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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with George R. Elmore, March 11, 1976. Interview H-0266. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Discomfort with unions

Elmore explains his own lack of interest in joining a union. He reveals not only that he suspects their motives, but also a discomfort with so-called outsiders attempting to influence southern affairs.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with George R. Elmore, March 11, 1976. Interview H-0266. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

BRENT GLASS:
I know a lot of these mills do end up having some trouble. What do you attribute it to: just the hard life of working in the mills?
GEORGE R. ELMORE:
Well, it depends on whoever has come in there and stirred them up.
BRENT GLASS:
It's not from within, though?
GEORGE R. ELMORE:
Well, some of those organizers are pretty good salesmen. But I've listened to some of them. I don't know, I've always kind of felt like they were out for the dues that they could get out of the people more than they were to help them. I may be wrong there. Those people needed help, I've always said, and I sympathize with them. But I didn't want to see that outside crowd come in there and taking dues from them that basically didn't give a damn about the good will of the people. Now there's too much of that labor organization; and we see it all when you get on higher, to Hoffa and all that crowd, these pension funds. I was always in favor of labor. But the management of it, and the people's taking advantage of the poor working man, I can't go along with the organization.