Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

The mill's acceptance of a shorter workday led to worker support

The mill obeyed the new eight-hour day labor law, which dramatically altered a worker's day. As a result, the mill had little union activity.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

ALLEN TULLOS:
They went right along with the law, and they didn't-here, the people who were running the mill.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What did they think about it.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, they didn't say a word about it, not here they didn't. And other places that I know of they didn't. Everybody was glad of it. See, this mill has never been union.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Never.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, we never had no union.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, did anybody ever try to start a union here?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes, they tried several times, but I don't remember what they done about it. They never done nothing about it because they never did get it. Nobody wouldn't vote for the union.
ALLEN TULLOS:
They tried several times.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yes. But they never did get it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Did they try it while your father was superintendent.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah. Now, he'd of paid a bit more attention to it, he would of-dog barking. (George laughing in background)