Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Julia Virginia Jones, October 6, 1997. Interview J-0072. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Death of father demonstrates that marriage provided no economic security for women

Because of the unexpected death of her father, Jones realized that marriage offered no long-term guarantee of security. Jones discusses how her mother's hard work served as a strong example for her sisters in the aftermath of her father's death.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Julia Virginia Jones, October 6, 1997. Interview J-0072. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

JUDGE JULIA V. JONES ...and daddy died in 1971. Mother, at that time, was also 48. I had graduated from college, but I had a sister who was a sophomore at Chapel Hill, a sister who was in high school, and a brother who was 14. Mother basically worked minimum wage at the hospital as a volunteer coordinator, and with social security put the rest of the kids through school. So, she certainly was an influence in my life, that you can do what you want to do through hard work. I think, also, the fact that my father died suddenly, influenced me. I've talked to my two sisters about this. Both of my sisters worked outside of the home for a long time. They are now raising children, but one was a banker for about ten years, and the other sold real estate. We all agreed, we realized that when daddy died that even if you were happily married that was no guarantee of someone to take care of you.