'clock.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would your mother get up and fix breakfast for him.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would she get up before he would.

Page 8
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, he always got up and built the fires. You know you cooked on a wood stove then. He'd get up and he'd build them fires and burned wood in the fireplace. We had a big old fireplace, I reckon it was as wide as that. Burned of course, if you put a stick of wood in.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And he would do that every morning.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, he'd get up and build it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would you leave any coals in the. . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they'd always leave the coals in the fireplace and cover 'em up with ashes, and there'd be a fire there the next morning.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And then, what would be the next thing that would happen after he started the fire.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, she'd get up and fix his breakfast, and he'd go to work.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of things would you have for breakfast.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, we had eggs and ham—we raised our own meat. We raised anywhere from four to five hogs. Had two cows, a horse.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where would you keep those animals.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Keep them in the barn and in the sty there to the barn, to the pigs. We kept pigs there all the time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would it be just your family keeping animals in one spot.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did other people who lived in the village have . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they had—now they all say hogs and chickens and cows and things is diseased, has diseases, and people have 'em. But

Page 9
I don't believe it because everybody on the hill had a hog pen. Most of 'em went up that branch, and they kept 'em cleaned out, they didn't leave 'em in the mess.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Everybody had their own hogs.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Hogs, yes. And, when it got cold enough to kill hogs, maybe they'd kill hogs a month around here. Killed maybe six and eight a day, wasn't it Joe.
JOE:
Oh yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And what about cows.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
And cows.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did everybody have a cow?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
About everybody.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, where would they keep them. They couldn't keep 'em on each little lot, could they?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
They kept 'em in the barn, at the back of the house.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Everybody had a barn too?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Everybody had a barn that had a cow.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Is that right. You don't see any of these barns here anymore.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, no. They made 'em tear 'em down and move 'em. So there ain't none of 'em around here now. But there used to be just plenty of 'em, up and down that branch, and back out here up down Edge Road they called it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was there any place they could put them out to pasture at all?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they'd tie 'em out all around here. And all around the home, everywhere.

Page 10
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you have chickens?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, had chickens. You raised your own meat, you raised your own chickens, and you had eggs, and had milk and a horse to plow the garden, and to carry you to town.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And now, going back to fixing breakfast—you'd have eggs, and how would you fix the eggs.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Just fry 'em, fry 'em or boil 'em. Fix 'em different ways. We had ham all the time, we was hardly ever out of ham.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would you have any bread, or anything?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we had bread—plenty of bread. We didn't have no light bread, only what you called home made light bread. My mammy could make as good a light bread as you ever eaten. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would you have any for breakfast ever?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What would you have for breakfast?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Biscuit.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And what kind of flour would you use?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, we generally used straight grade flour. And an old man called—Johnson his name was—he come around once a month and you bought a barrel of flour. You didn't buy just a little bit, you bought a barrel of flour.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And Mr. Johnson would sell the flour.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And was he a miller?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, he was a miller. And he'd bring flour around every month. You'd buy that flour, and it'd last you a month.

Page 11
ALLEN TULLOS:
And your mother would make light bread out of this flour.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. Take yeast and make light bread. I used to could make it but I ain't made no bread in so long 'till I don't no whether I could make a biscuit or not. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would you have anything like molasses or syrup or honey or anything.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we had honey, we had syrup, we had molasses and had things just like they have now. Only didn't have light bread and no bakeries nor nothing like that. We had a great big ice box that held a block of ice and that's where you kept anything that you didn't want to spoil. But daddy always cured his meat—they'd stay in salt so many weeks—and then take it out, wash that salt off and put pepper on it and put it in the sack, hang it up. After it stayed in that salt for so long, it was cured. We never lost no meat.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What time of the year would you all kill your hogs?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
In November.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would everybody pretty much do it at the same time?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, they would just as fast as they could get to it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you divide up the meat among several different families.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well now, there'd be so many families help one another you know. When you'd kill hogs they'd come and help, with the meat and stuff.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That would take a whole day?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
A whole day, and sometime two days. Just according to how many you had killed at once.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And how would you know when the time was right to kill it?

Page 12
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, you'd look at the almanac and find out. And they had a certain time to kill hogs and they killed then.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which almanac do you reckon that was.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
S. Bloom's.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Bloom's Almanac.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Old Red Back Almanac. That's been the almanac ever since I can remember anything. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you all still get that one or use it at all?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we still get it. You buy it in town at any of the hardware stores. And it used to be ten cents, and now they're seventy five cents. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
So you all didn't have to buy very much food then, at all, except the flour. And what else did you buy besides flour?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Sugar and coffee, and things like that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How would that stuff come?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, we'd get it down here at the store.
ALLEN TULLOS:
At this store down the road.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would you buy it by the—what kind of packages would it come in?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well you could get five pounds, you could get ten pounds or you could get fifty pounds.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Of sugar?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Sugar. You could get as much coffee as you want. And them that had to buy meat got the meat—fatback meat was five cents a pound.

Page 13
ALLEN TULLOS:
When was this?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, that was back when I was little. [laughter] That was a long time ago.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well now, would just your mother and father eat breakfast since you all stayed up so late, or would you all get up.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We'd get up in time to go to school, in winter time. But, didn't go to school but four months.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which school did you go to?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, now we had school up yonder—you know where the flea market's at. Well that was the school house. And they just kept building better schools and bigger schools until they got this building. Then I don't know how come they decided to move the school up and out in the Haw—they moved 'em up there. And carry the children to school by bus. I never have liked that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How did you go to school?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I walked to school.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you go by yourself or with some other children?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I had—let's see—I had five sisters and a brother in school when I was in school.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And all of you would go along together.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We all went together.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you take along any lunch with you?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, if we wanted to. If we didn't we had a hour for lunch and we'd come home. `Cause we lived up yonder—the school house was right up the road there, so we didn't have to.

Page 14
ALLEN TULLOS:
But you all didn't usually take lunch with you.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, mother always had it done when we got back at dinner time—we had a hour and we could go and come.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What time of day would that have been?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
About twelve, twelve thirty.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What would she fix for those meals.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, she'd fix beans and things like that. Potatoes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you have more than one kind of beans, do you remember?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, sometimes we'd have two.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What were the names of some of those beans?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Pintos and snap beans, and corn. See daddy had fifty acres of land back up in the country and he had a colored man that raised a garden up there. He didn't farm, he just raised a garden. Well he raised beans and corn.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember the name of the corn?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Truckers Favorite. We have it now.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Same kind.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And what else would he raise.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He raised watermelon, canteloupes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember the names of any of those? Particular kind of watermelons?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. We had the George Rattlesnakes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I've seen that one—it's got stripes.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, and they're dark green and a white looking melon but I can't think of the name of that. But I know we had two or three

Page 15
different kinds. And he raised 'em, or had 'em raised—he didn't raise 'em, 'cause he worked at the mill.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What were some other things, would he raise tomatoes?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He'd raise tomatoes, and onions, and okra, and—we raised all kind of vegetables—and he canned 'em. We had to gather 'em, wash 'em, get 'em everything ready and packed in the can and he'd come home in the afternoon, he sealed 'em.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would they be put in glass.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
In actual cans.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
In tin cans. And he'd seal 'em, and then we'd cook 'em. Cook 'em so many hours. And then he'd fix—you know there's a little hole right on top of the can—he'd take a drop of sodder and put it on every one of them. Sometime we'd can as much as four and five hundred cans.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What would you do with all of them.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, eat them.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Just your family?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Gosh, it'd take a whole lot for a family of twelve. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, did other people can or is that unusual?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, everybody canned. And you saved everything you could for winter time. 'Cause you didn't make but four and five dollars a week.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Because you all were the superintendent's family, did you all have a little more money or a little better wages than most of the people who worked.

