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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Josephine Turner, June 7, 1976. Interview H-0235-2. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Obstacles to political success

Turner discusses some of the factors that have prevented her from more active political participation, including a lack of ready funds for dues and, to a lesser extent, the fact that she is a black woman.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Josephine Turner, June 7, 1976. Interview H-0235-2. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

AREN SINDELAR:
The League of Women Voters, are you in that?
JOSEPHINE TURNER:
Well, I'm not as active in that as I would like to be, but I am a member.
KAREN SINDELAR:
That's a fully biracial group, isn't it? Black and white women?
JOSEPHINE TURNER:
Yes, black and white.
KAREN SINDELAR:
In this community do both black and white women have leadership roles in the League of Women Voters?
JOSEPHINE TURNER:
Yes. Yes, when I was active they do. I haven't been to a meeting there… That's what I said: working at night has kept me from a lot of the meetings, you know. My dues—in fact it's about time for me to pay my dues. [laughter] So in a lot of those things my dues are paid up, but I haven't been able to participate as I desire.
KAREN SINDELAR:
Do you feel in any that you have been hurt any way by being a woman? I mean, in terms of your political activity or community activity? Do you feel like being a woman, or being a black person, has hurt you in any way?
JOSEPHINE TURNER:
Well, I feel like that maybe I could have aggressed more if I had been a man or maybe white, in some respects. Then again, you know I look at it this way: I look at the human side of it. I feel like I'm able to do the job as well as anybody else; in fact, I know I can given the chance. But I know there's a lot of them up there don't want me up there, black and white, because a lot of people would be exposed that they don't want exposed. But I'm going to still try.
KAREN SINDELAR:
You're actually president of this East End Community Organization.
JOSEPHINE TURNER:
Right.
KAREN SINDELAR:
Have there been other women presidents before you?
JOSEPHINE TURNER:
No, I'm the first woman president.
KAREN SINDELAR:
Was that made an issue?
JOSEPHINE TURNER:
No.