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Oral History Interview with Rebecca Clark, June 21, 2000. Interview K-0536. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007).
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  • Abstract
    Rebecca Clark recalls living and working in segregated North Carolina. She finished her schooling in all-black schools, so the bulk of her experience with white people in a segregated context took place in the work world. There she experienced economic discrimination in a variety of forms, and despite her claims that many black people kept quiet in the face of racial discrimination at the time, she often agitated for, and won, better pay. Along with offering some information about school desegregation, this interview provides a look into the constricted economic lives of black Americans living under Jim Crow.
    Excerpts
  • Economic and neighborhood segregation affects blacks' lives
  • Frank Porter Graham treats African Americans well
  • Economic discrimination hurts African Americans
  • Economic discrimination under Jim Crow
  • African Americans see segregation as natural
  • African Americans resist segregation
  • Racial segregation in the public sphere
  • Resisting workplace discrimination
  • African Americans' economic negotiations
  • Clark's political activism during Howard Lee's mayoral campaign
  • Individual worries over black political progress
  • Integration process in Chapel Hill
  • Learn More
  • Finding aid to the Southern Oral History Program Collection
  • Database of all Southern Oral History Program Collection interviews
  • Subjects
  • African Americans--North Carolina--Chapel Hill
  • Lincoln High School (Chapel Hill, N.C.)
  • Clark, Rebecca
  • The Southern Oral History Program transcripts presented here on Documenting the American South undergo an editorial process to remove transcription errors. Texts may differ from the original transcripts held by the Southern Historical Collection.

    Funding from the Institute for Museum and Library Services supported the electronic publication of this title.