Page 16
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, daddy had a little better wages, but we didn't. We fared just like the rest of the help. It didn't make a bit of difference and I think he was stricter on us than he was the rest of the help. He made us do, and do right.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Who was that, your father.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. And when we come from that mill, we didn't set at the table and talk about what the other fellow done down there—if we did we got our mouth mashed. He didn't laugh, no sir.
ALLEN TULLOS:
He was pretty strict.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He says, you leave the mill out of your conversation, he says, leave it, there's enough to talk about you all. And he didn't allow us to say a word about it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, what kind of things—what was he talking about?
[END OF TAPE 1, SIDE A]

[TAPE 1, SIDE B]

[START OF TAPE 1, SIDE B]
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of things did he talk about?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, you know how people will talk in a place like that—anywhere where there's a crowd. He didn't allow us to talk about it. He said, now let the other fellow do that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, when you all got off of work—you said about six o'clock, you worked from six to six—then would you have supper?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we'd have supper.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would that be right after you got off of work?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, mother always had our meals ready when we got home.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would they be different than the other meals.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, most of the time.

Page 17
ALLEN TULLOS:
How would that be?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, sometimes she would fry different things for a whole meal and then—just have different things.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which was the biggest meal of the day, would you reckon?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, I imagine supper was the biggest because we was all there then, all of us. And at lunch time, I generally went home and got the others—when we was several of us at work—their lunch, and carried it back to them. And let them stay down there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That's when you were working and not when you were going to school.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. When I wasn't in school.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, did you all have any dessert?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yes, we had ice cream, we had cake and pie—all kind of dessert.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you make the ice cream yourself.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kinds did you make?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Made every kind we wanted.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What was your favorite kind?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We generally made vanilla or chocolate, sometime we'd make peach. The fruits that we had, you know, at the different times, when the fruits were ripe and all.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You had an ice cream making machine.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we had a ice cream freezer. You could buy the ice. There was ice men come around about three times a week and fill up the ice box. So we used it out of there.

Page 18
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where would the ice man come from?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Burlington.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And would he come all times of the year.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, he'd come any time you wanted him to.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did most everybody have an ice box?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Everybody had one. Everybody here, I don't know whether everybody had one or not [laughter] , but everybody here had one.
ALLEN TULLOS:
In Glencoe.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes. And this place was a pretty place and they kept it fixed up and it was clean. You could see all over yonder. There wasn't no trees—nothing but these maple trees. All them other big trees, except that one yonder—them two down there at that old spring, they've been there every since I can remember.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well what were some of the different kinds of cake that you had.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, we had chocolate cake, we had banana cake, we had all kind of cakes that you could think of.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you have some made out of nuts?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was your mother a good cook?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Ooh—my mother was a number one cook. And that colored girl that we had was a number one cook too. Or daddy wouldn't have kept her.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you learn how to cook some things from them?

Page 19
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Ooh—my momma learned every one of us to cook and sew and do housework. And you done it right, didn't you went back and done it over.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did she write down any recipes or did she just know 'em.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We had cookbooks, just like we do now. From different ones.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember what any of those were called.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I didn't pay no attention to it you see. I didn't have it to do and [laughter] , I didn't pay no attention to it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When was it that you started working in the mill?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I started working in the mill when I was eighteen.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was that about the time most people started.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, some of 'em—my sister started when she wasn't but nine year old. And my brother did too. Back then they'd start from eight and nine, until they passed that child labor law you know, where they couldn't work.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well what did your brothers and sisters do when they started work.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, I had one sister that was a weaver. I had a brother that was a carding room man, he was fixer in the carding room. And I had a brother that worked in the finishing room, where they finish the cloth. And I had a sister that worked in the finishing room, and I had one that worked in the drawing and twisting room—besides myself, I worked there. Me and her worked in the drawing and twisting room.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That's what you did when you first started?

Page 20
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember, maybe you don't, but do you remember the first time you went down to go to work?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. I used to carry lunch down there to my sister and to another fellow that worked down there that lived over the other side of us. I'd carry lunch down there and while she was eating her lunch I learned to work on her job. And that's how I learned. I was already learned when I went to work, 'cause I'd work every day on her job while she ate her lunch. I learned to twist in and then after I went to work, I learned to draw in. I worked 'till they shut down down there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
In fifty four?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
In fifty four.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you stay at the same job?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. Oh, I didn't—I worked in the weaving room, or I worked upstairs or I worked in the draw in room—I worked anywhere they wanted me to. I worked over at the finishing room, when they needed me, I just worked wherever they need me.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you like the work?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, I liked the work. I wish it was running now, I'd be at work.
ALLEN TULLOS:
[laughter] Was it . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
It was cotton, and made outing. Made this here outing like you see men's shirts made out of them outing shirts—that's what they made here.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What was it like on the inside, did it have windows in it?

Page 21
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, there was windows in the mill.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was it light?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Light, and they did—now I don't remember that but I've heard 'em laugh about having the man to fill the oil light and light the lights. Whenever it began to get dark enough to light lights. George's daddy done that for awhile.
ALLEN TULLOS:
It was open from six in the morning until six at night?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. And they heat the mill one time by stoves. But, I don't believe—yes you can—where that round place is up there on the end of the mill. That's where the chimbley is at—the both ends of the mill. [laughter] Yeah, that's where it is at.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That would be to keep it warm?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. They heated the stoves. Now, I don't know what they burned in them stoves, they could burn wood I reckon. Because I know I was a great big girl when we began to get coal and have a coal stove.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, were there different parts to the mill, you talk about upstairs and downstairs.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. There's three floors.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What went on on each of the floors?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, the weaving room was in the bottom floor, and spinning. The little weaving room was on the second floor. Then the carding room was on the third floor and the twist in and draw in room was on the third floor.
ALLEN TULLOS:
So you worked up on the third floor a lot.

Page 22
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. I worked up on the third floor, and sometime I worked down in the weaving room.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did people like to do some jobs better than others?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, yeah. Different ones had a certain job that they liked to do—and they wanted that job, they didn't want to do nothing else.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did some of the jobs pay better than the others.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How did that go?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well they'd paid by the hour, most of the time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which ones were better, how did that work?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
The hour work, you made more for that because you're paid so much an hour you know. Now when I went to work I made eighty five cents a day. Well, that's what I made, eighty five cents a day. And when I quit work I made a dollar and sixty nine cents a hour.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about different jobs, did different jobs pay different things?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Could you tell me about that.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Different jobs. Now a weaver made more than spinning and carding, and made more than we did in the drawing in room. But we finally did get it raised up to where we made more than they did.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Made more than who did?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
The weaving.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Oh really?

Page 23
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, because we worked by the piece, you know. You work by the piece you can make more if you want to and if yif yon't want to you can fall down on the job.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, what did it sound like inside?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, it was just a fuss, all I know. [laughter] Different machines running that made more fuss than others. [unknown] Now down in the weaving room made a whole lot more fuss than did up in the twist in and draw in room 'cause there wasn't no machines up there. We drawed in by hand and twisted in by hand. Wasn't no machines.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was there too much noise sometimes?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
It was all the time, you couldn't hear your—you couldn't hear nothing. [laughter] Not down there, that you was right close up there to somebody. You would talk to 'em if you was right at 'em.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did people ever worry that they would hurt their ears, would they worry about their hearing or anything like that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I never knowed 'em to say nothing about it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I've heard some songs that people used to sing about working in the mill. Did people ever sing in there?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they'd sing, but you couldn't hear 'em. [laughter] You knowed they was doing something, you'd see their mouth working.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you ever do any singing when you were in there?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Not hardly, 'cause I don't sing.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What were the songs that people would sing. Would they be about the work itself or would they be other kind of songs?

