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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Edith Warren, August 28, 2002. Interview K-0601. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

A woman finds friendships with male peers on the job

Warren became Pitt County's first female principal in 1974, encountering no resistance. In fact, she was "one of the fellows," and enjoyed a "special cameraderie" with her male peers.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Edith Warren, August 28, 2002. Interview K-0601. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

We moved to Farmville where Billy's work was. He was working with A. C. Monk and Company, and when it came time to move to Farmville, I taught first grade there. Then I got my master's degree, and became an elementary school principal, of Sam Bundy School in Farmville, and I was the first woman who was a full-time principal with Pitt County Schools.
LEDA HARTMAN:
What year was that?
EDITH WARREN:
This was in 1974.
LEDA HARTMAN:
And you were the first woman, in 1974?
EDITH WARREN:
In Pitt County Schools.
LEDA HARTMAN:
Did you encounter any resistance to the idea of a female principal, or did you just ride along on your accomplishments?
EDITH WARREN:
I was just one of the fellows. It was a very good working relationship with the other principals. They were very, very supportive. They joked with me in the beginning and said, "Well, you'll have to carry your own books and open your own doors." But they were so very, very supportive of me, and there was a very special camaraderie between all the other principals and me. And it's still very special.