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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Eva Hopkins, March 5, 1980. Interview H-0167. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Hopkins' father barred from mill work

Her father was not allowed to work in the mill after his treatment for tuberculosis because of the dangers of cotton lint. He sought temporary jobs elsewhere while his wife worked at the mill.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Eva Hopkins, March 5, 1980. Interview H-0167. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

LU ANN JONES:
When your father was in the sanitorium, did you go visit him?
EVA HOPKINS:
Oh yes. They didn't let me go in where he was until I was about twelve years old. He got better and was up. He never was so bad until he couldn't get up. He was up. They collapsed one of his lungs after I was married, and he got better. He came out of the sanitorium. He wasn't able to work again in the mill because on account of that cotton lint dust. He worked as a watchman for a while at different places. Then he worked at Ivey's. They called them floorwalkers. He just never did go back to the mill. But my mother did. She worked until she retired, it was sixty-five, she worked in the mill.