Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Letha Ann Sloan Osteen, June 8, 1979. Interview H-0254. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Osteen's older sister gave up mill work to care for the family home

Osteen's sister Mamie was a weaver at the textile mill until she had to take over the household duties from her deceased aunt.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Letha Ann Sloan Osteen, June 8, 1979. Interview H-0254. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

ALLEN TULLOS:
And so now, Mamie, what about her?
LETHA ANN SLOAN OSTEEN:
Well she lived over here at Monegan. She . . .
GEORGIA:
She was a textile worker. Her and Mama stuck to it and Uncle John. I knew John and Mama and I reckon was theonly three that was in textiles, out of the bunch.
LETHA ANN SLOAN OSTEEN:
Yeah.
ALLEN TULLOS:
And did she start to work here in the Poe Mill, Mamie, when she started working?
LETHA ANN SLOAN OSTEEN:
Yes, she learned to weave. But after Aunt Hattie died, my aunt, she had to keep house. She was the oldest girl.
GEORGIA:
Well she went to work down here in the weave shop.