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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Sheila Florence, January 20, 2001. Interview K-0544. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Northside Elementary's strict principal

Here, Florence recalls that the principal at Northside Elementary was quite strict, and kept students' parents informed of their misbehavior. She does not remember Lincoln High School's principal, C.A. McDougle, as particularly strict, although he inspired respect.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Sheila Florence, January 20, 2001. Interview K-0544. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

BOB GILGOR:
Do you remember the principal Mr. McDougle?
SHEILA FLORENCE:
Oh yeah, I do remember him. I remember mostly Mr. Peace, the principal of Northside. Mr. McDougal, he was principal of the High School.
BOB GILGOR:
What do you remember about Mr. Peace?
SHEILA FLORENCE:
I remember all the students used to get nervous when they see him coming, therefore, remembering that, he must have been a strict man [laugh]. A strict principal. You'd hate to get sent to the office because you'd get put on punishment, and he'd always let, everybody would know each other in the black community, and he would know your parents and so he would let them know, he'd get in touch with the parents, send notes home.
BOB GILGOR:
Same day?
SHEILA FLORENCE:
Same day. He could call them up. So I can't remember too much about the principals, except he was strict and you wouldn't want to get sent to the office.
BOB GILGOR:
Mr. McDougal, was he strict too?
SHEILA FLORENCE:
I don't think he was strict, no. Everybody had respect for him. Back then, students had respect for principals and teachers.