Page 24
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
They'd be different kinds. I don't remember what they was.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would sometimes people sing songs about their jobs?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. And I did have a piece that one man wrote about the whole mill, and I lost it somewhere. He made up a song about the whole mill—but I forget what it was, don't you George?
GEORGE:
What?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
The song where, was it Walt Dickens or—who was it made that song up about the mill, and it started at the first of it. Where it started in, the cotton started in. But I can't remember who it was.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What was the song about?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
It was about the different kind of works you know. And he rhymed it up and he made a song, a great long song. Because he started where it went in the breakers at the lap room and went on up. But I can't remember who it was, been so long ago.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did he sing it?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When would he sing it?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, there was a crowd of 'em that picked guitar and the banjo and different string instruments. We run by water then, had water wheels—that was the power that run the mill—and when the water'd get low, maybe they'd stop off for a hour or two. Well these gang of boys would get their instruments and get out there in the front of the mill, and they would sing and pick the guitar and the banjo, and different kind of string music. And maybe they'd stand an hour or two and the water'd gain up, and they'd start back up.

Page 25
ALLEN TULLOS:
How often would that happen?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
That was in the summer time. And when the water got low—the water'd get low—there's a big old rock out there they call Lily and—I forget the other one's name, but there's two of 'em. When you begin to see them two rocks, you'd know we was going to get a rest. 'Cause the water was getting low. (George: Yeah, they made up songs whenever the water'd get low.) Get out in front of the mill under two big trees—they done cut the two trees down in front of the mill now. Get out there in the shade and sing.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you reckon that'd be once a week or once a month in the summer time, or how much?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, sometime it was two or three times a week. When it didn't rain. We had dry weather just like we have now. People say, oh I don't remember it. Well I remember it very well, for I was working in the mill. And I know'd when it'd shut down for low water.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember any other songs. That's a good song that you remembered there, do you remember any others?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I don't.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would people sing church music?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they'd sing sacred songs, and they would sing jazz.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Jazz?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. [laughter] Old Aunt Dinah's Quilting Party.
GEORGE:
That used to be the main one.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes it was. Just a whole lot of songs, but I don't remember.

Page 26
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did people know the names of different singing groups, different musicians that played their songs.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember any of those groups at all?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I don't.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about record players and radios and things like that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we had a record player and we had—the first little radio I ever saw was just about like that, wasn't it. Just a little square box, about half as big as that. And you listened at it through earphones.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you all have one like that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, we didn't have one like that. 'Cause there was too many of us, and daddy said we'd fuss over it. And he'd just wait 'till a bigger one come out. So when the big one come out, he bought us one. We had a piano, an organ, and all.
ALLEN TULLOS:
So you went to somebody's house and heard that little one with the earphones?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, Claude Phillips was the first man and the first one that I ever know'd to have one, wasn't he.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember what you heard?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I don't.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you hear music, or talking?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they had mostly music. He lived right out there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was it a station that was far away from here or close by?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
This here was just a record.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Oh, a phonograph.

Page 27
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
It was a little phonograph. You could hear it though, through them earphones. (George: Played it with a needle.) No this here—yeah, that one played with a needle but you had to listen with the earphones, you had to listen that a way, you couldn't hear it—it didn't have no loudspeakers on it. But now, our'n was a great big one, had a morning glory horn—great big horn you know. And it had big records.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of records?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, oh some of was that big around, wasn't they George?
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember what they were?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would it be music some?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they'd be music and dancing and singing.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would it be country music?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Music from around North Carolina?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I reckon it was, I don't know.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about, you know, some of it had orchestras.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I know it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you have any of that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. We had all kind of records, we did.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where did you buy your records?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
From Ellis Music Store in Burlington. They still got a music store.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Is that right?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I believe—I know old man Ellis is dead and his wife's dead, but I believe he's got a son that runs that music store.

Page 28
Yeah, he sold sewing machines and all kind of music. Instruments, 'cause I know daddy bought us organs, and when pianos come out he bought us a piano. And then when phonographs and different things come out [laughter] , he bought us one of those.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You all had a piano and an organ?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Who played 'em?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
My sisters.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you play?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I never did try.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you sing?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we all sing. I got a sister that did teach music awhile, but she isn't doing nothing now.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When would you do your singing and music making?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
At night, and on Sunday. 'Cause we worked 'till twelve o'clock on Saturday. Sing and play, maybe there'd be half a dozen different families, children come up there. [laughter] That's what'd worry daddy you know. All would get in the living room, some playing the piano, and some the organ, some playing the phonograph [laughter] , and he just couldn't take it—and he had every room built where he wouldn't have to listen. But now he allowed us to have a big time there. Said when we was home he know'd where we was at, know'd what we was doing.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What if you wanted to go off and visit somebody else?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, he'd let us go but we had to be back by ten o'clock.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You couldn't go by yourself.

Page 29
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. We'd go to different parties—ice cream parties, and box parties, and different things like that. But now we didn't stay out no later than ten o'clock. Then he'd come after us.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What's a box party?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, the women would make the boxes and put different things to eat in it and the one that bought the box, they'd eat supper with the girl that was the one that made it, you know.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of things would they put in 'em.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, they'd have supper in 'em. They'd have fried chicken, and ham and cake, pie—just a whole lot of things in the box. Have plenty for two's supper.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where would that be held.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
At the school house. In the auditorium.
[Interruption]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Let's go back to the bread, and how that changed. Do you remember when people quit making the bread and started buying it.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, no I don't. I don't remember, 'cause that's been a long time ago.
ALLEN TULLOS:
'Cause you said your mother made this.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, my mother used to make her—light rolls they called 'em. And they were just as good as any light bread you ever eat.
ALLEN TULLOS:
But people were already buying light bread then.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. But she made that before they was buying it because she made that years and years ago. And she took flour, and we used to use lard where they use oil now. She took buttermilk and yeast and just a tiny bit of sugar. But I don't remember all she put in there

Page 30
and she made that up—just like she was making up a batch of dough to make biscuits. And then she'd pack it down in a big bowl and set it in the ice box. And let it set in there and all night and then the next morning she'd take it out and she'd knead that good and then she'd set it up where it was warm and let it rise. And it'd rise clean out of that bowl. I've seen it rise up 'till it raised the lid up off of the bowl. Then she would fix it in a loaf and put it in a loaf pan and bake it. And it was as good a light bread as you ever eat—it's a whole lot better than this here that the bakeries make now.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you all change from one kind of flour to another, any time?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, whenever they begin to put out this self rising flour—my momma bought that. But she didn't buy it regular, she used her old straight grade flour where it was ground at the mill. And there's a mill up yonder right above Green Acres that still grinds flour—makes flour. It's on the river, and it's water ground.
ALLEN TULLOS:
One last thing, do you remember any of the names—when they started making the self rising flour—what brands?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No I don't, I don't remember.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where would you buy that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We'd buy it down here at the company store.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And would the flour man, Mr. Johnson, did he quit coming around?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well he died, of course he quit coming around. [laughter] And he lived over in Virginia, and he'd come one day and stay all day and stay that night and leave the next day. He stayed over there at my aunts' most of the time, at night with them.

