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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Gladys and Glenn Hollar, February 26, 1980. Interview H-0128. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Work speed-ups at a glove factory

Gladys Hollar remembers efforts to speed up production at the glove factory in the fall, when the number of orders increased. She shares her bafflement that some of her fellow sewers were not willing to sew a bit faster to make some extra money.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Gladys and Glenn Hollar, February 26, 1980. Interview H-0128. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JACQUELYN HALL:
During the fall, they would try to step up production?
GLENN HOLLAR:
That would be a good time.
GLADYS IRENE MOSER HOLLAR:
More orders would come in.
JACQUELYN HALL:
Could you make more? Were you working on piecework?
GLADYS IRENE MOSER HOLLAR:
I didn't, because I did about all I could do any time. I never did play around.
GLENN HOLLAR:
But they'd want you to work regular. Of course, back then, they worked . Most all of them did.
GLADYS IRENE MOSER HOLLAR:
But it did go hard with some, because everybody isn't the same a-working. Now you can take one person and maybe she'd be real fast and work real fast at something else, and you'd think, "Oh, she'll really make a good sewer." But you'd put her down to sewing, and she was slow. And then somebody else that looked like they'd be so slow at sewing on piecework like that, then they would be fast. You couldn't tell till they… And me, I was one of the lucky ones. I could sew fast.
GLENN HOLLAR:
She always was a fast sewer.
JACQUELYN HALL:
Did people complain when they stepped up production in the fall?
GLADYS IRENE MOSER HOLLAR:
Yes. Some of them would. The ones that didn't care. It's the same today. Some, just so they make enough to live on, they're all right. Like this one girl that I worked with for several years. It wasn't too many years before I retired. She'd start figuring along about the middle of the week, see how much money she needed. And then when she got it made, what she needed to pay her bills and things, she didn't care whether she made any more or not. And I'd ask her, "Wouldn't you like to have a little money in your pocket once in a while? Or wouldn't you like to have a little money just one time when you have to take your baby to the doctor, that you wouldn't have to charge it?" But now she didn't care; just so she had enough to pay her bills, she was . And there's always people like that.
JACQUELYN HALL:
Did the supervisors try to get those people to work faster?
GLENN HOLLAR:
They used to, but they don't now. You can't say nothing to them. They'll quit now.
GLADYS IRENE MOSER HOLLAR:
No, she was fast. She would work fast. Yes, they'd get after them for fooling around and messing about. But it didn't do any good, because, like he said, they could go somewhere else and get a job, so it didn't do much good. Especially when business was rushing.