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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Gladys and Glenn Hollar, February 26, 1980. Interview H-0128. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

A boss helps his employees during hard times

Gladys Hollar describes how a local business owner supported her family during a difficult period in this excerpt. A Mr. Brady, who ran a furniture mill, brought groceries to her family as they struggled through the 1918 influenza epidemic. (Gladys calls the illness pneumonia.) Gladys remembers that both the prominent business owners in her area were community benefactors.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Gladys and Glenn Hollar, February 26, 1980. Interview H-0128. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JACQUELYN HALL:
And then Shuford took the glove mill, and Brady took the furniture?
GLENN HOLLAR:
They split up. They had this lumber plant or whatever you want to call it and the mill together, and then they split up. Mr. Brady taken the shop, and Shuford took the glove mill.
JACQUELYN HALL:
Was there some conflict between them?
GLENN HOLLAR:
No. It just got to getting a little bigger and bigger, and Mr. Shuford had some children coming on, a few, and then Mr. Brady had a bunch of boys and a couple girls. He had a big family. And they decided they wanted to split it up, and one run one and the other the other. And my daddy worked up there for Mr. Brady for years back during the Depression. Had a flu epidemic in 1918, about the time the War was over.
JACQUELYN HALL:
GLENN HOLLAR:
After the First World War. . And Daddy had pneumonia, and Mother had pneumonia. a baby born during the time of it. My sister was in bed with pneumonia. We couldn't get anybody to come in to cook or anything. We had a time. And Mr. Brady would bring groceries down every week. He'd give us a bag of groceries, something to eat on. I was about eleven or twelve years old then. Then I'd get out and cook and just keep the house going. I tell you. I taken it first, but I didn't get sick. I never will forget that. And the baby born dead.
JACQUELYN HALL:
The baby was born in the midst of this flu epidemic?
GLENN HOLLAR:
My mother had pneumonia when the baby was born. I tell you. I never… Phew: I don't know how we ever survived that.
JACQUELYN HALL:
You couldn't get a doctor … [END OF TAPE 1, SIDE B] [TAPE 2, SIDE A] [START OF TAPE 2, SIDE A]
GLENN HOLLAR:
That's when that flu epidemic hit so bad.
GLADYS IRENE MOSER HOLLAR:
That was when it first come around.
GLENN HOLLAR:
It was after the First World War.
JACQUELYN HALL:
Were Mr. Brady and Mr. Shuford very different from each other?
GLENN HOLLAR:
No SIDE not a whole lot of difference. They was just good people, and they was trying to treat everybody good so they could live and make a little something to live off of. Mr. Shuford was awful good to work for. He'd look out for his help. If things would get a little rough, he'd work out some way to give them work. I've seen one time there that it got so bad that he couldn't sell gloves. So if a man would order fifty dozen, he'd give him six dozen. If he'd order a hundred, he'd give him twelve dozen extra. Just to get the orders, so he could keep the hands together and work. He was really good. He had a head on him. I learned more from him than I did going to school.