Page 31
[END OF TAPE 1, SIDE B]

[TAPE 2, SIDE A]

[START OF TAPE 2, SIDE A]
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
After they built that they never did run much. I reckon the old head gates is out, up there now.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You haven't been back there to look in awhile?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. [laughter] And I ain't going up there, there's too much meanness going on up that river.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Oh really. What kind of meanness?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know, for I don't go up there.
GEORGE:
I ain't got no business up there neither.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I ain't got no business up that river.
GEORGE:
Might run into a still.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Is that what goes on up there.
GEORGE:
I don't know.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We don't go up there, we don't mess around up there. And none of these people down here don't—used to. We'd go up there fishing, going swimming in the pond. But since they've turned loose so much old poison in there, nobody don't go up there an go in no more.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When you all were working in the mill, you say you used to go fishing and hunt muscadines?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When did you stop doing that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, we been stopped ever since they started the mill on the third shift.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When would that have been, do you reckon?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, I don't know, I don't remember.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would it be after World War II?

Page 32
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. The mill was running in World War II.
ALLEN TULLOS:
But they didn't run a third shift before then, did they?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, didn't run second shift. We never did run no more than one shift, that I can remember, 'till after they went on eight hour law. We never did.
ALLEN TULLOS:
But you would run a ten or twelve hour shift.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. We went to work at six o'clock and come home at six. And had forty five minutes for lunch.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When did that law change things?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Didn't it change in thirty two—I believe it did in July. ‘Cause the reason I remember so well—we were down to George's fathers’, he lived at Hopedale. And he said then, that was on a Saturday—no, we went down there one day through the week. He said, well, I'll never live to work on a eight hour law. You know he died on Sunday, before the eight hour law come in on Monday.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I guess that would make you remember it.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
That's the reason I remember it so well. But I don't remember exactly what the date was, but I know it was in thirty two that the law come in.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They went right along with the law, and they didn't—here, the people who were running the mill.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What did they think about it.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, they didn't say a word about it, not here they didn't. And other places that I know of they didn't. Everybody was glad of it. See, this mill has never been union.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Never.

Page 33
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, we never had no union.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, did anybody ever try to start a union here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, they tried several times, but I don't remember what they done about it. They never done nothing about it because they never did get it. Nobody wouldn't vote for the union.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They tried several times.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes. But they never did get it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they try it while your father was superintendent.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. Now, he'd of paid a bit more attention to it, he would of—dog barking. [George laughing in background]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, who would be the ones that would try to get it started.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know who the one was, it was somebody'd come here. And I just remember 'em talking about it because, we didn't never ask daddy nothing about the mill because that was one thing he didn't allow. He said, wasn't none of our business—that's just what he'd say. [laughter]
GEORGE:
And you'd better do just what he said too.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
And we know'd it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, you're saying that the people that started the union, they didn't live here, but they came in from somewhere else?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Came in from somewhere else, and I don't know who they was.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they work here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They didn't even work here. Well, when would this have been, do you reckon, just generally.

Page 34
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well I don't know, I can't tell you. 'Cause I don't remember, 'cause I never went to work in the mill 'till after I was eighteen years old. So I just don't know.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember any union people in the 1930's.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No I don't.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They had something called a general strike, in a lot of different mills.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
A lot of mills struck, but I didn't know nothing about it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did anybody here go on strike ever?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Is that right.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, there wasn't no union here. [laughter] This mill, they always laughed and said, Glencoe Mill will run regardless how many big mills were standing. And we did, as long as Bob Holt lived, and as long as Holt Green lived, he run it. But still, he went off to the war, and got killed and it never did do no more good. And they finally just shut it down.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Why was it that you didn't start working in the mill until you were eighteen?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, my mother and father had a big family of children. And as we got big enough to help her with the housework, why we helped her until one of the others got big enough to help [laughter] , and we'd go to work. And that's the reason.
ALLEN TULLOS:
So you were along about—you had three of 'em I think that were younger than you.

Page 35
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, there's more than that younger than I am.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, did some of them start to work in the mill before you did, some of the younger ones?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Why not.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well because they weren't old enough and they didn't go to work. We went to school, as long as we could.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you go all the way through high school.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I finished the eighth grade. I didn't go through high school.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you want to go some more?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. I finished the eighth grade in May, I believe school was out first of May. And then the next March I got married and I didn't go back to school no more.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How old were you when you got married?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nineteen. I was nineteen December, and got married in March.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well how did that happen, how did you all meet each other.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, we know'd each other from childhood. Just raised up you might say, together. All lived here on the hill you see. That's how we met.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you have an engagement, anything like that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I didn't let nobody know a thing about it until we got married.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Just all of a sudden you told them.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. We were engaged about three years before we got married.

Page 36
ALLEN TULLOS:
But nobody knew about it.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nobody knew it but me and him.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of a wedding did you have?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We just went to a magistrate and got married.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where was that, where did you go?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Down to Mr. Charlie Wilson, who lived down here on the road to Carolina.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Why did you decide to get married right then and not wait.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, because my people were against it—they didn't want me to marry. And I slipped off and married him—I was old enough, they couldn't help it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
So you waited until you got to be eighteen.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I was old enough, 'till I was a nineteen year old.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they have any reasons.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nope, no. They didn't have none.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well what did they say after you all had gotten married, what did they think about it.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nothing. No, they didn't say nothing. They said that we was married and that's all there was to it. Couldn't do nothing about it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you all still get along.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
It didn't change how you got along at all.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We got along good. And I reckon my mammy and daddy. loved George just as good as they did me—I know they did. [unknown] (George laughs)
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well did you all move into a house of your own right after you got married?

Page 37
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
We moved in a house over on that street—a little three room house. Then, we decided we wanted a bigger house and we moved on to this house. Back then they'd let you have a house—if it come empty you could get it, if you lived here. Of course now, they was particular—they rented houses too. They didn't have none of this here fighting and drinking and cutting up. You done that, you got out.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Who would see to it that the people got the houses, and if they were rowdy, who would see to it that they were . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
My daddy was the one rented the houses, every one of 'em. [laughter] And he was strict on 'em.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember him ever having those times where he had to put somebody out of a house?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, no. I never did. I don't remember 'till this day that he ever put anybody out. But now he'd go and talk to 'em, and tell 'em he just wasn't going to have it. And he wouldn't. But I never did know him to put nobody out.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well what kind of things would make him mad so that he would go and talk to them.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, if they got drunk and got to fighting and cutting up he'd go and—try to, you know, straighten it out—and tell 'em just what they'd have to do if they didn't. And, they'd straighten up about it. We had a decent place to live all the time, and we haven't had no rough people here until the last few years that they run, have we George? (George: That's right.) And then they got in some rough ones but they didn't stay long. And this was a pretty place, they kept it clean, it was clean as it could be. And all this growth around here has growed up since this mill shut down. `Cause every one

Page 38
of these houses stayed full of people. They had a big garden, they raised their hogs, they kept their cow—if they owned one, and their horse—everybody, and there wasn't no trouble here. They kept things cleaned up—you didn't smell no hog lots nor cow lots or nothing—they had to keep it up, keep it cleaned up.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, to go way back again, to think back to your grandparents. As far as you know did they live on a farm?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
As far as I know, part of 'em did. And then part of 'em lived here at Carolina, worked down there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
In the mill.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
In the mill. And then, there was people lived down at the Hopedale that had a grist mill down there-where they ground the wheat and the corn, made flour and everything. And that's as far back as I remember.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Now what about your father. Did he grow up on a farm or was he one of those that lived in
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. They had a farm over there right this side of Mount Zion Baptist Church. They lived over there, but now to what his people done, I don't know. For they was both dead when I come up.
ALLEN TULLOS:
But you don't think they ever worked in a mill?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I don't think they did. Daddy I think is the only one. Then, daddy's mother's sister had some children, her and her husband. And I don't know whether you ever heard anybody talk about Tobe Sullivan in Greensboro? Well that's one of her children. She was a Sullivan—she married a Sullivan. She was a Marshall and married a Sullivan. And that's the only one on daddy's side of the people that I knew except his two sisters.

