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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Kenneth Norton, March 23, 1999. Interview K-0440. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Limited resources at a segregated black school

The Ada Jenkins School served grades one through eleven, Norton remembers; students graduated after eleventh grade. Presumably because a segregated school lacked adequate resources, the school offered chemistry and physics on alternate years, so he never took chemistry.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Kenneth Norton, March 23, 1999. Interview K-0440. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

KENNETH NORTON:
Ok, I'm Kenneth Norton and I attended the Ada Jenkins School back in the thirties. I first started school at a little one teacher across the street behind, just off of Mock Circle. Really, the building is still there, but it is turned into a house. Mrs. Brown was the teacher there, Mrs. Josephine Brown. And we had a three-teacher school across the road from that one that shows up on a picture I have made around 1938 or 1939. That was a three-teacher school. I don't remember going to school in that building because somewhere around 1938-39 I think the new building was built which we call the Ada Jenkins building. A picture was made shortly after we got into the school and of course I bought one of the pictures. Mrs. Ada Jenkins' picture appears on that. I don't remember how many students we had then, but it was a relatively small school. It was called a high school and it went first through eleventh grade. We didn't have a twelfth grade at Ada Jenkins school, so we graduated after the eleventh grade. So, if you took chemistry one year whoever came through that class would have to take physics. Physics was offered one year and chemistry the next, so I missed chemistry in high school because physics was the subject when I came through. We did not have a principal there until a fellow by the name of Lorenzo Poe (sp?) came.