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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Icy Norman, April 6 and 30, 1979. Interview H-0036. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Norman wanted to keep working, but was forced to retire

Norman remembers a congenial work environment. She wanted to keep working, but was forced to retire.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Icy Norman, April 6 and 30, 1979. Interview H-0036. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

Everybody seemed to get along and everybody seemed like they enjoyed working with one another. Just like I said, everybody up there in the room I worked in felt like just one family. We just laugh and joke. We'd say anything. We didn't think nothing about what we said to one another, because nobody paid no mind. We'd all work together and tried to pull together. I think that's the main thing on the job. Especially where it's a group of people. If they all work together.
MARY MURPHY:
Was there a lot of competition? Did they always have that production board up?
ICY NORMAN:
No, they stopped that. When they went to running the high speeds. They had a clock on there would tell you how many yards a warper hand would run a day. It would clock it off like your automobile, how your automobile will tell you how many miles you got on your car. Something similar to that. Its warp mill is running and that clock is a clocking all the time. At the end of the day, the warper hands, they had a sheet to do them all with. They put down how many yards they run each day, the days of the month, and all. We didn't have to keep production. I creeled anywhere from seventeen to eighteen hundred cones a day. Long towards the last them cones went to weighing anywhere from eight to ten pounds a cone. It was kind of heavy. But I enjoyed it. I really did love my job. I hated that I had to quit. I just begged and I done every way in the world to get them to let me work on. So now they let you work as long as you want to, so they say.
MARY MURPHY:
That's the law.
ICY NORMAN:
But I did, just let me work one more year. Just let me work from now until next April. Then I'll have all my debts paid off. They says, "I wish I could. I hate to see you leave so bad. We'll never replace you." So I went back up there in a month or two. Roy says, "Icy, please go over there and creel that mill up for me. You know I ain't run one yard all day long." I says, "Roy, you know better." He says, "I ain't."