Page 39
ALLEN TULLOS:
He had a twin sister didn't he?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Her name was Alice?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Now what became of her.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
She died.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When was that.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
She died here, she been dead about two years, didn't she, before daddy died. (George: Yeah, I think so.)
ALLEN TULLOS:
What did she do?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
She worked at Plaid Mill. She was a drawing in twister hand at Plaid Mill, as long as I can remember. And she worked there 'till just, oh, two or three year before she died. She died when she was seventy and daddy died when he was seventy two. Just two years difference.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And now, what about the other sister?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, she died, I can't remember how long she been dead.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What was her name?
GEORGE:
Who was that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Mag, Maggie Allen. Jim Allen's wife.
GEORGE:
That's way back isn't it? [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
What did she do, did she work in the mill too?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know whether she did. She never did that I know of.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was she older or younger than. . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
She was older. She was older than daddy, right much older.

Page 40
ALLEN TULLOS:
But you say you don't really think she did, work in the mill.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, I don't think she worked in the mill.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about her husband, what did he do?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He worked in the mill. He worked in the mill up until . . .
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which one, which mill?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Down here.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Down here at Glencoe.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, he worked down there from the time I could remember anything, until he died.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I see, did they live here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they lived on back a street. They lived here.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, what about the different people that your father worked for. How many of those people would there be and what are the names of some of those people that he worked for.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Here at the mill?
ALLEN TULLOS:
Yeah.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He was superintendent, he worked for R. L. Holt.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That was the first one that he worked for.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Over here. Now, he worked at other places but I don't know . . .
ALLEN TULLOS:
Yes'm. But over here Mr. Holt was the first one, okay, and then after him who would it be.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Who took daddy's place?
ALLEN TULLOS:
No, I mean after Mr. Holt.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
It was Mr. Green's family. See, they were heirs, Mr. Green—Walter Green. And then Holt, he was the one that took training for a cotton mill, so he went to the war and got killed. And Walter said he couldn't run it, he said he wasn't no cotton mill man.

Page 41
ALLEN TULLOS:
So it would have been R. L. Holt and then Mr. Green, Walter Green?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And then, what would be the last one, the one that got killed?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Robert Holt.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Holt Green?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Holt Green, yeah. And now I don't nothing about them much, only they'd come up here in the summer time and stay with their Uncle Bob—they called him. But that's all I know about 'em. They come up to our house and play with our brothers. They'd come up here and stay the whole summer with him. And they was two devilish a boys as ever you've seen in your life. They had a cart and a pony and they'd get in that cart, and of all the riding you've ever seen they'd do it. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well who was it that lived down here in this house on the corner?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Bob Holt.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And did the Green's ever live there, any of them?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. Nothing but Robert and Holt would come up here, when they was boys and stay with their uncle.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That's where they would stay.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
And then Bob Holt moved over in the house over there where Walter Green lives now. And he died over there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did your father ever talk about any of those people that he worked for, what did he think about them?

Page 42
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, he didn't ever. He never talked to us about no mill business.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That was just left behind.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Mill business was left at the mill when he came home. (George: That's right.) And if we went and talked about it he'd shut us up right then. He didn't allow us to talk about it. And now, the mill's down yonder, and we're at home.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Why do you think he did that, why?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know, but he didn't allow us to talk about it. Nothing'd happen down there now, we didn't have. . . . We could tell momma but we'd have to tell her when he wasn't around. We couldn't tell him, no sir, we couldn't tell him. (George: Better off if they'd do that now.)
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well now, you all wouldn't worry so much. [unknown] There were eight children, if I remember right, that your father and mother had. And then you all also raised a child that wasn't one of your brothers and sisters. Now, could you tell me that story. How did that happen and what's the story?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, momma was always going to see the sick, you know, down here on the hill. Well Kate's mother was bad off and she told daddy that she wanted to come down here—it was about, a little after supper. So he and her come. And momma said when she got down here that Kate's mother was dying and she hated to leave her. So her and daddy just stayed on 'till after she died. And Kate went out on the porches in the summer time. And she told daddy, she said now—she always called him Uncle Man—and she says now, Uncle Man, I ain't got nobody, she says, momma's gone. And says, I want to come and stay with you. Daddy said, well I got eight of my own, but one more won't make no difference, just come on when you get ready. Well her brothers wanted

Page 43
her to go and stay with a Miss Boone—Miss Mary Ann Boone. Well she didn't want to stay up there and they was having a week meeting down here at the church, and she told Miss Boone that she wanted to come down here and go with us to church that week. So she let her come. And Kate told momma, says Aunt Mary Eliza, says I don't want to go back up there. Says, I'd rather you'd kill me than to let me go back up there. So momma told her, says you don't have to go back up there if you don't want to. Says, you could stay here with the children. Says, we got a crowd, but we could take on one more. So, Kate stayed that week. Miss Boone sent two men from up here at the orphanage, up at Elon—down here to get her, carry her up there. So they come up to the house. Momma told 'em, says, well I got eight of my own, but I'm going to keep her. Says, I dare every one of you to touch her, if you do, she says, I'll kill you. Says, I got the gun right here on my machine. That's just what she told 'em. Says, now you don't touch her. So she sent to the mill after daddy. He come to the house and he told her, he said no, he says, you all can't take her away from here. If you do, you'll pay me a week's board that you can't afford. [laughter]
So he just got rid of him. And him and mother went to Graham, he didn't adopt her. He just went down there and had it fixed so that he could keep her. With that they could afford to pay the board that he wanted for her. And so she stayed at that house until she was eighteen year old.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How old was she when she came?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
She was between five and six, she was just a child.

Page 44
ALLEN TULLOS:
Now what had happened—did you all ever know what had happened to her mother, what it was that she died of?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, she died of some kind of fever. I don't know what it was, I don't remember.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about her father, Kate's father. Where was he?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He was dead. He died and her mother married again.
ALLEN TULLOS:
But there wasn't—was there a man in the household then.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That was the man she had married again.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. And Kate didn't want to stay with him. He would have stayed, he was a good man. And he would have stayed there and kept the children together. But her children by her other husband was all married but two—they were older you know. And so, the married ones didn't want to keep them but they wanted to put 'em somewhere else. [unknown] So Kate stayed with us.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well your mother and her mother must have been pretty good friends.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
They were good friends. They weren't a bit of kin in the world. But they were just good friends. Well I don't know of nobody that my momma wasn't a good friend to. I couldn't tell you anybody.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And you say she was a real talker.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yes, she just loved to talk and laugh. But she didn't want to talk about nobody. No sir. She'd get up and leave if you went to talk about somebody, she'd leave right then. She just like that.
GEORGE:
Be better if we'd all do that, wouldn't it?

Page 45
ALLEN TULLOS:
Let me ask some more then about this kind of thing. Was it unusual for a family to take in a child like that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nope.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You knew other people that did that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah now. It wasn't nothing unusual. They didn't have but—I don't remember of but one children's home, and that was up here at Elon.
GEORGE:
That's still up there too, isn't it?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yes, it's still up there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, when children were working in the mill—when they got paid did they give the money to their parents?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Parents, yes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How would you do that, how did that work.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well now, if there's more than one worked, they'd just make out one pay check to the parents and all of 'em that'd be down there. How many days and how many hours, everything, was right on there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And would the parents give the children an allowance or any money.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, they'd give 'em some—give 'em whatever they wanted. We got whatever we wanted. Daddy let us run charge accounts here at the store for clothing, things like that. He run charge accounts at Sellars'. You know Sellars'.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That's in Burlington.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
In Burlington, yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That's an old store.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Old store, I reckon it is. (George: I reckon it is. Older than I am.) It's been Sellars' ever since I can remember. And I

Page 46
was eighty one week before last. And so it's been up, it's a old store. The store right there in Burlington where it's at now, of course it's got three or four different stores now all together. But they had just one store there on Main Street ever since I can remember.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What did they sell?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
All kind of dry goods. Had ready made things.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well would you all buy clothes that were already made or would you make your own.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, momma generally made ours.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I see.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Of course we bought maybe a suit or something like that. But we always bought the cloth and she made it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did she teach you all how to sew and make things.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Every one of us.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you keep on doing that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. I sewed until I lost this eye. I lost this eye and got a cataract on this one so I don't. I make a lot of quilts but other than that I don't do much sewing, 'cause I can't.
GEORGE:
How'd you lose that eye, Ethel?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Blood clot.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well now, let's talk about you all's children. When did you have your first child. How long had you been married and how far apart were your children?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Around two years. I was married eleven months when my first baby come.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And what was his name?

Page 47
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Robert. He's dead. He died, when flu was—1918.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Nineteen eighteen. So he was a real young child.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nine months old.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well lots of people remember that flu.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, I reckon they do. I had pneumonia and George did too. And my baby died, and my brother's baby. And lord, sometimes there'd be three and four in this village, laying a corpse at one time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well were there doctors or anybody to help out.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, Dr. Walter and Dr. Anderson and Dr. Vosit. And And there was Dr. Montgomery and Dr. Moore. [Interruption]
ALLEN TULLOS:
I think you all have a visitor here.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh it's nobody but Carl, one of my brothers. Just come by here to get some things.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Let's talk some more about the flu epidemic then. Do you remember how it started?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No I don't. I don't know how it started. But I know there wasn't a family on this place what didn't have three or four with it. I know that all of us had it. And all of us near about were down at one time.
[END OF TAPE 2, SIDE A]

[TAPE 2, SIDE B]

[START OF TAPE 2, SIDE B]
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
And all of us near about were down at one time. All except mother and she never did have it. She waited on all of us. And George's father, he said, well that wasn't right. George should be up there for momma had as much as she could do and he was going to bring George down here to his house. Well he did. And me and the

Page 48
baby stayed on up there for I had pneumonia and the baby did too. And the baby died and I never even got to go to the funeral or nothing. I couldn't, I wasn't able. But now people say they have the flu now, but they get up too quick with it. `Cause we had the flu and we never got over it in a week or two. And people say, oh I got the flu. Well they ain't got it like I had it. [laughter] Now I'll tell the world on that. It was something else.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did it close down the mill.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, the mill had to close down. There was one man that didn't have the flu and when the doctor got out here, why, he'd follow him and get the prescriptions and carry 'em back to Burlington and get the medicine. That was Henry Wilson. His family had the flu but he'd take time out long enough to go have everybody's prescription filled and bring it back and deliver it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How long did it take from the beginning to the end of all of that flu, how long was that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I reckon it was two months, wasn't it George?
GEORGE:
Yeah, I reckon so.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Every day, you'd hear somebody's died. And they couldn't build coffins fast enough to take care of it. It was terrible. I hope they never will be like that no more. Of course now people say, oh I've got the flu. But I don't believe it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How long do you reckon the mill stayed closed?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
The mill stayed closed 'till people got able to go back to work to start it back up. [laughter] That was about three weeks, for nobody wasn't able to work.

Page 49
ALLEN TULLOS:
Were there any other times that you remember the mill being closed?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That was the only time.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Only time that I know it was closed for any sickness or anything like that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well all of the children, your brothers and sisters that went to work in the mill—did any of them ever have any kind of accidents at the mill when they were little?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. You didn't hear tell of many accidents in the mill and they worked 'em from about eight year old on up. You didn't hear no tell of 'em getting hurt, bad. Of course they'd have a few minor cuts or something like that. But there wasn't nothing hardly ever that they had to go to a doctor.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Nobody lost their fingers or hands?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. The only one that I ever know'd, I didn't know it. It had happened before I come along. It was a boy, got killed down here in the wheel. (George: What happened?) And that's the only bad accident that I know of, wasn't it? (George: Yeah.)
ALLEN TULLOS:
In the mill wheel, that big wheel?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, the big wheel.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How did he do that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Somebody said that there's another boy pushed him off in there. But now we don't know, we don't know nothing about that. I don't. [Interruption from George: indistinguishable] Yeah. And there wasn't never nothing much said about it.

Page 50
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well when World War I came along, did that affect your lives any around here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, I reckon it did. So many of the boys had to go. That's why Holt Green went. He said, all of his boys was going his age and he's going too. And he did.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That was World War I.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Two.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about World War I.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well there was a lot of 'em left here to World War I. They all come back except Walter Ellis, didn't he. (George: That's right.) We had one to get killed, one of the boys from here at the mill on World War I.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did that leave the mill short handed at all, after that war, World War I.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, until they could get somebody to take their places, they were short a little while but not long.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Who would take their places?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Just different ones that got old enough. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did women do jobs that they wouldn't have done before?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. And Bob Holt always claimed that he raised his help. [laughter] Well he did. (George: Well he was about right.) He was about right. You went to the mill and you learned to work. When you got old enough you went down there and you went to work. And so it wasn't like it is now, you put a young person in the mill, he'll maybe'll work and draw one pay check and then he's done.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well were there different jobs for men and women, did they do different things?

Page 51
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which were the ones that the women would do that the men wouldn't do.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well now, there wasn't many. Now both women and men worked in the weaving room—weaver s you know—weaver s, loom fixers, and all. Well in the spinning room it was all women that worked up there except the fixer and the overseer. And in the carding room the men worked up there, didn't they?
GEORGE:
Huh?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
All men worked in the carding room.
GEORGE:
Just about.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
There was one old lady that worked in the carding room until she died. That was Miss Catherine Wren.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Why was she working there?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, she had always worked up there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
She liked that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I reckon she did. She always worked up there, and she worked up there until she died. And then there was, let's see, a Montgomery man died up there in the carding room tower. And I believe there was another one died on the steps, wasn't there, with a heart attack. But I can't remember who it was. (George: That's right, I can't either.) It was a Montgomery man that died up in the carding room.
GEORGE:
Ed Montgomery.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, Ed Montgomery.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, now the mill used to run off water power and then it switched over didn't it?

Page 52
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When did it switch over to electricity?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know. I was little when it switched over. I don't remember. I know they built the big power plant up the river, up there where the—I believe it's the Indian Golf Course. I don't know whether you've ever heard about it, you might have heard about it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I drove by there.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
You did. Well, it was up there. They built a big power plant and made their own current.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, the time you were talking about when the water was getting down and people knew they were going to have time off, that was when they were still running on water.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Running the big wheel. Running the water wheel.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And so after that change, they wouldn't have that time off like before.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. They wouldn't have that time off no more after that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
It meant that they could just run all the time.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. They had a big plant up there. So after the mill shut down, there was some boys from Burlington burned the club house and the plant too down, up there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well what about when they passed this child labor law. Did that . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
That stopped the children, you know, under fourteen, from working.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they obey the law?

Page 53
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, they obeyed the law.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Who would see to it that they obeyed the law. The superintendent?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, the superintendent.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You all went to Burlington now and then to go shopping?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. We bought our groceries down here at the store and the we could buy dry goods here at the store. Overalls, work shirts and things like that, you could buy down here at the company store. And shoes, and all like that—go down there and get 'em. But when you wanted hats—you know they wore hats back then. [laughter] But they don't wear 'em now, but they're coming back in style, hats are. So we'd go to town for that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How often would you go to Burlington?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Every Saturday.
ALLEN TULLOS:
In the morning?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, you worked 'till twelve o'clock. And then you'd go to town Saturday afternoon.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How would you go?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well we had a horse and carriage and we had a buggy and we'd go that-a-way. When there wasn't but two or three of us going, why we'd just hitch up to the buggy and go on.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How long would you stay?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Stayed 'till dark if we wanted to.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What all would you do besides go to the store?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well you see there's a whole lot more stores. They had what they called a grotto—a show you'd go to.

