Documenting the American South Logo
oral histories of the American South
Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Barbara Hanks, August 10, 1994. Interview K-0098. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

A sense of camaraderie at White Furniture Company

Hanks and her coworkers were good friends, she remembers. She misses that sense of camaraderie at her new job.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Barbara Hanks, August 10, 1994. Interview K-0098. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

PATRICK HUBER:
How did the people in rub and pack get along?
BARBARA HANKS:
We all got along real well. I mean, I really--. We was all like a big family, I mean, when you come in everybody know if you had a good afternoon or not, you know, cause we worked together so long that we could just--. We was all like a family. We'd tell each other our problems, and that's what's so weird cause over here at Dixie's it's not like that at all. I mean, I hardly know any of those people. Cause, I mean, at White's when you're working you could at least talk, you know, cause you can work and talk. Not a whole lot, you know, you still have to keep your mind on what you was doing, but everybody got to know everybody. Like Christmas and stuff, rub-and-packing and some of the people out in finishing, we'd go to someone's house and have a party. Just us, you know. Or cookouts or whatever. We still get together some time. So it's real neat. And when you see some of them out, it's really nice just to get to see them again. I miss them all. I do.
PATRICK HUBER:
These were things that the workers would get together and have parties. They weren't sponsored by the company?
BARBARA HANKS:
No, we'd just do it ourselves. The company, at first, when I went there they would for Christmas they would have a party.