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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Naomi Sizemore Trammel, March 25, 1980. Interview H-0258. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Working in the spinning room of a textile mill

Trammel offers a brief description of her first job at the Victor textile mill, maintaining roping on a spinning frame. She and other children worked in the spinning room.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Naomi Sizemore Trammel, March 25, 1980. Interview H-0258. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

ALLEN TULLOS:
Well, what do you remember about first going into the mill?
NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
Well, I didn't know, hardly, but I just went in and had to learn it. Really, I had to crawl up on the frame, you know. You've seen a spinning frame. Well, I had to crawl up on that to put my—what do you call it?—roping in, you know, because I wasn't tall enough. 'Cause I never was much big, you know. Then I a little old spindly thing, and I couldn't reach up there to put my roping in. And I'd have to crawl up on that frame down there, and put it in. I wasn't the only one, they's a whole place like that. And they had mothers and daddies. They wasn't no better off than I was.
ALLEN TULLOS:
There were lots of other children your age.
NAOMI SIZEMORE TRAMMEL:
Oh, yeah, a lot of them. It's a lot of them. 'Specially in the spinning room, that's where they put the children. You could run a frame, you know, where you couldn't run—a child couldn't run nothing else.