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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Blacks not included in textile mill worker culture

Faucette remembers blacks as a humble sort of people. Yet, despite their friendly attitudes, blacks did not work in textile mills. Instead, they held various domestic jobs.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Ethel Marshall Faucette, November 16, 1978, and January 4, 1979. Interview H-0020. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Yeah, you could stay after dark if you wanted to. Because you wasn't scared to come through Nigger Town on account of the niggers weren't mean, they were just as humble as they could be. And you treat them right and they'd treat you right.
ALLEN TULLOS:
What kind of jobs did they have?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
Well, different jobs. Some of 'em worked on the streets, and different things.
ALLEN TULLOS:
But they didn't work in any of the mills?
ETHEL MARSHALL FAUCETTE:
No, they didn't work none in the mill. But they had jobs to do-some clean streets and different things you know, where you have, in a town. They worked the whole time, to make a living.