Page 54
ALLEN TULLOS:
A grotto?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
That would be a movie?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, it's a movie, but it wasn't a talking movie, it was just pictures, you know. And so, you'd go there, and go different places in town. Just stay all evening if you want to, come back when you got ready. And all out there where the theatre—I believe there's a theatre on that block—florist, and a furniture store, and different stores there on that block. There was a big white house, two story, in a grove of big oak trees. It was Zeb Walters. And fourth of July, that's where they had the fourth of July at, there in that grove round Zeb Walters house.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What would that be like?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, people all went the fourth, went to town that day. They always stood on that day, let you go to town on the fourth of July. They'd have a big parade and then they'd have stands you know, where they sold something to eat and to drink and just have a big time, that day over there. People gather over there by the hundreds.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you stay after dark?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, you could stay after dark if you wanted to. Because you wasn't scared to come through Nigger Town on account of the niggers weren't mean, they were just as humble as they could be. And you treat them right and they'd treat you right.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of jobs did they have?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, different jobs. Some of 'em worked on the streets, and different things.

Page 55
ALLEN TULLOS:
But they didn't work in any of the mills?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, they didn't work none in the mill. But they had jobs to do—some clean streets and different things you know, where you have, in a town. They worked the whole time, to make a living.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, when you all did any travelling around besides going into Burlington, where else would you go?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, about every year, we'd take a vacation, like I'd take now.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How long would you get?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
A week. And sometimes, we generally all of us went to Norfolk, and Newport News, and down around in there. And they'd charter a train and get so many hundred to go from here and from Burlington—any where around here, you know, that wanted to go. And we'd go down there and stay a week. And then we'd come back in time to go to work.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What time of year?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
In July, when it was hot.
ALLEN TULLOS:
People would go to the beach.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, go to the beach.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And all of you would go together.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, just be two or three hundred maybe. Be a train load.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of places would you stay in when you got there?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Go to the hotel, and stay in the hotel.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When did they start doing that, do you reckon?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know. I know we went—I don't know how many times, we didn't go.

Page 56
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would they have been doing that, say before World War I.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
As far back as you can remember?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
It was way back when I was just a child, we went down there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where would you go to catch the train, into Burlington?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Burlington. Catch the train right there at the depot in Burlington.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would you go anywhere else then?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes. We'd go to Greensboro, go to Salisbury, and different places.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Why would you go to Greensboro?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Just to go shopping.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, we kind of got lost, we started talking about your children and then you got onto the flu, because that was real interesting, but let's go back and pick up again about your different children and what became of them.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well mine are all right around here except one and he's in Fayetteville. Of course I've got a grandson in Germany, I got a granddaughter in California, I got a granddaughter in Philadelphia, and then my son lives in Fayetteville, I got one lives here in Burlington on South Ashland Drive. One lives at Haw River, and I got one lives about two mile out here on Smith Store Road.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well did any of your children ever work in the mills?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
All of 'em.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They all worked in the mill.

Page 57
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
[unknown] Don, he works at Burlington Mills, he's been there twenty seven years and Holt, he works at the machine shop in Burlington. He's not been there too long, he's been there about fifteen year. But he worked at Western Electric, that's where he first worked at. And then they wanted to change some way or another and all them that had built up their priority, why they wanted to change that you know, and bring it down. And he told 'em no, they wasn't going to change his'n, if they did, he'd be looking for another job. So he did. So now he's boss man. He's worked his self up at that machine shop, somewhere out there in Burlington. I don't know, I never paid no attention to where they were. And my oldest son, he worked for the city until he had a heart attack last May. And now the doctors won't let him work. So he's on retirement.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did any of them ever work here in Glencoe?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, every one worked here in Glencoe first.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Oh, I see. When did they start, how old were they when they started out?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, I reckon they was about eighteen when they went to work, wasn't they George?
GEORGE:
Who?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Paul, and Hubert and Don and Hope.
GEORGE:
If I was going to be shot I couldn't tell you that.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
They worked. They went to school and Hubert and Hope, they finished school. Paul, he went into the eleventh grade and he wouldn't go back that year, he'd a finished that year. And Don went into the eleventh grade and didn't finish. I had two to finish and two to quit.

Page 58
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, when you all were buying things at the different stores, you mentioned that people could buy things on a credit and you could pay cash. But did they also have different kind of scrip or other kind of ways to buy things. Some of these mills, you know, had the. . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. They just got their paycheck, regular paycheck. And he went in there every week and paid it up.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about different kinds of religion. You all had two or three churches right here, didn't you?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Didn't have but one.
ALLEN TULLOS:
This one that was. . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
This one where it's felled down.
ALLEN TULLOS:
There was one up on the hill.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, there is now but there wasn't back then. Let's see, that one has been organized, I forget how long it's been organized, but it's been organized a long time up here.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did a lot of people go to different churches, or did most everybody go to the same one?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, most everybody here on the hill went to this little church down here. It was a union church and any preachers could preach there except the Mormons.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I see. It wasn't a particular denomination.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, any preachers. So we had a Baptist church down here and a Methodist church that was in that same building. One had their meeting on the morning and one in the afternoon. And then the Baptists decided that if Bob Holt would give them the land to build on up yonder, why they would build. So he did, he give 'em the land,

Page 59
give 'em a deed. And the Baptists built up there on the hill. And then the Methodists wanted to buy this little church down here, and the land, and build a Methodist church down there. And Walter Green told 'em he'd love to give 'em the land, but says he can't give 'em no deed for it. So that's why they didn't build down here. They went up in Green Acres and built.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And you say that's because the deed is kind of tangled up?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Deed is willed back to the old generation—is what they tell me, now I don't know. I never have see'd it, I'd have to see the deed if I know'd, but I don't know. But they say it's willed back to the Holt generation.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did most of the people here go to one of the church services?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, some of 'em went to both. [laughter] Go to one in the morning, one of the evening. Ain't nothing out here but to go to church. And you was reared to go to church.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did the ministers live here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Where were they from?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
They were from Burlington.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Now, did people take up a collection to pay them some?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you know if the Holts ever contributed any to them.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yes. The Holts did all the time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
To their salary?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. And now, the last few years that Holt Green lived, he give each church a thousand dollars a year, that was here. He'd

Page 60
always give it on Christmas—him and Mr. Green. So, they ain't give none in a long time. It's been a good while, ever since the mill shut down.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they ever go to the service?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, they'd go. Mr. Walter did and Holt did. He'd go with the boys wherever they went—he'd go on with them. That's the reason he went to the army and got killed—World War II.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they have any musical instruments in the churches, piano?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yep. We had a organ first and then we had a piano. Now we got a organ and a piano.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What were the books that you would sing out of, do you remember. Did you use books?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we had a Baptist hymnal.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you ever sing the shape notes?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they ever have those kind of singing schools?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. Old Man Pied was one that (sining master), and we had another but I can't think of his name.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Pied was one?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. P-I-E-D.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I see. Did he live here
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, he lived here.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When would he have a singing school?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
He'd have a singing school about once a year. You went twelve nights.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did you go?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, I went a lot.

