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Excerpt from Oral History Interview with Frances Hogan, May 23, 1991, and June 3, 1991. Interview L-0044. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) See Entire Interview >>

Pressure from mother and society against women's athletics

People generally accepted the lack of competitions for women's sports because it was a long-standing tradition. Hogan recalls the lack of athletic opportunities when she was younger and how her mother tried to discourage her interest in sports.

Citing this Excerpt

Oral History Interview with Frances Hogan, May 23, 1991, and June 3, 1991. Interview L-0044. Southern Oral History Program Collection (#4007) in the Southern Oral History Program Collection, Southern Historical Collection, Wilson Library, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Full Text of the Excerpt

FRANCES HOGAN:
Back in the '40s, '50s, and '60s I did because they didn't have many competitive opportunities. And so the whole idea, like with the Tennis Day, was to set up situations for them. Back then, I had girls who had been on the Junior Wightman Cup team. I had the tennis champion from virginia. I had many good players. The whole club may have not been as strong. I mean, there was a big difference between the number one player and the last player. And I didn't cut anybody. I'd have eighty or more people trying out for the tennis club. And we had a JV club. I was trying to give opportunities to as many as I could. Angela Lumpkin was assigned to help me with tennis because there were so many. She's now over at North Carolina State. Anyway.
MARY JO FESTLE:
Were you involved in the Division of Girls' and Women's sports? I guess in the fifties, that was. . .
FRANCES HOGAN:
Yes. We all were, really. We all were and we certainly tried to abide by all of their guidelines.
MARY JO FESTLE:
How did you feel about the guidelines?
FRANCES HOGAN:
Well, back then, that was all I knew, you know. That's what we had preached to us in school and college. I came from a high school that had an excellent program. Even down in South Carolina we had field hockey which was unusual. There was not a sport we didn't have. And yet, we could not play outside of that high school unless it was a play day type thing. If you were in the senior class, there were maybe four field hockey color teams out of that one class, so you played color games until you got down to the last class games. And we just had a terrific time.
MARY JO FESTLE:
So, you yourself played tennis and field hockey?
FRANCES HOGAN:
Oh, I played every sport and played club hockey. I guess I played fifteen years of field hockey. And I played tournament tennis since I was a little girl. And we didn't have divisions like we do now, so if you were thirteen you went and played in the tournament. You didn't have age divisions. [phone rings] It's not mine but it's ringing.
MARY JO FESTLE:
Did you do track and field?
FRANCES HOGAN:
Track and field and gymnastics were two that I did not do that much of. I played a lot of golf, a lot of tennis, a lot of basketball, a lot of field hockey. Of all the team sports, field hockey was my favorite. In fact, I had all these teeth knocked out from it in high school. And my mother, when I went away to college, the first letter I received. "Now, don't put your foot on the hockey field." And I'd already been out there playing. [Laughter] Things were easy for me. I was blessed, I guess, with natural ability.
MARY JO FESTLE:
you said your mother didn't want you to get any more teeth knocked out.
FRANCES HOGAN:
Oh, she was so dainty and pretty and cute; not at all like me. And then I had two brothers; they are both dead now. And my father was very athletic, so he understood. I mean, I played all the time. There wasn't anything that I didn't try.
MARY JO FESTLE:
They didn't try to stop you?
FRANCES HOGAN:
Oh, no. Mother sent me to music lessons and all that, and then finally she gave up. [Laughter]