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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

The mill's pay scale system

Here, Faucette explains that piecework and an hourly rate offered mill workers the best pay scale. She further discusses the difference in pay for various mill tasks.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

ALLEN TULLOS:
Did some of the jobs pay better than the others.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
How did that go?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well they'd paid by the hour, most of the time.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Which ones were better, how did that work?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
The hour work, you made more for that because you're paid so much an hour you know. Now when I went to work I made eighty five cents a day. Well, that's what I made, eighty five cents a day. And when I quit work I made a dollar and sixty nine cents a hour.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What about different jobs, did different jobs pay different things?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Could you tell me about that.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Different jobs. Now a weaver made more than spinning and carding, and made more than we did in the drawing in room. But we finally did get it raised up to where we made more than they did.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Made more than who did?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
The weaving.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Oh really?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, because we worked by the piece, you know. You work by the piece you can make more if you want to and if yif yon't want to you can fall down on the job.