Page 61
ALLEN TULLOS:
And you would learn to sing the notes, shape.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember whether there were four shapes or seven shapes.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't remember, it's been a long time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was it sacred harp music, is that what they called it, or do you remember?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't remember. That's been a long time. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
But you would sing that without any instruments.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You'd have instruments?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Sure, we had a organ.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Even when you were having the singing school.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. We had a organ down there. We had a organ at home and a piano too. [laughter]
ALLEN TULLOS:
Yeah I remember, that sounded like a real musical house.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
And what they call the phonograph with a great big morning glory horn, and all of that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well let me ask you about washing. You talk about you all would make some of your clothes and sometimes you would buy your clothes—what about when it came time to do your washing, clothes washing?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Washed in the tub on the board. [laughter] You rubbed 'em like that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How often would you do that?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Every week.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was there a particular day?

Page 62
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, we always done it on Monday if it wasn't raining.
ALLEN TULLOS:
All year round.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. 'Cause in the summer time we had two big springs down next to the branch back of the house. We carried the wash pot and the tubs and all down there, and we wouldn't have to carry the water.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How many of you would be washing at one time?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
There wouldn't be nobody but our family. And we had a colored woman that done the wash.
ALLEN TULLOS:
She would do that. You mean she would help you or she would do it?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, she'd do it. She done the wash.
ALLEN TULLOS:
She'd do it by herself.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, she'd come up in the morning and wash.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How would you all pay her, how did that work?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, we'd pay her the last of the week. And sometime momma'd pay her when she done it, so she wouldn't have to come back.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would other people be washing on Monday too?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. They had a big wash place right down here at this old big poplar tree. Maybe there'd be five or six colored people down there washing clothes.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well how often would you all get to take a bath?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Every day.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You'd take a bath every day?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. We had a bathtub.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Inside?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Had a bathtub but we didn't have running water. We had to carry the water and if it was cool enough we had to heat it. And we

Page 63
had a big old cook range where we cooked on. It had a twenty five gallon water tank on it, it heated the water. We had a bathtub.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Was that unusual, to take a bath every day.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, just as ordinary as it is now to take one every day. [laughter] And we don't have a bath here. But we've got a bathtub [laughter] , and we heat the water.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about different kind of sports, or musical groups like bands. Sometimes in different towns the mills would sponsor baseball teams or bands. Did that happen here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, they had string music.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Yes'm you told me about that.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
And my daddy was one that belonged to the band, whenever they had a band here. But I don't know nothing about that, that was. . . .
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about ball games?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of ball games?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
They had baseball games. It was played back up yonder, the other side of the old home place. Until Bob Holt gave 'em a ball ground and told 'em now they had to play up there. And so they did, they played up there. That's up there out across the highway from the school house, I expect you've been by there.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would they just kind of choose up and play or would there be a team?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
There'd be a team that'd come in from Carolina or from Altamahaw or Ossipee or Hopedale. Different places would come in and play with 'em.
ALLEN TULLOS:
When would those games be held?

Page 64
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
On Saturday afternoon. `Cause they worked every day but Saturday.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They wouldn't ever play on Sunday?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No sir, you didn't play on Sunday. If you did you got one of the worst whippings you ever got.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Could you do anything on Sunday?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, you couldn't cut up and play on Sunday. Sunday was the Sabbath.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You couldn't go fishing either could you?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Nope, you didn't go fishing, you didn't go to a ball game, you didn't go to a movie picture show, and nothing like that on Sunday. Sunday was kept holy.
ALLEN TULLOS:
People would cook though, wouldn't they?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they'd cook, but they didn't go . . .
[END OF TAPE 2, SIDE B]

[TAPE 3, SIDE A]

[START OF TAPE 3, SIDE A]
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
to different places.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Let me ask about, when you all were having your meals in your house when all of the family would have been there—your mother and father and all of your brothers and sisters. Was there a certain way that they would sit around the table.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, everybody had his own place. And you didn't go to the table and make a fuss either. You went to the table and you behaved yourself.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would your father and mother sit at a particular end of the table?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
One at one end and the other at the other. They see'd everything that was going on too, [unknown] It was

Page 65
a crowd of us. We had a big old dining room as big as this room and a table clean across it. Now you got in there and you behaved. If you didn't you know'd what was coming after you got away from the table.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would there be a prayer at the beginning?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, they'd return things, mother would most of the time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And did they pass the food around or did everybody just kind of reach?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
They passed the food around and you waited 'till your turn. You know'd when it was coming to you, and you waited too. [unknown] Didn't do like they do now, they just fall in and grab and go to it. But now, we've always returned things for what we had to eat. Maybe it wasn't exactly what we wanted but it was something that was good for your body.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did your father ever do any of the things like help cook?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, nor he didn't wash no dishes, no sir. Up until we, some of us got big enough to help do the cooking, he hired somebody to help. And he didn't cook and he didn't wash no dishes. But he expected his meal on the table when he got in from work.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Would your mother kind of wait on the table to serve?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Generally the cook waited on the table, most of the time. We kept the cook until, I reckon 'till I was twelve year old.
ALLEN TULLOS:
You mentioned that you all used to—still do—get the almanac—did you get any other magazines or newspapers?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh we got a newspaper all the time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which paper did you get?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Burlington paper.

Page 66
ALLEN TULLOS:
For as long as you can remember.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, as long as I can remember we got the Burlington paper.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about any magazines, things like that.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, we never did fool with a order for no magazine here at the time, but we'd buy 'em at the news stand in town lots of time. But back then you didn't take time to read the magazines and things like that. You read your school books and . . . (George: [unknown] You didn't have much time for the other.) You didn't have time to read 'em because you had something to do besides go to school and play—you had something to do. [laughter] Or we did, we always kept two cows and three or four hogs and a horse and we had it to tend to too. We had to do the milking and tend to 'em.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And you would keep 'em right out behind your house.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. Out here on what they call the hedgerow. Everybody had a barn nearby out there. And of course we always lived back up there in the woods back of the Baptist church.
ALLEN TULLOS:
In other words, the barn would be at a different place than your house, it that right?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yeah. The barn would be way back down there on what we call down on the branch, like.
ALLEN TULLOS:
There would be lots of different barns.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And people would keep their animals down there. You wouldn't keep any animals here in this area.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No not out in this side. But kept 'em down yonder on the other side. And then up there at the house—we had our way down there in the field from the house. It wasn't close to the house.

Page 67
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, that may do it. One of the other things—did they have any kind of provisions for pensions or insurance or health insurance or anything like that while you all were working there?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. They didn't have hospitals until I reckon I was near about grown. And the first hospital that I know anything about was St. Leo's Hospital in Greensboro and Dr. Stokes hospital in Salisbury. And I know my momma had appendicitis and they carried her to Salisbury. Then my aunt had gall bladder trouble and they carried her to Raleigh. And then, I can't remember his name, but he come here—he was a doctor and built—oh, Dr. Rainey—built the old Rainey Hospital. That was the first hospital that was ever in Burlington. And then everybody that had to go to the hospital—didn't nobody much go because they never had heard tell of the hospital much. But now they just go if 'ary a little thing happens.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did people use any of these home remedies?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Your mother would. . . .
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. And a heap of times, never had no doctor. Pshaw, if you see'd a doctor in a year, why that was awful. [laughter] You didn't see no doctor. And the doctors were in town. And then we had a doctor that lived over here in the house where Walter Green lives in. That house was built over there for a doctor. He stayed over a long time and then he moved back to Burlington. And he got too old to practice and moved back to his home in Burlington. Then Bob Holt moved over there in the Dr. Moore house.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Do you remember the name of the main street in Burlington that all these stores were on?

Page 68
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Main Street, yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They would just call it Main Street.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, it's Main Street now. But they built all that mess up in there and ruined it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
It's changed a lot.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Oh, I reckon they have. Put that old depot down there in the middle of the street—just messed it up just wanting to spend money. That's all it was for, just wanted to spend money.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, I think we've about run out on this tape.
END OF INTERVIEW