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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Leisure time declined with the advent of electrical power in the mills

The leisure time Faucette described earlier changed with the addition of electrical power. As a result of electricity, the mill could run nonstop.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

ALLEN TULLOS:
When did it switch over to electricity?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
I don't know. I was little when it switched over. I don't remember. I know they built the big power plant up the river, up there where the-I believe it's the Indian Golf Course. I don't know whether you've ever heard about it, you might have heard about it.
ALLEN TULLOS:
I drove by there.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
You did. Well, it was up there. They built a big power plant and made their own current.
ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, the time you were talking about when the water was getting down and people knew they were going to have time off, that was when they were still running on water.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Running the big wheel. Running the water wheel.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And so after that change, they wouldn't have that time off like before.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No. They wouldn't have that time off no more after that.
ALLEN TULLOS:
It meant that they could just run all the time.
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah...